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CENTENNIAL



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3 1833 01703 8438

„Gc 977.2 In2795a 1921
1 Indiana University.
Arbutus



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ARBUTUS




1921

Centennial
j^rhutus



Digitized by the Internet Archive

in 2010 with funding from

Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center



http://www.archive.org/details/arbutus1921indi




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HE Centennial Arbutus
is dedicated to the future
of In dia n a Un ivers ity -
and to the undying spirit of her
men and Women which must ever
mal^e glorious the Univer-
sity's name.



Allen County Public LiDra7

900 Wtbster Ct:3et

PC Box 227',

Fort Wayne, IN 46801-2270



Indiana Centennial
Pageant

INTENSE with colour, light, and motion, the Pageant cele-
brating the Centennial of Indiana University will remain in
our minds above all else for its sheer beauty. To see those
glowing, vibrating lines of dancers in their flowing draperies of
gold and blue, crimson and purple, come streaming out from
the soft green o( the pines was to know the ioy of living.
The mass effects had the richness of brilliant tapestries. The
processionals across the rich background sparkled like iewels
streaming across velvet. Sunlight and colour; the poetry
of rhythmic motion; beauty — such was the Pageant of 1^20.




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Poised in the dance, ethereal
sprites hail Indiana



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The Hoosiers k.ncw thai education
is the soul of freedom



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Thai their children mie,hl know
what their forefathers lacked



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Education heeds the call of a
world united after war



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The light of learning and the
wisdom of the world



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The Queen of Beauty erouncd
as Queen of May



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After Us all over il is only
a beginning after all



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upon a bleak, and snow-clad slop
— a solitary beech



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Sun-flecked shadows over a
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Where feathery willows sway
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Through tangled wood uinds
a vagrant road



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[27]




.va_£7"



INDIANA VNI\'EP^5ITY



-f^-e-iL



[28]




President William Lovoe Bryan



X E N T E N N I




T V



Indiana University
Mother of College Presidents

INDIANA UNIVERSITY has the distinction of having graduated fifteen
men who are now the presidents of great universities and normal school
institutions. Until recently there were seventeen, but the death of Morris
Elmer Daily and the resignation of Joseph Swain from Swarthmore College,
has since occurred. The name of "Indiana University, Mother of College
Presidents," can justly be attributed to our Alma Mater, for perhaps no
other state university the size of Indiana, can present so many prominent
university and normal school presidents.

The attention of the country's educators was first directed to Indiana
University when its president, David Starr Jordan, was chosen to direct
the institution endowed by the Stanford millions. Since that time there
has been a steady call from other states to positions of similar honor.

Indiana's graduates are now the presidents of the University of Maine,
the University of Kansas, the University of Minnesota, Colgate University
and Washington State College. She has graduates who are presidents
of normal schools in Florida, Illinois, Indiana and Minnesota. Two are
Presidents Emeritus of Leland Stanford University and Leiand Stanford
Junior University. One graduate, formerly the president of Indiana
University, is now the head of the Botany department at Chicago Univer-
sity, while another is commissioner of education of Idaho. The list is
completed by Dr. William Lowe Bryan, now serving his seventeenth year
as president of his Alma Mater.

As Dr. Bryan said in his commencement address to the class of 1920,
the University throughout all its hundred years has played and now plays
its part. The fact that she has given to the country such leaders of thought,
is proof of her century of activity, and her ability to contribute to America's
progress.



INDIANA



V N I V E P^ 5 I T Y



[29]



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CENT E N N l_A L







A P^ B V T V S




DAVID STARR JORDAN • JOSEPH. SWAIN



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INDIANA V N I \ K P^ 5 I T >



[30]



fOTc E N 1 L N N 1_A L'^^i^;






A P^ B V T V S

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INDIANA VNIVEP^SITY



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C E N T E N N L^A L^^.|3/ ' J iS^ A P^ B \ T V S



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I.U.



MOTHER s/^UNIVERSiry
PRESIDENTS




N D I A \ A V N I \' E FV S I T Y



[33]



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MOTHER 3/^UNIVERSITy
PRESIDENTS



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N D IANA V N I V E P^ S I T Y

[34]



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ATHLETICS



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INDIANA VNIVEP^SITY



[35]



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CENTEN NIAL




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T V




Left to right: "Cottc



GENERAL COACHING STAFF
Berndt. G. W. Levis. Jumbo" Stiehm. Jesse B Field and John M. Millen.



