Copyright
Ill.) Inter-state Publishing Company (Chicago.

History of Wayne County, Indiana : together with sketches of its cities, villages and towns (Volume 1) online

. (page 1 of 67)
Online LibraryIll.) Inter-state Publishing Company (ChicagoHistory of Wayne County, Indiana : together with sketches of its cities, villages and towns (Volume 1) → online text (page 1 of 67)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


Gc fM

977.201 '^'

W36h

v.l

1132110



GffNEALOOY COLLECTieSfi



3 1833 00828 5899



c



GENEALOGY
977.201
W36H
v.l



^^f0^' ,



HISTORY



WAYNE COUNTY,

INDIANA.



TOGETHER WITH SKETCHES OF ITS CITIES, VILLA.GES AND TOWNS,

EDUCATIONAL, RELIGIOUS, CIVIL, MILITARY, AND POLITICAL

HISTORY, PORTRAITS OF PROMINENT PERSONS, AND

BIOGRAPHIES OF REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS.



HISTORY OF india:n:a

AND THE

NORTHWEST TERRITORY.



EMBRACING ACCOUNTS OF THE PRE-HISTORIC RACES, ABORIGINES,

WINNEBAGO AND BLACK HAWK WARS, AND A BRIEF REVIEW

OF ITS CIVIL, POLITICAL AND MILITARY HISTORY.



IliliUSTRATED.



CHICAGO:
INTER-STATE PUBLISHING CO.



i^



1132110



PREFACE.

In presenting the history of Wayne County to the public

we have had in view the preservation of valuable historical

cv facts and information, which with the passing away of old

N^ pioneers, the failure of memory and the loss of public records

would soon iiave been unobtainable. Although the county is

comparatively new, already it was impossible to find many

public documents, but no pains has been spared to make the

"^ history a complete one. We do not claim for it a place in

\ the ranks of advanced literature, but as a book of reference

for the present reader and future generations we have no doubt

its value will be recognized. Conflicting statements have

tended to perplex the compilers. Members of a family, even,

. ^ differ in the spelling of names, contradict each others state-

^ ments in regard to nativity, dates of birth and settlement.

We have endeavored to give the preference to the majority,

and make the work as correct, historically and biographi-

cally, as possible.

The biographical department contains the names and private
sketches of as many of the old settlers as it was possible to
obtain. We would gladly have inserted many more if it had
been possible to obtain them, but through the neglect or in-
difference on the part of the family or the individual, the
matter was not furnished us. However, we think we have
secured some items in regard to the majority of prominent
persons, and feel that we have fulfilled all obligations in this
regard.

We are indebted to " Young's History of Wayne County "
for many im|i<)rtrtnt and interesting events of early history.



We also consider the articles by local writers of especial
interest to tlie reader.

In connection with as complete a county history as it was
possible to obtain, is given a condensed history of the North-
west Territory, and the Territory and State of Indiana, with
many items of National interest.

We trust the work will meet the expectations of onr patrons,
and that as the years go by it will grow in favor and valne.
INTEE-STATE PUBLISHING CO.

Chicago, June, 1884.



TABLE OF CONTENTS.



HISTOKV OF THK NOKTHWKST TKKKITOKV.







1. Capture of Kaskaskia-

: ' .■! hi. Hans' l.v "a^Rnse*-

'larkeV .Mililiiiy Career-A




fork


Lieltr-Hinton, Rne aud HoN
3f 1787-It8 Authors-Sale of



—Laws of the Territorv-Louipluiicuiarv It-stiiiiouial-Indiau War— Wayne's Cam-
paisD. Address and Trc-aty-C\?siou of Lands— Treaty with Spain-ludian Treaties
—Indian Annuities— Purchase of Louisiana— First Territorial Legislature. . .90-106



jeProphet's_ _ ^

the Mississinewa-Ulose of the War-Ciyil and Political Kvents-Population in 1815
—Several Territorial Legislatures- Last Session— Members of Constitutional Con-



HI««TORV OF INDIA



Bone Bank on the Wabash— Plketon Walls— Signal Station— Stone Fort— Fauna—
Animale-Fishes-Birds-Flora-Meteoiology 149-17T

CHAPTER VIII.

State op Ikdiana— Fuom Depesdenoe to I:jdependbnce.

