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Indiana University of P e n n s y I v a n i




w the Campus Has

(and Hasn't) Changed




THEN NOW



MESSAGE FROM THE

PRESIDENT



By Tony At water



At the Core

This issue of IUP Magazine includes exciting news of ongoing
and transformational capital projects that are changing the
landscape of the IUP campus.



One of the most visible
changes to the campus is
the S270-million Student
Residential Revival, which
will be completed with the
opening of the Crimson
Suites this coming fall. IUP
also is contributing to a face-
lift for the Indiana community




with the construction of the
Kovalchick Convention and
Athletic Complex, which will be
open in the spring of 201 1 ,
IUP and community members
alike are enjoying the beautiful
new Performing Arts Center,
which was achieved through
the renovation of Fisher and
Waller halls.

While these are the most
recent and visible landmarks for
the Indiana campus, many other
significant physical plant projects
have been completed in the past
decade or so. The university has
renovated three classroom
buildings — Uhler. Wilson, and
Cogswell — and its student
services center, Clark Hall. The
Student Cooperative Association
has greatly expanded and
reenergized the Hadley Union
Building, making it a destination
for the university community.

On the South Campus, IUP has
honored the late Owen Dougherty,
a longtime baseball and football
coach, with the creation of Owen
Dougherty Field, and Ruth
Podbielski, a champion for
women's sports, with new Softball
facilities — Podbielski Field. We
have also added a soccer field
for our varsity women's team.




The regional campuses offer new
facilities, including a renovated
IUP Fairman Centre in downtown
Punxsutawney.

We have reestablished our
commitment to the continued
health of the "heart" of our
campus, the Oak Grove, and to
increasing green space on
campus with the establishment of
the Allegheny Arboretum as a
campuswide, living museum.

While important and impressive,
progress at IUP is not limited to
physical plant improvements. In
the last fifteen years, we have
established the only endowed
honors college in the
Pennsylvania State System of
Higher Education— the Robert E.
Cook Honors College — and
celebrated more than $10 million
in gifts from its namesake and
benefactor, a member of the Class
of 1964; achieved unconditional
Middle States reaccreditation:
developed a comprehensive
long-range strategic plan;
established the Common
Freshman Reader program,
Freshman Convocation, and the
Center for Student Success;
introduced the Center for Civic
Engagement and Student
Leadership; and carefully and

Continued on page 29





CHANCELLOR OF THE PENNSYLVANIA
STATE SYSTEM OF HIGHER EDUCATION:
John Cavanaugh

CHAIRMAN OF THE STATE SYSTEM
BOARD OF GOVERNORS:
Kenneth Jarin

PRESIDENT OF INDIANA UNIVERSITY

OF PENNSYLVANIA:

Tony Atwaler

VICE PRESIDENT FOR

UNIVERSITY RELATIONS:

Terry Carter

ASSOCIATE VICE PRESIDENT FOR

COMMUNICATIONS AND COMMUNITY

RELATIONS:

John Veilleux



EDITOR: Karen Gresh
RECOROS EDITOR: Susan Kirchner
CONTRIBUTING EDITOR: Bob Fulton
STAFF WRITER: Elaine Jacobs Smith
ALUMNI EXTRA EDITOR: Bruce Dries
WEB EXCLUSIVES: Mike Powers, Aaron
Kennelly. Elaine Jacobs Smith. Bruce Dries
NAMEDROPPERS EDITOR: Mike Hollman
DESIGN: Michael Maskarinec
ADVERTISING DESIGN: Ronald Mabon
ILLUSTRATION: David Raymond

PHOTOGRAPHERS: Keith Boyer
(University Photographer). Barry Reeger



'J«*



a. PA 15705-l(M6(tclcphon
7-3062 lax 724-357-5512.





> ■ ■■:



Then and Now

It's true there are new buildings on the IUP
campus, and it's true that most of the old
residence halls have been replaced. But how
different, really, is the campus?



