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Free Electives:



48



45



4cr

4cr ( 1 )

2cr

4cr

4cr

Icr

4cr

4cr

4cr

3cr

Icr

lcr

Icr

3cr

2cr



3cr



23-2S



3cr
4cr
4cr
3cr
3cr
3cr

3-4cr
()-4cr



(1-4
I2ii



Total Degree Requirements:

( 1 ) CULM 1 1 I and 1 12 can be substituted lor CHEM 11 3 and I 14.

(2) Qualifying students can also use 500- or 600-le\el CULM courses to
meet ilus requirement

( 3 ) (HEM 35 1 may be substituted for B1CM II 1 1



Bachelor of Science in Education-Chemistry (*)

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section

with the following specifications:

Mathematics: MATH 123. 124

Natural Science: PHYS 111-121 and 112-122

Social Science: PSY( 101

Liberal Studies Electives: Ocr

College:

Preprofessional Education Sequence:

COMM 103 Digital Instructional Technology
EDSP 102 Educational Psychology
Professional Education Sequence:
EDEX 301 Education of Students with Disabilities in

Inclusive Secondary Settings
EDSP 477 Assessment of Student Learning: Design and

Interpretation of Educational Measures
EDUC 242 Pre-Student Teaching Clinical Experience I
EDUC 342 Pre-Student Teaching Clinical Experience II
EDUC 441 Student Teaching
EDUC 442 School Law
EDUC 451 Teaching Science in the Secondary School



50



2 ')



3cr

3c r



2cr

3cr

lcr

lcr

12cr

Icr

3cr



32



Major:

Required Courses:

CHEM 113 Concepts in Chemistry III)

CHEM 1 14 Concepts in Chemistry II 1 1 1

CHEM 214 Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry

CHEM 23 1 Organic Chemistry I

CHEM 232 Organic Chemistry II

CHEM 321 Quantitative Analysis

CHEM 341 Physical Chemistry 1

CHEM 343 Physical Chemistry Laboratory I

CHEM 499 Problems in Chemistry Education

Controlled Electives: (2)

Select 4cr from the following:

CHEM 322. 342. 344. 351,410, 411; BIOC 301. 311

Other Requirements:

BIOL 1 1 1 Principles of Biology

GEOS 1 1 1 Earth Science for Educators I or

GEOS 1 13 Earth Science for Educators II
GEOS 1 12 Earth Science for Educators I Lab or

GEOS 1 14 Earth Science for Educators II Lab

Free Elective: 1

(<*) Total Degree Requirements: 120

(*) Sec requirements leading to teacher certification, titled "3-Step
Process for Teacher Education." in the College oi~ Education and
Educational technology section of this catalog.

(1) CHEM 111 and 1 1 2 can be substituted foi ("III M 113 and 114

(2) A minimum of 6cr of Controlled I lectives, including either CHI \l
551 oi BIOC 301. is required foi the \( S-certified degree in
Chemistry Education

(#) See advisory paragraph "lunch Completion of Degree Requirements"
in the section on Requirements for Graduation.



4c r
4cr
2cr
4cr
4c r
4cr
4c r
lcr
lcr
4cr



4cr
3cr
Icr



Minor-Chemistry

Required Courses:

CHEM 111 General Chemistry I or

( 111 \l 1 1 - ( oncepts in Chemistrj I
( hi M 112 Genera] Chemistrj II or

< in \i 1 14 i oncepts in Chemistrj II
CHEM 231 Organic Chemistrj I
i ill M 232 organic Chemistrj II

At least 4 additional cr from the following
( III M J21 »23, »41, 151



20



4c r

4cr

4cr
4cr

4cr



Page 132



INDIANA 1 \l\ I RSin (i| I'l NNSM \ \NI \ t NDI Ri,R \l)l Ml CATALOG, 2009-2010



Department of Computer Science

Website: h ■ - upset

Charles J. Shubra, Chairperson; Vli, Deb, Ezckicl Farag Fries,
Obliley, O'Neil, Shumba, Smith; and profes rompkins

[Tie programs in Computer Science al II P lead to the B.S orB.A degree
and .Hi.' designed primaril) to prepare graduates fot productive woik in
high!) computer-dependenl areas ol business, government, and industrj In
recent yean, majors graduating from the program have attained theii fii il
jobs in business applications, progi imming and systems analysis, computet
software development, scientific and applied mathematical program
and othei computer-related areas and have gone to graduate school

In a rapid!) developing field such as Computet Science, it is important that
the graduate's education be broad and fundamental so that new trends can
more readil) be followed < lui goal is to balance fundamentalit) and breadth
with sufficient supen ised prat tit e so that out graduates are productive .11
the time the) graduate but read) and willing to change with the field

We encourage t omputet Science majors to take .1 strong minoi (01 area
concentration) in .1 second area ol interest Souk- students ma) wish to
double 111.1101 Majors in othei disciplines al 11 I' are also welcome 10 take
1 omputer Science courses for which the) are qualified 01 to complete a
Computet Science minoi 01 Information Assurance Minor.

