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Natural Science: BIOL 103-104. (HIM 101-102. or SCI 105-106

Social Science: ICON 121. PSYC I (I I

Liberal Studies Electives: 6cr, BTED/COSC IEMG 101,

ICON 122. no course with lll'l D prefix



51



INDI \N \ UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2009-2010



Page 83



Major:

Core Requirements:

HPED 142



23



Foundations of Health. Physical Education.

and Sport

Prevention and Care of Injuries to the

Physically Acme

MotOl Behavior

Human Structure and Function

Evaluation in Health and Physical Education

Physiology of Exercise

Psychosocial Implications for Health and

Physical Education

Senior Seminar: Professional Development

in Health. Physical Education, and Sport

Sport Administration Requirements:

HPED 280 Aquatic facilities Management

Introduction to Sport Management

Preprofessional Experience II

Managing Facilities and Events in Sports

Adapted Physical Activity and Sport

Business Practices in Sport

Law and Issues in Managing Sport

Internship

Select one course from the following:

ECON 239, HPED 315. 335. 375. 412. 430



HPED 175

HPED 209
HPED 221
HPED 341
HPED 343
HPED 441

HPED 442



HPED 2^2
HPED 319
HPED 320
HPED 344
HPED 445
HPED 460
HPED 493



3er

2cr
3cr

3cr
3cr

Ml

3cr

3cr

2cr
»ci

3cr
3cr
3cr
3cr
2cr
3cr
3cr



25



21



Business Minor Requirements:

ACCT 201 Accounting Principles 1

ACCT 202 Accounting Principles 11

BLAW 235 Legal Environment of Business

BTST 321 Business and Interpersonal Communications

FIN 310 Fundamentals of Finance

MGMT 310 Principles of Management

MKTG 320 Principles of Marketing

Total Degree Requirements:



Bachelor of Science-Physical Education and Sport-Aquatics



Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section

with the following specifications:

Mathematics: MATH 217

Natural Science: BIOL 103-104. CHEM 101-102. or SCI 105-106

Social Science: PSYC 101, SOC 151

Liberal Studies Electives: 9cr, BTED/COSC/IFMG 101,

FDNT 145, no course with HPED prefix

Major:

Core Requirements:

HPED 142 Foundations of Health. Physical Education,

and Sport 3cr
Prevention and Care of Injuries to the

Physically Active 2cr

Motor Behavior 3cr

Human Structure and function 3cr

Evaluation in Health and Physical I ducation Icr

Physiology oi I xercise 3cr
Psychosocial Implications for Health and

Physical Education hi
Senior Seminar: Professional Development

in Health, Physical Education and Sport 3cr
Sport Science Requirements:

HPED 263 Aquatics Icr

HPED 315 Biomechanics 3cr

HP) D 319 Preprofessional Experience 11 3cr

HPED 344 Adapted Physical Activity and Sport 3cr

HPED 375 Physiological Basis of Strength Training 3cr

HPED 410 Exercise Prescription 3cr

HPED 411 Physical Fitness Appraisal Jci

HPED 412 Physical Activity and Stress Management 3cr



54



23



HPED 175

HPED 209
HPED 221
HPED 341
HPED 343
HPED 441

HPED 442



Aquatics Requirements:

HP] D 165 Life-guarding

HPED 261 Water Safety Instructor

HPED 264 AdvancedAquatics

lll'l I) 270 Instructor of Handicapped Swimming

HPED 276 Coaching of Swimming

HPED 279 Swimming Pool Maintenance and Chemistry

HPED 2S0 Aquatic Facilities Management

HPED 335 Athletic Coaching

Free Electives:

Total Degree Requirements:



12



3cr




3cr


HPED 175


3cr




3cr


HPED 209


3cr


HPED 221


3cr


HPED 341


3cr


HPED 343


120


HPED 441




HPED 442



HPED 344
HPED 345
HPED 346
HPED 365
HPED 375
lll'l I) 376
lll'l D 377
lll'l I) $80
HPED 385

lll'l D 411
lll'l I) 44(.
lll'l I) 44S

HPED 47o

lll'l 1) 477
Pins 151



Icr
Icr
Icr
Icr
Icr
2cr
2cr
3cr



I2(i



Bachelor of Science-Athletic Training

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 5 1

with the following specifications:

Mathematics: MATH 217

Natural Science: BIOL 103-104 or CHEM 101-102

Social Science: PSYC 101. SOC 151

Liberal Studies Electives: 6cr. BTED/COSC u MG 101.

