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green, to yellowish green, due to the
presence of an absorption band in
the red* and to the encroaching of
the ultra-violet band upon the violet
and blue.

The solution which contained only
copper chloride absorbed all radia-
tions from 0.20/4 to about 0.361/1.
The solution which contained the
greatest amount of the dehydrating
agent absorbed all radiations from
0.20/4 to about 0.509/1. Hence, the
ultra-violet region of absorption
widened by about 1480 Angstrom
units when the concentration of the
calcium chloride was increased from
o.ooo to 4.041 normal. The spec-
trogram shows clearly how the suc-
cessive increments of absorption de-
creased as the concentration of the
calcium salt increased in arith-
metical progression. Other dehy-
drating agents, such as aluminium
chloride, for example, produce sim-
ilar changes in the limits of ab-
sorption.



*For exhaustive details see " Hydrates in Aqueous Solution," etc. Harry C. Jones, Publication No. 60 of the
Carnegie Institution of Washington.



ATLAS OF ABSORPTION SPECTRA.



165. Copper Chloride in Acetone.

Fig. 91, pi. 23, and fig. 93, pi. 24.

Fig. 91 shows the changes in the posi-
tions of the ends of the regions of
absorption and transmission of cop-
per chloride produced by varying the
solvent. The depth of the cell was
1.50 cm. Counting from the com-
parison spectrum towards the oppo-
site side of the spectrogram, the four
photographic strips correspond to
solutions of anhydrous copper
chloride in absolute acetone, in ab-
solute ethyl alcohol, in anhydrous
methyl alcohol, and in water, re-
spectively. The acetone solution was
brownish yellow. The ethyl solution
was dark green. The color of the
methyl solution was yellowish green.
The aqueous solution was blue. The
concentrations of the solutions, in
the order named, were, respectively,
0.022, 0.321, 0.283, and 0.795 normal.

The aqueous solution absorbed all
radiations from 0.20/1 to 0.387/1 and
from 0.588/1 into the red.

The solution having methyl alcohol for
solvent absorbed all of the ultra-
violet from 0.20/1 to near 0.462/1. It
transmitted from 0.462/1 to beyond
the region of photographic sensibility
of the Seed films.

The solution in ethyl alcohol absorbed
from 0.20/1 to about 0.515/1 and again
from 0.59/1 into the red.

The acetone solution absorbed from
0.20/1 to near 0.510/1. It transmitted
from 0.510/1 to beyond the region of
sensibility of the film used.

These results were supplemented by
the aid of a Cramer "Trichromatic"
plate. A bluish-green, aqueous solu-
tion of concentration 1.590 normal
was substituted for the one referred
to above. The depth of cell and the
concentrations of the three remain-
ing solutions were unaltered. This
photograph showed that the new
aqueous solution transmitted from
0.434/1 to 0.588/1, the methyl solution
from 0.462/1 to beyond 0.625/1, the
ethyl solution from 0.513/1 to 0.604/1,
and the acetone solution from 0.510/1
to beyond 0.625/1.



165. Copper Chloride in Acetone Cont'd.
The exposures for the Seed film and

the Cramer plate were, respectively,
1.5 and 2 minutes long.

Fig- 93 shows the way in which the
limits of absorption change when
water is added to solutions of anhy-
drous copper chloride dissolved in
absolute acetone. The depth of the
cell was 2 cm. The solutions were
made up as explained under No. 158,
which see.

The percentages by volume of the
water in the solutions under consid-
eration were o, i, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8.
The concentration of the mother-
solution was 0.022 normal.

The photographic strip nearest to the
comparison spectrum corresponds to
the solution which was anhydrous.
The next strip pertains to the solu-
tion which contained I per cent of
water, etc., across the entire spectro-
gram. The mother-solution ab-
sorbed completely all radiations from
0.20/1 to 0.517/1. The next four solu-
tions had a region of transmission
the center of which was at 0.436/1.
This region was followed by an ab-
sorption band whose middle was dis-
placed towards the ultra-violet as
the amount of water in the solutions
was increased. For the i and 2 per
cent solutions the center of the ab-
sorption band had the approximate
wave-lengths 0.478/1 and 0.475/1, re-
spectively. The solution which con-
tained 8 per cent of water absorbed
all radiations from 0.20/1 to about
0.393/1 and transmitted from this
wave-length to beyond 0.62/1.

