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Ill.) Home for the Friendless (Chicago.

Tried and true recipes. The home cook book of Chicago. Comp. from recipes contributed by ladies of Chicago and other cities and towns: published for the benefit of the Home for the Friendless online

. (page 1 of 18)
Online LibraryIll.) Home for the Friendless (ChicagoTried and true recipes. The home cook book of Chicago. Comp. from recipes contributed by ladies of Chicago and other cities and towns: published for the benefit of the Home for the Friendless → online text (page 1 of 18)
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UNIVERSITY OF

ILLINOIS LIBRARY

AT URBANA CHAMPAIGN

OAK STREET

LIBR'^^^FACIUTY



Corner Book Shop

102 Founh Ave.



TRIED x\ND TRUE RECIPES.



THE



HOME COOK BOOK



OF CHIO-A-OO-



COMPILED FROM RECIPES CONTRIBUTED BY LADIES OF CHICAGO AND

OTHER CITIF.S AND TOWNS: PUBLISHED FOR THK HI NKFIT

OF THE HOME FOR THE FRIENDLESS.



With flispatchfnl looks in hrvilc

She turnx, on hoxpilublc thovyhU iiitenl.
What choice, to choose for delicacy brgt,
Whal order, no contrived a^ not to mix
Ttigte not well joined, inelcgnnt, but bring
Taste after taste upheld with kindliest change.

PARADISE LOST,



CHICAGO:

J. FRED. WAGGONER, PUBLISHER.

1874.



Entered according to Act of Congress in the year 1874, by

J. FRED. WAGGONER,
In the Office of the Librarian of Congress at Washington.



coMaiaciAL purr, toluo.







PREFACE.



Good diet, with wisdom, best comforteth man.

— Thomas Tusser.

Sir Thomas Browne has quaintly observed, that at some
time or other we have all been on our own trenchers; and if
the present rendering of science be true in the relation of mat-
ter to mind, it may be a subject of no slight importance how
the psychological units that go to build up our brain and nerve
forces are set before us, and how our 'dinners are cooked may
be a more momentous question than who is to be the next
President.

With all supplied advice upon this subject, there are two
qualities which have been seldom attained in any treatise hith-
erto published upon this science, viz : the art of uniting plain,
simple and practical methods in the preparation of food, with
that finish and perfection of detail, and that delicate blending
of material, which are products of a refined and exquisite per-
ception, and a delicate and sensitive taste. In short, that
"gumption," by which the woman who possesses the genius for
housekeeping graces her table daily with viands that in her
skillful hands become a " perpetual feast of delights." It is just
as easy, for instance, to broil a beefsteak to perfection, as to



•4 PREFACE.

prepare those greasy and indigestible products of unskilled
hands and unsuitable gridirons, so often set before us. It is
just as easy to make biscuits of feathery lightness, (if one only
Icnows just how to do it,) as to prepare those heavy and sour
compounds accepted neither of body nor spirit.

How to unite perfection and simplicity in food, is a problem
that puts many a housekeeper's soul upon the rack. To this
end, the woman of "gumption" has come to the fore with her
experiences, and has inaugurated a new era in the literature
and science of gastronomic art in a class of Cook Books that
supply a want which no treatises hitherto published have ever
filled. These works are made up from recipes in daily use
with experienced housekeepers, in which they have achieved
a success that makes of these methods objects of especial de-
sire among their friends. Although these methods have hith-
erto found their way into our households in the unobtrusive form
of penciled recipes, they are, like Jewish oral law and tradition,
of high — indeed, we may say, of the highest — authority and now
that they are offered to the public in the permanent, convenient
and attractive form of letter-press and binding, we feel assured
of the warm welcome that awaits them from every housekeeper
who may. resort to our Book for advice and suggestion.



VALUABLE RECIPES.



©O^^PS*



" No useless dish our table crowds;
Harmoniously ranged and consonantly just,
As in a concert instruments resound,
Our ordered dishes in their courses chime."

