Howard Pyle.

Pepper & salt : or, Seasoning for young folk online

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NY PUBLIC LIBRARY THE BRANCH LIBRARIES



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his is fhe way fliat ne in Cap and-AWley stops for
along he stony Pa(K f Life to make you iaugK



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HARPER and BROTH




BOOKS BY
HOWARD PYLE

THS RUBY OP KISHMOOR. Illustrated
THE ROSE OF PARADISE. Illustrated
REJECTED OF MEN
THE WONDER CLOCK. Illustrated
MEN OF IRON. Illustrated
PEPPER AND SALT. Illustrated
STOLEN TREASURE. Illustrated
A MODERN ALLADIN. Illustrated
TWILIGHT LAND. Illustrated
ADVENTURES OF PIRATES

HARPER & BROTHERS, PUBLISHERS, N. Y.



THE NEV7 YOKA

PUL1C UW4RY






MTU* >..1M>






Copyright, 18S3, by HARPLK & BnoTHERS
Copyright, 1913, by ANNE POOLE PTLE

I'rint.-.l in the United iStateg of America




H



ERE, my little man, you may hold my cap and bells,
and you, over there, may hold the bauble ! Now,
then, I am ready to talk as a wise man should, and am a giddy-pated jester no longer !

This is what I have to say :

One must have a little pinch of seasoning in this dull, heavy life of ours ; one should
never look to have all the troubles, the labors, and the cares, with never a whit of
innocent jollity and mirth. Yes ; one must smile now and then, if for nothing else
than to lift the corners of the lips in laughter that are only too often dragged down
in sorrow.

It is for this that I sit here now, telling you all manner of odd quips and jests until
yon sober, wise man shakes his head and goes his way, thinking that I am even more
of a shallow-witted knave than I really air-. But, prut : Who cares for that? I am
sure that I do not if you do not.

Yet listen! One must not look to have nothing but pepper and salt in this life of
ours no, indeed ! At that rate we would be .we off .than we are now. I only mean
that it is a good and pleasant thing to have something to lend the more solid part a
little savor now and then !

So, here I'll sit ; and, perhaps, when you have been good children, and have learned
your lessons or done your work, your mother will let you come and play a little while
with me. I will always be ready and waiting for you here, and I will warrant your



Vlll



PREFACE.



mother that I will do you no harm with anything that I may tell you. If I can only
make you laugh and be merry for a little while, then my work will be well done, and I
will be glad in the doing of it.

And now give me my cap and bells again, for my wits are growing cold without
them ; and you will be pleased to reach me my bauble once more, for I love to have
him by me.

Will you be seated ? And you, over there, seat the baby on the grass ! Are you
ready ? Very well ; then I will tell you a story, and it shall be about " The Skillful
Huntsman."





Table -of-Contents-




PAGE
I

9

I I

'3

15

25

27

2 9



THE SKILLFUL HUNTSMAN

Two OPINIONS

Y E SONG OF Y E FOOLISH OLD WOMAN

A NEWSPAPER PUFF

CLAUS AND HIS WONDERFUL STAFF

THREE FORTUNES

VENTURESOME BOLDNESS

SUPERFICIAL CULTURE

HOW DAME MARGERY TWIST SAW MORE THAN WAS GOOD

FOR HER 3'

Y E SONG OF Y E GOSSIPS 41

A VICTIM TO SCIENCE 43

PLAY AND EARNEST ... / ... 45

CLEVER PETER AND THE TWO BOTTLES 47

THE ACCIDENT OF BIRTH 57

Y E ROMANTIC ADVENTURES OF THREE TAILORS 59

FANCY AND FACT 61

HANS HECKLEMANN'S LUCK 63

Y E Two WISHES 71

A VERSE WITH A MORAL, BUT NO NAME 73

Y E SONG OF Y E RAJAH AND Y E FLY 75

FARMER GRIGGS'S BOGGART 77

PRIDE IN DISTRESS 85

PROFESSION AND PRACTICE -87

A TALE OF A TUB 89



TABLE OF CONTENTS.



THE BIRD IN THE LINDEN TREE

Y E STORY OF A BLUE CHINA PLATE .
MORAL BLINDNESS ....