1920 FOOTBALL SEASON

CROM Conference cellar to first division! This is the attainment of Indiana's 1^20
varsity football team. The greatest varsity that has represented the Crimson in
ten years battered its way through seven gruellmg games, wmnmg five o^ them. The
two games lost were to powerful and versatile elevens and then only by close margins.
Indiana scored 129 points as against only 48 counted by opponents during the season.
By victories over Minnesota, Northwestern and Purdue, Coach E. 0. Stiehm's machine
landed third place in the Western Conference titular race. This is the highest an Indiana
team has finished m the Conference since 1910.

The coach went through the season with the smallest squad of players which has been
out in years, but this squad, though numbering less than thirty, was concentrated football



1 N D 1 ^\ N .A



V N I V E Ps^ S I T Y
[36]



^



C E N




FL. B V T




genius. It numbered among it fifteen "I" men, veterans
of one, two and three years of varsity experience. In'
eluded in this squad were new men who were to step into
regular places on the team and display all the prowess of
veterans. Sickness and iniury to players at critical times
seemed to affect but little the fighting spirit and effect-
iveness of the team.

Stiehm welded a versatile combination. He had a
swift and terrible line defense in such men as Leonard,
Mumby, McCaw, France, Pierce, Lorhei and Risley. After
all, it was this defense which meant more to the team than
any other single factor in the season games. It halted offen-
ses rated as among the most slashing in the whole country.
The coach had big, shifty ends in Hanny, Bell and Don-
ovan. He possessed a superb trio of quarters in Cravens,

Faust and Mathys. He had in Williams and Raymond, backs who could run the ends.
As a defensive back and passer, there was Minton. Thomas was a utility half. Then
there were Kyle and Ross, powerful, line-plunging fullbacks.

Stiehm had men who could kick. First among these were Captain Risley and Kyle.
Risley excelled at goal kicking from placement, while Kyle punted consistently for fifty
yards. The Crimson forward passing attack became renowned throughout the West,
and was a dreaded feature. Minton, Mathys, Hanny and Williams were the chief manipu-
lators of Stiehm's aerial system.

The achievement of the 1 920 varsity in trouncing the Pride of the South, in swamping
a prominent Hoosier secondary college, in crushing Minnesota on its own field, in obtaining
revenge on Northwestern, in defeating the ancient rival — Purdue — in staging a come-
back that nearly wrested victory from defeat in the Iowa game, and in outplaying the
Fighting Irish for three periods, will long be remembered.




Trying Our Their Speed



INDIANA



V N 1 V '

[37]



I T Y




From left to right President W. L. Bryan, Coach Jumbo Stiehm. Ed. Showers, Dick Miller, C J. Sembo
A, G, Messick. Harry Johnston. Fred Matthews and Frank Miller,



THE COMMITTEE OF SEVENTEEN

I HE men forming the Committee of Seventeen are former athletes of Indiana Univer'

* sity. They are men who, while in school, did all they could for the good of the

University in their every endeavor. These men have never lagged! From the time

they entered the University as students to the present they have performed noble work

for their Alma Mater.

The Committee of Seventeen was formed several years ago for the purpose of stimu-
lating athletics at Indiana University. These men form a nucleus of Indiana University's
great alumni body and stand ready to pledge alumni support to every need and worthy
cause. The Committee has been and is now working for a better and a greater Indiana.
It has done much toward creating a new spirit in Indiana athletics. The new spirit
was noticed last year, and in the seasons just past, it has been a strong force behind a
successful athletic year.



I N D 1 .A N A



V N I V E

[3S]



P^ S I T Y



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INDIANA V N 1 V E Pv. S I T >•



[39]




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1920 FOOTBALL SQUAD
First Row. left to right: Ringo, Minton, DeHority, McCaw. Reed. Captain Risley, Kyle. Thomas. Burnett, Klink. Shonkwiler.
Second Row: Coach Fields. Kelso, Matthews. Cox. Buck. Ickes. Boggs. Hanny. Von Tress. Williams. Leonard. Coach Stiehm.
Third Row: Coach Berndt. Pierce. Ross. Mumby. Mathys. Cravens. Raymond. France Lohrei. Donovan. Bell, Maynard.



