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Business: ACCT 201, ACCT 202. BLAW 235
Criminology; CR1M 210, 215. 255
Economics: ECON 121. 122. 332
English: ENGL 212. 220. 310
History: HIS! 320, 321, 346
Philosophy: PHIL 101. 110, 222.450

Free Electives:



51



0-6



33



3cr (2)
*cr (3)
30cr



15-21



9-21
120



Total Degree Requirements:

( 1 ) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in liberal Studies
electives.

(2) PLSC 101 satisfies non-Western requirement.

( 3 ) Credits for PLSC 1 1 1 are counted in the Liberal Studies Social Science
requirements.

(4) PLSC 280 and or 2X5 recommended as prerequisite to PLSC 380
through 389.



Bachelor of Arts-Government and Public Service

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section

with the following specifications

Mathematics: MATH 217

Social Science: ECON 121. PSYC 101. SOC 151

Liberal Studies Electives: 6cr, COSC 101, no courses

with PLSC prefix



College:

Foreign Language Intermediate Level ( I I

Major:

Required Courses:

ECON 335 Public Finance

ECON 336 State and Local Finance

PLSC 1 I I American Politics

PLSC 250 Public Policy

PLSC 251 State and Local Political Systems

PLSC 300 Research Methods in Political Science

PLSC 370 Introduction to Public Administration

PLSC 371 Issues in Public Administration

PSYC 330 Social Psychology

SOC 458 Political Sociology

Controlled Electives: Three courses from the following:

PLSC 350. 351. 352. 353, 354. 355. 358, 377,

444, 481, 482, 485, 493



0-6



39



Jcr(2)
3cr(2)

3er

3cr

3cr

3cr

3cr

3cr

3cr

3cr (3)

9ci



Other Requirements: 21

One course from communications areas (English, Journalism. 3cr

Communications Media) as approved by ad\ ism
Interdisciplinary minor: Government Management. Personnel

Administration. Financial Administration, Planning IScr

Free Electives: 4-10

Total Degree Requirements: 120

( 1 ) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in the Liberal
Studies electives

(2) Approved substitutes for ECON 335 and 336: ECON 5 J2, 333, 361,
373.

(3) Approved substitutes for SOC 458: SOC J35, 345. 387.



Bachelor of Arts-International Studies/Political Science

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 50

with the following specifications:

Mathematics: 3cr

Social Science: PLSC I I I

liberal Studies Electives: 6cr, no courses with PLSC prefix

College: 0-6

Foreign Language Intermediate Level i I I

Major: ; )

Required Courses:

PLSC 101 World Politics

PLSC 1 I 1 American Politics

Interdisciplinary sequence

Cultural specialization sequence



Other Requirements:

Free Electives:

Total Degree Requirements

(1)



3cr

•cr (2 1
I5cr(3)
I5cr (4 1

0(5)

31-37
120



Intermediate-level foreign I anguage maj be included in Liberal Studies
electives, < inlj courses 300 level and beyond ma> count in the cultural
specialization sequence
(2) Credits for PLSC 1 I 1 arc counted in the Liberal Sludics Social Science
requirements.

(3) The interdisciplinary sequence includes .in introductory orcompara-

tive inlcrnation.il course from each of five social science disciplines

anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, and

sociolog\ Selection depends on goal! si ol major and should He planned

50 in consultation with the International Sludics advisoi

i4i The specialization sequence focuses on one area or culture and three
disciplines economic systems, political systems, language, literature,
history geography. Currently, three specializations are offered: Latin
America, the I at I ast, and Soviet Studies Consul! with advisor for
planning course selection.



