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Guide to the Catskill Mountains for vacationist and tourist online

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Hotel Kaatlrskill

C-A-T-S-K-I-L-L M-O-U-N-T-A-I-N-S, N. Y.

GRANDEST & LOFTIEST HOTEL IN AMERICA,

3,000 FEET ELEVATION,

90 MILES OF HUDSON RIVER VIEW;

DIRECT RAILWAY ACCESS.

DRUG STORE, LIVERY, GOLF

LINKS, TENNIS, BOWLING ALLEY,

GERMAN RATHSKELLER.

K-A-A-T-E-R-S-K-LL-L C-U-I-S-I-N-E,

famous the world over;
K-A-A-T-E-R-S-K-l-L-L S-P-R-I-N-G,

purest drinking water;
K-A-A-T-E-R-S-K-I-L-L O-R-C-H-E-S-T-R-A,

under the direction of Prof. Julius Simonson;
K-A-A-T-E-R-S-K-l-L-L P-A-R-K,

10 miles of drives; 20 miles of walks;

The famous road to Palenville.
K-A-A-T-E-R-S-K-l-L-L L-A-K-E,

10 minutes from the hotel,

boating, canoeing, fishing;
K-A-A-T-E-R-S-K-I-L-L F-A-R^M,

fresh vegetables daily;
K-A-A-T-E-R-S-K-I-L-L D-A-I-R-Y.

guaranteed milk, cream and fresh butter;
K-A-A-T-E-R-S-K-I-L-L
F-I-R-E B-R-I-G-A-D-E,

organized service, fog horn signal, steam fire

engine, watchmen on each floor all night.
O-P-E-N-S F-O-R S-E-A-S-O-N,
27TH O-F J-U-N-E, 1903.
For rates, how to reach and other details write to

H-O-T-E-L K-A-A-T-E-R-S-K-I-L-L C-O.,
K-A-A-T-E-R-S-K-I-L-L, N-E-W Y-O-R-K.



Copyrighted

By W. R. HEARST

1903




NILW YORK AMERICAN
System of Information Bureaus

CENTRAIi BURKAU.

BROADWAY, COR. ETTH STREET. N. T.

HARLEM Bl RKAU.

237 WEST 125TH STREET. NEAR 8TH AVENUE. N. Y.

IN BROOKLYN, N. Y.

298-300 W.\jSHIN6T0N iSa'REET.

.S23 325 FULTON STREET.

NEW JERSEY COAST BUREAU,

ASIBTRY PARK, N. J.

NEW ENGLAJ^TD STATES BUREAU.

BOSTON, MASS.

CHICAGO,

HEARST'S EXAMINER AND AMERICAN OFFICE,

SAN FRiANriSiOO.

THE EXAMINER OFFICE.



DEPARTMENTS

SITMMER HOMES FOR RENT.

SUMMER HOTEI.S_^ BOARDING AND FARM HOUSES.

SUMMER RESORTS— WINTER RESORTS.

TRAVEL— TOURS— TRANSPORTATION.

EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS ^nd TEACHERS.

NEW YORK CITY HOTELS.
HIGH CLASS APARTMENT HOUSE VACANCIES.
BO.ARDING .VND FURNISHED ROOMS.



ANNUALS AND HANDY GUIDES

ISaUEO BY THE

N. Y. AMERICAN INFORMATION BUREAUS



ANNUALS

N. Y. AMERICAN'S SUMMER' VACATION MAGAZINE.

N. Y. AMERICAN'S EDUCATIONAL MAGAZINE.

N. Y. AMERICAN'S WINTER RESORT MAGAZINE.

APARTMENT HOUSE VAOANCIEfl CATALOGUIEi.

MONTHLY REALTY RECORD MAGAZINE.
SECTIONAL DIRECTORIES OF SUMMER HOTELS.



HANDY GUIDES

SW¥oT sale at all New York American Information Bureaus, or
mailed on receipt of remittance at American's Central Bureau,
Broadway, corner 37th Street. New York.

VISITORS* aUIDiE TO NEW YORK.

80 PAGES WITH MAP, 15 CENTS.

GUIDE TO CATSKILL MOUNTAINS, 15 CENTS.

GUIDE TO ADiRONDACK MOUNTAINS. 16 CENTS.