The basis of all good soups, is the broth of meat. This may-
be made by boiling the cracked joints of beef, veal or mutton,
and is best when cooked the day before it is to be eaten. After
putting the meat into the pot, cover it well with cold water and
let it come to a boil, when it should be Well skimmed. Set the
pot where it will simmer slowly until it is thoroughly done, keep-
ing the pot closely covered the while. The next day, when the
soup is cold, remove the fat, which will harden on the top of
the soup. After this, add the vegetables and the herbs you use
for seasoning, cooking all well together. Before sending to the
table, the soup should be strained. A good stock for soups may
be made from shreds and bits of uncooked meat and bones,
poultry and the remains of game. When these are all put to-
gether and stewed down in the pot, the French term it consomme,
and use it chiefly in the preparation of brown soups.

Soups may be varied in many ways, chiefly in the kinds of
vegetables and different seasoning used, — as in herbs, burned
caramel, eggs or slices of bread fri -d to a crisp in butter, -which
impart a savory relish.



THE HOME COOK BOOK. -

s



BEEF SOUP.

Mrs. Wm. H. Low.

Cut all the lean off the shank, and with a little beef suet in
the bottom of the kettle, fry it to a nice brown ; put in the bones
and cover with water ; cov^r the kettle closely ; let it cook slow-
ly until the meat drops from the bones ; strain through a colan-
der and leave it in the dish during the night, which is the only
way to get off all the fat. The day it is wanted for the table,
fry as brown as possible a carrot, an onion and a very small tur-
nip sliced thin. Just before taking up, put in half a teaspoonful
of sugar, a blade of mace, six cloves, a dozen kernels of allspice,
a small teaspoonful of celery seed. With the vegetables this
must cook slowly in the soup an hour; then strain again for the
table. If you use vermicelli or pearl barley, soak in water.



JULIENNE SOUP.

M. A. T.

Shred two onions and fry brown in a half spoon of butter ;
add a little mace, salt and pepper; then a spoonful or so of
stock ; rub a tablespoonful of flour smooth with a little butter
and let fry with the onions ; strain through a colander, then add
more stock as desired ; cut turnip, carrot and celery in fillets ;
add a few green peas ; boil tender in a little water and add both
water and vegetables to the soup. If wished, the flour can be
left out, and it will make a clear light colored soup. In that
case, the onions should be cut in fillets and boile;d with the veg-
etables.

MUTTON SOUP.

Mrs. Whitehead.

Boil a leg of mutton three hours ; season to your taste with
salt and pepper, and add one teaspoon of summer savory ; make
a batter of one egg, two tablespoons of milk, two tablespoons of
flour, all well beaten together; drop this batter into the soup
with a spoon and boil for three minutes.



VALUABLE RECIPRR.



VEAL SOUP.

To about three pounds of a joint of veal, which must be well
broken up, put four quarts of water and set it over to boil. Pre-
pare one-fourth pound of maccaroni by boiling it in a dish by
itself, wMth sufficient water to cover it; add a little butter to^the
maccaroni when it is tender ; strain the soup and season to taste
with salt and pepper, when add the maccaroni in the water in
which it is boiled. The addition of a pint of rich milk or cream
and celery flavor is relished by many.

SWISS WHITE SOUP.

. • Anonymous.

Ta rich broth or soup for six persons, when boiling add three
eggs, two spoons of flour and one cup of milk beaten together ;
pour this slowly through a sieve^nto the boiling soup and serve.

TURKEY SOUP.

Anonymous.

Take the turkey bones and cook for one hour in water enough
to cover them; then stir in a litde -dressing and a beaten egg.
Take from the fire and when the water has ceased boHing, add a
little butter with pepper and salt. y

OYSTER SOUP.

M. A. T.

Take one quart of water; one teacup Sf butter; one pint of
milk; two teaspoons of salt; four crackers rolled fine, and one
teaspoon of pepper; bring to full boiling heat as soon as possible,
then add one quart can ofrf)ysters; let the whole come to boiling
heat quickly and remove from the fire.

OYSTER SOUP.

Mrs. T. V. Wadskicr.