Page 1 1 6



INDIANA UNIVERSITY ol I'l NNSY1 \ AM A I M)l R(.R MM VII CATALOG, 2009-2010



i J) Majors arc itrongl) encouraged to lake advantage ol ihe study abroad
opportunities available through II I' departmental programs and ol
exchange opportunities available through the International I dui

ttiti



Minor-Political Science

Required < out tea:

PI St 101 World Politics

PI si ill American Politics

( ontrolled I lecth i ■

I hree additional I'l si courses



15



HI
Id

9ci



Minor-International Studies 18

Requli i ii i out sea:

PI S( I0I World Politics let

ri s( i ii American Politics *cr (1)

Controlled Electivea:

Interdisciplinary sequence (see major) I5ci

redits counted with I iberal Studies Social Sciences



Bachelor of Arts-Religious Studies

Liberal Studies i mtlincd in I iberal Studies sc< lion with
the follow ing spe< ifi< ations

M.nlu in .■ I ii s: hi

Liberal Studies Electives 9ci no courses with RLST p

( ollege:

inguage Intermediate I evel 1 1 1

Major:

( ontrolled I lectives (2)

one Core Kl si 100 oi 110

Western Kl si 1411

■u Kl si III 170, ...
Indigenous Kl S I 160 oi <<.r

Five additional Klsl courses (3) ivr

( >ik- religion-related co <a

Free I lectives: 31-37

hiial Degree Requirement!: 120

( 1 ) Intermediate-level I oreign I anguage mas be included in the Liberal
Studies electives

(2) Othei courses may be approved in consultation with advisor

(3) ( onsull Religious Studies ad



Department of Religious Studies

Website: uu» iup.edu religiousstudies

I in 1 1 s.i s. Smith, Chairperson; Chandler, Gibson, Holm. Reich,

Yirenkyi; and professors emeriti Chan, Ferrara, I in, Mlecko,

Montgomery, Schaub

The program in Religious Studies is designed to pro\ ide .i balanced, nonsec-
tarian, cross-cultural approach leading to a better understanding of the
phenomenon ol religion in human experience, It emphasizes an interdisci-
plinary approach and encourages the minor or a double major, as well as a
single major in Religious Studies.

The program is valuable for those planning to teach about religions or
religious studies m schools at the primary, secondary or college level. The
program also provides an excellent background for graduates planning to
enter Catholic, Jewish, oi Protestant seminaries. Additionally, Religious
Studies is a good complement to majors in such fields as Anthropoh
English. Fine Ails. History, International Studies, Music, Philosophy,
Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology Religious Studies is one
significant way to integrate course studies within the university curriculum.

In addition to the 2" credits of Religious Studies eouises in the major, ;
credits must he taken from a number of courses offered h\ other depart-
ments which complement those offered in Religious Studies Opportunity
for interdisciplinary and cross-cultural stud) is implicit in the stud\ ol

religious themes and is required in the Religious Studies program at H'P.

Religi ous Studies Minor

The requirements for a minor are 15 credits that must he taken from the
Religious Studies offerings, w Inch include certain required courses

Religious Studies Honors Program

The honors program is open by departmental imitation to Religious Studies
majors with a minimum 3.25 cumulative GPA and a 3.5 GPAin Religious
Studies courses Students complete RLST 480/H/, 483/H/, 493/H .and
HNRC 499, which fulfills the Liberal Studies Synthesis requirement To
determine how honors track courses will be integrated into existing require-
ments for the Religious Studies major, students should consult their ad\ isors

Lib eral Studies Offerings

The Religious Studies program's Liberal Studies courses are all introductory
in nature, none presupposes anj Religious Studies background. The student
may choose from Rl ST 100. 110. 250. and 290



Minor-Religious Studies

( ore Kl si i ii 1 10

Western Kl SI 260, 290, 180, lid. or 440
I astern Kl SI 511, $70, or 375
Indigenous Kl S 1 160 "i 365
Elective: one RLS1 course ( 1 )

( I ) Consult Religious Studies ad\ isor.



15



Hi

3cr
3ct
Jet
Jcr



12



*cr
3cr
3cr
3ct



Religious Studies Honors Track

Required Courses:
HNRC499 Honors Senior Synthesis
RLST4K0 II Seminar in Religious Studies
RLST4S3II Honors I hesis in Religious Studies
RLST 4"^ II Internship in Religious Studies

( I ) Credits for HNRC 499 are counted in the Liberal Studies Synthesis
requirement.



