Idaho) Boise Commercial Club (Boise.

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the state would be complete without
some reference to the magnificent water
power afforded by her many streams.
The Snake, Boise, Payette, Weiser and
a score of other rivers possess the vol-
ume and the fall necessary to develop
power sufficient to turn the wheels of




Lumber Mill, Boise



the world's commerce. Here, too, are favorable sites for
building dams. In fact, the utilization of this incalculable
power is entirely feasible, needing only the action of cap-
ital for its development. Already several plants draw their
power from the harnessed torrents of the river. At Swan
Falls, on the Snake River, 25 miles south of the city, 10,000
horse power is developed, applied to the operation of the
Interurban Railroad and to furnishing light for Nampa
and Caldwell. On the Payette River, 21 miles from Boise,
the Horse Shoe Bend Power Plant developes 2,000 h. p.,
supplying light for the city. The Barber Lumber Mill de-
velops 1,000 h. p., utilized to operate its own plant, and
transmitted to one of the street railways and for lighting
purposes. A project at Oxbow, on the Snake, proposes to
take 30,000 actual horse power from the river, to be used
for power and lighting in near-by communities. And this
is but the beginning.

Boise the Head and Center

much, then, for the resources of the
country tributary to the city of Boise.
Certainly the significant question,
"What is back of Boise," is exhaustive-
ly satisfied. Everything is back of
Boise such marvelous magnitude and
such tremendous possibilities that in
their aggregate, the mind utterly fails
to grasp them ! And of it all Boise is the acknowledged
head. Every acre that is reclaimed by an irrigating ditch
adds to its wealth. Every ounce of gold taken from the
mines of Idaho, every tree felled, every horse power de-





Entrance Pierce Park, on Boise and Interurban Electric Line.



veloped makes for the progress and prosperity of the
metropohs-Bo.e. This is merely the workin/out of a

denr^T?, ^^ ^ The state nt is not made to
deprecate the standing of any other community. Idaho
has hundreds of progressive towns, sharing the common
prospenty and playing their part in the development of



the state But none of them is a competitor of Boise
None challenges its proud place as metropolis

( reat as is the prestige that attaches to the position

1 capital of the sovereign state of Idaho, of far greater

importance is the strategic position held by Boise as the

icial center and principal distributing point between



Page 44



BOISE, IDAHO



Salt Lake City on the east and Portland on the west.
Conceive, if you can, the significance of the fact : its value
to Boise's banks, wholesale houses, its corporations and
its business men.

Granted that this vast area is an undeveloped one, it
is also true that, by reason of the stupendous reclamation
of desert land, and its rapid occupancy by settlers, this
region is developing far more rapidly than other sections
of the United States. Indeed, it is doubtful if any other sec-
tion of corresponding area has ever made such rapid pro-
gress. Had this growth occurred simultaneously with the
development of other regions, as Western Oregon, Southern
California, et al., Boise would today be a city of 200,000
inhabitants. That she will reach that mark and exceed
it, is the confident belief of every one at all familiar with
the conditions that make cities grow. Today Boise num-
bers between 28,000 and 30,000 people, all enjoying to the
highest degree the health and prosperity of their fair city.
If "position is power, and the right place on the map a
guarantee of greatness," Boise must be destined to become
one of the great cities of the West. This is the inevitable
conclusion reached by all who give the question careful con-
sideration, and here, again, for the farmer, the banker, the
business man, the situation spells "opportunity." Indeed,
it would be difficult to imagine a condition of life and
environment at once more attractive and more intrinsically
prophetic of future greatness. For this is not only Boise
and Idaho, but it is a part of the great West toward
which the "course of empire" has been making for cen-
turies past and which, unless all signs fail, is soon to come
into its own as the most attractive, the most fertile and
the most wonderful part of the world. Let us now look at
Boise as a city in more detail.




"Boise the Beautiful"

OISE THE BEAUTIFUL" is not a mean-
ingless catchword, but an expression
coined in the mint of reality. The first
impression of the visitor to Boise is that
of the physical loveliness of the city a
loveliness due in part to the endow-
ments of a beneficent nature an en-
vironment that provides a fit setting
and in part to the municipal pride of the citizen. The
broad streets, paved and kept scrupulously clean ; the
numerous shade trees; the many beautiful homes, sur-
rounded by well-groomed lawns and beds of blooming
flowers; the splendid appearance of the business blocks;
together with the total absence of those disreputable
shacks and eye-sores that destroy the beauty of many
a city. All these things combine to produce a picture
of loveliness that clings to the memory as a permanent
impression.