OvERCONFIDENCE



PAGE

91

IOI

103
105

107



THE APPLE OF CONTENTMENT

THE FORCE OF NEED 117

A DISAPPOINTMENT 119

Y E SAD STORY CONCERNING ONE INNOCENT LITTLE LAMB AND FOUR WICKED

WOLVES . .121





PAGE

THIS is THE WAY THAT ONE IN CAP AND MOTLEY STOPS FOR A WHILE ALONG THE )

} Frontispiece
STONY PATH OF LIFE TO MAKE YOU LAUGH . }

JACOB'S MOTHER AND THE HERR MAYOR 2

JACOB AND THE RED ONE 3

JACOB SHOOTS AT THE MAGPIE 4

JACOB AND THE MAGIC PLOUGH 5

JACOB AND THE RED ONE GO HUNTING TOGETHER 6

JACOB AND GRETCHEN GET THE BEST OF THE RED ONE AND GO HOME TOGETHER HAPPILY 7

Two OPINIONS 9

Y E SONG OF Y E FOOLISH OLD WOMAN 1 1

A NEWSPAPER PUFF 13

CLAUS AND THE MASTER OF BLACK ARTS . . 16

CLAUS AND THE WHITE SNAKE 17

THE MASTER is ANGRY 18

CLAUS LISTENS TO THE TALK OF THE TWO RAVENS 19

CLAUS AND THE MANIKIN 20

HANS DISCOVERS CLAUS'S LUCK 21

How HANS WAS CAUGHT 22

THREE FORTUNES 25

VENTURESOME BOLDNESS 27

SUPERFICIAL CULTURE . . . 29

DAME TWIST DRINKETH TEA . . 32

THE LITTLE MAN AND THE GREAT HORSE 33

DAME TWIST VISITS A STRANGE PATIENT 34

DAME TWIST DRIVES AWAY THE LITTLE FOLKS 35

DAME MARGERY TWIST GOETH TO SEE THE MERRY DOINGS AT THE FAIR . . . -36

DAME TWIST SEES THE LITTLE MAN IN GREEN FOR THE LAST TIME 37

Y E SONG OF Y E GOSSIPS 41



xii LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

PAGE

A VICTIM TO SCIENCE 43

PLAY AND EARNEST 45

CLEVER PETER AND THE LITTLE GENTLEMAN IN BLACK 49

CLEVER PETER RIDES TO THE KING'S PALACE UPON HIS FINE HORSE ....

PETER EATS WITH THE KING AND PRINCESS 51

CLEVER PETER AND THE UNLUCKY BOTTLE . 53

CLEVER PETER OPENS THE UNLUCKY BOTTLE FOR THE KING AND PRINCESS .... 54

THE ACCIDENT OF BIRTH 57

Y E ROMANTIC ADVENTURES OF THREE TAILORS 59

FANCY AND FACT 61

HANS HECKLEMANN 64

CATHERINE 64

HANS HECKLEMANN GOES TO THE COTTAGE OF THE OLD WISE WOMAN IN SEARCH OF ins

LUCK 65

HANS HECKLEMANN AND THE OLD WISE WOMAN 66

HANS FINDS HIS LUCK 67

HANS HECKLEMANN PLOUGHS FOR GOLD 68

Y E Two WISHES 71

A VERSE WITH A MORAL, BUT NO NAME 73

Y E SONG OF Y E RAJAH AND V s FLY 75

FARMER GEORGIE GRIGGS 78

DAME MALLY GRIGGS 79

FARMER GRIGGS AND THE BOGGART 80

THE DEPARTURE 81

FARMER GRIGGS AND THE WISE MAN 82

THE BOGGART REJOICES 83

PRIDE IN DISTRESS 85

PROFESSION AND PRACTICE 87

A TALE OF A TUB 89

Y E KING 92

PRINCE JOHN 92

THE PRINCE AIDS THE OLD WOMAN 93

THE GREAT UGLY TROLL FINDS THE PRINCE BY THE FIRE .94

THE GOOSE-HERD AND HER DAUGHTER MEET THE PRINCESS AT THE ROADSIDE . . .95

THE PRINCK LOOKS THROUGH THE MAGIC KEY 96

THE OLD KING REJOICES AT HIS NEW DAUGHTER-IN-LAW -97

Y E STORY OF A BLUE CHINA PLATE 101

MORAL BLINDNESS 103



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.



xi i;



PACJK

OVEKCONFIDENCE IO5

THE LITTLE MAN ASKS FOR HIS CAP 108

CHRISTINE AND THE APPLE . . 109

CHRISTINE'S MOTHER AND SISTERS WISH FOR THE APPLE .... . . no

THE KING REACHES FOR THE APPLE m

THE KING TALKS WITH THE WISE MAN .112

THE KING'S STEWARD AND CHRISTINE ... -113

CHRISTINE GIVES THE APPLE TO THE KING .114

THE FORCE OF NEED . 117

A DISAPPOINTMENT ... .119

Y E SAD STORY CONCERNING ONE INNOCENT LITTLE LAMB AND FOUR WICKED WOLVES . 121




THE SKILLFUL HUNTSMAN



Showing how a man may gain
y e best ofy e Bargain with
y e Red One by y e
help of his
wife



THE cSKILLFUL-HUNTJAAN-




NCE UPON A TIME there was a lad named Jacob Boehm, who was a
practical huntsman.