Department of Sociology

Website: www.iup.edu sociology

I). Me\ lleekert. Chairperson: \ckeiman. Anderson. Bonaeh. Boser,
Donner. Gondolf, Gunter, Measles. Hildebrandt, Holt/. Hysock, Mahry
\owak. Shmberg. Snyder, Su auger: and professor emeritus Hunter

I he Department of Sociology seeks to develop both the scientific and

humanistic foundations oi sociology, to educate the wider community as to

the significance ol sociological knowledge, to apply sociological knowledge
to current social problems, and to advance the profession b\ promoting the
welfare of individuals ami society I he discipline of sociology focus
primarily on the analysis of modem industrial societies b\ examining their
basic patterns ol soeial organization, the \anous changes that occur within
these patterns, and the impact oi the patterns on indh idual thought and
action Students are prepared lor employment in human service fields or for
graduate Study in sociology or related fields

Students majoring in Sociology may select one of four tracks General Soci-
Human Services Sociology ofDisability Services, and Applied Social

Research The general track attempts to broadK educate those students who



INDI AN \ I \l\ I Ksin HI l'l\\WI\WI\ I ND1 RGRAIH AIT (.'ATM (Hi. 2009-2010



Page 117



maj wish to pursue graduate training in sociology and make sociology a

career and profession Because of Us flexibility, il is also appropriate for
students who want to pursue double majors that would include such fields as
psychology or criminology. The general track gives students the broadest
possible training in sociology. Students graduating with majors in general
sociology often find employment in business, industry, and government.

The Human Services track in sociology seeks to help students understand
the causes of many of the problems that plague modern societies, such as
poverty, racial discrimination, substance abuse, and domestic violence. It is
designed to provide students with the know ledge and skills necessary to
become practitioners in various human services areas (e.g.. juvenile
delinquency, medical sociology, gerontology, and interpersonal dynamics
and family sociology).

Students who complete the specialized major track for Sociology of Disa-
bility Services will be prepared for employment in the human services/social
services as therapeutic staff support personnel or in a wide variety of career
services such as mental health mental retardation programs, community-
based residential employment training programs, early intervention pro-
grams, residential treatment programs, aging programs, and other agency
service providers for individuals with disabilities. Additionally, students in
this track are encouraged to complement their studies by adding a second
major in Disability Services Program or a minor in Education of Excep-
tional Persons offered by the Department of Special Education and Clinical
Services to better prepare them in a multidisciplinary curriculum. Minors
are also recommended in Psychology or Child Development and Family
Relations.

The Applied Social Research track emphasizes the development of research
and assessment skills in students. Such skills are important in carrying out
program assessments, needs assessments, program development, and other
activities that focus on gathering, analyzing, and interpreting data
important for policymakers

The department also prepares teachers for secondary school social studies
with a concentration in sociology. The program leads to the degree
Bachelor of Science in Education. With its emphasis on patterns of social
organization in modern industrialized societies, sociology provides a solid
foundation for teaching social science at the secondary level. Minors in
sociology are available in the following tracks: general sociology, human
services, sociology of disability services, and applied social research.

Sociology Honors Program

The honors program is open by departmental permission to declared
Sociology majors with a minimum 3.25 cumulative GPA and a 3.5 GPA in
Sociology courses.

Students complete CUSS 4X9 (a multidisciplinary colloquium emphasizing
problem-solving, discussion, reading, and writing on a topic or theme); SOC
483; and IINRC 494. which fulfills the Liberal Studies Synthesis require-
ment. Students must cam at least a grade of C in each course completed for
the track [o determine how honors track courses will be integrated into
existing requirements for the Sociology major, students should consult their
advisors.

Students may be invited to apply or may nominate themselves In either
case, to be considered tor the Sociology honors track, students must have
earned 15 credits in Sociology, including SOC $20 Sociology majors who
have met the eligibility criteria must submit an application to the chairper-
son of the Department of Sociology after they have earned at least 56
credits.



(1-6



33



Bachelor of Arts-Sociology/General Sociology Track

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section vvuli

the following specifications

Mathematics: MATH 217 recommended

Social Science: SOC 151

Liberal Studies Electives: 9cr, no courses with SOC prefix



♦cr (2)

3cr

3cr

3cr

3cr



I2cr



College:

1 oreign Language Intermediate Level ( 1 )

Major:

Required Courses:

SOC 151 Principles of Sociology

SOC320 Sociological Theory

SOC 460 Social Research Methods I

SOC 461 Social Research Methods II

One course from the following:

Si k 361 Social Stratification

SOC 362 Racial and Ethnic Minorities

SOC 363 Sociology of Gender

At least one different course from four of the following

substantive areas:

Social Inequality ami Sot ial ( hange.