16
18



Saved by the Bell

When she won a national boxing
championship last fall. Lauren Fisher
did something out of character for most
victorious pugilists: she cried.

Namedroppers

Eleven inductees into lUP's Athletic
Hall of Fame reflect the richness and
diversity of the university's athletic
programs and history.

Departments

2 Letters

12 Achievements

14 Mentors

19 All About Alumni



On IUP Magazine's Website

(www. tup. edu/magazine)

Band of Brothers — Even the burden of incurable illness can't
break bonds first forged in an IUP fraternity two decades ago.

Serious about Comics— A Robert E. Cook Honors College
student explores the portrayal of women in autobiographical
comics versus mainstream comics and traditional literature.

Then and Now— All the vintage and contemporary photos that
appear in this issue are here, plus more that couldn't be
squeezed into the print edition.



The Ollicial IUPMai).u«« Foim may Ik i



1 1 1( IN I COVE H Sludenls who walked north toward the HUB Irom Grant S'lrdel in the eighties * ,
passed Esch (loregroiindltMM Wallace halls on the right and Keith Hall on the left In the dis-
tance, the pov/ei plants smokestack is visible Today, only a smidgen ol smokestack peeks'h>ni v
above Wajlwork Hall's root Photography by Keitti Boyer

BACK COVER IUP Music Theater, directed by Sarah Mantel, perlonhed selections Irom s

the Meny Wnluwn\ IUP Plays Piltsbuigli in November The annual Hem? Hall event showiasis, N *
the muSical talents ol IUP sludenls and laculty mernbeis. Photography by Keith Boyer



' rK \r ,'•"',■ • SLTjitl J ^ V- Www'.iup.ecA



edWiragai




ers



After Sixty Years, a Sweatshirt!

Editor's Note: The following letter was
received by IUP Magazine's records editor,
Susan Kirchner. A photo of the writer in his
new sweatshirt appears in Alumni Extra at
www.iup.edu.

Thank you for your help in sending the
phone number of the Co-op to me. I
ordered the Indiana sweatshirt, and when
the fall and winter seasons appear here in
the desert, I will certainly display my Alma
Mater, among the numerous USC shirts.

I can recall that in 1947-1951, we did not
have access to Indiana sweatshirts. I can
remember that when I was student body
president, the dean arranged a trip to
Columbia University in New York City for
the secretary, treasurer, and me to attend. I
was given the honor of delivering a speech
to a convention of college-elected student
bodv government personnel.

We traveled by train and stayed at the
Roosevelt Hotel in New York City. What a
wonderful memory. We, from Indiana, did
not have identity sweatshirts. Now, I have
one! As soon as the cool weather comes, I
will wear it, and my wife will take a picture
of me. I will send you a copy.

William H. Keister '51, M'65
Desert Hot Springs, Calif.



Aviatrice ID

Editor's Note: IUP researcher Theresa
McDevitt received the following e-mail
message in response to the photo that
appeared at the top of page 3 in the Fall issue.

Tonight, when catching up on my IIP
Magazine, I came across a photo of my dear
friend and sorority sister (Alpha Sigma
Alpha). It was a photo of Jean Liddicoat
Hall from Frackville, Pa. (She was the
woman standing in the foreground, i We



w'ere so proud of her when she was chosen
for the aviation training program in '40 or
'41. We graduated in '41, and, as far as I
remember, she did not continue in aviation
but went on to have a lifetime career in
teaching Home Economics in Frackville,
where she lived until she died, about three
or four years ago. I visited lean several
times in my trips east to Pennsylvania from
my home in Palo Alto, Calif.

My mother, Maud Sensenich Griffith,
told me about her time at Indiana Normal
in the early 1900s. After dinner in John
Sutton Hall, the young men and women
would promenade in the long hallway. One
group would walk clockwise and the other,
counterclockwise. I suppose it was a mild
form of courtship. It wasn't till I traveled in
Spain that I learned the Spanish had done it
for a very long time. I've forgotten the
Spanish word for it.