One day Jacob said to his mother, " Mother, I would like to marry Gret-
chen the nice, pretty little daughter of the Herr Mayor."

Jacob's mother thought that he was crazy. " Marry the daughter of the Herr Mayor,
indeed! You want to marry the daughter of the Herr Mayor? Listen; many a man
wants and wants, and nothing comes of it !"

That was what Jacob Boehm's mother said to him.

But Jacob was deaf in that ear; nothing would do but his mother must go to the Herr
Mayor, and ask for leave for him to marry Gretchen. And Jacob begged and begged so
prettily that at last his mother promised to go and do as he wished. So off she went,
though doubt was heavy in her shoes, for she did not know how the Herr Mayor would
take it.

" So Jacob wants to marry Gretchen, does he ?" said the Herr Mayor.

Yes ; that was what Jacob wanted.

" And is he a practical huntsman ?" said the Herr Mayor.

Oh yes, he was that.

" So good," said the Herr Mayor. " Then tell Jacob that when he is such a clever
huntsman as to be able to shoot the whiskers off from a running hare without touching
the skin, then he can have Gretchen."

Then Jacob's mother went back home again. " Now," said she, "Jacob will, at least, be
satisfied."

" Yes," said Jacob, when she had told him all that the Herr Mayor had said to her, " that
is a hard thing to do; but what one man has done, another man can." So he shouldered
his gun, and started away into the world to learn to be as clever a huntsman as the Herr
Mayor had said.

He plodded on and on until at last he fell in with a tall stranger dressed all in red.

" Where are you going, Jacob?" said the tall stranger, calling him by his name, just as if
he had eaten pottage out of the same dish with him.



! PEPPER AND SALT.

" I am going," said Jacob, " to learn to be so clever a huntsman that I can shoot the

whiskers off from a running hare without touching the skin."

" That is a hard thing to learn," said the tall stranger.

Yes; Jacob knew that it was a hard thing; but what one man had done another man
could do.

" What will you give me if I teach you to be as clever a huntsman as that ?" said the
tall stranger.

"What will you take to teach me?" said Jacob; for he saw that the stranger had a
horse's hoof instead of a foot, and he did not like his looks, I can tell you.

" Oh, it is nothing much that I want," said the tall man ; " only just sign your name to
this paper that is all."




But what was in the paper? Yes; Jacob had to know what was in the paper before
he would set so much as a finger to it.

Oh, there was nothing in the paper, only this : that when the red one should come for
Jacob at the end of ten years' time, Jacob should promise to go along with him whitherso-
ever he should take him.

At this Jacob hemmed and hawed and scratched his head, for he did not know about
that. "All the same," said he, " I will sign the paper, but on one condition."

At this the red one screwed up his face as though he had sour beer in his mouth, for he
did not like the sound of the word " condition." " Well," said he, " what is the condition ?"

" It is only this," said Jacob: "that you shall be my servant for the ten years, and if, in



THE SKILLFUL HUNTSMAN. 3

all that time, I should chance to ask you a question that you cannot answer, then I am to
be my own man again."

Oh, if that was all, the red man was quite willing for that.

Then he took Jacob's gun, and blew down into the barrel of it. " Now," said he, " you
are as skillful a huntsman as you asked to be."

" That I must try," said Jacob. So Jacob and the red one went around hunting here
and hunting there until they scared up a hare. "Shoot!" said the red one; and Jacob
shot. Clip ! off flew the whiskers of the hare as neatly as one could cut them off with the
barber's shears.

" Yes, good !" said Jacob, " now I am a skillful huntsman."

Then the stranger in red gave Jacob a little bone whistle, and told him to blow in it
whenever he should want him. After that Jacob signed the paper, and the stranger went
one way and he went home again.




Well, Jacob brushed the straws off from his coat, and put a fine shine on his boots, and
then he set off to the Herr Mayor's house.