NEW JERSEY SEASHORE GUIDE. 15 CENTS.

TROLLEY TRIPS AND EXCURSIONS. 15 CENTS.

GUIDE TO WHITE MOUNTAINS. 15 CENTS.

WATEIR EXCURSIONS FROM NEW YORK.

(In I'repwation.)



GUIDi:



TO THL



CATSKILL
MOUNTAINS



FOR



VACATIONIST
And TOURIST



By HOWARD HENDRICKS



nrTtEN GIANTS



ISSUED BY THE



System of Information Bureaus

CLNTRAL BURLAU:

BROADWAY, Cor. 37th STRLLT

NLW YORK



ILLUSTRATIONS

A ICAATERSKILL COACHING PARTY f**6

A SPRING IN TETB CATSKILLS 11

A TURN OF THE ROA i » 21

ELM AT KINGSTON. 250 YEARS OUD 30

ENTRANCE TO STONY OIvOVE ^OTCH 29

HAINES FALLS DAM 32

HOTEL KAATERSKILL, REAR VIEW 34

HOTEL KAATERSKILL. FROM HUDSON RIVER 34

JENNIE JUNE'S COTTAGE, TWILIGHT PARK 31

KAATERSKILL FALLS 38

LEAVING NOTCH. LOOKING SOUTH 30

LEDGE END, TWILIGHT PARK 37

LOCK MARIAN AND TRAPPER S LODGE 28

LOCKWOOD'S CUT 12

MAP OP CATSKILL MOUNTAINS 24 25

MINNEHAHA GLEN 19

OBSERVATORY, MT. UTSAYANTHA, STAMFORD 20

OLD RIP VAN WINKLE TAVERN 7

PINE HILL VALLEY 18

RED FALLS, NEAR PR.\TTSVILLE. N. Y 22

RESIDENCE OF SAMUEL D, COYKEKDALiL. KINGSTON 14

BANTA CRUZ, TWILIGHT AND SUNSET PARKS 30

SCENE AT STAMFORD 26

STONY CLOVE NOTCH 2t

SUMMER HI M \ STAMFORD 27

THE WITTENRERG'S DEEPEST SHADOWS 22

TWILIGHT AND SUNSET PARKS 85

UPPER KAATERSKILL FALLS ' 38

UPPER KINGSTON, CATSKILL IN BACKGROUND



GENERAL INDEX



Page.

Alder Lake 20

Alligator Head 40

Andes 19

Albany Day I-ine 7

Annuals and Handy Guides 2

AppaJachian Mountains 6

Austin's Glen 10

Beach, Charles L 45

Bell Ayr Mountain 16

Big Indian 14

Birch Creek 15

Bishop's Falls 11

Brodhead's 11

Brown'"! 11

Burnt Knob '^0

Bushnelvllle 13

Catskill Evening Line 10

Catskill Landing 10

Catskill Mountains 5

Catskill Village 7

Central Information Bureau 2

Chimpion, Simon B 2<>

Chichester 30

"Colonel's Chair" Peak 33

Delaware River 15

Delaware Valley 18

Devasego Falls 23

PownsTille 19

Druid Rocks 40

Drv Brook 18

Eagle Rock 40

Elfin Pass 40

Elka Park 33

Efeopus Creek 9, 13

Furlough Lake 19

Grand Gorge Station 22

Grand Hotel 16

Griffin's Comers 18

Guide to Adirondack Mountains. 2

Guide to White Mountains 2

HallcotvUle 21

Harding. George 46

High mount Park 17

Hotels in Catskills 27

Hotel Kaaterskill 7

Hunter 32

Jewett Heights 33

Kaaterskill Scenic Features 39

Kaaterskill Clove 34

Kaaterskill Lake 36

Kaaterskill Mountain 7

Kelly's Comers 21

Kingston 12

Kingston Point 7

Kirkside Cottage 21

LanesvUle 30



Page.