1920 VARSITY SQUAD

I HE men of the 1920 football varsity by their brilliant performances on the gridiron
added glory to the name of Indiana University. In the belief of many, the varsity
of 1920 was the greatest in Crimson football history. It definitely deserted the lowly
door mat of the Conference for a place in the sun third position in the Big Ten.

Such players as "Cow" Minton, Elliott Risley, "Babe" Pierce, Charley Mathys and
Ted Mumby will be lost this year by graduation. These men by their playing have added
their names to the honor roll of Indiana's athletes.

Next year John Kyle captains the team. Indiana will be represented by a thoroughly
seasoned team, and men who worked faithfully this year as understudies will step into
the vacancies. "Once up in the sun, always there," is the spirit of the 1921 Crimson varsity.



t



INDIANA



V N I V E B^ S 1 T Y

[40]




Franklin Finds Going Hard



V T V



BAPTISTS EASY

Indiana 47 Franklin

September 25

r^OACH Thurber's Blue and Gold
^-^ Baptists stood no chance against
the Crimson in the first game of the
season on Jordan Field, September
25. Franklin failed to register a single
first down, while Coach Stiehm's men
broke through for long gains almost at will. The score was 47 to 0. Indiana used
only straight football to make touchdowns. Stiehm started a lineup of seasoned
veterans, but shifted this formation at the end of the first half. In the last
quarter, the regulars again entered the lists. Roscoe Minton, veteran of many a battle
on Jordan Field, had the honor of making the first touchdown of the season. The half
ended with the count standing 20 to 0.

Cravens and Hanny also scored touchdowns in the first half. Maynard went across
the line soon after play was started in the second half. Von Tress, Hanny and Ross
scored in the last quarter.

Franklin put up a game fight but was woefully outclassed. The day was much too
warm for football.

The following lineup played most of the game: Donovan and Hanny, ends; Risley
and France, tackles; McCaw and Mumby, guards; Pierce, center; Cravens, quarter;
Minton and Williams, halves; and Kyle, full. Leonard only played a short time because
of an injury.




Risley Kicks from Placement



INDIANA V N I V E Ps^ 5 I T Y

[41]





K. _B_ , V TV S I II

HAWKEYES WIN
Iowa 14 Indiana 7

October 2

psVERPOWERED in the first two
quarters, Indiana lost to Iowa in the
Indiana Makes End Play Homecoming game on October 2. The

Crimson defense held the powerful Hawk-
eyes scoreless in the first quarter, but the splendid Iowa back, Aubrey Devine, was
chiefly responsible for two Iowa touchdowns in the second period. The tallies of
the Hoosiers in the first half were halted by a stubborn Hawkeye defense of which the
chief cog was the giant colored tackle, Duke Slater.

Iowa did all of its scoring in the first half.
The visitors were placed on the defensive
throughout the last two quarters, and only
costly fumbles prevented Indiana's tying the
score. On one of these occasions the ball
was on Iowa's fifteen yard line and on the
other it was on the one yard line. The
Crimson inaugurated a spectacular aerial
offensive in the final quarter which netted
one touchdown and came so very near making another that only the final whistle
saved Iowa from a tied score. Minton caught a pass and raced across the line for
the Crimson score.

The game was witnessed by a crowd estimated at no less than 7,000 persons, one o^

the largest throngs
~^ j^ ever gathered on

Jordan Field.

The loss o{ the
Iowa game was at-
tributed to the fact
that it came before
the new Indiana
team had rounded
into real season
form and that the

.-, -«Mri:_-— «— i««,f^ .- veteran Hawkeyes

Breaks Through Were at their best.



Iowa Backs Gain




tjr



INDIANA



^ N I V h Pv. S ! r Y

[42]



C E N




P^ B V




Williams Cuts Through Line



SOUTH DEFEATED

Indiana 24 Mississippi A. and M.C.

October 9

I HE last football game of the home

season resulted in a trouncing for

Mississippi Agricultural and Mechanical

College. The Dixie team was defeated 24 to 0. The first half score was 7 to 0.
The Crimson team, employing little but straight football, pushed over three touch-
downs, registered a goal from placement, and held the visitors to two downs.

The light line of the southerners was unable to hold the smashing plunges o^ the
Indiana backs. On two occasions the visitors showed remarkable defensive tenacity

by holding Indiana in the shadow of their
own goal posts.