"How do you find yourself, Jacob?" said the Herr Mayor.

" So good," said Jacob.

"And are you a skillful huntsman now?" said the Herr Mayor.

Oh yes, Jacob was a skillful huntsman now.

Yes, good ! But the Herr Mayor must have proof of that. Now, could Jacob shoot a
feather out of the tail of the magpie flying over the trees yonder?

Oh yes! nothing easier than that. So Jacob raised the gun to his cheek. Bang! went

2



PEPPER AND SALT.



the gun, and down fell a feather from the tail of the magpie. At this the Herr Mayor stared
and stared, for he had never seen such shooting.
" And now may I marry Gretchen ?" said Jacob.

At this the Herr Mayor scratched his head, and hemmed and hawed. No; Jacob could
not marry Gretchen yet, for he had always said and sworn that the man who should marry
Gretchen should bring with him a plough that could go of itself, and plough three furrows
at once. If Jacob would show him such a plough as that, then he might marry Gretchen
and welcome. That was what the Herr Mayor said.

Jacob did not know how about that; perhaps he could get such a plough, perhaps he
could not. If such a plough was to be had, though, he would have it. So off he went
home again, and the Herr Mayor thought that he was rid of him
now for sure and certain.

But when Jacob had come home, he went back of the
wood -pile and blew a turn or two on the little bone whistle

that the red stranger had given him.
No sooner had he done this
than the other stood before
him as suddenly as though
he had just stepped out of
the door of nowheres.

" What do you want,
Jacob ?" said he.

" I would like," said
Jacob, " to have a plough that
can go by itself and plough
three furrows at once."

" That you shall have," said
the red one. Then he thrust
his hand into his breeches pock-
et, and drew forth the prettiest
little plough that you ever saw.

He stood it on the ground before Jacob, and it grew large as you see it in the picture.
" Plough away," said he, and then he went back again whither he had come.

So Jacob laid his hands to the plough and whisk ! away it went like John Storm-
wetter's colt, with Jacob behind it. Out of the farm -yard they went, and down the road,
and so to the Herr Mayor's house, and behind them lay three fine brown furrows,
smoking in the sun.

When the Herr Mayor saw them coming he opened his eyes, you may be sure, for
he had never seen such a plough as that in all of his life before.

"And now," said Jacob, "I should like to marry Gretchen, if you please."
At this the Herr Mayor hemmed and hawed and scratched his head again. No ; Jacob
could not marry Gretchen yet, for the Herr Mayor had always said and sworn that the man
who married Gretchen should bring with him a purse that always had two pennies in it and
i mild never be emptied, no matter how much was taken out of it.

Jacob did not know how about that; perhaps he could get it and perhaps he could not
If such a thing was to be had, though, he would have it, as sure as the Mecklenburg folks



Jacob <&hoot 3 . at -





THE SKILLFUL HUNTSMAN. 5

brew sour beer. So off he went home again, and the Herr Mayor thought that now he was
rid of him for certain.

But Jacob went back of the \vood-pile and blew on his bone whistle again, and once
more the red one came at his bidding.

"What will you have now?" said he to Jacob.

" I should like," said Jacob, "to have a purse which shall always have two pennies in it,
no matter how much I take out of it."

" That you shall have," said the red one ; whereupon he thrust his hand into his pocket,
and fetched out a beautiful silken purse with two pennies in it. He gave the purse to
Jacob, and then he went away again as quickly as he had come.

After he had gone, Jacob began taking pennies out of his purse and pennies out of his
purse, until he had more than a hatful hui ! I would like to have such a purse as that.

Then he marched off to the Herr Mayor's house with his chin up, for he might hold his
head as high as any, now that he had such a purse as that in his pocket. As for the Herr
Mayor, he thought that it was a nice, pretty little purse ; but could it do this and that as
he had said ?

Jacob would show him that ; so he began taking pennies and pennies out of it, until
he had filled all the pots and pans in the house with them. And now might he marry
Gretchen ?

Yes ; that he might ! So said the Herr Mayor ; for who would not like to have a lad
for a son-in-law who always had two pennies more in his purse than he could spend.





Jacob and-the-TAagic Plough/^



So Jacob married his Gretchen, and, between his plough and his purse, he was busy
enough, I can tell you.

So the days went on and on and on until the ten years had gone by and the time had
come for the red one to fetch Jacob away with him. As for Jacob, he was in a sorry state
of dumps, as you may well believe.