Pour one quart of boiling water into a skillet; then one quart
of good rich milk; stir in one teacup of rolled cracker crumbs;



8 THE HOME COOK BOOK.

seasoned with pepper and salt to taste. When all come to a
boil, add one quart of good fresh oysters ; stir well, so as to keep
from scorching; then add a piece of good sweet butter, about
the size of an egg; let it boil up once; then remove from the fire
immediately; dish up and send to table.

LOBSTER SOUP.

Mrs. Robert Harris.

One large lobster or two small ones; pick all the meat from
the shell and chop fine; scald one quart of milk and one pint of
water; then add the lobster, one pound of butter, a tablespoon-
ful of flour and salt and red pepper to taste. Boil ten minutes
and serve hot.

PLAIN CALF'S HEAD SOUP.

Mrs. F. D. J.

Take a calf's head well cleaned, a knuckle of veal, and put
them both into a large kettle; put one onion and a large table-
spoon of sweet herbs, into a cloth and into the kettle, with the
meat over which you have poured about four quarts of water.
If you wish the soup for a one o'clock dinner, put the meat over
to boil as early as eight o'clock in the morning; let it boil steadily
and slowly and season well with salt and pepper. About one
hour before serving, take off the soup and pour it through a col-
ander, pick out all the meat carefully, chop very fine and return
to the soup, putting it again over the fire. Boil four eggs very
hard, chop them fine, and slice one lemt)n very thin, adding at
the very last a glass of wine.

VERMICELLI SOUP.

Anonymous.

A knuckle of lamb, a small piece of veal and water to cover
well; when well cooked season with salt, pepper herbs to your
taste, and a small onion, to which you may add Halford or
Worcestershire sauce, about a tablcspoonful. Have ready one
quarter of a pound of vermicelli, which has been boiled tender;



VALUABLE RECIPES. 9

Strain your soup from the meat, add the vermicelli, let it ])()il
well and serve.

GUMBO SOUP.

Anonymous.

Put on a half a peck of tomatoes in a porcelain kettle aiui let
them stew; have half a peck of ochra cut in fine shreds; put
them with thyme, parsley and an onion cut fine, into the toma-
toes and let them cook until quite tender. Fricassee one chick-
en in ham giftvy ; then take the yolk of four eggs, a litde vinegar,
the juice of one lemon, and seasoning to taste, beating the eggs
into the vinegar; pour this over the chicken, and put all then
into the tomatoes, letting the ketde he nearly filled with water.
Boil all together four or five hours.

OCHRA GUMBO.

Mrs. Andrews.

Two tpiarts of ripe tomatoes and one cjuart of o( hra cut in
small rings; put them over the fire with about three (piarts of
water and let the mixture come to a boil ; take one chicken ; cut
it up and fry brown, with plenty of gravy; put it in with the
ochra and tomatoes; add several small onions chopped fine; salt
and pepper to taste ; a little corn and Lima beans are an im-
provement, if you have them. Let all simmer gently together for
several hours. To be served with a tablespoonful of boiled rice
and green garden pepper cut fine to each soup plate.

TOMATO SOUP.

Mrs. Whitehead.

Boil chicken or beef four hours; then strain ; add to the soup
one can of tomatoes and boil one hour. This w ill make four
tjuarts of soup.

MOCK TURTLE SOUP.

Mrs. C. H. Wheeler.

One soup-bone, one quart of turtle beans, one large spoonful
of powdered cloves, salt and pejiper. Soak the beans over



10 THE HOME COOK BOOK.

night, put them on with the soup-bone in nearly a pail full of
water and cook five or six hours. When half done, add the
cloves, salt and pepper ; when done strain through a colander,
pressing the pulp of the beans through to make the soup the de-
sired thickness, and serve with a few slices of hard-boiled egg
and lemon sliced very thin. The turtle beans are black and can
only be obtained from large grocers.

TOMATO SOUP.

Mrs. B. J". Seward.

To one pint tomatoes canned, or four large raw ones, cut up
fine, add one quart boiling water and let them boil. Then add
one teaspoonful of soda, when it will foam ; immediately add one
pint of sweet milk, with salt, pepper and plenty of butter. When
this boils add eight small crackers rolled fine, and serve. E<:|ual
to oyster soup.

