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UNWIN'S LIBRARY



ILLY AND OLLY

OR

A Holiday Among the Mountains



BY

MRS. HUMPHRY WARD




COPYRIGHT
EDITION

All Rights
Reserved

Thin Edition U
issued for sale
on the Conti-
nent of Europe,
and is not to be
taken into the
United King-
dom or any
British Colony.



T. FISHER UNWIN

.EIPZIG LONDON PARIS

jkelstrasse 20 i Adelphi Terrace 7 Rue de Lille

. M. l.SO or Fr. 2



Milly and Oily



Unwin's Library



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T. FISHER UNWIN



Milly and Oily



or



A Holiday Among the Mountains



BY



MRS. HUMPHRY WARD

Author of

'Robert El sine re," "David Grieve," "The Marriage
of William A she," "Marcella," etc.




T. FISHER UNWIN

LONDON
i ADELPHI TERRACE
LEIPZIG PARIS

INSELSTRASSE 20 7 RUE DE LILLE

MCMVII



COPYRIGHT EDITION
[All Rights Reserved}



SRLF
URL



TO

F. A.

IN THE NAME OF

THE CHILDREN OF FOX HOW,

THIS REVIVAL OF A CHILD'S STORY

WRITTEN TWENTY-SEVEN YEARS AGO,

UNDER THE SPELL OF ROTHA AND FAIRFIELD,

IS INSCRIBED BY THE WRITER.



September, 1907.



PREFACE

A FTER many years this little book is
JL~\ once more to see the light. The
children for whom it was written are long
since grown up. But perhaps the pleasure
they once took in it may still be felt by some
of the Millys and Ollys of to-day. Up in the
dear mountain country which it describes
the becks are still sparkling ; " Brownholme "
still spreads its green steeps and ferny hollows
under rain and sun ; the tiny trout still leap
hi its tiny streams ; and Fairfield, in its noble
curve, still girdles the deep valley where these
children played : the valley of Wordsworth and
Arnold ; the valley where Arnold's poet-son
rambled as a boy ; where, for me, the shy
and passionate ghost of Charlotte Bronte still
haunts the open doorway of Fox How ;
where poetry and generous life and ranging



10 MILLY AND OLLY

thought still have their home, and bring their
benediction to the passers-by. On the lawns
and by the streams of Loughrigg, the children
of to-day find bliss and fairyland, as did their
elders before them. The parrot, alas ! is gone
where parrots may ; but amid the voices that
breathe around Fox How the voices of
seventy years his mimic speech is still re-
membered by the children who teased and
loved him. For love, while love lasts, gives
life to all things small and great ; and in
those who have once felt it, the love of the
Fairfield valley, of the grey stone house that
fronts the fells, and of them that dwell, and
have dwelt therein, is " not Time's fool "

"Or bends with the remover to remove."

MARY A. WARD.

September 18, 1907.



CONTENTS



CHAPTER I

PAGE

MAKING PLANS . . . . . .13



CHAPTER II
A JOURNEY NORTH . . . . . .24

CHAPTER III

RAVENSNEST . . . . . . .45

CHAPTER IV
OUT ON THE HILLS . . . . . . 72

CHAPTER V

AUNT EMMA'S PICNIC . . . . .87

11



12 MILLY AND OLLY

CHAPTER VI

PAGE

WET DAYS AT RAVENSNEST . . . .130

CHAPTER VII
A STORY-TELLING GAME . . . . .157

CHAPTER VIII
A STORY OF BEOWULF . 1 86



CHAPTER IX

MILLY'S BIRTHDAY AND A MISFORTUNE , . 2l6



CHAPTER X
LAST DAYS AT RAVENSNEST .... 249



MILLY AND OLLY:

OR
A HOLIDAY AMONG THE MOUNTAINS



CHAPTER I

MAKING PLANS

" TV /T ILLY, come down ! come down
1.VJ. directly ! Mother wants you. Do
make haste 1"

" I'm just coming, Oily. Don't stamp so.
Nurse is tying my sash."