Organization and Bounds- First Ek-clion- Members of First Legislature- General
Progrees- Indian Legend— Water Supply— Internal Improvements— Letter of In-

„,...„,;„„ r. „„„(„„ 'i'"-i-— Financial Embarrassment-Amount of Work Done

,-al of Business-Progress ol Work— Credit of State
178-195

CHAPTER IX.
HE Progress op One Fourth of a Centdrt— The Bra op Internal IsrrBOTEMENT.
Decade Between 1830 and 1840— New Capitol— Toledo iVar and Michigan Boundary

Brown— Battle of Palo Alto— Resuca De La Palma and .Monterey— Campaign of Gen-
eral Scott— Vera Cruz to tbe City of Jlexko-Indiana in the War— State's Progress
—Plank Roads— Railroads— Bank Statement 198-209

CHAPTER X.

«DIANA AND THE WAR FOR THE UNION— ThK RECORD OP BrAVE MeN AND THE RESULT.

Ten Thousand Men in Arms-Thr.e Months' Men-On Their Return— Address of
Wulcome-From the First Six Regiments to the One Hundred and Fifty-Sixth-
Thelr Welcome Home— Colored Troops— Light Artillery- Twenty-six Batteries-
Battles of the Wiir-2ti7,uii0 Men in Arms from Indiana- Their Record and What
They Accomplished— Indiana's Expenses— War Statistics of the United States—
Men in the Union Army— Sixteen American Wars 210-253

CHAPTER XI.



<- Topography— Soil— Altitt



CIIAi'TKR XII.



and 1870— Aggregate of 1880— inrii:



Court .Judges- Speakers of the House of RepreBcutatives- State Officers- Mem-
bers of the House of I{upresentativeB— Sketches of the Governors of Indiana— United
States Senators-Biographical Sketches of Senators 291-313



t, Origin, Names, Etc.- Populatio
1850 to 1880— Valuation, Receipts at
I— Railroads- For Ready Beferent





cation-The Public Schools-Their Pr




livereity-Purdne










tion


8 of Learuin?-State PomologicalSoci








e Capitol-Some Important Laws-So


cial Statistics-Firsi Pa,


)er m Indiana. ..^





CONTENTS.




HISTORY OF WAVSJE COUMTY,




CHAPTER XYI.


.neebHistor'




Early Piomr
rol Years, isn


, ni-!.>r> I<. ,ii.n,i,r„untyandLawreucebnrg,1803-LocU9taEd

"r" ■'.'.'" . ' ' \^''!!'ute~inic''Re°dMen-F?r7t^^^^^^^

'^ -1 - , . . „.l Mauners-Market Prices for Cattle-, H
,:: • , - -^ Financial Depression-Ways of 1820 and S




CHAPTER XVII.



The Life of the Old Pioneer-Their Mode of Living and Incidents of Their
Lives.
Old Time Prices— Sale of Hogs in 18J6-R.ii»ing Bees— Hospitality-Bee Hunting-
Going to Mill— WoU Hnnt-Snakes — Money and Barter- Education - Spelling
Schools- Sugar Making— Marriage Bells — Red Men on the Warpath— Watchful
Care-The Bright Side— What the Pioneers haTe Done— Women Pioneers-Their
Glorious Work— Woman's Work is Never Done— A Peaceful Life— The Close. 371-393

I'HAPTBR XVIII.

-S?u"mlier"i"i' 1 I •-"^\VayneCount™Compared with Other Localities
-Western c>i,iiii.-ii i,. ii,. N,-w World - Ancient Whitewater River -Niagara
Limestone CliaiaLiti ui iliis 1 urmaiion— Glacial Epoch— Value of the Lime Rock
-Abseuceof MineralH-Geolot,'y ^'ud Agriciiltnre 393-401

CHAPTER XIX
Civil History-Official Acts and ToivNeiiir Ok.;anization.

Courts— Firi^t i.\>iiui\ s, .■ I ni!- ' .i (if the Legislature— Removing County
SeattoCeniini!!.; n,: ,. i Records- New Townships-Justices
and Election- Tin i, ihe County's Size-Taxation-Jail—
Centre and Cn-.n r, ,, - ,. >■„ Educational- Clay and Jefferson
Townships— Franklin. Ih-Iiii m.i \ i i li..ii TownBhips- Dalion snd Webster-
Removal of County Seal iiuiu c. uiitMl.. lo Itichmond— The Petition— The Contro-
versy— The Result 402-42B

CHAPTBR XX.