FDNT 145. no course with HPED prefix

Major: 23

Core Requirements:

HPED 142 Foundations of Health. Physical Education.

and Sport 3cr
Prevention and Care of Injuries to the

Physically Acme 2cr

Motor Behavior 3ci

Human Structure and Function 3d
Evaluation in Health and Physical Education 3cr

Physiology of Exercise 3cr
Psychosocial Implications for Health and

Physical Education 3cr
Senior Seminar: Professional Development

in Health. Physical Education and Sport 3ci
Athletic Training Requirements: 46

BIOL 151 Human Physiology 4cr

HPED 315 Biomechanics 3ci

Adapted Physical Activity and Sport 3cr

Athletic Training 3cr

Athletic Training Lab Icr

Advanced Athletic Training 4cr

Physiological Basis of Strength Training 3cr

Athletic Training Clinical Practicum I lei

Athletic Training Clinical Practicum II Icr

Seminar in Sports Medicine 2cr
General Medical Conditions in Athletic

Training 2cr

Physical Fitness Appraisal $ci

Therapeutic Modalities 4cr
Therapeutic Exercise foi Athletic Injury

Management 4cr

\thlctic Training Clinical Practicum III Icr

Athletic Training Clinical Practicum IV Icr

Medical Physics I ecture Jcr

Controlled Electives: one course from the following: Jci
FDNT 245. HPED 410. 4s>2. SAF1 347



Total Degree Requirements: 120

Note: I he HPED office or the office of the \thlctic I raining Curriculum

Coordinatoi can provide additional information related to specific

requirements regarding initial health screening, criminal record checks, and

liability insurance needs



Page 84



INDI \NA CNIYERSin OI PI wsx I \ \\l \ I \H1 R(,R \l)l M 1 i ( \I U.OG, 2009-2010



Bachelor of Science in Education-Health and Physical
Education (")

1 iini.il Studies: ^s outlined in I iberal Studies section

« >ih the follow ing spc< ifu ations

Mathematics: \i Mil .' i ' and ; additional ci (must be

approved as I iberal Studies Mathematics courses)

Natural Science: B101 103 104 oi ( HI M 101 102

Social Science: PSY< 101

I Ibei .il Studies I lectives: Oct

Major:

Required ( ourses:

lll'l n 142 I oundations of Health, Physical I ducation,

and spun
lll'l I) 175 Prevention and i are ol Injuries to the

Physically Active
lll'l D 209 Motor Behavioi
lll'l D 221 Human Structure and Function
lll'l D 242 Emergenc) Health Care (I i
lll'l D -"I Watei Safety Instructoi
lll'l n 115 Biomechanics

lll'l I) 341 Evaluation in Health and Physical I ducation
lll'l D343 Physiology ol I xercise
lll'l I) 441 Psychosocial Implications for Health and

Physical I ducation
lll'l I) 442 Senior Seminar: Professional Development

in Health, Physical I ducation and Sport

Professional Requirements:

IK .ill h and Physical Education:

lll'l D 214 reaching Health Fitness and Gymnastics
lll'l I' 21 s reaching Rhythmic Activities and Dance
HPED 216 reaching Elementary Physical Education
II PI D 217 Teaching Middle School Physical Education
lll'l I' 21S leaching Secondary Physical Education
lll'l D 3I<> reaching Elementary Health Education
HPED 318 Preprofessional Experience I
lll'l D 325 School and Community Health
lll'l I) 370 Adapted Health and Physical Education (2)
1IP1 I) 42<> Health Science Instruction
HPED 450 Curriculum and Programming in Sexuality
Education






lei

2cr
Id
Id

ler

Icr

in

3cr

3cr

3ci
3cr



ler
lcr
2cr
2cr
2cr
2cr
lcr
3cr
3cr
3cr

3cr



3cr
3cr

lcr
lcr
6cr
6c r

lcr



2S



23



21



College:

Preprofessional Education Requirements:

COMM 103 Digital Instructional Technology

EDSP 102 Educational Psychology

Professional Education Requirements:

EDl'C 242 Pre-Student Teaching Clinical Experience 1

I Dl ( -42 Pre-Student leaching Clinical Experience II

EDUC421 Student leaching

EDUC 44 1 Student Teaching

EDUC442 School I. iu

I nt u I Degree Requirements: 120

(*l See requirements leading to teacher certification, titled "3-Step
Process lor leacher Education." in the College of Education and
Educational Technology section of this catalog.

I 1 ) Students are required to keep C PR Instructor Certification current
from completion of HP1 I) 242 until graduation.

(2 l leacher education majors must take HPED 370.

See advisory paragraph "Timely Completion ol Degree
Requirements" in the section on Requirements for Graduation.



Certification-Driver Education

t eiiiik.iiion in Drivei I ducat nay i«- added t.. a valid Petui ylvania

ii. .nil i ertificate with the completion ol the following

lll'l l' 251 Foundal s of Safety and Emergency Health

Mi
Introduction to the I >m ing I
Driving I ducation Program Management
Vpplii ation "i Drivei I .in. ation

lnstniclioii.il Modes



12



lll'l i>

lll'l I) <s<

lll'l I



lei
lei
In



)ci



I I ) lll'l D 251 may he BUbstitUted fol lll'l I) 242 in the core curriculum



Highway Safety Center



II P's Highway Safety < lentei attempts to address the highway salclv needs

ol the commonwealth through a variety ..i pr ogram s ami activities, I he

Highway Salclv ( enlei programs encompass activity in five ma|or areas
l l research. suivcvs. and studies. 2| education (teaching), <l training and
conferences, 4| field and extension sen ices, and 5) traffic safety communi-
cations and information exchange

Teacher Certification in Driver Education

Through cooperative effort with the Department of Health and Physical
Education, the Highway Safety Center coordinates ami directs II P*s
Teacher Certification Program in Driver Education.

IUP Regional Highway Safety Project

This project is ,i federally funded program contracted with the Pennsyl-
vania Department ol Transportation's Center for Highway Safety. Origi-
nating at HP in January 1987, under the title of the Indiana County Seat
Belt Program, its purpose was to increase public awareness and the usage of
occupant restraints. The program expanded its emphasis and territory in
1989 and now includes the counties of Armstrong, Jefferson, and Clearfield
Programs for corporations, schools, civic groups, law enforcement agen-
cies, etc., include topics such as occupant safety, bicycle safety, pedestrian
safety, safe driving characteristics, and DUI. The project also serves as a
resource to other community safety groups by providing printed materials.
audiovisual aids, crash-car dummy costumes, and the "Seat Belt ( on\ nicer
A Car Seat Loaner Program provides car seats to Indiana County residents

Driver Training Programs

from basic driver education programs for beginning drivers to truck driver
training to advanced driver training programs in emergency driving tech-
niques, the Highway Safety Center provides a cadre of courses, all designed
to meet the needs of the student

Emergency Services Training

This program area is designed to meet the training needs of ambulance.
fire, and police personnel in the areas of emergency medical services and
rescue

Traffic Accident Investigation

Traffic Accident Investigation programs are available tor safety directors,
insurance adjusters, and police personnel. Courses range from basic investi-
gation up to ami including accident reconstruction

Department of Hospitality Management

Website: www.iup.edu hospitalily-mgt

Thomas 1.. Van Dyke. Chairperson; Miller. Shiring. Sullivan; and
professors emeriti Simkins. Woods

The Department of Hospitality Management is one of the premier
hospitality management programs in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
The second largest hospitality management program in the common-
wealth, it is regionally known and nationally respected It offers students
an academic preparation leading to a Bachelor of Science degree

The mission of the Department of Hospitality Management program is to
develop competent hospitality management professionals who meet or



INDIANA I NIYPRS1TY Of PI NNS , I Y\NI \ I NDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2(1(19-2010



Page 85



exceed contemporary industry needs while preparing them for future career
growth and achievement.