TOMATO SOUP.

Mrs. J. Hudson.

One quart of tomatoes, one soup bone, one onion, one cucum-
ber sliced, two ears of grated corn, salt, pepper and a trifle of
cayenne pepper. Boil four hours, then add one tablespoon of
corn starch dissolved in cold water; strain before serving.

TOMATO SOUP.

Mrs. G. \V. Brayton.

For one gallon of soup, take two and a half quarts good beef
soup, one medium sized carrot, one turnip, one beet and two
onions peeled and cut in pieces; boil the vegetables in the beef
soup three quarters of an hour; strain through a sieve; add a two
quart can of tomatoes and boil fifteen minutes; strain again and
add salt and pepper. While this is cooking, take a sauce-pan
that will hold about six quarts and put in a quarter of a pound
of butter and heat it to a light brown ; add while hot three table-
spoons of flour; take from the fire and mix well together, and
thoroughly; add one desert spoon of sugar and stir until it boils;
boil fifteen minutes and strain.



VALUABLE RECIPES. 11

TOMATO SOUP.

Mrs. L. H. Smith.

Make one gallon beef stock. Take half peck ripe tomatoes,
cut in halves, two carrots, two onions, one turnip cut fine; boil all
together for one hour and a half, then strain all through a fine
sieve ; take a sauce-pan large enough to hold it and put it on the
fire with half pound of butter; heat it until of a light brown color,
and add two spoons of flour, mixing well together; add to. this,
two spoons of white sugar, salt and pepper to suit taste); stir
well until it boils; let it boil and skim it for five minutes and
serve very hot. This receipt serves a large family, usually pre-
pare two quarts of beef stock for a small family, using half the
quantity of ingredients.

GREEN PEA SOUP.

Anonymous.

Four pounds of lean beef cut in small pieces, one-half peck of
green peas, one gallon of water ; boil the empty pods of the peas
in the water one hour ; strain them out ; add the beef and boil
slowly one and a half hours. Half an hour before serving strain
out the meat and add the peas ; twenty minutes later add one-
half cup of rice flour; salt and pepper to taste; and if you
choose, one teaspoonful of sugar. After adding the rice, stir
frequently to prevent burning.

CORN SOUP.

Mrs. W. P. Nixon.
One small beef bone, two quarts of water, four tomatoes,
eight ears of corn ; let the meat boil a short time in the water ;
cut the corn from the cob and put in the cobs with the cut corn
and tomatoes; let it boil about half an hour and ju.st before serv-
ing add the milk, which allow to boil for a few moment only;
season with salt and pepper.

CORN SOUP.

Anonymous.
One quart of corn cut from the cob in thre» pints of water ;
when the grain is quite tender, mix with them two ounces of



12 THE HOME COOK BOOK.



sweet butter rolled in a tablespoon of flour; let it boil fifteen
minutes longer; just before taking up the soup, beat up an egg
and stir in with pepper and salt.

TURTLE BEAN SOUP.

Mrs. A. N. Arnold.
Take a quart of black beans, wash them and put them in a
pot with three quarts of water; boil until thoroughly soft; rub
the pulp through a colander and return it to the pot; add some
thyme in a clean cloth, and let it boil a few minutes for flavor;
slice some hard boiled eggs and drop them into the soup ; add a
little butter, pepper and salt.

BLACK BEAN SOUP.

Mrs. John B. Adams.
Boil the beans and strain them ; at the same time make your
stock (of any kind of meat) saving the best for force meat balls ;
to be well seasoned and fried. Put the bean pulp in with the
stock and boil; add red pepper, salt and a little thyme, tying
it up in a bag to be taken out; cloves to your taste and a little
wine. When ready to serve, put the fried balls into the tureen,
with two or three sliced hard boiled eggs, and a lemon or two,
according to the quantity of soup. Skim out bones and pieces
of meat and pour over.

BLACK BEAN SOUP.

Mrs. H. L. Adams.