When I was at Indiana, Jimmy Stewart
would occasionally come home to visit his
parents. He would be invited to speak to the
student body at ISTC. At that time he had
graduated from Princeton and was
beginning to work in New York City in live
theater. I don't believe he sang or danced,
so he just talked to us and had a Q-and-A
session.

Cwen Griffith Brechin '41
Palo Alto. ( alif.

Wonderful Turnabout

There are many good things to say about
the IIP Magazine, but special domains are
the class notes, where we see the impressive
and often unique contributions made by
IUP grads. Much as I implore them, Social
Studies Education grads are such an
uncharacteristically modest crowd. Those
who suffered this old one are enjoying each
other via e-mail, shared on-line teaching, etc.

Last spring, one of our teachers oxer at
Richland High School trained me in regard
to on-line co-teaching of a sociology class.



This continues now. In the process, we
involved another of our gang teaching at
Buena Vista High School in Virginia. An
IUP D.Ed, teaching at Indiana State
University who is a tech whiz became
interested in what we were doing. The
upshot: we have an article in the chapter he
submitted for a book on latest modes-
methods in tech-teaching!

Our social studies students are Virgil
Wenturine '96 and Paul Bevington '99. Our
D.Ed., who worked under George Bieger, is
Larry Tinnerman D'07. Altogether, these
IUP grads are making a cutting-edge
difference in social studies education. And,
in the process, they taught this latter-day
Luddite how to tech-teach! Wonderful
turnabout when students teach the old prof 1 .

John Lamer
Altoona, Pa
Editor's Note: The writer is a professor
emeritus in the IUP History Department.

Well-Written, Weil-Read

I was reading the magazine yesterday and
wanted to tell you how much I liked "Staying
Positive." It was interesting and well-written.
In fact, I read the whole thing, which is the
gauge I use to measure a good piece of writing.

Thanks for continuing to create a magazine
I really enjoy.

PatEramz ( 'ercone '85

Bradford, Pa.

Appreciation

The most recent issue of the IUP
Magazine is wonderful. I especially enjoyed
the article on "Where Pap Worked."

Thanks for keeping me on the mailing
list. As always, you're doing a fabulous job.

Peter Smits
Fresno, Calif.
Editor's Note: The writer was lUP's first vice
president of Institutional Advancement and has
filled a similar role at Fresno State since the
midnineties.



www.iup.edu/magazine



ron



cts, figures, short subjects, quick takes, facts, figures, short subjects, quick takes, facts, figures, s.



IUPNUMBERS



Enrollment through the Years



B ■) K \ h i \ G



In Fall 2()()9, 111' experienced its all-time greatest enrollment,
For many of its 135 years, the institution has had remarkably
stable numbers, tor the most part growing steadily. Blips and
burps occasionally occurred, reflecting events on a wider



stage, such as influenza epidemics and world wars.
Enrollments in selected years are reflected below, as provided
by the [UP Office of Institutional Research, Planning,
and Assessment.



Academic
Year



p 1875-76 225

Doors open on May 17, 1875,
-at Indiana State Normal School



1881-82



392



1911-12


1,202


1915-16


1.318


1917-18


1,050


r-1918-19

L Spanish Flu epidemic


893




1919-20


1.016



1920-21 812

Normal School comes under
L commonwealth ownership

1925-26 1.126

r 1926-27 1,237

Indiana State Teachers College
confers first collegiate degree-
on a transfer student from
*- Chatham College
1929-30 1.558



1930-31
1931-32
1932-33
1933-34
1934-35
1935-36
1936-37
1937-38



1.538
1.565
1.489
1.330
1.361
1.458
1,477
1.293



Academic


Total Academic


Total


Year


Year




1938-39


1.611




1962-63


4,671


1939-40


1.554




Punxsutawney Campus






— upeiib




1940-41


1,587


r- 1963-64

*- Armstrong Campus


5,224


1941-42


1,399


opens


1942-43


1.253


1964-65


5.706


1943-44


890




-1965-66


6,334


- 1944-45


1,037




On December 18. 1965.