The dynamic, flexible curriculum prepares students for professional careers
in the hospitality management industry. Graduates of the program have
specialized know ledge and skills for managing the business of hotels,
resorts, restaurants, clubs, theme parks, contract food sen ices, school food
service, business and industry, cruise lines, special events, convention and
trade show events, and wedding consultation and in areas of the travel and
tourism industry. The program is accredited by the Accreditation Commis-
sion for Programs in Hospitality Administration.



Bachelor of Science-Hospitality Management

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section

w ith the following specifications:

Health and Wellness: FDNT 143

Mathematics: MATH 101 or higher

Natural Science: Option 1

Social Science: ECON 101. PSYC 101

Liberal Studies Electives: 3cr. no course with HR1M prefix

Major:

Required Courses:

HRIM 101 Introduction to the Hospitality Industry

HRIM 130 Hospitality Sanitation and Security

HRIM 150 Principles of Hospitality Management

HRIM 256 Human Resources in the Hospitality Industry

HRIM 259 Hospitality Purchasing

HRIM 265 Hospitality Cost Management

IIRIM 310 Professional Development in the Hospitality

Industry
HRIM 313 Food Production and Service
HRIM 320 Hospitality Marketing
HRIM 330 Applications of Food Production and Service
HRIM 335 Legal Issues in Hospitality
HRIM 413 Advanced Food Production and Service
HRIM 470 Hospitality Business Model
HRIM 493 Internship
Controlled Electives: One track required:
16crof nonrequired HRIM prefix courses

Other Requirements:

ACCT 201 Accounting Principles I
FNLG XXX Foreign Languages

Free Electives: (2)

Total Degree Requirements:

(1)



4S



44



3cr
3cr
3cr
3cr
3cr
3cr

2cr

4cr
3cr
4cr
3cr
4cr
3cr
3cr(l)



16



9-11
3cr
6-8cr

1-3

120



Each student must complete 800 hours of work experience, of which
400 hours must be through supen ised experiences in IIRIM 493. See
department internship coordinator for detailed information.
(2) State System Board of Governors' policy states that at least 40
percent of the coursework in a degree must consist of courses
numbered 300 or above.



Department of Human Development
and Environmental Studies

Website: www.iup.edu Tides

Mary E. Sw inker. Chairperson; Blood. Bowers. Brown. Gordon. Henry.

Huang. McCombie. Ramassini. Su; and professors emeriti Cramer.

Gallati. Heekroth. Hovis, Huang, ka/nicr. kcsiier. A. Nelson. L.

Nelson. Streifthau. Viggiano. Wood

The Department of Human Development and Environmental Studies was
created by the merging of the lamiK and Consumer Sciences I ducation and
Consumer Services departments I he mission statement of the department
is to empower individuals to support human and en\ ironmental needs.

enabling them to perform professionally in a changing, diverse technologi-
cal and global society



I he department is composed of majors that arc interdisciplinary and share
humanistic values. All majors have an applied research locus and stress
critical thinking, professional judgment, decision making, and synthesis ol
information with direct focus upon career paths

The Human Development and Environmental Studies Department offers
academic programs leading to the Bachelor ol Science degree uuh the fol-
lowing majors: Child and Family Studies. Fashion Merchandising, and
Interior Design. The Family and Consumer Sciences I ducation program
leads to a Bachelor of Science in Education. These majors prepare men ami
women for positions in business, the community, and education. The
majors also prepare students for graduate study in the areas of interior
design, housing, clothing, textiles, consumer economics, human service,
child development, family studies, or education.

Faculty advisors work closely with students in planning and integrating the
academic program to meet the students' career goals and to supplement
classroom experiences. Internships are available and encouraged so students
can apply academic knowledge to actual situations. International study is
also available to provide an enriching cultural experience.