One pound of the round of beef, one-half pound of salt pork,
and one quart of black beans; soak the beans twenty-four hours;
chop the beef and pork and boil with the beans, one grated car-
rot and one onion five or six hours; strain and add hard boiled
eggs, salt, pepper and sliced lemon.

BLACK BEAN SOUP.

Mrs. Andrews and others.

Take one quart of beans; cook them over night; put them in
a pot with a large (juantity of water; add a bone of beef or veal;



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VALUABLE RECIPES. 13

Stir fretjuently ; when reduced to a pulp, strain throi^h a colander
and return to the fire, putting in a cjuantity of celery, some red
pepper and onion. This should be done three or four hours
before dinner is ready. The longer the soup simmers the bet-
ter. Force meat balls are a great improvement.

POTATO SOUP.

M. A. T.

Boil five or six potatoes with a small piece of salt pork and a
little celery ; pass through a colander and add milk or cream (if
milk, a little butter) to make the consistency of thick cream ;
chop a little jjarsley fine and throw in ; let boil five minutes ; cut
some dry bread in small dice, fry brown in hot lard ; drain them
and place in the bottom of soup tureen, and pour the soup over;
chop two onions and boil with the soup, if liked.

FORCE MEAT BALLS FOR BLACK BEAN SOUP.

Mrs. Baushar.

Take cold meat ; chop very fine ; add flour enough to make it
stick together in balls about the size of a walnut ; roll in flour
and fry until brown, and add to the soup just before it is served.

FORCE MEAT BALLS.

Mrs. James S. Gibbs.

Mix with one pound of chopped veal or other meat one egg, a
little butter or raw pork chopped fine, one cup or* less of bread
crumbs ; the whole well moistened with warm water, or what is
better, .the water from stewed meat ; season with salt and pep-
per; make in small balls and fry them brown.

EGG BALLS FOR SOUP.

M. A. T.

Boil four eggs; put into cold water.; mash yolks with yolk of
one raw egg, and one teaspoon of flour; pepper, salt and pars-
ley; make into balls and boil two minutes.



14 THE HOME COOK BOOK.

• NOODLES FOR SOUP.

Mrs. F. D. J.

Rub into two eggs as much sifted flour as they will absorb ;
then roll out until thin as a wafer ; dust over a little flour, and
then roll over and over into a roll ; cut off" thin slices from the
edge of the roll and shake out into long strips; put them into
the soup lightly and boil for ten minutes; salt should be added
while mixing with the flour — about a salt spoonful.



Tt&n,



"The silvery fish,
Grazing at large in meadows submarine,
Fresh from the wave now cheers
Our festive board."

— Anon.

Fish are good, when the gills are red, eyes are full, and the
body of the fish is firm and stiff". After washing them well, they
should be allowed to remain for a short time in salt water suffi-
cient to cover them; before cooking, wipe them dry dredge,
lightly with flour, and season with salt and pepper. Salmon,
trout and other small fish are usually fried or broiled ; all large
fish should be put in a cloth, tied closely with twine and then
placed in cold water, when they may be put over the fire "to boil.
AVhen fish are baked, prepare the fish the same as for boiling, and
put in the oven on a wire gridiron, over a dripping pan.

TO BOIL FISH.

Mrs. C. G. Smith.

Put a small onion inside your fish and tie it up in a towel ;
cover it with cold water, salt and a little vinegar, and let it heat



VALUABLE RECIPES. 15



to the boiling point ; from two to three minutes' boiling is suffi-
cient for the largest fish, and a small one will not require more
than one minute. Fish boiled in this way is incomparably bet-
ter than when cooked longer.

A Suggestion. — Boiling salt watti is l)est for salmon, as it
•sets the color. — M. A. T.

BOILED WHITE FISH.

Mrs. Andrews.

Lay the fish open ; put it in a dripping pan, with the back
down; nearly cover with water; to one fish put two tablespoons
salt ; cover tighdy and simmer (not boil) one-half hour ; dress
with gravy, butter and pepper ; garnish y,iih sliced eggs.