The offensive work of Kyle and Ray-
mond featured the game. Raymond, tak-
^ ing the place of Minton, who was hurt,

made a number of pretty open field runs.
Kyle gave his first real exhibition of line
feared throughout the remainder of the season.
Risley made his first season field goal in the third quarter when he booted from place-
ment. This made the third quarter end 10 to 0, for Indiana.

Coach Stiehm injected a number of fresh men into his lineup in the last quarter,
with the result that the battered Mississippi wall could no longer hold up. Indiana
scored two touchdowns. Gains made by Raymond, Thomas and Kyle were largely
responsible for the Crimson scores in the last quarter. Raymond made one touchdown
and Thomas the other.




Mississippi Held for 1.1 ,-,

plunging and which made him




Cravens Snaps Ball Back



V E P^ S I T Y



[43]




R_ B



T V



M;



Gopherman Caught
touchdown in the first five minutes.



GOPHERS LOSE

Indiana 21 Minnesota 7

October 16

IN the first Western Conference
football victory since the mem'
orable Purdue game of 19 17. In-
diana outclassed Minnesota on its
home gridiron and won bv a score
of 2 I to 7.

Indiana displayed a brilliant
versatility of attack and a dogged,
strategic defense. Forward passes
in which Minton. Williams and
Mathys figured and crashing gains
*rV*- i-^-vmn, -■"*■■ '"'^ ^Y^^ ■ Were largely responsible

-••''■ for the undoing of the Northmen.

n Line Minnesota gained the iump and

Captain Arnston went over for a

A fifty-yard pass. Minton to Mathys, in the second quarter,



was probably the most spectacular play executed by Indiana during the whole season.





Minton Making Touchdown Against Minnesota



INDIANA VNIVFPv_SITY

[111




Caught




In Full Pursuit



K. B ' V T V



YEA, THERE, MEDICS!

Medics 2 Laws

October 16

I N an annual affair of football bravery
and of embryo gridders, the ancient

tribe of the Medics were lucky enough to
defeat their time-honored enemy - the Laws in a 2 to encounter, October 16.
The game was played on Jordan Field while the varsity was defeating Minnesota
at Minneapolis in the first Conference victory of the season. The proceeds of the game
went to defray the expense of a leased wire
from Minneapolis to Bloomington as a
carrier of the Crimson's break into the
Big Ten winning column.

For several weeks prior to the game,
both the Laws and the Medics had been seen
rounding into form under the shelter of
the falling evening tide. Men were shifted from one position to another in the attempt
of each captain to add strength to his line and "pep" to his back field. As a
pre-game statement, Captain Wooten of the Laws, and Captain Tavenor bravely asserted

that "barring injuries or acts of Providence,
they would win handily."

'V^^JBTsmm fjBBIlIK Iff HT' *' ir Until the very last minute, it looked as

i^fS^CS !wJ*^.*^5T^^i^ '-%y though the Laws and Medics were to

battle to a zero score. But a blocked
punt in the last quarter with the ball
behind the Law's line gave the Medics

their only chance to score. Time out had to be called frequently by both teams as

the exertion was more than the men of either team could bear up under. The water

boy was about the busiest man on the field, and generally when a man was tackled,

he would lie prostrate until the breath of life returned. During the frequent rest periods

which occurred many of the players

rushed for the sidelines where eager

hands held waiting for them the butts

of burning cigarettes. A few hasty

puffs had the effect of giving new life

to the fast wearing gridders.

Laws Away in a Spurt




Trying Their Interference




INDIANA



V N I V E P^ S I T Y



[4.0]



C E N T E N







P^ B ' V T V



TIED FOR SECOND PLACE

Indiana 10 Northwestern 7

October 30



INDIANA tied for

second place in the
Big Ten race by
defeating Northwest-
ern at Indianapolis on
October 30.

Though the game
was primarily a defen-
sive one, with Indiana
showing a decided
superiority, the steady
hammering of the Crimson backs proved
too much for the opposing wall.

The Crimson team was held to a nar-
row margin by receiving the bad
end of almost every break. A fum-
ble in the first mmutes o( play
allowed Grausnick, the speedy
Purple back, to score.




The Steady March Begins



Steady line plays by

>i Indiana soon worked

the ball down the field
and a pass from Wil-
liams to Mathys across
the Ime gave Indiana
a touchdown.

In the third quar-
ter a place kick by
Captain Risley made
the count 10 to 7.
Indiana was on the point of going
across for another touchdown when the
game ended.