Boise is a wholesale and manufacturing center of con-
siderable importance to the Northwest generally, and of
first rank in the Inland Empire. It has 18 wholesale
houses, which handle practically all lines but drugs. Dur-
ing the past six months of 1908 two new houses, with n
combined capital of $200,000.00, were established there by
outside people. New money such as this is constantly com-
ing into the city from many different sources. The whole-
sale business of Boise from June, 1907, to June, 1908, was
$4,310,000.00, the pay roll during that time was $280,290.00,
and the number of men employed 271, an average of
$1,034.00 to the man. The total capital invested in the
wholesale business is $1,216,700.00.




Churches, Boise.



Page 46



BOISE, IDAHO



Boise's manufacturing business is now but a pigmy to
what it will be in ten years; nevertheless, its size is al-
ready commendable, and it grows rapidly. Electric power
is cheap there, power lines which will transmit to exceed
200,000 horse power are headed for Boise, and there is al-
ready over 40,000 horse power ready for use there. This
is generated by the water falls in that vicinity. The total
value of Boise's manufactured products during the year
ending June, 1908, was 1,734,284.00, the capital stock in-
vested $6,160,230.00, the pay roll $529,685.00, and the
number of men employed 625. These figures partially an-
swer the question, What is behind Boise? They are taken
from the statements of the companies.





One of Boise's Industrial Enterprises



Climate

HAT climatic conditions are a big asset in
the success of any community, none will
deny. Of course, men will live wherever
is afforded the opportunity to make a
living; but, other things being equal,
surely any rational man or woman would
prefer to live in a country where six days
out of the seven are sunny days ; where
the Winters are without the severe cold that bites to the
very marrow, the Summers without the extreme heat that
enervates and prostrates, and where there are no heavy
winds or severe storms, floods or tornadoes.

The following statement, prepared by the U. S. Weather
Bureau, at Boise, conveys statistical information of
weather conditions for Boise and the near-by country:

The climate of Boise is much milder than that of places
in the same latitude east of the Rocky Mountains. The
records kept at the local office of the U. S. Weather
Bureau show the mean temperature for the year to be 51
deg.. which is only about 1 deg. lower than the mean for
Springfield, Illinois. Comparison with the distribution of
temperature throughout the year, however, shows that the
average January in Boise is 3 deg. cooler than Springfield.
The temperature occasionally, about once in three years,
goes a little below zero, but at such times there is almost
entire absence of wind, and very little discomfort results.
Often there are long periods in the Winter months where
the temperature does not fall to the freezing point. The
mean minimum temperature in Winter is about the siunr
as that at Fredericksburg, Va., or Stillwater, Okla. Oc-
casionally the temperature goes above 100 deg. in Sum-




= ^^^=

Teams leaving Boise for Thunder Mountain mining district.




The building in the upper left hand corner is the Carnegie Library, Boise. The other buildings are Boise public schools.




Idanha. Hotel, Boise.



Page 50



BOISE, IDAHO



mer, but this is for only a short time in the afternoon,
the temperature falling rapidly after sunset. The nights
are ordinarily delightfully cool, the mean temperature for
July being about the same as that at Duluth, Minn. The
high temperatures are accompanied by very low relative
humidity, and sunstroke is practically unknown.

Mean Temperature

Mean Maximum Temperature

Mean Minimum Temperature

Average Precipitation

No. of days with rain or snoy

No. of clear days

No. of partly cloudy days

No. of cloudy days

Average Hourly Wind Velocity...

The absence of high winds is an important feature of
the climate of Boise. The average movement of the wind
is about five miles an hour, or about one-third less than
the average at Denver. Windows may safely be left open
nearly the year round, and discomfort from the wind is al-
most unknown.

The accompanying table of meteorological data is taken
from the records of the local office of the U. S. Weather
Bureau at Boise, and covers the period from the opening of
the office, in December, 1898, to the close of May, 1908.

The healthfulness of Boise is proverbial. With an alti-
tude of 2,800 feet, the air is clear and ivigorating. Many



a sufferer from the East or Middle West has found here a
relief from the malaria and the catarrhal affections that
have made life miserable for him. Among the soldiers at
Boise Barracks the U. S. Government has found a lower
death rate and a greater freedom from disease than at
any other Army post in the United States.