Lemon Squeezer Mount 40

Lexington 13

Margaretville 18

.Mountain Laurel 30

Mount Lincoln 35

Mount Pakatakan 18

Mount Pleasant 12

Mount Utflayantha 27

Necrological 45

N. Y.. Ont. & Western R. R. . . 9

Olive Branch 11

Onteora Park 33

Overlook Mountain 11

Overlook Mountain House T

Over the Siimmit 18

Palenville 35

Palisades 8

Panther Mountain 16

Peakamoose Mountain 15

Pine Hill 15

Pratt's Rocks 23

PrattsTille 22

Pudding Stone Hall 40

Rip Van Winkle 40

Route to Slide Mountain 16

Roxbury 21

Santa Cruz Park 35

Senate House 9

Schoharie Manor Park 38

Shandaken 13

Shavertowa 19

Shokan 11

Slide Mountain 14

Snyder Hollow 13

South Gilboa 23

Spruceton 18

Stamford 28

Steeple Mountain 30

Stony Cove 12

Stony Clove Notch 29

Sunset Park 35

Table Mountain 15

The Finny Streams 43

The First Hill 11

The Sphinx 40

Twilight Park 36

Ulster & Delaware R. R 7

Up Kaaterskill Mountain 37

Visitors' Guide to New York. ... 2

Walkill Valley R. R 9

Wett Hurley 11

Westkill 13

Western Catskill 17

What it costs 42

Winnesook Ledge 14

Woodstock 11




The Summer vaca'tlon !s no longer a fad, but a necessity; no
longer a mere luxury for the rich, but an Inestimable reality for
the poor. No man or woman vyjll care to contradict these state-
ments in these opening years of the new century. From every
point of view they will be freely conceded. To ignore the fact
is madness that can be indulged in only at tlhe peril of the trans-
i,'ressor. If such a vacation a hundred, or even fifty yeais ago,
was less important or imperative to the people of that period,
it was because of the different conditions in social and business
life that prevailed in those days of moderation and comparative
composure. No such tension of human existence, no such hust-
ling competition, nor any of the hot conflicts that now dominate
the efforts of men and women in every walk of life were even
ilreamed of In the days of our ancestors. Nor is the average
man or woman of to-da.v more liberally endowed with strength
or resistance than at that time. Neither in brain nor physique
do we find any material change In normal conditions. We niu«t,
therefore, meet the exigency of the situation by the conservation
of forces. There must be a time for rest and relaxation, com-
plete and unreserved; a period in which to regain and build up
lost energy and vital force. This is the sanitary aspect of the
vacation on its practical and serious side. Natural laws cannot
be set aside with impunity.

•But there ie also another ptoase, and it pertains more directly
to the aesthetic side of our natuie. We need change, and can-
not live on monotony or sys-tematic routine. Every one of the
five senses needs a new diet and a change of regime. This can-
not be had in the atmosphere or liorizou of the town home, even
with an entire cessation of worli or business. Ml must be
changed — the air. the scenery, the environment, the room, the
food, the people we meet, the sounds we hear; all these must be
different, to make the rest complete and secure the benefits de-
siied. These things we have learned during recent years, and
there are still other lessons in the ethics of a Summer vacation
which are being studied by careful otwervers and scientists-

Just where it is best to spend this vacation and the reasons*
for It, or in what particular month it should be taken, and
how long it should last, are juatters not within the purview of
this book. Assuming here that the reader of this Guide wants
to go to a mountain resort, the Catskill Mountains e.speclally,
and is not wholly familiar with the region, ihe effort will be
to assist him by giving needed lufoi mutton. He wants to know
where and what they are, what they look like, and how to reach
the leading points; what can be seen there, and where to look;
what U -costs to ftay a week, or a month, and. a host of other
things which are so often hidden by interrogation points to
the inquiring new visitor. Information of this character will
be found interspersed between the haud/some pictures of this
Guide.



There is no more picturesque mountain region on the globe
than these romantic Catsliills. No matter in what land the
search Is made, the verdict must be the same. On the west bank
of the Hudson ^River, and some ten or more miles away, about
ninety miles north of New York City, some of the n^ore promi-
nent crags of the eastern pait of the range come into view, tow-
ering abruptly from their base far up into the sliy line. The
bold slopes in the distance, rocky and well wooded, here rise to
the height of nearly 4,000 feet in some cases, most of those in
sight being over 3,000 feet in the air.