Fashion Merchandising

The Fashion Merchandising program provides course emphasis in clothing
and human behavior, apparel production and analysis, textiles and quality
control, apparel distribution, merchandising and promotion, global
diversity, historic textiles and apparel, color and aesthetics, and apparel
construction. Communications, problem solving, group project organiza-
tion, professional presentation, and analytical and critical thinking skills
are incorporated in course content. The Ebcrly College of Business and
Information Technology complements the Fashion Merchandising major
by providing study in one of three options: Business Administration.
Marketing, and Small Business Management

A cooperative program between IUP and the Fashion Institute of Tech-
nology in New York City allows students to study one of se\ en majors:
accessories design, advertising and communications, advertising design.
fashion design, manufacturing management, textile surface design, and
textile development and marketing.

Graduates of this program are being prepared for entry-level positions such
as manufacturer's sales representative, production assistant, ready-to-wear
quality control analyst, textile testing laboratory technician, management
trainee leading to position of store manager, executive merchandising
trainee leading toward position of buyer merchandise manager, museum
curator assistant, personal color consultant, and personalized shopping
specialist for an upscale retail firm.



Bachelor of Science-Fashion Merchandising

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section

with the following specifications:

Mathematics: MATH 101 or higher level MATH course

Natural Science: (HEM 101-102 or SCI 105-106

Social Science: ECON 121. PS. ( 101, GEOG 104 or

ANTH 110 orANTH 211

Liberal Studies Electives: 9cr, BTED/COS< II MG 101.

ECON 122. MATH 214 or 217. no course with FSMR prefix

Major:

Required Courses:

I S\IR I 10 Introduction to Fashion

FSMR 1 12 Fundamentals of Clothing Construction

FSMR 3 14 textiles

FSMR 350 Apparel Industry 1

FSMR J60 Apparel Industry. II

FSMR3S5 Ready-to-Weai Analysis

1SMK434 Qualitv Control in [textiles

I SMR456 Historic Costume

FSMR 4so Seminar in 1 asluon Merchandising



54



»6



ici
Jci
Jci

3cr
3cr
3cr
)ci
3cr
3cr



Page 86



INDIANA UNIVERSM Y < >l PI Wsn LVANIA I M>l RGRADUATE ( vl \I(K,. 2009-2010



6-9

120



( outrolled I lectivet: rhrec courses from the following
FSMR 212, 252, 281 103 156 154

FSMR 455, 181, 482 INDS 205

Additional Requli ements:
Required < ourses:
\> i 1 201 Accounting Principles I
ik\i 120 Journalistic Writing <>r

I \i,l 110 Public Speai
MK ii. 120 Principles ol Mark
Students »ill complete courses in one <>t the
following options:
Option I Business Administration Minor (15cr)

\n I 202. FIN J10, MOM! 110, select two courses

iromlUM 121, Bl W !35, IFMG 100 (Note students

must meet .ill minoi requirements listed in catalo
Option 2 Marketing t I2ci i

MKTG 121, select three »cr400-level MKTG courses
Opium 3 Small Business Management (12cr)

MGM I 275, 125 ( I ). selecl two courses from

Mi, \ll »00, $10 150, 403 (2)

trie Electlves:

Ini.il Degree Requirements:

« 1 1 Prerequisites to be waived.

Student will need to lake ACC1 202 and 300



Interior Design

The Interior Design program enables graduates to analyze problems.
synthesize information, and implement design solutions supportive of the
needs of people and the environment. The program emphasizes synthesiz-
ing of information and creative problem solving based on interdisciplinary
experiences and communicating solutions. The program enables graduates

to adapt to B changing world by drawing on history and multidiscipliiun
experience and applying principles ol research I Ins program is aceredited
by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design.

The core of the program includes courses addressing space planning, draft-
ing, design graphics, color theory, building systems, materials and finishes,
human factors, computer-aided drafting and design, design development.
textiles, lighting, residential and contract design, and professional practice.
Detailed information is available from instructors regarding equipment and
supplies to be purchased by students tor indi\ idual courses in this program.
Internships present an excellent opportunity for students to gam practical,
on-the-job training and are highly recommended Experiential learning op-
portunities in the community augment the program Students tour a variety
ol settings including offices, museums, lactones, showrooms, retail outlets,
and construction sites. Supportive courses are offered in art and business.
Graduates are prepared for entry-level positions in commercial and
residential design, sales, historic preservation, and showroom management