Growth and Resources of Watni; Cot-xTT-OFFiciAL Ltfe-Popct.ation.

—Stock Company— Di-inV; -^.i . > ..•,> - i .i n , isi^ :<- l - i Manufactures—
—Wild Cat Times aiulii; , , , ' ,t',',,ii of Property

Legislators-Internal liii|.,. ■,. n, in ■. r .. ,. - i' vr.'ik. .mi i; n iiIh 437-461

CHAPIEI; XXI.

The Early Settlers' Interest in Education-First School -First School-House- Early
Teachers— Log School-House Described— State Legislation fur the Benefit of Schools
—The District System — Question of Taxation — General Intelligence -Friends'
Schools-New Constitution— Frec.Schools-General View of Educational Progress-
Town and Township Schools from the First to the Present 462-525

CHAPTER XXII.
The Press of Watne Codntt.

The Growth of Modern Journalism— Character and High-standing of Wayne County
Papers— The First Newspaper— Its Successors-Journalism in Richmond Early and



CHAPTER XXin.

^\TNE County Bar.

Distinguished Lawyers of the County- An Honorable Record— Early Practitioners-
First Lawyers oJ Centrcville and Richmond-Biographical Sketches ol Eminent
Lawyers, Lerislators and Judges-Cyrus Pinch-Hon. .Tames Rariden— Lot Bloom-
aeld - J. D. Vaughan-Hon. J. S. Newman-M. M. Ray-Hon. J. B. Ray-Hon. C. B.
Smith— Abner Haynes- Hon. J. W. Borden-J. W. Green-J. B. Stilt— Hon. C. H.



VIII. CONTENTS.




Test-Hon. S. E. Perkins-Hon. J. B Juliau-Hon. G. W. Jalian-Hon. W
-J. P. Siddall-Michael Wilson-Uon. N. H. Johnson-Hon. James Perr
A. Peelle-Hon. O. P. Morton-Gen. W. P. Benton-Hon. J. P. Kibbey-t
enal-H. B. Payue-Hon. E. B. Newman^D. W. Mason-Hon. John Ya

c! ComsTock-Ge'n. T. W.lennett-Hon. J.^L^Ktj^e-Cof'w^W^Dadley-
bins-B. F. Harris— Hon. W. D. Poulke-O. E. Shiveley— Wayne Coanty


yau-

-J.F
Bar


CHAPTER XXIV.




The First Physicians-Manner of Practice-Medical So.ieiT- M !
vice-Medical Officers from Wayne CoQuty— Earlv Ch:ir- ■- i 1 -

Thomsonian System -Physio-Medical System- Eclerti. ii ,

Prevalent in the C-ounty-beath Ratio -Health Officers i: ;.
Pensions-Biographical Skelehes-J. M. Thiirsion ". 11; . II

Wmiam1»'"?h"-J~R.'Mend\'^,lhall^^^^ ' ' ' ' 'i!',"


el Te



R'were!






M. Jordan-R. U. Johnson-D. W.' Dennis - Marcns Mot
CHAPTER XXVI.
Chaptbr op Reminiscbncks.



.'''."".. ..'!,*!^*M"f....''."^.l!'.....*..**64i

HAPTER XXVII.

redith-Prof. g



Ho8hoar-Andre\y Hoiv " I Henry Hoover-Jesa

Hannah- Thomas Bull;i A ' emiih Cox— George

Moffltt- Cornelias Ratlin, -m \"1 ii-le N mi-'^ in Kichmond-John Smith— Roi ert
Morrisson-Hon. D. P. uM^y.wi, Lua,., o. .-jUufer. , 65S- 176.

CHAPTBR XXVIII.
HE War Between the States— The Result— A Union Fokevek.

From 1861-1865- War's Alarm— Wayne County in Arms— The Prompt Enlietmi nt-
Relief to Soldiers' Pamilies-Extraordinaiy Contribution— Those at Home Taking
Care of the Soldiers' Families^Money and Provisions Contribnted-Her Duty )one
—Her Glory and Honor— Prom the " Soldiers' Record "—The List of Patriot and
the Roll of Honor 6' -T36.