JAN.


FEB.


MARCH


APRIL


MAY


JUNE


JULY


AUG.


SEPT.


OCT.


Nov.


DEC.


YEAR


33


36


43


50


57


64


73


71


62


53


43


33


51


38


44


52


62


69


78


89


87


77


65


52


40


63


26


27


34


39


45


51


57


56


47


41


33


26


40


1.89


1.42


1.44


1.18 1


.29


0.88


0.18


0.16


0.41


1.28


0.86


1.72


12.71


13


10


14


7


7


5


2


2


3


8


10


11


92


5


6


6


8


9


13


22


19


18


15


8


8


137


8


8


10


11


13


11


7


9


8


8


9


8


110


18


14


15


11


9


6


2


3


4


8


13


15


118


4


5


6


6


6


5


5


4


4


4


4


4


5



Railroads

: OISE is on a branch of the Oregon Short
Line, 19 miles from the main line at
Nampa. Survey has been made for the
construction of the main line directly
through Boise. Promoters are now
working on a project from Boise to
Butte, and from Boise to Winnemucca,
with great promise of success. If built,
this line will place Boise but 400 miles from Butte and 600
miles from San Francisco. It will connect at Butte with





Churches, Boise.




Scenes in Pierce Park, Boise.



BOISE, IDAHO



Page 53



the Great Northern, the Northern Pacific, the Milwaukee
& St. Paul and the C., B. & Q. At Winnemucca it would
connect with the Western Pacific and the Southern Pacific,
thus making a connecting link for the great trans-con-
tinental lines of the North and South. Another one of
the great trans-continental systems is headed in her direc-
tion. With the building of these lines, Boise will possess
the railroad facilities that she deserves.

Facts About Boise

[OISE has four miles of streets with hard
surface pavements asphalt and bitu-
lithic and 50 miles of cement sidewalk.
An excellent fire department is support-
ed, with three stations, provided with
every device for controlling fires. The
total loss by fire for 1907 was only
$12,500.00 a showing so satisfactory
that a decrease of 20 cents per $100.00 was made by the
insurance people. An efficient police force is maintained,
and crime and vice are reduced to the lowest degree. The
Sunday closing of saloons is strictly enforced. In fact,
municipal conditions are of the best, quite free from the
corruption that has tainted the fair name of so many
cities of our land.

The streets are adequately lighted by electricity, which
is also furnished for domestic use. Water, pure and cold,
is supplied, and what is indeed a unique distinction, nat-
ural hot water flows from subterranean reservoirs, and is
used for heating and domestic purposes in the business
houses and homes of the city. This water, at a tempera-
ture of 170 degrees, is taken from three artesian wells,




394 feet, 405 feet and 455 feet deep respectively, produc-
ing 800,000 gallons every 24 hours. This water is used
for heating many of the residences and business blocks of
the city, and many of the streets of the city are sprinkled
with it.

This water, tempered to the desired degree, is used in
Boise 's famous Natatorium an institution that is, properly
enough, a feature of the city. In this palatial structure,
of Moorish architecture, is housed the second largest in-
door swimming tank in America. The plunge alone is 122
feet by 60 feet, of graded depth. With 60 private rooms
for the bathers, commodious parlors, reading room, smok-
ing and billiard rooms, banquet hall, a spacious ballroom,




Wholesale House, Boise.



Page Bi



BOISE, IDAHO



and the environment of beautiful landscape, the Natato-
rium contributes in no small degree to the enjoyment of
life in Boise.

To say of a city that it is a "city of homes" is to be
guilty of unoriginality. Perhaps the homes of Boise are
no better than those of other cities. But the least that
can be said is decidedly to their credit, and one of the
lasting impressions of Boise is of the attractiveness, the
architectural fitness, and the undeniable "hominess" of its
residences. Its business streets are especially noteworthy,
lined as they are with modern commercial buildings, ar-
tistically designed and substantially constructed. The
Overland Building, Boise City National Bank Building,
Sonna Block, Idanha Hotel, Idaho Trust and Savings
Building, etc., etc., are admirable types of modern muni-
cipal architecture.