166. Copper Chloride in Ethyl Alcohol.
See No. 165.

167. Copper Chloride in Methyl Alcohol.
See No. 165.

1 68. Diamond.
See No. 154.

169. Erbium Chloride.*

Fig. 101, pi. 26. In solution very faint
pink.

Concentrated (filtered).

The solution was poured into a quartz
cell, the ends of which were plane
and parallel. The cell was succes-
sively adjusted to the following



* A specimen from the collection of the late Prof. Henry A. Rowland.



MISCELLANEOUS ABSORBING MEDIA.



53



169. Erbium Chloride Continued.

depths, viz: 0.83, 1.13, 1.43, 1.73,
2.03, 2.33, 2.63, and 2.93 cm. In
other words, the thickness of the
absorbing layer was increased by 3
mm. between the successive photo-
graphic exposures. As has been
often remarked by other observers,
the solution in question has a very
large number of remarkably narrow
absorption bands.

For the depth of 0.83 cm. all of the
ultra-violet is absorbed from 0.20/4
to the cadmium line at 2880.9, while
for the depth of 2.93 cm. transmis-
sion begins near 0.300/4. The wave-
lengths of the maxima of the ab-
sorption bands, and the essential
characteristics of the bands, as ob-
tained directly from the original
negative, are as follows: 0.325/4,
-35/*> strong with a broad penum-
bra on both sides; 0.3555/4, faint;
0.3645/1, strong; 0.3662/1, faint com-
panion of the last; 0.3766/1, nar-
row and faint; 0.3792/4, strong and
sharp; 0.3875/1, faint, diffuse band
shading off gradually towards the
red ; 0.405/4, weak and sharp ;
0.4075/4, weak; 0.416/4, faint, dif-
fuse band shading off towards the
red ; 0.419/4, faint ; 0.422/4, faint and
narrow; 0.427/4, extremely faint
and diffuse band; 0.4425/4, faint;
0.450/1, comparatively strong and
narrow with a very faint com-
panion at the more refrangible side
and with a broad, hazy band near
the opposite edge ; 0.4675/1, very
faint; 0.4725/4, very faint and dif-
fuse ; 0.480/1, extremely faint ;
0.485/4, weak; 0.4875/4, compara-
tively strong and narrow ; 0.491/4,
wide, hazy band shading off to-
wards the red; 0.5186/4, weak and
narrow; 0.5205/4, narrow; 0.5235/1,
strong and narrow; 0.5365/4, weak
and broad ; and 0.5413/4, weak with
a broad, diffuse companion on the
side nearest to the red.

170. Ethyl Alcohol.
See No. 148.

171. Glycerine.

A plane-parallel layer of glycerine
13.5 mm. deep absorbed all light
of wave-length less than 0.25/4 and
it produced a general weakening



171. Glycerine Continued.

of the continuous background as
far as about 0.33/4. The exposure
lasted for 1.5 minutes.

172. Litmus.

Figs. 83 and 84, pi. 21.

In solution blue and red for the
neutral (or alkaline) and acid con-
ditions, respectively.

Saturated.

Angle, about 6 for both cases.
Depth o to 3.2 mm., approximately,
for fig. 83.

The absorption of the blue solution
is suggested by fig. 83. Absorp-
tion was practically complete from
0.20/1 to about 0.28/4. From this
wave-length the absorption band
followed a gentle slope to about
0.42/4 for the greatest depth of so-
lution. A region of partial trans-
parency extended from 0.42/4 to
near 0.496/4. A band of absorption
began at 0.496/4 and had its max-
imum approximately at 0.531/1.
The spectrogram indicates the ex-
istence of intense absorption in the
orange and red.

Fig. 84 gives the photographic record
obtained with an acid solution of
litmus. This solution absorbed
the greater part of the ultra-violet
region just as the neutral solution
did. On the other hand, the acid
solution exerted general absorp-
tion in the violet and blue, where-
as the neutral solution, of the same
depth, transmitted the light of
these colors. The maximum of
the band in the green was at 0.515/4
for the red solution. The displace-
ment of this maximum from 0.531/4
to 0.515/4 was probably exaggerated
by the variations of sensibility of
the photographic films for radia-
tions of different wave-lengths.
Fig. 84 recorded only weak ab-
sorption in the yellow-orange. Red
was transmitted.