Bachelor of Science-Interior Design

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 5 I

with the following specifications

I iiu Arts: fulfilled by AKIII 205

Humanities: PHIL 223 recommended

Mathematics: M Mil 101 or higher

Natural Science: SCI 105-106

Social Science: I'SVC 101. SOC 151

Liberal Studies Elecrjves: 6cr, ARM 207, ECON 122.

no courses with INDS prefix

Major: 51

Required Courses:

FSMR3I4 textiles 3cr

INDS 105 Introduction to Interior Design 3cr

INDS 118 Drafting for Construction 1 3cr

INDS 205 Color Theory and Application 3cr



9ci


ISDS.'IS




INDS 2 10




INDS 'in


21 2-t


INDS ids
INDS HO


lei


INDS (I t


INDS s | s


lei


INDS 119


lei


INDS (70


12 ISci


INDS 180
INDS Ids




INDS 464




Inds 165



I Iraftii ini, n, ,n II

Presentation foi Interioi I '

rhree-Dimeniional Design foi Interioi Design lei

Interioi I ighting let

Human I actors in Interioi Design (ci

Matei ids and I inishes Id

Kcsulenli.il Design I ll i

Residential Design n Kitchen, Hath

Media Kim, in I), j Ur

Development ol I tesign I let

Development "i Design u Jci

Intcnoi Design Pi i I'i H lie* Jcj

i ontrai t Design I Jcr

i ontract I lesign II icr

other Requirements:
Outside Concentration:

Business HI SI 105, MKTG 320 6ci

in \KI 114; two courses from the following:

AKI 21V 214. 215. 2lo. 2IX. 219 9ci

Free Elecrives:

lutal Degree Requirements:



15



3

120



Family and Consumer Sciences Education

The Family and Consumer Sciences Education major prepares students inr
the teaching of family and consumer sciences-related subjects in the public-
schools ( ourscwork is required in all areas of family and consumer ser-
\ ices, including child development and family relations, consumer
economics, clothing, foods, and interior design. Professional education
courses are also required.

Bachelor of Science in Education-Family and Consumer
Sciences Education (*)

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section

with the following specifications: 51

Mathematics: MATH 151

Natural Science: CHI M 101-102

Social Science: PSYC 101, SOC 151

I iberal Studies Elcctives: 6cr. CNSV 315, MATH 152.

no courses w ith It SI prefix

College: 32

Preprofessional Education Sequence:

COMM 103 Digital Instructional Technology 3cr

EDSP 102 Educational Psychology 3cr

Professional Education Sequence:
I Dl X 301 Education of Students with Disabilities

in Inclusive Secondary Settings 2cr

EDSP 477 Assessment ol Student Learning: Design

and Interpretation of Educational Measures 3cr

EDUC 242 Pre-Student Teaching Clinical Experience 1 Icr

EDUC 342 Pre-Student Teaching Clinical Experience II Icr

EDUC 43 1 Student Teaching in Family and Consumer

Sciences 6cr

EDUC 44 1 Student Teaching 6cr

EDUC 442 School law ler

FCSE350 leaching Family I ire i ducation 3cr

l( s| 450 Teaching Vocational and family 3cr

Consumer Science Education

Major: 34

Required Courses:

CDFR2I8 Child Development 3cr

CDFR 224 Marriage and Family Relations 3cr

CDFR321 Preschool Education: Developmental!)

Appropriate Practices Vr

CNSV 101 Personal and Family Management 3cr

FDNT 150 Foods 3cr



INDIAN \ I NIYERSITY Of PENNSYLVANIA I NDI RGRADl AIT CATALOG 2004-2010



Page 87



Icr
3cr
5cr

3cr
3cr

3cr

3cr



FDNT 151 Foods Laboratory

FDNT212 Nutrition

FSMR 1 12 Fundamentals of Clothing Construction

FSMR314 Textiles

INDS312 Housing and Culture

Controlled Electives:

One course from the following: CNSV 413, 416,

FSMR 434, INDS 213
One course from the following: CDFR 323. 463.



Online LibraryIndiana University of PennsylvaniaUndergraduate catalog (Volume 2009/2010) → online text (page 24 of 76)