SOC 269. 337. 361 S62 $63, 387. 448, 452. 458
Deviance ami Social Problems:

SOC 231. 269. 333. 335, 427, 428, 452
Individual in Society: SOC 251. 2(-'». 345, 357. 452
Social Organization ami Institutions: SOC 286, 336.

340. 341. 342. 34S. 352. 421. 458
Comparative Sociology: SOC 233. 271, 272. 273.

286, 314, 337, 342, 387
Free Sociology Electives (3)

Free Electives:

Total Degree Requirements:

( 1 ) Intermediate-level foreign Language may be included in Liberal Studies
electives

(2) Credits counted in Liberal Studies, not in the major.

(3) Internship in Sociology (SOC 493) will not count as part of the
required Free Sociology electives and must count as credits beyond the
3(>cr required for the major (out of Free Electives). The student must
write a one-page justification explaining the selection of his her 9cr of
Free Sociology electives as it relates to the internship experience.



9cr



28-34
120



Bachelor of Arts-Sociology/Human Services Track

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section

wnh the following specifications:

Mathematics: MATH 217 recommended

Social Science: SOC 151 required. ANTII 110 and

PSYC 101 recommended

Liberal Studies Electives: 9cr. no courses with SOC prefix

College:

foreign Language Intermediate level 1 1 )

Major:

Required Courses:

SOC 151 Principles of Sociolo]

SOC 320 Sociological Theory

SOC 387 Social and Cultural Change

sin 391 Foundations of Sociological Practice

si K 392 Clinical Sociological Practice

SOt 460 Social Research Methods 1

SOC 461 Social Research Methods II

SOC 493 Internship in Sociology, Oi

Controlled Electives: One substantive aiea (4)

Medical Sot iology AN 1 1 1 444 or S( K $42, and four courses

from the following: ANTII 222. 444. BIOL 151 or 155.

I i n\ $35 I DM 212. I'sM $21, $78, RGP1 $50,
s ) SOC 2 'I. $36, 342. $57, 44S. 452. 457

Gerontology PSYC $78ot sin $57, and four courses from

the following: ANTH 444, ECON 135, PSY( $12,378,

RGPI $50, SOt 231,251,336,342,352,357,448,457



53



0-6

45

•en 2 1
3cr

HI

3ci
$ci

HI
HI
I2CT

15cr (5)



Page 118



INDIAN A I Nl\ ERSITY OI I'l NNS"i I \ \NI \ I N 111 Kt .K \I >l Ml ( \1 vl OG 2009-2010



Juvenile Dellnaui m i SO ; ; ; and foui courses from the
following I RIM 10 ; Gl OG i

lllsi 174, SCM

so

Interpersonal and Family So ind

four courses from the following t DFR 218

PSY< III, 121, 130 SOI

SOI 161 163, 42 ' 428 448.4
and Indus IOoi 148 and four courses from

the following ECON 130, 150, 171, 172, 173. ELR426 180

HIM | ; PSY< ; '"' sin 231 140 148 161

SOI 45 '. 458
Community Development SOI ' ; I oi 148 and four courses

from the following VNTH/SO *I4.

ECON 136 183, I I'M 402.GEOG 131, 132 PI S< 251,

RGPI 150 SOI 269 133 < ; <>. 141, 163, 148

Free I lectlves:



Community Development si >< Ji| oi -44s .mil foui •.•■>.
from Ihe following VNTH SOI
ECON 331 ■ I in.' GEO

RGPI 150 si H

I 1 1 1 ii,, tivei



lnt.il Degree Requirements:



16-22
120



1 1 » Intermediate-level I oreign I anguage maj be included in 1 iberal Studies
electives

(2) i rcilitN counted in I iberal Studies, not in the major

(3) SO 391 and 392 must be taken before SO 493. Generally, SO 193
is taken in the summer before the senioi year.