Five males are in


1945




- ISC becomes IUP




L graduating class




1966-67


7.295


1945-46


1.084


1967-68


8.411


1946-47


1.422


1968-69


9.104


1947-48


1.590


1969-70


10,242


1948-49


1.606












1949-50


1.724


1970-71


10.347






1971-72
1972-73


10.532
10.788


1950-51


1.699


1951-52


1.822


1973-74


10.859


1952-53


1,688


1974-75


11,006


1953-54


1,661


1975-76


11.119


1954-55


1.790


1976-77


11.420


1955-56


2,081


1977-78


11,727


1956-57


2.361


1978-79


12.019


1957-58


2,613


1979-80


12,145


- 1958-59


2,982












ISTC becomes Indiana


1980-81


12.278


L State College




1981-82


12.399


1959-60


3,317




-1982-83

Act 188 establishes
Pennsylvania State


12,503


1960-61


3.665




System


1961-62


4,106




- of Higher Education





Academic


Total


Year




1983-84


12.526


1984-85


12.806


1985-86


12.938


1986-87


13.248


1987-88


13.404


1988-89


13.650


1989-90


13.861


1990-91


14.398


1991-92


14.620


1992-93


14.357


1993-94


14.062


1994-95


13,814


1995-96


13.879


1996-97


13.680


1997-98


13.736


1998-99


13.790


1999-2000


13.442


2000-01


13.410


2001-02


13.457


2002-03


13.671


2003-04


13.868


2004-05


13.998


2005-06


14.081


2006-07


14.248


2007-08


14.018


2008-09


14.310


2009-10


14.638



www.iup.edu/magazine



LOT HAS CHANGED AT



OVER 135 YEARS.



The pace of physical change accelerated
with the 2006 start of the Residential
Revival, in which most of the campus's
residence halls have been replaced.
While it's true that some new buildings
have taken the place of old, perhaps not
everything is so very different.



*



THEN



University Photographer Keith Boyer
compared a few campus vistas of today
with how they looked in the fifties, sixties,
seventies, and eighties. (In some cases,
a tree, or a building, blocked an exact
re-creation.) More Then and Now pairings
appear on the IUP Magazine website at
www.iup.edu.



■*!'»**_



jp.edu/magazine




www.iup.edu/magazine • 5



m . I




There used to be a phone booth at the foot of the stairs from the Oak Grove to Sutton Hall. On the lawn outside Sutton today, with Wallwork Hall
in the background, communication still occurs. BELOW: Students in the eighties who crossed Grant Street from Sutton Hall and walked toward
Maple Street passed Wahr and Langham halls on the left and Turnbull Hall on the right. A little farther west on Grant today, a crossing leads to
Delaney Hall at left, Putt Hall at right, and the Suites on Maple in the distance.





6 • www.iup.edu/magazine




8 • www.iup.edu/magazine




iup.edu/magazine





• NAMESAKE: Gealy Wallwork stands in front of the IUP residence hall that since
December has borne his name. A university trustee and chair of the Administration and
Finance Committee for nearly two decades, he has played an important role in many of
the Residential Revival and other campus building projects. In 2006. Wallwork
received the IUP President's Medal of Distinction. A Kittanning resident, he worked for
more than forty years in operation and management positions in the mining business,
from mine level through corporate headquarters. He retired as president and chief
executive officer of the Arthur T. Walker Estate Corporation, a holding company for the
Shawmut Companies. Wallwork Hall was previously called Sutton Suites.