173. Methyl Alcohol.
See No. 148.

174. Neodymium Ammonium Nitrate.
Figs. 96, 97, and 98, pi. 25.
Pink crystals. In solution pink.
Concentrated (filtered).

For fig. 96 the solution was poured
into a quartz cell the ends of



54



ATLAS OF ABSORPTION SPECTRA.



174. Neodymium Ammonium Nitrate

Continued.

which were plane and parallel.
The cell was successively adjusted
to the following depths, viz: 0.53,
0.83, 1.13, i-43 1 -73. 2 -3. 2.33,
and 2.63 cm. In other words, the
thickness of the absorbing layer
was increased by 3 mm. between
the successive photographic ex-
posures. As has been often re-
marked by other observers, the so-
lution in question has a large num-
ber of unusually narrow absorption
bands, some of which are very in-
tense and persistent.

For the depth of 0.53 cm. all of the
ultra-violet is absorbed from 0.20/1
to the zinc line at 3302.7, while for
the depth of 2.63 cm. only very
faint transmission obtains in the
immediate vicinity of 3407.7 A. U.
The general characteristics of the
most intense bands can be readily
seen by referring to fig. 96, hence
it will suffice to give the approxi-
mate wave-lengths of the absorp-
tion bands which were recorded
by the original negative.

The centers of the bands were at
0.347/1, 0.350/1, 0.355/1, 0.381/4, very
faint ; 0.418/1, faint ; 0.4275/1, sharp ;
0.433/1, very faint; 0.4437/1, dif-
fuse; 0.461/1, faint and diffuse;
0.4695/1, 0.4755/1, faint; 0.4823/1,
0.5087/1, 0.5112/1, with a hazy
boundary at the less refrangible
side ; 0.520/1, 0.5225/1, broad and in-
tense ; 0.5324/1, faint ; 0.5775/1, broad
and intense, and 0.5925/1, faint and
diffuse.

Fig. 97 shows the absorption of the
same solution when placed in the
wedge-shaped cell. The^ angle of
the liquid wedge was i 18' and
the depth increased linearly from
0.71 mm. to 1.24 mm. Except for
the transmission of the strong
metallic lines at 2558.0, 2573.1, and
2748.7, the ultra-violet absorption
is practically complete as far as
0.3250/1. The negative for fig. 97
recorded very faintly all of the ab-
sorption bands given above except
the ones at 0.347/1, 0.350/1, 0.381/1,
0.418/1, 0.461, and 0.5324/1.



174. Neodymium Ammonium Nitrate

Continued.

The angle of the cell was 39' for fig.
98, so that the thickness of the
absorbing layer varied from about
o to 0.36 mm. Absorption was
complete from 0.20/1 to 0.237/1. The
boundary of this region of ab-
sorption curved around rather
abruptly from 0.237/1 to 0.250/1 as
the depth of solution increased
from its least to its greatest value.
Transmission by the deepest part
of the liquid wedge was weakened
somewhat from 0.277/1 to 0.308/1.
Only the intense absorption band
at wave-length 5225 A. U. was re-
corded by the negative.

175. Nickel Nitrate.
Fig. 81, pi. 21.

Green crystals. In solution green,
light green.

Saturated.

Angle, about 6. Depth o to 3.2 mm.,
approximately.

Strong absorption in the orange and
red, also weaker absorption in the
extreme violet. The absorption
was nearly complete from 0.20/1
to about 0.312/1. The end of this
region of absorption curved
around from 0.312/1 to 0.326/1 with
increasing depth of solution. Un-
usual transparency from 0.326/1 to
0.374/1. A symmetrical absorption
band, with its maximum at 0.391/1,
extended from 0.374/1 to 0.408/1.
Transmission was complete from
this point as far as the absorption
band in the orange. The sloping
end of the spectrogram calls atten-
tion to absorption in the orange.

176. Nickel Sulphate.
Fig. 82, pi. 21.

Green crystals. In solution green,
pale green.

Saturated.

Angle, about 6. Greatest depth, 3.2
mm., approximately. Absorption
in the extreme violet, orange, and
red. Using the faint comparison
spectrum as a standard of com-
parison, it becomes evident that
the solution was remarkably trans-
parent to the ultra-violet radia-
tions from 0.226/1 to about 0.365/1.
A symmetrical absorption band,



MISCELLANEOUS ABSORBING MEDIA.