But Master Oily went on stamping, and
jumping up and down stairs, as his way
was when he was very much excited, till
Milly appeared. Presently down she came, a
sober, fair-haired little maiden, with blue eyes
and a turn-up nose, and a mouth that was
generally rather solemn-looking, though it

13



14 MILLY AND OLLY

could laugh merrily enough when it tried.
Milly was six years old. She looked older
than six. At any rate she looked a great deal
older than Oily, who was nearly five ; and you
will soon find out that she was a good deal
more than a year and a half wiser.

"What's the matter, Oily? What made
you shout so ? "

" Oh, come along, come along ! " said the
little boy, dragging his sister to make her run.
" Mother wants to tell us something, and she
says it's a nice something, and she wouldn't
tell me without you."

Then the two children set off running, and
they flew down a long passage to the drawing-
room, and were soon scrambling about a lady
who was sitting working by the window.

"Well, monkeys, don't choke me before
I tell you my nice something. Now, Milly,
guess what have father and I just been
talking about?"

" Sending Oily to school, perhaps," said
Milly. "I heard Uncle Richard talking
about it yesterday."

" That wouldn't be such a nice something,"
said Oily, making a long face, " I wouldn't



MAKING PLANS 15

like it not a bit. Boys don't never like
going to school. I want to learn my lessons
with mother."

" I know a little boy that doesn't like
learning lessons with mother very much,"
said the lady, laughing. " But my nice some-
thing isn't sending Oily to school, Milly. Try
again."

" Oh, mother ! is it a strawberry tea ? "
cried Milly. " The strawberries are just ripe,
I know. Gardener told nurse so this morn-
ing. And we can have tea on the lawn, and
ask Jacky and Francis."

" Oh, jolly ! " said Oliver, jumping off his
mother's knee and beginning to dance about.
" And we'll gather them ourselves won't you
let us, mother?"

" But it isn't a strawberry tea even," said his
mother. " Now, look here, children, what
have I got here ? "

" It's a map a map of England," said
Milly, looking very wise. Milly had just
begun to learn geography, and thought she
knew all about maps.

" Well, and what happens when father and
I look at maps in the summer-time ? "



16 MILLY AND OLLY

" Why," said Milly, " you and father pack
up your things and go away over the sea, and
we stay behind with nurse."

" I don't call that a nice something," said
Oily, standing still again.

" Oh, mother, are you going away ?" said
Milly, hanging round her mother's neck.

"Yes, Milly, and so's father and so's
nurse " and their mother began to laugh.

" So's nurse ? " said Milly and Oily together,
and then they stopped and looked at their
mother. " Oh, mother, mother, take us too ! "

" Why, how should father and I get on,
travelling about with a pair of monkeys ? "
said their mother, catching hold of the two
children and lifting them on to her knee ; " we
should want a cage to keep them in."

" Oh, mother, we'll be ever so good ! But
where are we going? Oh, do take us to
the sea ! "

" Yes, the sea ! the sea ! " shouted Oily,
careering round the room again ; " and we'll
have buckets and spades, and we'll paddle and
catch crabbies, and wet our clothes just like
Cromer. And father'll teach me to swim he
said he would next time."

" No," said Mrs. Norton, for that was the



MAKING PLANS 17

name of Milly and Oliver's mother. "No,
we are not going to the sea this summer.
We are going to a place mother loves
better than the sea, though perhaps you
children mayn't like it quite so well.
We're going to the mountains. Uncle
Richard has lent father and mother his own
nice house among the mountains, and we're
all going there next week such a long way
in the train, Milly."

" What are mountains ? " said Oily, who
had scarcely ever seen a hill higher than
the church steeple. "They can't be so
nice as the sea, mother. Nothing can."

"They're humps, Oily," answered Milly
eagerly. " Great big humps of earth, you
know ; earth with bits of stone sticking in it.
And they reach up ever so high, up into the
sky. And it takes you a whole day to get
up to the top of them, and a whole day
to get down again. Doesn't it, mother?
Fraulein told me all about mountains in
my geography. And some mountains have
got snow on their tops all the year, even
in summer. Will the mountains we're going
to have snow on them ? "

2



18 MILLY AND OLLY

" Oh no ! The snow mountains are far
away over the sea. But these are English
mountains, kind, easy mountains, not too
high for you and me to climb up, and covered
all over with soft green grass and wild
flowers, and tiny sheep with black faces."