For sauce use a piece of butter the size of an egg, one table-
spoon of flour, one-half pint boiling water; boil a few minutes,
and add three hard boiled eggs, sliced.

TURBOT A LA CREME.

Mrs. A. Keith.

Boil a large white fish; pick it uj) fine, taking out the bones;
make a sauce of a quart of milk, a little thyme, a few sprigs of
parsley, a little onion ; simmer together till well flavored ; wet two
ounces of flour and stir in with a (juarter of a pound of butter;
stir until it thickens; then strain it on the yolks of two eggs;
season with pepper and salt. Put some of the sauce in a pudding
dish, then a layer of fish aad so on until the dish is full, putting
sauce on top; cover with rolled crackers and a little grated
cheese, if to the taste; brown in the oven.

SAUCE FOR BOILED FISH.

To one teacup of milk, add one teacup of water; put it on the
fire to scald, and when hot stir in a tablespoonful of flour, prev-
iously wet with cold water; add two or three eggs; season with
salt and pepper, a little celery, vinegar and three tablespoons of
butter. Boil four or five eggs hard, t^e off" the shells, and cut
in slices, and lay over the dish. Then pour over the sauce and
serve.



16 THE HOME COOK BOOK.

BAKED HALIBUT OR SALMON.

Let the fish remain in cold water, slightly salted, for an hour
before it is time to cook it; place the gridiron on a dripping pan
with a little hot water in it and bake in a hot oven; just before
it is done, butter it well on the top, and brown it nicely. The
time of baking depends upon the size of the fish. A small fish
will bake in about half an hour, and a large one in an hour.
They are very nice when cooked as above and served with a
sauce which is made from the gravy in the dripping pan, to
which is added a tablespoonful of catsup and another of some
pungent sauce and the juice of a lemon. Thicken with brown
flour moistened with a little cold water. Garnish handsomely
with sprigs of parsley and currant jelly.



BAKED BLACK BASS.

Mrs. P. B. Ayer.

Eight good sized onions chopped fine; half that tjuantity of
bread crumbs; butter size of hen's egg; plenty of pepper and salt,
mix thoroughly with anchovy sauce until (piite red. Stuff your
fish with this comi)ound and pour the rest over it, pre\ iously
sprinkling a little red pepper over it. Shad, pickerel and trout
are good the same way. Tomatoes can be used instead of an-
chovies, and is more economical. If using them, take park in
place of butter and chop fine.

BROILED WHITE FISH— FRESH.

Mrs. G. E. P.

i Wash and drain the fish; sprinkle with pepper and lay with
the inside down upon the gridiron, and broil over fresh bright
coals. When a nice brown, turn for a moment on the other
side, then talte up and spread with butter. This is a very nice
way of broiling all kinds of fish, fresh or salted. A little smoke
under the fish adds to its flavor. This may be made by putting
two or three cobs under the gridiron.



VALUABLE RECIPES. 17

SALT MACKEREL.

Mrs. F. D. J.

Soak the fish for a few hours in lukewarm water, changing the
water several times; then put into cold water loosely tied in
cloths, and let the fish come to a boil, turning off the water once,
and pouring over the fish hot water from the tea kettle; let
this just come to a boil then take them out and drain them, lay
them on a platter, butter and pepper them, and place them for a
few moments in the oven. Serve with sliced lemons.

BOILED CODFISH— SALT.

Soak two pounds of codfish in lukewarm water over night or
for several hours; change the water several times; about one
hour before dinner put this into cold fresh water, and set over
the fire; let it come to a boil, or just simmer, for fifteen minutes
but not to boil hard, then take out of the water, drain and serve
with egg sauce, or with cold boiled eggs sliced and laid over it,
with a drawn butter or cream gravy poured over all,

CROQUETTES OF FISH.

Take dressed fish of any kind ; separate from the bones, mince


1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

Online LibraryIll.) Home for the Friendless (ChicagoTried and true recipes. The home cook book of Chicago. Comp. from recipes contributed by ladies of Chicago and other cities and towns: published for the benefit of the Home for the Friendless → online text (page 1 of 18)