IMiUSTRATIONS.



T. G. Noble 402

Elijah Coffin KS

George Rogers Clarke 45



Tecimset"'


eking Frontiersmen


Early Explo
Srcfi^he

Ke"i;^:i


ndiana Forest ..:'.

"ung"!"!'^;:::;::;:: :::



HISTORY OF THE

NORTHWESTTERRITORY.

CHAPTEK I.

THE DATES OF ITS DISCOVERY.

Yerging on Ancient History. — What was Discovered. — The
Northmen in the Year 985. — The First Discoverers. — De
Soto, the Spirit of the 16th Century. — Marquette, Jol-
lET AND La Salle. — Miami Villages and French Settle-
ment. — Pontiac War. — Vincennes. — English and French
War. — Port Vincent, now Vincennes. — The Leading
Tribes of Indians. — Ownership of the Northwest. — French
and Indian War. — Lord Dunmore's War. — His March
against the Indians. — The Defeat, Capture and Death
OF General Crawford, by Burning at the Stake.

VERGING ON ANCIENT HISTORY.

The world generally dates the discovery of America from the
time of the landing of Columbus, in 1492, but ancient history
and ancient historians certainly point to a far earlier knowledge
of this continent of ours. Still, it is safe to say that for all
practical purposes its real discovery dates from the time the bold
and intrepid voyager, sustained and encouraged by Ferdinand
and Isabella, first trod the soil and gave the light and lite of Eu-
ropean civilization to this continent. The whole country and
the islands contiguous were originally called the West Indies
from its first discovery, and the name " Indian " was misapplied
to its inhabitants. In the history of North America, by Sam-
uel G. Drake, he remarked: " It has been the practice of every
writer who has written about the primitive inhabitants of a
country to give some wild theories of others as to their origin,
and to close the account with his own which, generally, has been



IS HISTORY OF THE NORTHWEST TERRITORY.

more visionary, if possible, than those of his predecessors.
Long, and it may be added useless, disquisitions have been
yearly laid before the world, from the discovery of America by
Columbus to the present time, to endeavor to explain by what
means the inhabitants got from the old world to the new."

WHAT THE ANCIEI^TS KNEW.

Hanno flourished 100 years before the founding ofEome,
about SCO years before the Christian era. After fully exploring
the coast of Africa he set out for what is now called the Straits
of Gibraltar, and thence sailed westward thirty days; hence,
many believe that he may have visited this continent or some of
the West India Islands.

Plato, Diodorus Siculus and Aristotle all refer to islands and
fertile lands west of the Straits of Gibraltar, full of forests, nav-
igable rivers and fruits in abundance. It is evident from this
that while no positive facts are given of the time of these several
voyages, and no record kept of their actual occurrence, with de-
scriptions of what was seen and discovered by these early navi-
gators of the ocean, yet there is the fact of tradition and a belief
in a country beyond the mighty waters that swept the western
shore of Europe, whose lands were rich and fertile; that mighty
rivers coursed through its immense area, chains of lofty mount-
ains and endless forests were to be found. These were not all
a myth, but have become a reality, and doubtless these tradi-
tions were founded upon actual facts, yet who they were or when
they came is only known as a tradition of the past. These were
traditions of a country at the tropics, and only a few centuries
later a native of Iceland, by the name of Liefur, actually came
to the continent of America. This was in the eleventh century,
and evidences have been found that corroborate the fact of this
discovery. While almost every country of Europe claims the
honor of discovering America, the Iceland navigators, or North-
men, are the earliest of whom any positive knowledge has yet
been ascertained. They date from 985. The tradition brought down
of a tropical land was undoubtedly founded upon actual facts,
but when the discovery was made, and by whom, will never be
known. In the language of a prominent historical writer with
regard to tlie peopling of this continent, he says: " Though
nearly four centuries have elapsed since the red man was first



HISTORY OF THE NOBTHWEST TEREITOEY. 19

known to the civilized world, his origin is still uncertain. The
popular opinion of the unbiased mind is, that the Creator who
made the universe and holds it in the 'hollow of his hand' could
make a race of people on the Western as well as on the Eastern
hemisphere, and that neither Moses nor any of his priests or
scribes, ' with all the learning of the Egyptians,' had the remot-
est conception of the extent of the world." Having no desire
to take part in a discussion of this kind, and knowing that the
archffiological researches of this country show a prehistoric race,
of whom the Indians even, who had possessed the country for over
four centuries, could give no account, the question will be left
here, the facts embraced here heing sufficient for the introduc-
tion of this work.