55



176. Nickel Sulphate Continued.

with its maximum at 0.391/1, ex-
tended from 0.367/1 to 0.415/1.
Transmission was complete from
this point as far as the absorption
band in the orange. A comparison
of figs. 8 1 and 82 is very sugges-
tive. Both spectrograms show the
same band at wave-length 0.391/1,
but the ultra-violet absorption ex-
erted by the nitrate is entirely dif-
ferent from that shown by the sul-
phate.

177. Picric Acid.
Fig. 86, pi. 22.

Yellow crystals with greenish hue.
In solution yellow, pale yellow.

Concentration unknown.

Angle 50.7'. Depth o to 0.46 mm.

Hazy band in the violet extending
into the ultra-violet. Absorption
decreased gradually from 0.20/1 to
partial transparency at 0.275/1.
Semi-transparency from 0.275/1 to
0.300/1. A band of absorption, with
hazy contour, extended from about
0.300/1 to 0.400/1, its maximum being
near 0.35/1.

178. Potassium Chromate.
Fig. 80, pi. 20.

Yellow crystals. In solution yel-
low, faint yellow.

Very dilute.

Angle 50.7'. Change in depth 0.46
mm.

Absorption in the extreme violet ex-
tending into the ultra-violet. The
most refrangible absorption band
only extends from beyond 0.20/1 to
0.226/1. The solution is noticeably
transparent to all radiations from
2265.1 A. U. to 2321.2 A. U., inclu-
sive of these limits. An intense
band extends from 0.227/1 to 0.300/1.
This is followed by a region of al-
most complete transparency, the
middle of which is near 0.316/1. A
strong band of absorption extends
from 0.332/1 to 0.406/1 with its max-
imum at 0.369/1.

179. Potassium Permanganate.
Figs. 74 and 75, pi. 19.
Grayish-brown crystals with violet

reflex. In solution deep violet,
violet.



179. Potassium Permanganate Continued.

16.67 P er liter.

Angle 27.3'. Depth o to 0.25 mm.

Five distinct bands clearly visible
in the green with a very faint com-
panion on the blue side. The cen-
tral band of the five is a little
more intense than its less re-
frangible neighbor. Light from the
spark decomposes the potassium
permanganate so rapidly, with the
formation of innumerable small
bubbles, that the exposures had
to be made as follows : ist. Expose
to spark for 25 seconds. 2d. Re-
move cell from spectrograph and
clean away the bubbles. 3d. Re-
place the cell and make another
exposure for 25 seconds, etc., three
times for each distinct strip of the
spectrogram. The absorption at
0.20/1 is weak and decreases to
transparency near 0.25/1. Unusual
transparency from 0.25/1 to 0.29/1.
This fact is brought out in a half-
dozen spectrograms of the region.
A band of absorption extends
roughly from 0.29/1 to 0.36/1 with
its maximum at the center. The
transparency increases to com-
pleteness and continues to 0.483/1.
The wave-lengths of the 7 photo-
graphic bands are 0.457/1, 0.472/1,
0.488/1, 0.505/1, 0.525/1, 0.545/1,
and 0.570/1. (Only 5 bands show on
the complete spectrogram.) In
decreasing order of intensity the
three strongest bands are 0.525/1,
0.505/1 and 0.545/1.

An effort was made to detect the 8
bands given by Formanek,* but
the conditions were not favorable
to recording more than seven
bands. Formanek's wave-lengths
are "571.0, 547.3 (Hauptstreifen),
525.6, 505.4. 487.0, 470.7, 454.4,

and 439-5-"

The negative for fig. 75, pi. 19, shows
the seven bands. The solution
was practically saturated since it
contained 50 grams per liter at
room temperature. Here the ultra-
violet absorption extends as far as
0.39/1. For concentrations from
16.67 to 5 grams per liter, and for



''See], Korinanelc, "Die qualitative Spectralanalyse anorganischer Korper," p. 59.



ATLAS OF ABSORPTION SPECTRA.



179. Potassium Permanganate Continued.

the method used, the bands do not
shift at all.* Trichromatic plates
were used to see if any photographic
bands less refrangible than 0.570/1
could be recorded. No evidence of
the existence of such bands was pre-
sented.

1 80. Praseodymium Ammonium Nitrate.
Fig. 100, pi. 26.