At last Gretchen spoke to him. " See, Jacob," said she, " what makes you so down in
the mouth?"

" Oh ! nothing at all," said Jacob.

But this did not satisfy Gretchen, for she could see that there was more to be told than
Jacob had spoken. So she teased and teased, until at last Jacob told her all, and that the
red one was to come the next day and take him off as his servant, unless he could ask him
a question which he could not answer.



6 PEPPER AND SALT.

" Prut !" said Gretchen, " and is that all ? Then there is no stuffing to that sausage, for
I can help you out of your trouble easily enough." Then she told Jacob that when the
next day should come he should do thus and so, and she would do this and that, and
between them they might cheat the red one after all.

So, when the next day came, Gretchen went into the pantry and smeared herself all
over with honey. Then she ripped open a bed and rolled herself in the feathers.

By-and-by came the red one. Rap ! tap ! tap ! he knocked at the door.

"Are you ready to go with me now, Jacob?" said he.

Yes; Jacob was quite ready to go, only he would like to have one favor granted him
first.

" What is it that you want ?" said the red one.

" Only this," said Jacob : " I would like to shoot one more shot out of my old gun
before I go with you."

Oh ! if that was all, he might do that and welcome. So Jacob took down his gun, and
he and the red one went out together, walking side by side, for all the world as though
they were born brothers.




By-and-by they saw a wren. " Shoot at that," said the red one.

" Oh no," said Jacob, " that is too small."

So they went on a little farther.

By-and-by they saw a raven. " Shoot at that, then," said the red one.

" Oh no," said Jacob, " that is too black."

So they went on a little farther.

By-and-by they came to a ploughed field, and there was something skipping over the
furrows that looked for all the world like a great bird. That was Gretchen; for the feath-
ers stuck to the honey and all over her, so that she looked just like a great bird.



THE SKILLFUL HUNTSMAN. 7

"Shoot at that! shoot at that!" said the red one, clapping his hands together.

" Oh yes," said Jacob, " I will shoot at that." So he raised his gun and took aim. Then
he lowered his gun again. " But what is it ?" said he.

At this the red one screwed up his eyes, and looked and looked, but for the life of him
he could not tell what it was.

" No matter what it is," said he, " only shoot and be done with it, for I must be going."

"Yes, good! But what is it?" said Jacob.

Then the red one looked and looked again, but he could tell no better this time than
he could before. " It may be this and it may be that," said he. " Only shoot and be done
with it, for they are waiting for me at home."

" Yes, my friend," said Jacob, " that is all very good ; only tell me what it is and I will
shoot."

"Thunder and lightning!" bawled the red one, " I do not know ivliat it is/"

" Then be off with you!" said Jacob, "for, since you cannot answer my question, all is
over between us two."

At this the red one had to leave Jacob, so he fled away over hill and dale, bellowing
like a bull.

As for Jacob and Gretchen, they went back home together, very well pleased with each
other and themselves.



And the meaning of all this is, that many another man beside Jacob Boehm
would find himself in a pretty scrape only for his wife.




wo Opinions




A- talking- gab bllng-hairbrained- dunce-
Came-by-wKere-a-jign-post-jlood'
H e-rio d d e d- hiJ-h cad- wiffva-mod i jh-air-



c?i, Th at-fhe-jfgn-post- pointing-ill- finger- (here
(p, Was-only-a.'block.'of-\vood'

; Quofh-he- K Arvexceedingly-
'Tirmore-like-June n ~-
TKe-poj(



AVy-homs-is-in-fhe-Cafhedral-Sptre-
The- air- LJ coo ler- and purer-(he-h3sher.
You.get - as-you-ve-doubtl65S-neard"



jo-ort-he-chattered-wifh-never-a-Jtop
And-on-andon-till-you'd- fhJnk -he-would-dipp-
Clhe-post-waj- dumb-aj



But- 5o.a5-."fhe-pi&- could- jay-hi5-5ay -=^
He-did-n't-care-whefherH-Jpoke-all-day^'
Fo^fhu/'he-objeryed-aj-he-walkec'
An-intelligent-creature-fhaf-"^



The- AVagpie-chanced..to.come<by- again



"Helloa."iaid-fhe-^\agpie-"Whar-you-here
P ray- tell- me-I'beg-i j-fhere-jhel tering. near-
A-terrible-day-ror-thii-time-of-fhe-year'
'T-would- make -a- Jaint- Anthony-fret-"