• ENLIGHTENED: "The government should explain itself to the people." said
Bob Woodward, the 2009 speaker in lUP's First Commonwealth Endowed Lecture
series. Woodward spoke in Fisher Auditorium in November An associate editor of the
Washington Post, he has won two Pulitzer prizes, including one for his reporting of the
Watergate scandal. "Hate was the poison that destroyed [Nixon) and his presidency."
he said. While President Gerald Ford's subsequent pardon of Nixon "looked like the
highest corruption." to Woodward it "was actually the highest act of courage."
Asked what threat should most concern Americans, he replied. "Secret government.
Democracies die in darkness."



www.iup.edu/magazine • 11



evements



Honorary Doctor of Laws Degree

• Awarded to Pennsylvania Secretary of
Education Gerald Zahorchak M'88 at lUP's
Midyear Commencement ceremonies in
December. More information will appear in the
Summer issue of the magazine and also may
be found at www.iup.edu/commencement.

New Appointment. Pennsylvania State
System of Higher Education Board of
Governors

• Jonathan Mack, an Indiana attorney and
member of the IUP Council of Trustees

New Appointment, IUP Council of Trustees

• Mary Esther Van Shura. who has an
extensive background in the nonprofit,
education, and public affairs sectors and
who has served since 2006 as director of
Community Affairs in the office of Allegheny
County Executive Dan Onorato

2009 Pennsylvania Teacher Educator
of the Year

• Linda Norris. English, selected by the
Pennsylvania Association of Colleges and
Teacher Educators



• BACK HOME IN
INDIANA: Homecoming
Parade marshals Ron
Frey (left), Joan Zima
Moss, and Bob
Cleminson represented
the Class of 1959.
which held its fiftieth
reunion last year.



Nation's Top ROTC Cadet

• Erik Lloyd '02, a current IUP graduate
student, emerged as number-one in a field of
4,700 cadets who participated in last summer's
Leader Development and Assessment Course
for senior ROTC cadets at Ft. Lewis, Wash. A
story about Lloyd and the ROTC program at
IUP will appear in the Summer issue.

IUP Legislative Fellow

• Pennsylvania Representative Gary Haluska,
who represents the 73rd Legislative District in
Cambria County, selected as the 2009
Legislative Fellow in a program begun in 1998
by IUP-APSCUF

Friend of Higher Education

• Jack Wagner '74, currently serving his
second term as Pennsylvania's auditor general,
who has more than a quarter-century of
elected public service, including a decade on
Pittsburgh City Council and a decade as a
state senator

Best Business Schools

• Eberly College of Business and Information
Technology included, for the sixth consecutive
year, in the Princeton Review's Best 301
Business Schools. 2010 edition




Phi Kappa Phi Chapter of Merit

• lUP's chapter recognized with eighteen
other campus chapters nationwide for the
designation. Phi Kappa Phi is the nation's
oldest, largest, and most selective honor
society for all academic disciplines and has
chapters on more than three hundred
campuses.

2009 Silver Telly Award

• Awarded to Fish Eyes, a film produced and
written by Communications Media student
Sam Hakes '08 in collaboration with other
IUP students.

Young Alumni Achievement Awards

The IUP Alumni Association annually
recognizes a recent outstanding graduate
of each undergraduate college.
The 2009 recipients:

• Eberly College of Business and
Information Technology — Amanda Gordon
'03, fixed utility financial analyst. Pennsylvania
Public Utility Commission. Office of Trial Staff

• College of Education and Educational
Technology — Lance Neeper '01. M'07.
doctoral candidate in Special Education.
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

• College of Fine Arts — Kenneth Collins '97,
artistic director. Temporary Distortion

• College of Health and Human Services —

Michael Brock Herr CA'97, '02. executive chef,
Oakland Hills (Mich.) Country Club

• College of Humanities and Social
Sciences — Kevin Lyons 02. Spanish Education
teacher. Greensburg Salem School District

• College of Natural Sciences and
Mathematics — Maureen O'Connor M'99, D'02.
director of Neuropsychology, Bedford (Mass.)
Veterans Administration Medical Center:
instructor of Neurology. Boston University ~%



12 • www.iup.edu/magazine





f



" EXCLUSIVE

Band of Brothers



always been outgoing, happy, competitive,
and a glass-half-full type of guy"

By itself, that statement would not seem
worthy of special notice. But it took Scott
McGuire about four minutes to create that
sentence, spelled out one character at a
time on a computer controlled solely through
the movement of his eyes.