Yellowish-green crystals. In solu-
tion yellowish green.

Concentrated (filtered).

The solution was poured into a
quartz cell, the ends of which were
plane and parallel. The cell was
successively adjusted to the fol-
lowing depths, viz: 0.73, 1.03, 1.33,
1.63, 1.93, 2.23, 2.53, and 2.83 cm.
In other words, the thickness of
the absorbing layer was increased
by 3 mm. between the successive
photographic exposures.

The solution is remarkable for the
comparative narrowness and great
intensity of its absorption bands.
Absorption was complete from
0.20/1 to about 0.333/1 and 0.343/1,
respectively, for the least and
greatest depths of solution investi-
gated. The centers of the four in-
tense bands which fell within the
region of sensitivity of the Seed
emulsion were at wave-lengths
0.4445/1, 0.4685/1, 0.4820/1, and
0.590/1. The least refrangible side
of the band at 0.590/1 does not ap-
pear in fig. loo because the band
came very near the limit of sensi-
bility of the photographic film em-
ployed.

181. Sodium Bichromate.
Suggested by fig. 14, pi. 4.
Orange-red crystals. In solution

yellow, pale yellow.
Very dilute solution.
Angle 50.7'. Depth o to 0.46 mm.



181. Sodium Bichromate Continued.

The spectrogram differs from fig. 14
in having the ultra-violet absorp-
tion curve displaced bodily to-
wards the region of the shortest
wave-lengths. Absorption was
practically complete from 0.20/1 to
about 0.27/1, for all depths. At the
thickest part of the liquid wedge
absorption was complete from 0.20/1
to 0.40/1, but both the photographic
strip adjacent to the comparison
spectrum and the one in the mid-
dle of the spectrogram recorded a
comparatively narrow band of
semi-transparency, the center and
maximum of which was near
0.318/1. This was followed by a
strong, round absorption band
whose maximum was at 0.36/1. In
other words, there were two round,
ultra-violet bands of absorption
which coalesced at the wave-
length 0.318/1. Transmission was
complete from 0.40/1 to 0.63/1.

182. Sodium Nitroprussid.
Fig. 76, pi. 19.

Garnet crystals. In solution reddish
brown, light brown.

Saturated.

Angle i 45'. Depth o to 0.96 mm.

Weak absorption in violet. Light
from the spark decomposes the
solution at the very beginning of
illumination so that the method
used for photographing the ultra-
violet absorption of the perman-
ganates was not applicable. This
difficulty was not overcome. Ab-
sorption decreases to about 0.38/1,
then increases to a weak maximum
near 0.396/1, and finally decreases
to transparency at 0.428/1. No
selective absorption from 0.43/1 to
0.62/1.

183. Water. See No. 148.



*See H. Kayser, "Handbuch der Spectroscopie," v. iii, p. 415.



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF ABSORBING MEDIA.
ALPHABETICAL LIST OF ABSORBING MEDIA.



57





Page


No.


Pi.


Fig.




Page


No.


PI.


Fig.




46
27
35
43
38
46
4i
4 1
42
44
44
4i
37
46

21

31
29

34

21

44
25
32
23
26

25

47

33
3i
3i
33
28

29
29

23
32
44
23
44
32
47
47
47
44
37
48

22
30
22
28
28
28
48

48

49
50

50

50
5i


148
42
86

133
1 06
149
1 20
118
128
134
135
119

97
150

i
62

53
82
8
136
3i
72
M
35
31

151

75
65
64

74
49
54
52
19
67

137
15
138
69
152
'53
154
139
99
155
13
57

12

45
47
46
156

157
158

159

160

161
162


22


87




23

45
43

33

33
32
30
29
3i
30
30
51

5'
52

52

52

37
30
23
35
25
34
40

35
3i
33
33
3i
32
52
45
27
34
24
24
39
40

39
52
24
40

53
36
38
38
26

34
26
26
22
45
35
36
40
53
45
42
43
24


20
140
I2g

77

78
7i
60
56
63
59
61
163

164
165
166
167

IOO

58
18
90
30
81
"3
89
66

73
76
66
68
168
141
40
84
23

21

109
III
1 08
169
22
112
170

91
105
104
38

79
34
36
9
142

8?
95
116
171

M3
124
132
24














12


46




3
9
9


13
(35
(36
35


Acid Magenta S






5
'9

7


19

73

28


Congo Brown G












6
9


23
33










Alizarine Orange. (Powder 80%)


6


24












4

18

22

I


M
72
88

i








Alkali Blue 6 B




20

23
(23
124
(23

1 24

(23

1.24
13


77

92
9i
93
9i
93
91
93
49




Copper Chloride and Calcium
Chloride


Amidonaphtholdisulphonic
Acid H


Copper Chloride in Acetone. . . .