DE SOTO, THE SPIRIT OF THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY.

The next of interest in the discovery ot'our country, after that
of Columbus in 1492, might be said to be that of that great ad-
venturer, De Soto. To be sure his discoveries have little to do
with the Northwest Territory, but in bringing the foregoing his-
tory down to the present time it will be better if the reader shall
know something of the country of his birth anterior to the local
settlement, so that the gap may not be too broad, and a chasm
in his country's history left so wide that even in his imaginings
he could not span it. De Soto was the first white man that nav-
igated the waters of the Mississippi, and that was as early as
1539, but he and his followers knew little of the mighty river
that penetrated a continent, or its numerous branches which
flowed from the east and from the west, or little dreamed of a
land so rich in all the attributes of soil, climates, its forests and
its inexhaustible mineral wealth. It was not these, not the evi-
dence of the almost boundless extent of the country, which lured
him on, but he traversed the country to the west to find that
myth of his imagination, "The Fountain of Youth." He came
back to die upon the turbid waters of the mighty stream on which
he was the first to embark, at the hands of one of his followers,
and the waters of the great river were his winding-sheet.

MARQUETTE, JOLIET AND LA SALLE.

In 1673, that bold and fearless spirit, James Marquette, with
hie companion, Louis Jollet, were the first white men who trav-



20 HISTORY OP THE NORTHWEST TEREITOKV.

ersed the soil of the Northwest Territory. The year above men-
tioned they started out to find the waters of the Mississippi
River, which over a century before De Soto had discovered, and
upon its banks had given up his life. After many weary days they
reached thebanksof the Mississippi and launched their canoe upon
its peaceful waters June 17, 1673, and explored its course from the
mouth of the Wisconsin River to the mouth of the Arkansas,
then returned. The description they gave of the great forests
which lined its banks, and here and there a broad expanse of
prairie, which seemed a living sea of grass and flowers, stretch-
ing as far ^s the eye could see, excited a wild spirit of adventure
among those who heard it, and among those who seemed to im-
bibe the spirit of Marquette was Robert La Salle. He made his
first attempt the same year as Marquette's return, but a series of
misfortunes seemed to pursue him, and not until the spring of
1682 did he succeed in his undertaking, when he successfully
navigated the Mississippi from the mouth of the Illinois River
to the Gulf of Mexico. His return to France, his subsequent
appointment as Governor of Louisiana, his return to America,
and his unavailing fefi'ort to find the mouth of the Mississippi,
and his subsequent shipwreck in Matagorda Bay, in the fall of

1686, is all a matter of history. He was, on the 19th of March,.

1687, like De Soto, assassinated by three of his followers, on
the bank of Trinity River.

MIAMI VILLAGES AND FRENCH SETTLEMENTS.

In 1670, and for many years previous, the fertile region of
country now included within the boundaries of the State of Indi-
ana was inhabited by the Miami Confederacy of Indians. This
league consisted of several Algonquin tribes, notably the Twig-
twees, Weas, Piankeshaws and Shockeys, and was formed at an ear-
ly period — probably in the early part of the seventeenth century
— for the purpose of repelling the invasions of the Iroquois, or
Five Nations, at whose hands they had suffered many severe de-
feats. By the frequent and unsuccessful wars in which they
were compelled to engage, in self defense, their numbers had
become greatly reduced, until, at the date mentioned, they
could not muster more than 1,500 or 2,000 warriors. They
dwelt in small villages on the banks of the various rivers in
Indiana, and extended their domain as far east as the



HISTORY OF THE NORTHWEST TERRITORY. 21

Scioto, north to the great lakes, and west to the country of
the Illinois. Their principal settlements were scattered along
the headwaters of the Great Miami, the banks of the Maumee,
the St. Joseph, of Lake Michigan, the Wabash and its tributa-
ries. Although once important among the nations of the Lake
region, they had become greatly demoralized by repeated defeats
in war, and when first visited by the French their villages present-
ed a very untidy appearance. They were living in constant terror
of the Five Nations, practicing only sufficient Industry to pre-
vent starvation, and indulging in all their vicious passions to a
vulgar extreme.