i4 1 Students mas create their own substantive area with the approval of

the department chairperson.
(5) \i least three courses in an> substantive area must be si )( courses



Bachelor of Arts-Sociology/Applied Social Research Track

I Iberal studio-.: \s outlined in Liberal Studies section 53

with the following specifications

Mathematics: MATH 21

Social Science: SOC 151 required, Will llo recommended

I Iberal Studies I lectives: 9cr. I OS! 101, no courses

with SOC prefix

College: 0-6

I oreign I anguage Intermediate Level (1)

Major: 45

Required (nurses:

sir 151 Principles of Sociology *cr (21

SO 120 Sociological Theory 3cr

si K 456 Field Research Methods 3cr

SO 4s _ Computer Use in Sociolog) 3cr

SO 458 Political Sociology lei

SO 460 il Research Methods I 3cr

SOT 461 Social Research Methods L 3cr

SO 493 Internship in Sociolog) (3) 1 2cr

Controlled Electives: Oie substantive area |4| 15er (5)

Medit til Sot iology Will 444 oi SI K 542. ami lour courses

from the following: Will 222. 444. BIOL 151 or 155.

ECON 335, FDNT 212. PSYC 321, 178, RGPI '50.

SOC 231. 135, 136, 142, 557, 44s. 4>2
Gerontology. PSYC 378 or SOC 357, and lour courses from the

following ANTH444.ECON 135, 160.PSYC <I2. 378,

RGPL 350. SOt 231. 251. 336, 542. 152, 357, 44s
Juvenile Delinquency. SOC 333 and lour courses from the

following: CRIM 102,225,235, 194.GEOG432,

1 US I -4. sir 231, 2<>". 135, 336, 145, 361, 162, 42s
Interpersonal and Family Sociology SO < ; <>,.r 145, and

lour courses from the following: t DFR 2 IS. 224.

PSYC 311. 521. 350. S(K 251. 269, 335, Cm..

SO 361, 163, 42". 42s. 44s. 452
Labor and Industry: SOt 540 or 54s. ami four courses from

the following: ECON 130, 350, 371, 5-2. 173, 1 I R 42n. 480,

HIST 173, PSY( 190, SOC 231, 340, 348, 161

SOC 44S. 458






iiii.ii Degrei Requirement!:

1 1 1 Intermediate-level I • ■! included in I iK.-r.il studies

elective
i2i Credits counted in I iberal Studies, not in the i

(3) SOC 4 0, and 4(,| must be taken before lakin

( ienerally, s< K 4'» I is taken in the summer before the senioi
iii Students ma) create then own substantive area with the approval ol
the department chairperson

\i least three courses in any Substantive area must '



Bachelor of Arts-Sociology/Sociology of Disability Services
Track

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Ihe I iberal Studies section ^<

with the following specifications

Mathematics: \i \l II 217 recommended

Social Science: SO 151 and I'SVI 101 required.

ANT1I 1 10 recommended

Liberal Studies Electives: 9cr, ii" ionises with SIX prefix

Collide: n f.

Foreign Language Intermediate Level 1 1 1

Major: 4>

Required t nurses:

I Dl \ 111 Introduction to Exceptional Persons 3cr

I Dl \ 4f.o family Perspectives on Disability 3ci

SOC 151 Principles of Sociology *cr

sin 120 Sociological rheory lei

si m 1 16 Sociologv ol the Family Icr

SI ii 342 Social and Cultural Aspects of Health and

Medicine let

SOC3 s_ Sociology of Aging 3cr

SOC 3 l M Foundations of Sociological Practice 3cr

si ii 192 Clinical Sociologie.il Practice 3ci

si ii 452 Disability andSociet) 3cr

si K 460 Social Research Methods I 3ci

50 4(.| Social Research Methods II 3ci
Internship:

51 'i 493 Internship m Sociology I2cr (3)

Suggested Minors or Kree Electiscs: 16-22

Free elective credits mas be used toward the studs of a
minor discipline. A minor in one of the following areas
is recommended:

( hild Development and Famih Relations IScr

Education of Exceptional Persons IScr i4i
Psychology I Set

Intal Degree Requirements: 120

i 1 i Intermediate-Foreign Language may be included in Liberal Studies
electives

i 2 I I redits counted in Liberal Studies, not in the major

(3) SO '"'I and 342 must be taken belou:^ enerally, SOC 493

is taken in the summer before the senior scar.
i4i Ihe minor in Education o\ Exceptional Persons is recommended for

students ss anting a more in-depth studs of disability services from an

educational pcrspcctise



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PI N\sx i \ \\| \ { \|)[ r ( ,r \[>l ATE CATALOG 2009-2010



Page 119



Bachelor of Science in Education-Social Science Education/
Sociology Track (*)



(2) Courses counted toward Liberal Studies credits Jo not receive duplicate
credits in the major.



Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section
with the following specifications:

Humanities: Historj is fulfilled bj courses in the major
Mathematics: MAIM 21" (recommended)
Natural Science: BIOL 103-104 (recommended)
Social Science: ECON 121. PSYt 1 01. SOC 151
Liberal Studies Electives: 6cr, PSYC 310 or 330,
no courses with SOC prefix

College:

3 additional credits of MATH 100-level or abo\c

(in addition to Liberal Studies Mathematics) ( 1 )

Preprofessional Education Sequence:

COMM 103 Digital Instructional Technology

EDSP 102 Educational Psychology

Professional Education Sequence:

CHSS 342 Si ii ial Studies Teaching Lab

EDEX 301 Education of Students with Disabilities in

Inclush e Secondary Settings
EDEX 323 Instruction of English Language Learners

w ith Special Needs
EDSP 477 Assessment of Student Learning: Design

and Interpretation of Educational Measures
EDUC 242 Pre-Student Teaching Clinical Experience I
EDUC 342 Pre-Student Teaching Clinical Experience II
EDUC 441 Student Teaching
EDUC 442 School Law
EDUC 455 Teaching of Social Studies in Secondary Schools

Major: (2)

Required Sociology Courses:

SOC 23 1 Contemporary Social Problems

SOC 320 Sociological Theory

SOC 336 Sociology of the Family

SOC 460 Social Research Methods I

Controlled Electives:

One course on Social Equity from the following:

SOC 361. 362.363
Select two additional courses: one each from any two of the
following three categories:
Deviance and Social Problem'.

SOC 269. 333. 335. 357. 42 _ . 42S. 452
Individual in Society: SOC 251. 345
Social Organizations ami Institutions: SOC 286. 337, 340. 341.

SOC 342, 348, 352. 361. 362, 363, 387. 421, 448. 458

History Distribution Requirements:

HIST 2(12 Western Civilization Since 1600

HIST 204 United States History to 1877

HIST 205 United States History Since 1877

Social Science Distribution Requirements:

ANTH 211 Cultural Anthropology
GEOG 230 Cultural ( ieography

PLSC 280 Comparative Government I: Western Political

PLSC 285Systcms or Comparative Government II:

Non- Western Political Systems

Free Elective:



3cr

3er
3cr

3cr
3cr



3cr



Total Degree Requirements:



48



3cr

3cr
3cr



2cr

2cr

3cr

lcr

Icr

12cr

lcr

3cr



3cr
3cr
3cr
3cr

3cr

6cr



35



21



123



(*) See requirements leading to teacher certification, titled "3-Step

Process for Teacher Education." in the College of Education and

Educational Technolog\ section of this cat tl
( 1 ) Students are required to take an additional 3ci of MAUI beyond the

Liberal Studies requirements for a total of 6cr, all of which must be

100 level or abo\e



Minor-Sociology/General Sociology

Required Course:

six 151 Principles ol Sociology

SOC 320 Sociological Theory

Controlled Electives:

One course from the following: SOC 361. 362. 363
Three additional courses in Sociology



Minor-Sociology/Applied Social Research

Required Courses:

SOC 151 Principles of Sociology

SOC 320 Sociological Theory

SOC 457 Computer Use in Sociology

SOC 460 Social Research Meth. ids I

SOC 46 1 Social Research Methods 1 1

Controlled Electives:



Online LibraryIndiana University of PennsylvaniaUndergraduate catalog (Volume 2009/2010) → online text (page 32 of 76)