That the Catskiile are a spur of the great Appalachian Moun-
tain System, which extends from Maine to Alabama, need hardly
be stated for the information of the reader of average intelli-
gence. They cover a superficial area of 2,400 sauare miles. There




are peaks innumerable, three of which are over 4.000 feet high,
and many others over 3,000 feet. These individual peaks differ
in physical structure and plastic form, and present eriatic geo-
logical features not found in other mountain formations. The
Tock is piled-up strata in the original horizontal position, Instead
of the usual folds or segments. This has given rise to a vast

6




amount of theory and speculation among geologists and other
scientific men as to the method of formation. But the best au-
thorities are inclined to agiee that they are due to the action of
water and the erosiye forces of glacial action rather than vol-
canic upheaval or eruption.

The tirst glimpse the traveller gets of the Catskllls, coming up
the Hudson, whether by boat or train, is at Kingston. Then
these prominent peaks loom up in the western sky for twenty-
five or thirty miles, extending somewhat above Catsklll Village.
He will now see three large white structures near the creste of
as many different peaks. The one on the left, furthest south, is
the once famous Overlook Mountain Hotel, which stands over
3,000 feet above tide, and commands one of the most extended
views of river, valley and plain to b,e found In the range. But
the house Is no longer open, because of the difficulty of accese —
uot because It Is more difficult to reach now than It was twenty
years ago, except for the neglected roads approaching the crest;
but In these days of railroads visitors will no longer ride in
stages, even to mountain resorts. Some day not far in the
future, when the steel rails are stretched over these eight miles
from the Ulster & Delaware trains at West Hurley, this famous
mountain will become the most popular Summer crest In the
Catskllls.

The larger building, or group of buildings, seen next toward
the right Is the great Hotel Kaatersklll on Kaatersklll Mountuln;
almost a village in itself, and the largest mountain hotel in the
world. This Is one of the most famous resorts In the Catskllls,
a biilllant scene of gayety and fashion, with every modern ap-
pliance for comfort, pleasure and luxury. The third structure Ls
the old Catsklll Mountain House, that pioneer of all mountain
resort**, which now 0"ens for its eighty-first season, and is known
all over the world. It is a familiar white landmark, with Its tall
Corinthian columns, as seen from the Hudson for over three-
quarters of a century. These houses are In full view from Kings-
ton Union Depot, and also from the river above Kingston Point.

If the tourist has journeyed ud the glorious Hudson by eltheh
of the palatial steamers New York or Albany, of the Day Line,
which left the city after breakfast, or by that fleet river grey-
hound, the Mary Powell, which arrives at Kingston early In the
evening, he will la either case take the mountain train for tbe
hills.




-'■ '^-^^^.^^-^ ^ -^' "^j/ ^//^^^




In befhalf of the sail on the river, it should be said that it is
the finest inland water trip to 'be had in the wide world. The
broad, deep flowing river, with its unceasing panoiama of scenic-
beauty on either bank, the trim lawns and magnificent villas of
millionaires in every mile, its cities, villages, hamlets and facto-
ries, the far-famed Palisades, and anon the rocky grandeur of
the erratic green Highlnnds as they arise abruptly toward the sky,
almost from the vessel's keel at times, the sinuous course of the
channel, and later t!he more genia' and sloping margins with the
sunny and fertile orchards of the choicest fruit farms in Amer-
ica—all this and vastly more is freely spread in this Summer
feast before the admiring traveller on these breezy Hudson River
decks, "While he drinks in the invigorating air.

This river trip to the Catskills covers the moet interesting
part of the Hudson. The stream above Catskill is less impressive
and the banks lose scenic interest.

Those (having fewer minutes to devote to these intervening
miles, or more scanty admiration of nature perhaps, will save
time by travelling in the trains, and satisfy themselves with
car-window glimpses. This would be more endurable if the air
was not vitiated by the consumption of bituminous coal in the
locomotives.

But whether one lands at Kingston or Catskill the mountain
train must pull him up among the hills of the sky- Starting
from home in the cars, he may remain seated without change,
if the pioper train has been selected, even until his destination
has been reached, unless it be a stage ride away from the rail-
way. This is, however, possible only by the Kingston route, and
the trains on the Ulster & Delaware System. The trains from
Catskill Village and landing involve several transfers for the
higher resorts. The choice between these routes is an open
question which need not be discussed here. Much depends upon
the particular point of destination and various other conditions;
and the traveller, having the facilities of each route set forth,
can best decide for himself.