McGuire has Amyotrophic Lateral Sclero-
sis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's dis-
ease. ALS is a disease that usually attacks
both upper and lower motor neurons and
J egeneration throughout the brain
nal cord. In short, the mind is clear,

hile all muscle function deteriorates.

As an undergraduate student at IUP,



i life that included
sports, mountain biking, fishing, and hiking.
He met his future wife, Heidi Hill, and also
joined Tau Kappa Epsilon (TKE) fraternity, a
brotherhood that would make an impression
on his life far beyond his expectations.

In the summer of 1994, McGuire began
noticing subtle signs of tremors and spasms,
although he wrote them off as signs of old
injuries. In 1997, after realizing that some-
thing was seriously wrong, he was ultimately
diagnosed with ALS.

Although McGuire and his fraternity broth-
ers had remained close after graduation,
McGuire's diagnosis brought them all
together again. When the TKE brothers
learned that McGuire had ALS, they orga-



nized a camping trip to show their support.
Longtime friend and fraternity brother Bob
Zernick built Scott and Heidi's house. Several
brothers show up regularly for what they call
"help days" to assist in regular maintenance
and seasonal outdoor work.

"Scott was and still is everything that TKE
represents," said Dan O'Leary '90. "He is that
guy who puts all others before himself.... He
is the motivation to push yourself harder
even if all others have given up on you. He is
truly an inspiration for all that know him." "%

Read more of the story of Scott McGuire
and the TKE brotherhood in the Web Exclusive
at www.iup.edu/magazine.



www.iup.edu/magazine 13



Il/P



I IQs president, Tony Atwater,

lUFwas selected by the New
Pittsburgh Courier tor its 2009 Men
of Excellence recognition. One of
fifty men chosen, he was named in
the education category. "I am
sincerely honored to receive this
prestigious award," Atwater said.
"I have been blessed to enjoy suc-
cess as a journalist, as a university
professor, and as a university
president, and I take pride in
serving my community and facilitating
the success of others." The program
recognizes African-American male
executives, business owners, and
community leaders who have dis-
played proven success within their
profession, are positive role models
whose contributions encourage
others, and are active in community
service or organizational involvement.
Alumnus Davie Huddleston '68 was
also selected for the 2009 list.

I in English Department faculty
lUl member Linda Norris was
named the 2009 Teacher Educator
of the Year by the Pennsylvania
Association of Colleges and
Teacher Educators. Norris has been
educating teachers for eighteen
years and has directed lUP's under-
graduate English Education program
for twelve years. With coauthor
sj Miller, she received the 2007
Richard A. Meade Award from the
National Council of Teachers of
English for the book Unpacking the
Loaded Teacher Matrix: Negotiating
Space and Time Between University
and Secondary English Classrooms.



Valeri Helterbran, a member of
the Professional Studies in
Education faculty at IUP, was
named Teacher Educator of the
Year two years earlier.

Teresa Shellenbarger, a faculty
member in Nursing and Allied
Health Professions, has been
chosen to serve as a mentor in the
Faculty Leadership Mentoring
Program of the National League for
Nursing and the Johnson &
Johnson Campaign for Nursing's
Future. The program pairs five
early-and-midcareer faculty
members with five fellows of the
league's Academy of Nursing
Education who are recognized
leaders in nursing education.
The paired participants will work
together throughout 2010 on
individual leadership development
and on a group project to be
presented later this year in Las
Vegas. Last fall, master's and
bachelor's degree programs in
Shellenbarger's department were
approved for unconditional ten-year
accreditation by the Commission on
Collegiate Nursing Education.

The August 26, 2009, edition
of the Pittsburgh Tribune-
Review profiled Pittsburgher
Irwin Kauffman, who has taught
guitar at IUP since 1977. At
seventy-two, the article said,
Kauffman is the oldest member
of the Pittsburgh Symphony


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