" And, mother, is there a garden to Uncle
Richard's house, and are there any children
there to play with ? "

"There's a delightful garden, full of roses
and strawberries and grapes, and everything
else that's nice. And it has a baby river
all to itself, that runs down through the
middle, so perhaps Oily may have a paddle
sometimes, though we aren't going to the
sea. And the gardener has got two little
children, just about your age, Aunt Mary
says ; and there are two more at the farm,
two dear little girls, who aren't a bit shy,
and will like playing with you very much. But
who else shall we see there, Milly ? Who lives
in the mountains too, near Uncle Richard ? "

Oily looked puzzled, but Milly thought
a minute, and then said quickly, " Aunt
Emma isn't it, mother ? Didn't she come
here once ? I think I remember."



MAKING PLANS 19

"Yes, she came once, but long ago, when
you were quite small. But now we shall see
a great deal of her, I hope, for she lives
just on the other side of the mountain from
Uncle Richard's house, in a pretty old house
where I spent a great many happy days
when I was small. Greatgrandpapa and
grandmamma were alive then. But now
Aunt Emma lives there quite alone. Except
for one creature, at least an old grey poll-
parrot that chatters away, and behaves as if
it were quite sensible and knew all about
everything."

" Hasn't she got any pussies, mother ? "
asked Oily.

" Yes, two, I believe ; but they don't get
on with polly very well, so they live in the
kitchen out of the way."

"I like pussies better than pollies," said
Oily gravely.

"Why, what do you know about pollies,
old man?"

" Pollies bite I know they do. There was
a polly bited Francis once."

" Well, and pussies scratch," said Milly.

"No, they don't not if you're nicey to



20 MILLY AND OLLY

them," said Oily, who was just then very
much in love with a white kitten, and
thought there were no creatures so delightful
as pussies.

"Well, suppose you don't make up your
mind about Aunt Emma's polly till you've
seen her," said Mrs. Norton. " Now sit
down on the rug there and let us have a
talk."

Down squatted the children on the floor
opposite their mother, with their little heads
full of plans and their eyes as bright as
sparks.

" I'll take my cart and horse," began Oily,
" and my big ball, and my whistle, and my
wheelbarrow, and my spade, and all my books,
and the big scrap-book, and

"You can't, Oily!" exclaimed Milly.
"Nurse could never pack all those up.
There'd be no room for our clothes. You
can take your whistle, and the top, and the
picture-books, and I can take my dolls.
That'll be quite enough, won't it, mother?"

" Quite enough," said Mrs. Norton. " If
it's fine weather you will hardly want any
toys. But now, look here, children," and she



MAKING PLANS 21

held up the map. " Shall I show you how
we are going to get to the mountains ? "

"Oh yes," said Milly ; "that'll be like
my geography lesson come, Oily. Now
mother '11 teach you geography, like Fraulein
does me."

"That's lessons," said Oily, with half a
pout, " not fun a bit. It's only girls like
lessons boys never do : Jacky doesn't, and
Francis doesn't, and I don't."

"Never mind about its being lessons,
Oily. Come and see if it isn't interesting,"
said Mrs. Norton. "Now, Milly, find Wil-
lingham."

Willingham was the name of the town
where Milly and Oliver lived. It is a little
town in Oxfordshire, and if you look long
enough on the map you may find it, though I
won't promise you.

"There it is," said Milly triumphantly,
showing it to her mother and Oily.

" Quite right. Now look here," and Mrs.
Norton took a pencil out of her pocket and
drew a little line along the map. " First of
all we shall get into the train and go to a
place called look, Milly."



22 MILLY AND OLLY

" Bletchley," said Milly, following where
the pencil pointed. " What an ugly name ! "

" It's an ugly place," said Mrs. Norton, " so
perhaps it doesn't deserve a better name.
And after Bletchley look again, Milly."

"Rug-by," said Milly, reading the names
as her mother pointed, " and then Stafford,
and then Crewe what a funny name,
mother! and then Wigan, and then War-
rington, and then Lan-caster. Ox-en-holme,
Kendal, Wind-er-mere. Oh, mother, what a
long way ! Why, we've got right to the top
of England."