\Both routes are favored, and the old-time animosity has now
settled into good-natured rivalry, lesultlng in a fair and legiti-
mate division of the traffic, to the comfort and convenience of
visitors.

Those desiring to prolong the river sail will land at Catskill.
For parlor cars and through trains Kingston must be the diverg-
ing point.




starting fraiii KiiiiivSton Pulnt, wlie:e tlie ^tcallle^ has beeu left,
I lie Ulster & Delaware mountain train Is found waiting with a full
modern equipment for comfortable travel. Passing up to the maln-
iiid and through the most unattractlre part cf Kingston City, tlie
tuion Depot Is soon reached. Here the Ulster & Delaware inter-
sects the West Shore and the Wallklll Valley railways, making
tills the liveliest and most important station on the entiie ILne
"f the West Shore road. In addition to these trains from the
river, there are others which are transferred directly from the
West Shore to the Ulster & Delaware track, and are taken up
solid, without change. The time of the be.s.t trains from New
York to Kingston Is about two and a quarter hours; thence to the
Kaatersklll it takes about one hour and forty minutes more, only
forty minutes being required to reach Phoenicia. Railway men
tell us this time could be reduced witli a train of oidinary length,
but they are obliged to so arrange their schedules as to cover the
longer trains that must be hauled during the mauntain rush.




UPPER KINGSTON— CATSKILLS IN BACKGROUND.



Taking our scat in the Ulster & Delaware train at Kingston,
we are soon speeding over the rlih lowlands Ixirderlng the Esopns
Creek In the northern limits of the city, getting a ha.<<ty glimpse,
perhaps, if on the left side of the car. of the old Senate House,
where New York State was born, and p;isslng the eastern ter-
minal of the new Port Jervls and Kingston brnneh of the New
York. Ontario & Westirn Railway. The elegant new station
building, freight house and coal pockets will be seen on the left.

A short Iron bridge carries us over the Esopus Creek, wltjl
which we now part company for some time, while it takes a
long reach to the left. Here our mountain climb begins at once,

9



Avitli the valley and loadway on the right. If we have been
fortunate enough to secure seats on that side of the car, the
wisdom of the choice will soon appear. During the forty miles
of the ascent to the summit in Ulster County, the valley, with
all its interesting features, is con inually on the right, through
all the windings of thy train. But there are many passengers,
and the seats on the left must also be occupiid. If those fa-
miliar with the scenery would content themseh es on that side
and allow the strangers to see things at their best, it would be
a kindly courtesy greatly appreciated. But to wait for this is
not advisable.

As we proceed the change of air becomes apparent, it Is
cooler, stronger and purer at every mile. And were it not for
the soft coal still used on the engine (to make steam rapidly,
they sa.v) one might enjoy every inch of the journey.

Leaving the river at Cats'kill Landing, twenty-five miles
further north, one must take the narrow-gauge trains on the
Catskill Mountain road and then transfer at the base of the
mountain to the Otis ISlevating Line and its connections for
Haines Falls and Tannersville. But there is much of interest
and beauty along the way. especially through the rocky glen
known as "Austin's Glen," along the Catskill Oieek ana over the
fertile meadows of Leeds. A uigut upon the river by the fine
steamers of the Catskill Evening line, and an early morning train
to the mountains, is a very popular route with many visitors for
the Greene County section of the range.

These steamers leave New York at an early hour of the
evening, and they are elegantly appointed. The Onteora and
the Kaaterskill are electrically lighted, having their saloons on
the main de<'k and being provided with every modern fitting.
They are also among the speediest of the niglit fleet.

Passengers are also landed at Catskill Point in vast numbers
by the steamers New York and Albany of the Day Line, and still
others come by the West Shore and New York Central trains.




-' '*'%f^^^^r



ELM AT KINGSTON, 250 YEARS OLD.

10




^^■l•st Huili'v is tlii'-lirst sidji of iiiipirt.iiu-c, or was, during
tlie popularity of tlie Overlook Mountain ri-sort, cif,'ht milos
away and sljyward, tlie last throe miles beinj; d cidodly up hill.
The hotel is disilnctly set n from this station, stamina out boliUy
af?ainst the sky on that massive crag. It is S.loit feet liigh. and
commands the best air and the most extendi-d view to be found
in the range. The view there begins at one's feet, and includes
parts of eight differ. nt States. Half way up this mountain is a
very comfortable resort always in operation, but a vacant room
there is another question. Stages for this and the little village
of Woodstock, which intervenes at the base of the mountains,
meet the liading tiaiiis.