^^"" - - ...



Not since 1910 haJ
an Indiana team uon
right to second place
in Big Ten football.



A




Under Northwestern's Coal Posts



INDIA



V N I V E P^ S 1 T Y

[ir.l



C E N T E N N I




P^ B V T V




Crimson Line Tco Strone



A GLORIOUS DEFEAT
Noire Dame 13 Indiana 10

November 13

OLAYING one of the greatest gridiron
combinations in the nation, Indiana's
team went down to glorious defeat at the
hands of Coach Rockne's Fighting Irish
at Indianapolis on November 13.

Indiana came very near winning. The Crimson outdid the Notre Dame athletes
in every department of the game until the last quarter, leading by a score of 10 to at
the end of the third period. Lack of first class reserves lost for I ndiana in the last minutes.
There was no scoring in the first quarter. In the second quarter, Risley sent the fans
into a delirium of ioy by booting a goal from placement from the twenty-six yard line.

For three quarters the touted Notre Dame back field and line beat futilely against
an impregnable Crimson wall, while the varied Indiana offense, with John Kyle forming
the spear-head of a crashing line attack, and Minton, Hanny and Mathys figuring in
successful passes, shattered the Irish barrier. At no time during this part of the game up
to the last of the third quarter was the Crimson goal in danger. Forward pass after
pass was speared by Mathys who played a wonderful defensive game.

The touchdown came in the third quarter. Another concentrated attack brought
the ball into Notre Dame territory, and Williams shot a pass from the twenty-two yard
mark to Hanny across the goal line. The score was 10 to 0.

The Crimson score goaded the great Irish team to desperation. Gipp retired from
the fray, and Barry, who took his place, started the rally which swung the tide in favor
of his team. Gipp replaced Barry in the last period and proceeded to go over for the
first Notre Dame touchdown. Mohardt was responsible for more Irish gains and another
touchdown.




Irish Backs Downed in Tracks



"^



INDIANA V N i V E P^ 5 1 T Y

[47]



Mc_



E N T E Nl N








V T



na





VICTORY SMILES AGAIN!

Indiana 10 Purdue 1

November 20

IN a contest which
marked the resump-
tion of gridiron rela-
tions between the
two State Universities
after a hiatus of three
years, Indiana emerged

victor over its old rival InJ.ana Hui Boilermaker Defense tor Gam

Purdue. The game

was played at Lafayette before 12,000 persons. By winning 10 to 7, Indiana finished

the Western Conference race in third place.

Indiana, doped to win by a goodly margin, went up against a splendid, fighting team
at Purdue. Only by virtue of the toe o'i Captain Risley was Indiana able to obtain the
winning margin in the last quarter.

Purdue's glory all came at the start of the second quarter, when ofF-tackle smashes
and end runs brought them down within scoring distance. Here Meeker, the Boilermaker
fullback, smashed over for the score.

Hanny's great return of the next kick-off made it possible for Minton to skirt right
end for twenty-five yards and a touchdown. The Crimson was within striking distance at
the end of the third quarter, and when play was resumed, Risley booted the oval for a
perfect goal from the sixteen-yard mark.




Minton Starting Forward Pass Against Purdue



W^-



N D 1 ANA V N I V E K .^ I T ^

I I, SI



^m




FRESHMAN FOOTBALL
First Row. left to right: D, B, Burke, Bockstahler. Woodworth. Witty. Hepshur, Helton Wootan, Coach Millen
becond Row: F, Moran, Manion. H. Moran. Ritterskamp. Mumby, Gentry, Bahr Woody
Third Row: McCoo!, D, M Burke, Million, Clay, Harden, Eberhart, Uline.
Fourth Row: Wilkins, Schunian, Crowe, Schultz, Thomas, Stevenson, Myers, Robinson, Booker,



THE SUICIDE SQUAD

TINDER the able direction of Coach John M, Millen, the 1920 freshman football
squad developed into an effective defensive and offensive team. Although given
the title of "The Suicide Squad," it is no implication that the freshmen were unable to
give the varsity a stiff scrimmage.

Many of the frosh have good chances to make varsity positions next year. Elmer
Wilkins and Dan Burke are expected to give the varsity back field men strong competition.
Burke and Wilkins showed up exceptionally well throughout the season. In McCool,
Clay and Moran, the 1921 varsity has good material for the tackle positions. Harold


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