" Stop a bit, Milly, and let me tell you
something about these places. First of all
we shall get out of the train at Bletchley,
and get into another train that will go faster
than the first. And it will take us past all
kinds of places, some pretty and some ugly,
and some big and some small. At Stafford
there is an old castle, Milly, where fierce
people lived in old days and fought their
neighbours. And at Crewe we shall get out
and have our dinner. And at Wigan all the
trees grow on one side, as if some one had
come and given them a push in the night ; and



MAKING PLANS 23

at Lancaster there's another old castle, a very
famous one, only now they have turned it into
a prison, and people are shut up inside it.
Then a little way after Lancaster you'll begin
to see some mountains, but first you'll see
something else just a little bit of blue sea,
with mountains on the other side of it. And
then will come Windermere, where we shall
get out and drive in a carriage. And we
shall drive right into the mountains, Oily,
till they stand up all round us with their
dear, kind old faces that mother has loved ever
since she was a baby."

The children looked up wonderingly at
their mother, and they saw her face shining
and her eyes as bright as theirs, as if she too
was a child going out for a holiday.

"Oh! And, mother," said Oily, "you'll
let us take Spot. She can go in my box."

Now Spot was the white kitten, so Milly
and mother began to laugh.

" Suppose you go and ask Spot first
whether she'd like it, Oily," said Mrs. Norton,
patting his sunburnt little face.



CHAPTER II

A JOURNEY NORTH

MILLY and Oliver lived at Willingham,
a little town in Oxfordshire, as I have
already told you. Their father was a doctor,
and they lived in an old-fashioned house, in a
street, with a long, shady garden stretching
away behind it. Milly and Oliver loved their
father, and whenever he put his brown face
inside the nursery door, two pairs of little feet
went running to meet him, and two pairs of
little hands pulled him eagerly into the room.
But they saw him very seldom ; whereas their
mother was always with them, teaching them
their lessons, playing with them in the garden,
telling them stories, mending their frocks,
tucking them up in their snug little beds at
night, sometimes praising them, sometimes
scolding them ; always loving and looking



24



A JOURNEY NORTH 25

after them. Milly and Oily honestly believed
that theirs was the best mother in the whole
world. Nobody else could find out such nice
plays, or tell them such wonderful stories, or
dress dolls half so well. Two little neighbours
of theirs, Jacky and Francis, had a poor, sick
mother who always lay on the sofa and could
hardly bear to have her little boys in the room
with her. Milly and Oliver were never tired
of wondering how Jacky and Francis got on
with a mother like that. " How funny, and
how dreadful it must be ! Poor Jacky and
Francis ! " It never came into their heads to
say " Poor Jacky 's mother," too, but then you
see they were such little people, and little
people have only room in their heads for a
very few thoughts at a time.

However, Milly had been away from her
mother a good deal lately. About six months
before my story begins she had been sent to
school, to a kindergarten, as she was taught
to call it. And there Milly had learnt all
kinds of wonderful things : she had learnt how
to make mats out of paper blue mats, and
pink mats, and yellow mats, and red mats ;
she had learnt how to make a bit of soft clay



26 MILLY AND OLLY

look like a box, or a stool, or a bird's nest
with three clay eggs inside it ; she had begun
to add up and take away ; and, above all, she
had begun to learn geography, and Fraulein
for Milly's mistress was a German, and had a
German name was just now teaching her
about islands, and lakes, and capes, and pen-
insulas, and many other things that all little
girls have to learn about some time or other,
unless they wish to grow up dunces.