Copper Chloride in Ethyl Alcohol.
Copper Chloride in Methyl )












II
10
12


43
39
45










Azo Blue










2


9










Crystal Violet














3

10

5
18


12

37
18
69


Barium Permanganate


19


'in

173








Dahlia
















Diamine Black B O








6


22










Diamine Red B








2


7




16

22

9


61
89
34


Blue Black












Brilliant Congo R






Dianil Yellow R


Brilliant Croceine, blue shade. .
Brilliant Orange G












8


31




8
13
5


29
52
17






Brilliant Purpurine R


7

22
22
22


26

88
88
89








Calcium Chloride. .




15
26

15
15

22

16


58

IOI

57
59
87

64






Carthamin


Erika B.


China Blue


18

20

2


?i
79

8




Chromium Chloride . .


Ethyl Alcohol


Chromotrope 6 B


Ethyl Violet


Chrysamine G


Fast Acid Violet A 2 R




2

7
3
6

20

24

(2 3
I 2 4

23

I 24

23

(24

21


7
25

ii

21

78

95
90

94
90
94
90

94

85


Fast Acid Violet B


16


63


Cloth Red G


Fast Brown 3 B


Cloth Red 3 G A


Fast Green O






Cloth Red O


Fast Red A ...


7


27


Cobalt Chloride


Fast Red, extra


Cobalt Chloride and Aluminium
Chloride


Fast Yellow






Fluoresceine






Cobalt Chloride in Acetone
Cobalt Chloride in Ethyl Alcohol.

Cobalt Chloride in Methyl Alcohol
Cobalt Glass


Fuchsine


12

14


48
53


Fuchsine S


Galle'ine


Glycerine






Guinea Carmine B






Heliotrope 2 B


'7


68




Cobalt Sulphate


Janus Green



















ATLAS OF ABSORPTION SPECTRA.

ALPHABETICAL LIST OF ABSORBING MEDIA. Continued.





Page


No.


PI.


Fig.




Page


No.


PI.


Fig.


Janus Red B


28














g




Light Green F S




8c














86










(83


Ponceau B O, extra


27


43










83




(4


Ponceau 2 G


22


ii
16


2


6






















Methyl Alcohol




173




8?




28


48






Methyl Blue




08






Ponceau 6 R B -








cfi
















178




80


Methyl Green


36


94


12


47










T71


Methyl Green OO


36








Potassium Permanganate


55


179


19


^ "


Methyl Orange III




28
















Methyl Violet 6 B


26






66


Nitrate


eg


1 80


26




Mordant Yellow O




















Naphthalene Red




















/3-Naphtholdisulphonic Acid G


21


2


I


{*


Quinoline Yellow, sol. in water. .
Red Violet 5 R S


43
37


131

Q 6


II
16


44
62






80










6






Naphthol Yellow


















38


Naphthol Yellow S












^8




17


6s
















7O














( 06




















90

J Q7




















1 08












Neutral Red












eg


181








26










s6


182




76




26






















88










146






Nickel Nitrate








81




A6








Nickel Sulphate




176




82












Night Blue














2Q










126






Tropaeoline OOO No. i




26
















Tropa'oline OOO No 2










o-Nitrobenzaldehyde


21


4








-}Q






fn


^-Nitrosodimethylaniline .


21


5


I

8


3




2Q


IO7
cc


4

2


1 16

7


Orcei'n










Victoria Blue 4 R


V7


IO2


T8


7












Water


c6


183


22


87










60


Wool Black


2Q


so


17


6?























ATLAS OF ABSORPTION SPECTRA.



59



For convenience in identifying the stronger spark lines, fig. 99, pi. 25, is given.*
The numbers on this positive correspond to those preceding the wave-lengths below.
The wave-lengths were derived from the two following sources:

"An Introduction to the Study of Spectrum Analysis," by W. M. Watts. Long-
mans, Green & Co., 1904.


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