The hotel facilities are at least equal to those of any
city of its size, but further provision for its guests and
accommodation for the great number of tourists who
throng to Boise is being made in the prospective erection
of a magnificent new hotel to cost $300,000.00. A well-
located site covering an entire block has been purchased
at a cost of $100,000.00, and work is to be started, in all
probability, before this publication reaches the public.
Under erection also is the new Pinney Theater, at a cost
of $100,000.00, which will provide adequately for the many
first-class companies that visit the city. There is building,
too, the one million dollar State Capitol to furnish a suit-
able home for the Solons of Idaho ; of dignified beauty is
the U. S. Federal Building, holding the P. 0., the Weather
Bureau, Land Office, etc. Though this building has been
completed but three years, the city has already outgrown



it, and Congress has appropriated $125,000 for an addition.
The Assay Office (referred to under section on Mining),
with its setting of stately trees and wide expanse of vel-
vety sward, always attracts attention, as does the Public
Library, built in 1905 at a cost of $25,000.00, containing
7,500 volumes, a well-equipped reading-room, etc.

Many of these buildings, as well as the residences of
the city, are built of an excellent native building stone,
quarried a few miles from Boise, or from the superior
pressed brick, manufactured from clay found in the
vicinity.

Churches and Schools

LL of the prominent church denomina-
tions are to be found in Boise, some with
two or three distinct organizations, and
a great many of the less prominent sects
have churches. Many of these are
housed in edifices of marked beauty and
support ministers of far more than or-
dinary ability. A flourishing branch of
the Y. M. C. A. exists in Boise, owning their own building
and equipment, and with a membership of 400. This
worthy organization receives the heartiest support of the
community.

The citizens of Boise feel that they may justly be proud
of their schools. The eight school buildings represent a
property of $400,000.00. Eighty-two teachers are em-
ployed, 15 in the High School. These receive an aggre-
gate salary of $70,000.00. None but a college or a normal
graduate is engaged. Five years ago there were 2,400
pupils in the schools; now there are 4,000. In that period




II II II 1 1 ,

v *\ "




Boise City National Bank Building. The Boise Commercial Club occupies the entire fourth floor.



Pagj 56



BOISE, IDAHO



the teaching force has been doubled. There are 325 in the
High School at the present time, with a graduating class
for 1908 of 41. High School graduates are accredited in
all colleges that receive on credentials. Domestic Science
and Manual Training are taught, and military drill has
been introduced.

In addition to the public schools, excellent academies
for young women are maintained by the Roman Catholic
and Episcopalian Churches.





The Boise Sash and Door Factory.



In a word, the school facilities of Boise are of the best,
and neither pains or expense is spared to provide equip-
ment and instruction that is inferior to none.

Other Institutions

ONTR1BUTING not a little to the pictur-
esqueness of the city is the military post
maintained there. The U. S. Govern-
ment has recently expended $135,000.00
for the improvement of the Barracks,
and has appropriated $200,000.00 more
for the same purpose. The fact that the
lowest mortality of any Army post in
America was reported from Boise Barracks has been pre-
viously mentioned. Just outside the city there is situated
also the Home for Veterans, where the brave soldier of
a previous day makes his last bivouac, awaiting the final
"taps." The State Penitentiary and the Institution for
the Deaf, Dumb and Blind are also located at Boise.

In the fortunate possession of so many sightly public
buildings, Boise presents a metropolitan appearance, sug-
gesting a population several times greater than she ac-
tually claims.

There can be found no truer index of the prosperity
of a city than its Postoffice records. For 1906 the total
postal receipts for Boise, including deposits from sub-
sidiary offices, were $87,356.00. For 1907, they were
$107,464. That is an annual increase of $20,000.00, or
about 25 per cent. Another significant comparison is that
of the money order business done in 1898 and 1907. In
the former year it amounted to $957,063.00; in the latter
$1,989,075.00. In other words, the money order business



BOISE, IDAHO



Page 57




more than doubled in nine years. Such evidence of the
growth of a city is incontrovertible.

Electric Lines and Parks

OISE is served by three street railways,
operating about 80 miles in and about
the city. Two interurban lines are in-
cluded, one to Caldwell, already complet-
ed, and to Nampa, which is nearing com-
pletion; and other lines and extensions
are projected, and will surely be built.
It is only a matter of a few years when
Boise will be the nucleus for a network of electric lines, for
the country is especially adapted to support a thickly set-
tled population, which, with the many villages, will provide
ample business for the electric lines.