A SPRING IN THE CATSKILLS.

Woodstock is a pretty village five miles from the train, where
many visitors enjoy the Summer quietly In the shadow of the
lofty Overlook crag. On a sjuir of that mountain a colony of
arti.sts and artisans has lately been established. Several quaint
structures, more or less el.-iborate and ornate in design, have
already In en completed, and others arc in contemplation.

Oli\e IJranrli and Hro\vn"s are the succeeding waystojx^ on the
long, level streti-h of tr.ick, where tlie engineer |)UlIs the throttle
wide opi-n. Summer boardcr.s with modest purses find rest,
health and enjoyment there among the foothills, with mountain
climbing and llsliing near at hand. We now encounter the old
Esopus Creek at Hiodhead's. another modest boarding section
with varied attractions. Just below, the stream tumbles over the
rocks at Bishop's Falls In sublime confusion, and Hows through
Cathedral Gorge In majestic beauty. Another picturesque mile
brings us to Shokan, a very popular Summer section always,
but without any large hotel.

11



We are now riglit in among the mountains for certain, with
peaks rising in the air on every side. The train now begins to
dally cautiously with the old creek, so long monarch of the
valley; crossing and recrossing the shallow and wayward water
in the effort to unbend the curves here and there, and get a
comparatively straight track without offending the forces of
nature too radically. Mount I'leasant is the next station of im-
portance. A rather large hotel, long establislied, stands back of
the depot, and there are numerous other resorts in this pictur-
esque vicinity, where creeks and brooks, bridges, drives, paths
and shady groves abound in pleasing variety.

Phoenicia is next, twenty-elglit miles from the Hudson, and
atout 794 feet above it. In the palmy days of the old Tremper
House, which will still be seen on the plateau to the right, it was
a popular resort with many visitors. But the large hotel is now
converted into a sanitarium, and although Summer boarders are
still entertained at other smaller hotels, and about the hamlet
generally, the place is mainly a mountain railway centre. At this
point the Stony Clove and Kaaterskill branch of the Ulster &
Delaware system begins, 'curving sharply northward over the
Esopus from the main line to the right. Here it will be neces-
sary for the traveller to make sure that he is on the right train,
or part of the train that goes to the desired point, if he has not
already done so at Kingston, whicli was the proper place to
adjust the matter.

Both at Kingston Foint Landing and at the Union Depot, on
the West Shore, train officials will direct passengers to the proper
coaches, and .vet annoying mistakes often occur in the hurry and
'bustle at that lively station.




IV




Contlnulug up the niiilu line at this time, however, It will be
seen that we are in a mountain dell with towering peaks close
at hand all around. These crags socnu'd almost to dispute the
passage of the train, but the engineers calmly followed the course
of the old creek In laying out the road, winding in and out, but
always at a respectful distance from It. For it must be re-
membered that although a comparatively small stream normally,
just a bit of sparkling water, trickling slowly over the stones
and bowlders during most of the Summer season, this Esopus
Creek is an erratic thing of giant force in times of flood and
freshet. Then It gathers water and force from the massive
slopes of a hundred towering crags in a few liours and carries
everything down before it, respecting nothing, turning aside for
nothing. ITie prlnci ly trout ganiliols gayiy over the pebbly bot-
toms of the pellucid jiools. darting here and there among the
gnarled roots and mossy margins, and glistening in the sunlight
all Summer long, while tlie creek ripples languidly on toward the
river, singing a glad welcome to every lirooklet that pours in Its
laughing water for the merry run. But the bridges and embank-
ments must be maintained in the Springtime as well. So the
melting snows and the torrents of rain must be provided for,
although the average mountain visitor sees the stream only In
its gentler moods.

On leaving Phoenicia the valley or mountain pass becomes
morfe narrow and the scenic charm Is greatly enhanced. Occa-
sional canyons are seen on either side, wailed in almost from the
sunlight by rock-ribbed crags thousands of feet high. Among
these deep gorges is that of Woodland Valley, or "Snyder


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