Almost immediately following the discovery and exploration
of the Mississippi, by La Salle, in 16S2, the government of
France began to encourage the policy of connecting its posses-
sions in North America by a chain of fortifications, and trading
posts, and missionary stations, extending from New Orleans, on
the southwest, to Quebec, on the northeast. Tiiis undertaking
was inaugurated by Lamotte Cadillac, who established Fort Pont-
ehartrain, on the Detroit River, in 1701. At this period the
zealous Jesuit missionaries, the adventurous French fur traders,
with their coarse blue and red cloths, fine scarlet, guns, powder,
balls, knives, ribbons, beads, vermilion, tobacco and rum, and the
careless rangers, or coioreurs des hois, whose chief vocation was
conducting the canoes of the traders along the lakes and rivers,
made their appearance among the Indians of Indiana. The pious
Jesuits held up the cross of Christ and unfolded the mysteries of
the Catholic religion in broken Indian, to these astonished sav-
ages, while the speculating traders offered them fire water and
other articles of merchandise in exchange for their peltries, and
the rangers, shaking loose every tie of blood and kindred, iden-
tified themselves with the savages, and sank into utter barba-
rism.

The Jesuit missionaries were always cordially received by the
Miami tribes. These Indians would listen patiently to the
strange theory of the Savior and salvation, manifest a willing
belief in all they heard, and then, as if to entertain their visit-
ors in return, they would tell them the story of their own simple
faith in the Manitous, and stalk off with a groan of dissatisfac-
tion because the missionaries would not accept their theory with
equal courtesy. Missionary stations were established at an early



^i HISTORY OF THE

day in all of the principal villages, and the work of instructing
and converting the savages was begun in earnest. The order of
religious exercises established at the missions established among
the Miamis was nearly the same as that among other Indians.
Early in the morning the missionaries would assemble the In-
dians at the church, or the hut used for that purpose, and, after
prayers, the savages were taught concerning the Catholic relig-
ion. The exercises were always followed by singing, at the con-
clusion of which the congregation was dismissed, the Christians
only remaining to take part at mass. This service was generallj'
followed by prayers. During the forenoon the priests were gen-
erally engaged in visiting the sick, and consoling those who
were laboring under any affliction. After noon another service
was held in the church, at which all the Indians were permitted
to appear in their finery, and where each, without regard to rank
or age, answered the questions put by the missionary. This ex-
ercise was concluded by singing hymns, the words of which had
been set to airs familiar to the savage ear. In the evening all
assembled again at the church for instruction, to hear prayers,
and to sing their favorite hymns. The Miamis were always
highly pleased with the latter exercise.

Aside from the character of the religious services which con-
stituted a chief attraction in the Miami villages of Indiana
while the early French missionaries were among them, the
traveler's attention would first be engaged with the peculiarities
of the fur trade, which, daring the first quarter of the seven-
teenth century, was monopolized by the French. Tliis trade was
carried on by means of the carriers, or rangers, who were en-
gaged to conduct canoes on the lakes and rivers, and to carry
burdens of merchandise from Detroit to the principal Miami
villages, where the traders exchanged their wares for valuable
furs, which they transported to the nearest trading post affording
them the most available market. This traffic was not, however,
confined to those whose wealth enabled them to engage vessels,
canoes, and carriers, for there were hundreds scattered through
the various Indian villages of Indiana, at almost any time dur-
ing the first half of the eighteenth century, who carried their
packs of merchandise and furs by means of leather straps sus-
pended from their shoulders, or M'ith the straps resting against
their foreheads.



HISTORY OF THE NORTHWEST TEKEITOKV. 23

Rnm aud brandy were freely introduced by these traders, and
always found a ready sale among the Miami Indians. A French-
man writing of the evils which resulted from the introduction of



Online LibraryIll.) Inter-state Publishing Company (ChicagoHistory of Wayne County, Indiana : together with sketches of its cities, villages and towns (Volume 1) → online text (page 1 of 67)