The Boise and Inter-urban Railway, operating the line to
Caldwell, possesses an equipment inferior to none in the
land. It has a private right of way, securely fenced, double
trolley, heavily ballasted roadbed, with 72-pound rails. A
22,000 volt alternating current is used, and the cars, of the
latest design, attain a speed of 45 and 55 miles an hour. In
addition to the passenger business, freight, express and
mail are carried.

On the line is situated Pierce Park, which has recently
been added to the attractions of the city. It is a beautiful
wooded tract of 182 acres, of which 35 acres are occupied
by a charming little lake, equipped with rowboats and
launches. In the park the act of man has effectively util-
ized the provisions of nature. Bosky copses invite the vis-
itor to rest in their shade. Pleasant roads and paths lead



to forest glades, opening at every turn a new vista of
sylvan loveliness. Places for picknickers, refreshment
booths, a dancing pavilion, etc., are to be found, but care
has been taken not to intrude upon the natural beauty of
the spot, which is a conspicuous acquisition to the attrac-
tiveness of the city.

Boise is thus characterized by that which makes the
struggle for existence not only extraordinarily productive,
but attractive as well. It has been shown, we believe, that
the land vields forth its increase in bountiful measure.




A View in the Wholesale District, Boise.



Page 58



BOISE, IDAHO




Hunting and Fishing

T Boise the sportsman enjoys the fullest
opportunity for the pursuit of his favor-
ite pastime. Within a short driving dis-
tance from the city are Shaffer Creek.
Harris Creek, Canyon Creek, Long Tom,
Cottonwood. Rattle Snake, etc., and any
one of which will yield the angler the
rarest sport in the world. All the favor-
ite varieties of trout are here, including the Rainbow and
Dolly Varden, and a few hours' fishing will yield the
angler more than he can carry. In June, July and August
the fish answer readily to the fly.

For the hunter the Quail, Fool Hen, Jack Snipe, Sage
Hen, Ducks and Geese abound ; and, if he seek larger game,
a short trip to the mountains will bring him in reach of
deer and bear, with cougars and bobcats to add zest to the
sport.

The Business of Boise

X previous connection, stress has been
put on the importance of Boise as a finan-
cial center and distributing point. Boise
has six banks whose deposits aggregate
over $6,000.000.00 and "clears" Idaho,
Wyoming and Western Utah.

The wholesale business of Boise has
shown remarkable strides during the
past three years. The investment of new capital, and the
aggressive policies pursued by the jobbers have been instru-




mental in opening up new territory from which Boise was
formerly excluded, owing to conditions of freight rates.

The territory covered by Boise now extends from Poca-
tello on the East to Baker City, Oregon, on the West, and
South as far as Owyhee, Nevada, and North into Pollock
and Goff, Idaho.

There are some fifty-seven traveling men who travel
from Boise, and do business of approximately six million
dollars per annum.

Some picturesque features, not usually seen in jobbing
(filters, are to be observed in Boise at certain times of the
year, when merchandise is loaded out on pack trains for
distant points in the mountains which are reached only by
narrow trails.

Boise has all sorts of communication with the outer
world by electric and steam lines and the old-fashioned
stage coach, which still continues to roll into this pictur-
esque city.

Although Boise is not primarily a manufacturing center,
yet there are here many thriving concerns producing raw
and finished lumber, sash, door and fixtures, boxes, pressed
brick, beer, liquors, harness, saddlery, roofing, cigars,
candy, oil, glue, etc., etc. Of these the lumber mills, of
which there are five, are the most prominent. The largest
has a capacity of 130,000 feet daily, and in 1907 shipped 700
cars of lumber and finished products. Other statistical
matter might be included, but to small purpose: The op-
portunity for the capitalist along manufacturing lines is
great. Here we have the raw material of greatest
variety and in unlimited quantity ; power is inexhaustible
in the rushing rivers, and a market that is already great
and every day assuming greater proportions. These condi-




Private schools and academies in Boise.



V- -*+




BOISE, IDAHO



Page 61



tions create opportunity, and the man with money or the
man with brains and energy will find here an unparalleled
field where the investment of capital or of energy will yield
richest returns.

Final Word

: UCH, then, is the story of Boise and the


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