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I. M. E. (Isabella Margaret Elizabeth) Blandin.

History of higher education of women in the South prior to 1860. online

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Institute was established.

At the regular meeting of the board, on June 2,
1900, after due deliberation, the board decided to make
a deed and convey the real estate and premises owned
by the board to Charles L. Cocke and the legal repre-
sentative of Charles H. Cocke, or to such corporation
as they may designate. They also transferred to the
grantee, in the deed mentioned, the right to use the
title " Hollins Institute."

The General Assembly of Virginia, during its ses-
sion for 1901, granted a new charter to the corpora-
tion known as Hollins Institute, and in pursuance of
the foregoing resolutions a deed was executed grant-
ing and conveying to the new corporation premises,
property, and franchises formerly held by the " Trus-
tees of Hollins Institute." Under this new charter,
Hollins Institute is empowered to hold funds and prop-
erty to the amount of $300,000. Extensive and costly
improvements have been made, wholly, however, by
private means, and the school is finely equipped.

Instruction is offered in the following departments:
English, Latin, Greek, French, German, history and
political economy, moral science, the English Bible,
mathematics, physics, chemistry, astronomy, botany,
physiology and hygiene, music (pianoforte, voice cul-
ture, organ, violin, theoretical studies), art (drawing,
painting, history of art), elocution and physical cul-
ture, stenography, typewriting, and bookkeeping.
These departments are separate and distinct, each con-
ducted by a professor, with such assistance as may be
demanded. Each department being distinct, the pupil
may, at her option, become a candidate for graduation
in any one or all of them.

The degree conferred is A. B. A certificate of dis-
tinction is given after satisfactory examination in any
study in which the student does not receive a certificate
of proficiency or a diploma. A certificate of proficiency



OF WOMEN IN THE SOUTH 325

is given after satisfactory examination upon certain
special studies, either not included in the course for
diploma, or upon certain portions of the regular de-
partments. A diploma is awarded after satisfactory
examinations of the prescribed course. The presi-
dent's medal for scholarship is awarded to a student
of the regular collegiate department who has three
senior classes, and has maintained the highest stand in
daily recitation and examinations, and who has a gen-
eral average of 90 per cent.

The two literary societies are Euzelian and Eupian.
The Euzelian Society founded the Euzelian Scholar-
ship in 1896, designed to assist deserving but needy
students in attaining higher training in English and
other branches of a liberal course of instruction. The
Eupian Scholarship was founded in 1900, for a simi-
lar purpose.

For many years the societies had charge of the li-
brary, and maintained it. In 1882 the alumnae asso-
ciation permanently established it for the school at
large. It is self-supporting, dependent on the fees
paid by the students. The reading-room is under the
same management, and is provided with newspapers,
literary, religions, and scientific magazines, among
which are French, German, and British periodicals.

(The material for this sketch was obtained from the
catalogue of 10,04-05, and from the Hollins Quarterly,
both sent by Miss Helen Steiner of Montgomery, Ala-
bama, a student in Hollins Institute.)

Rowlings Institute, Charlottesville, Virginia,
185^-1908

The Albemarle Institute, now Rawlings Institute,
was established in 1857 by the Albemarle Association
(Baptist), chiefly through the efforts of Prof. John
Hart and Dr. A. E. Dickinson. In 1875 Prof. R. H.
Rawlings purchased a three-fourths interest in the
property and conducted the school successfully for a



326 HISTORY OF HIGHER EDUCATION

number of years. In 1897 Mr. Rawlings donated his
interest in the property to the Baptist denomination,
through trustees named by him. These trustees pur-
chased the remaining interest and now hold the prop-
erty in trust for the denomination.

The course of study is divided into two departments,
preparatory and collegiate. In the latter there are ten
distinct schools besides the departments of music, art,
elocution, physical culture, and stenography and type-
writing. Each student may select one or more of
these by advice of parent or guardian. The time re-
quired for graduation in each of these varies from two
to four years, depending upon the qualifications of the
pupil at time of entrance. Graduation in eight of the
ten schools is required for the degree of M. A.

The degrees are scientific, literary, B. A. and M. A.
Diplomas are conferred upon all pupils who have
passed successfully both intermediate and final exam-
inations of any of the several schools, or have com-
pleted the prescribed courses in music, physical culture,
and elocution departments.

Special arrangements have been made whereby
young ladies may take exactly the same work at the
Institute and stand, on the same day, the same exam-
inations as the University of Virginia in the B. A.
courses in Latin, French, German, Italian, and Span-
ish. The examination papers will be submitted to the
University authorities and passed upon by them, and
a certificate signed by the professor given to the suc-
cessful candidate.

Five gold medals are given by the Institute, viz. :
scholarship, piano, voice culture, art and physical cul-
ture, and elocution medals.

The Browning Medal is given by Dr. J. H. Brown-
ing of Charlottesville, Virginia. It will be awarded
to the pupil who shall make the highest general average
on class-work and examinations in the department of
elocution, on subjects of lung gymnastics, and physiol-
ogy and physical culture. The candidates for this



OF WOMEN IN THE SOUTH 327

medal will be required to submit essays on some rele-
vant subject assigned by the teacher.

A system of annual scholarships and half scholar-
ships has been established. The emoluments of these
are $60 and $30 per year. The donors of these make
the gifts every year or every year for a specified time.
Appointment is made by the donor or by the president.

Two of these scholarships are now available The
Dr. W. B. Gray Scholarship, established by Dr. W. B.
Gray of Richmond, Virginia, in memory of his wife.
Emoluments, $60 a year. Appointment by donor.
Also the Alphonso and Virginia Carver Scholarship,
established by Mr. T. P. Carver of Charlottesville,
Virginia, in honor of his children whose names it bears.
Emoluments, $60 a year. Appointment by the presi-
dent.

There have been started a series of permanent
scholarships, only one of which has been fully estab-
lished. Messrs. Bedford Glascock, George B. West.
B. F. Johnson, and Z. H. Rawlings, donors.

The equipment consists in part of a commodious and
well-equipped gymnasium and art hall, music-rooms, a
reading-room, and a chapel.

(This sketch has been prepared from catalogues.)

Martha Washington College, Abingdon, Virginia,
i86o-ipo8

This college was projected by the Odd Fellows, in
1859, but before the buildings were completed they
transferred the property to the Virginia Conference,
Methodist Episcopal Church South, and the school was
organized in 1860 as a Conference school, with Rev.
W. G. Harris president. The first board of trustees,
in part, were Messrs. G. W. L. Litchfield, M. Hoof-
naugh, T. G. McConnel, E. Longley, and Judge N. I.
Campbell. The first diplomas were granted to the
class of 1863.

The school was closed two or three years during the



HISTORY OF HIGHER EDUCATION

War between the States, but was opened to pupils
again in 1865, with Rev. W. G. Harris president
He retained the position until his death, and was suc-
ceeded by his daughter, Miss Mattie Harris.

This school was commenced so short a time before
the great upheaval, it can scarcely be classed with the
old schools of the South ; but its very existence is only
another evidence of the interest taken by Southern
people in the higher education of women, long before
other sections aroused to the importance of this work.
The school continues. It is a modern school with all
modern equipments and ideas.



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Online LibraryI. M. E. (Isabella Margaret Elizabeth) BlandinHistory of higher education of women in the South prior to 1860. → online text (page 24 of 24)