As for Milly's looks, I have told you already
that she had blue eyes and a turn-up nose
and a dear sensible little face. And she had
very thick fair hair, that was always tumbling
about her eyes and making her look, as nurse
told her, like " a yellow owl in an ivy bush."
Milly loved most people, except perhaps John
the gardener, who was rather cross to the
children, and was always calling to them not
to walk on the beds and to be sure not to
touch any of the fruit or flowers. She loved
her father and her mother ; she loved Oily
with all her whole heart, though he was a
tease; she loved her nurse, whom she and
Oily called Nana, and who had been with
them ever since Milly was born ; and she



A JOURNEY NORTH 27

loved Fraulein, and was always begging
flowers from her mother that she might take
them to school for Fraulein's table. So you
see Milly was made up of loving. And she
was a thoughtful little girl, too, tidy with her
dress, quick and quiet at her lessons, and
always ready to sit still with her fairy-book or
her doll when mother was busy or tired. But
there were two things in which Milly was not
at all sensible, in spite of her sensible face.
She was much too ready to cry when any
Little thing went wrong, and she was dread-
fully afraid of creatures of all sorts. She was
afraid of her father's big dog, she was afraid of
the dear brown cow that lived in the field
beyond the garden, she was afraid of earwigs.
I am even ashamed to say she was afraid of
spiders. Once she ran away as if a lion were
behind her from a white kitten that pulled her
dress with its frolicsome paws to make her
play with it ; but that, Milly would tell you,
was " when I was little," and she was quite
sure she was a good deal braver now.

Now, what am I to tell you about Oily ?

Oily was just a round ball of fun and mis-
chief. He had brown hair, brown eyes, a



28 MILLY AND OLLY

brown face, and brown hands. He was
always touching and meddling with everything,
indoors and out, to see what was inside it, or
what it was made of. He liked teasing Milly,
he liked his walks, he liked his sleep in the
morning, he liked his dinner, he liked his tea,
he liked everything in the world, except learn-
ing to read, and that he hated. He could
only do one thing besides mischief. He could
sing all kinds of tunes quick tunes, slow
tunes, sad tunes, and merry tunes. He had
been able to sing tunes ever since he was
quite a tiny baby, and his father and mother
often talked together of how, in about a year,
he should be taught to play on the piano, or
perhaps on the violin, if he liked it better.
You might hear his sharp, shrill little voice
singing about the house and the garden all
day long. John the gardener called it
" squealin'," and told Oily his songs were
" capital good " for frightening away the birds.
Now, perhaps, you know a little more about
Milly and Oily than you did when I began to
tell you about them, and it is time you should
hear of what happened to them on that wonder-
ful journey of theirs up to the mountains.



A JOURNEY NORTH 29

First of all came the packing up. Milly
could not make up her mind about her dolls ;
she had three Rose, Mattie, and Katie ; but
Rose's frocks were very dirty, Mattie had a
leg broken, and Katie's paint had been all
washed off one wet night when Oily left her
out on the lawn. Now which of these was the
tidiest and most respectable doll to take out on
a visit ? Milly did not know how to settle it.

" I think, Nana," she said at last to her
nurse, who was packing the children's trunk,
" I will take Katie. Mother always sends us
away when we get white faces to make us look
nice and red again ; so, perhaps, if I take Katie
her colour will come back too, you know."

"Perhaps it will, Miss Milly," said nurse,
laughing ; " anyhow, you had better give me
the doll you want directly, for it is time I
packed all the toys now. Now, Master Oily,
you know I can't let you take all those things."

For there was Oily dragging along his
wheelbarrow heaped up with toys with one
hand, and his cart and horse with a box of
bricks standing up in it with the other. He
would not listen to what Milly said about it,
and he would scarcely listen to nurse now.



30 MILLY AND OLLY

" I can't do without my toys, Nana. I
must do mischief if you won't let me take all
my toys ; I can't help it."

" I haven't got room for half those, Master
Oily, and you'll have ever so many new things
to play with when we get to Ravensnest."

"There'll be the new children, Oily," said
Milly, " and the little rivers and all the funny
new flowers."

" Those aren't toys," said Oily, looking ready
to cry ; " I don't know nothing about them."

" Now," said nurse, making a place in the
box, " bring me your bricks and your big ball
and your picture-books. There, that's all I
can spare you."

" Wait one minute," said Oily, rushing off ;
and just then Mrs. Norton called nurse away
to speak to her in the drawing-room. When
nurse came back she saw nobody in the
nursery. Milly had gone out in the garden,
Oily was nowhere to be seen. And who had
shut down the trunk, which was open when
she left it ? " Me-ow " sounded very softly
from somewhere close by.

" Why Spot ! Spot ! " called nurse.

" Me-ow, me-ow," came again ; a sad, choky


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