"
CThen



"What-can-t-you-answer-a-quejtion-pray- ",
You- will-not- NO -Then-I-'ll-jay- good-day-"
And- flirting' his- tail-he -walked- away-
"You'r-a-fooJ." C(hi5- under-his-breafh-) ^

L'.ENVOY-

The-moral-fTiat'fhiJ'Jtary-t races
13- Circumstances- alter.casej-




I- beg- your-pardon-I-did-n't-quite-hear-'
[hen- louder)" J-jay-ij-fhere- sheltering-



HP-




Song ofy e

Foolish Old Woman



old- woman-





Lfawanold woman go op a fleephill,

And fhe chuckled and laughe-d ,as fhe went.wifhawilL

And yct,as (he went,

Her body was bent,.
WlfliaJpad as heavy as fins In lent.

"Ohlwny do you chuckle.old woman jTays I ,
As you climb up the hill-fide & fteep and fo high? "
B Becaufe ,do n't you fee .
I'll presently be,
At -fhe top offhe hill . He! he I "fayi Ihe.

I faw fhe> old -woman jjo downward agalns
And fhe eafl ly travelled , w ifh ne/ver a pain;

Yet fhe loudly cried,

Andguftilytfghed,
Andgroaned , though ft\e road was level and wide.

"Oh! why.my old woman " i ay i I ,"do y

q laughedjas youcli mbed up the hi Il-fide fo

! I am vexed , fteep?





Newspaper Puff



-




ne/ws-
pape/r-
puff;



1 welve gccfe
In a row
Oofhefe
Alway* go).
Dwn=hill
They meander,
Tail to bill;
Firft the gander.
$o they (talked,
Bold as brafs ,
As they walked
TO fhe graft.

Suddenly
Stopped fhefhrong;
Plain to fee
Something's wrong.
Ye 5-, fherej's
Something white-!
NO quiz ;
Clear to' fight.
('Twill amufe
When you're told
"Twa* a n
Paper old.)



Gander T
Braver bird
Never broke
Egg,I've heard:



I ' I f



j) - >?

-P^rf;)';



-S



,-o



/id



~s* f

w



flS



'<-.



^



<to



O'-



AL>W






%



^gg|

^^te



w^



-,&t^-




^



/i



IsO 5



~^^<.i<\".: "



i . >'



'Pi , ' W,^



"Stand here
5teadily >
Nevericar,
Wait for me. v



Cautious, i
Body bent ,
Head low.
Allfhereft
Stood faft,
Waiting fop
What patted.

"Wind came
Wifhacaper,
Caught fame
Daily paper.

Up it failed
lathe air;
Courage failed
Then and mere" .

5ca.redwell
Outofwitfj
Nearly fell
Into fits .

Offfheyfped,
Helter-fkelter,
'Till ihey Vi fled
Under fhelleiu



Never mind;
Ofhergee/e
Onecanfind,
Cutfhe fame-
Fooljfh caper
At empty wind
In a paper.

H-Pyie.



CLAUS AND HIS WONDERFUL

STAFF

Showing how one should not seek to take
more than one can carry




HIS-WNDERFUL-STAIT



H



o



ANS and Claus were born brothers. Hans
was the elder and Claus was the younger;
Hans was the richer and Claus was the poorer
that is the way that the world goes sometimes.

Everything was easy for Hans at home ; he
drank much beer, and had sausages and white bread

three times a day ; but Claus worked and worked, and no luck came of it that, also, is
the way that the world goes sometimes.

One time Claus spoke to Hans of this matter. " See, Hans," said he, " you should
give me some money, for that which belongs to one brother should help the other."

But Hans saw through different colored spectacles than Claus. No; he would do
nothing of the kind. If Claus wanted money he had better go out into the world to look
for it; for some folks said that money was rolling about in the wide world like peas on a
threshing-floor. So said Hans, for Claus was so poor that Hans was ashamed of him, and
wanted him to leave home so as to be rid of him for good and all.

This was how Claus came to go out into the world.

But before he went, he cut himself a good stout staff of hazel-wood to help his heavy
feet over the road.

Now the staff that Claus had cut was a rod of witch-hazel, which has the power of
showing wherever treasure lies buried. But Claus knew no more of that than the chick
in the shell.

So off he went into the world, walking along with great contentment, kicking up little
clouds of dust at every step, and whistling as gayly as though trouble had never been
hatched from mares' eggs. By-and-by he came to the great town, and then he went to the
market-place and stood, with many others, with a straw in his mouth for that meant
that he wanted to take service with somebody.


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