Students in .1 1 omputet Science track should set then goals beyond simple
programming and should be preparing to:

1 appl) computet science knowledge to application areas from science and
industry

2 appl) appropriate data structures and algorithms to analyze and solve
new problems

3 appl) software engineering techniques to designing, implementing,
documenting, testing, and maintaining software systems.

4 contribute to improving the design and implementation of databases

5 use more than one programming language and choose an appropriate
one for the project

6 work with and communicate effective!) with professionals 111 various
fields

7. continue a lifelong professional development in computing.
s. act ethical!) and professionally.

There are additional goals for students dependent on the Hack the) choose

Bachelor of Arts-Computer Science
\ graduate of this track will be prepared to:

1 appl) know ledge of computing to an area not usually associated with
computer science

. be particular!) effective in communicating with others of different

cultural and educational background regarding computing issues
3. he employed in entry-level positions in business.

Bachelor of Science-Computer Science/Applied Computer

Science Track

A graduate of this track will be prepared to:

1 develop web-based applications and interfaces

2 work with all types ot computer systems legacy, current, and future.
3. applv knowledge of computing to an area of secondary interest

I dependent on the minor taken I

4 work with a variet) of software tools in designing and implementing
computer-based sy sienis

5 manage activities that are Strongly computer-system dependent.

6. be employed at entry-level through project leader positions.

Bachelor of Science-Computer Science/Languages and
Systems Track

\ graduate ol this track will be prepared to.

I . improve a) the software tools that programmers and analysts use.

b) operating systems, c) Web-based applications and interfaces, and

dl networks and system security
2 develop a) better languages lot communicating with computers and

b) software that takes computer organization into account, and

c) enter graduate studies



Bachelor of Science-Computer Science/Information Assurance
Track

1 vuli be prepared lo

1 woik with business personnel to implement informal securit) policy

2 woik with law enforcement personnel al all levels 10 prevent informs

lion seuiiilv violations and prosecute those who attack COtnpUtCI
sv stems
! manage secuntv in network systems.

I iik icase i he public 's knowledge of information assurance issues

5 establish procedures thai providi information assurance in computet

systems foi winch s he is responsible.
i' contribute to improving secure data communications

strengthen the security of application programs



Bachelor of Arts-Computer Science

Liberal Studies: As Outlined in I ibci.il Studies section
with the following specifications

Mathematics: M \l II 125 tl 1

liberal Studies Elective*: $CT, M Mil 216, no courses with

1 1 IS( prefix

Major:

Required Courses:

( 1 ist ins 1 undamentals oft omputet Science

CI ISC I Hi Problem Solving and Structured Programming

( ( 1st 210 Object-Oriented and Gl [Programming

( ( 1st ' 221) Applied ( omputer Programming

( OS( ; < M| < omputer Organization and Assembly Language

COSC 3 1 () Data Structures and Algorithms

t 1 is< !41 Introduction to Database Management Systems

COSC 380 Seminar on the Computing Profession and

I lilies

1 list 180 Scininai on lechnic.il lopics

Controlled Electives: 6cr from the following i2i
( 1 ist MAI II 250 Introduction to Numerical Methods
(list $16 I lost Computer Security

( OSC319 Software Engineering Concepts
t 1 ist $20 Software Engineering Practice

COSC 345 Computer Networks

COSC 1FMG354 resting and Controlling LANs

COSC 355 Compulci Graphics

( llSC 356 Network Security

COSC 362 Unix Systems

COSC $65 Web .Architecture and Application Development

COSC481 Special topics in Computer Science

(only sections approved lor majors)
( 1 >S< 4S2 Independent Stud)

I i )S( 4 C )3 Internship in Computer Science

II MG455 Data Warehousing and Mining
Upper-level Electives l>\ Categories:
Artificial Intelligence. COSC 405

( 'omputer An hitet ture C< )SC 4 It)
Database Management COSC 444
Numerical Methods COSC 427, 451
Systems Programming t OSC 430, 4v2
Theory oj languages: COSC 420. 424. 460



4X



37

3cr
3cr
3er
4c r
3cr
3cr
3cr

2ct

lcr

3cr

3cr (3)

3cr

3cr (4)

3cr

3cr

3cr

$CI

3cr

3cr

I -4er

I -4cr
I2cr (4)
3 ci
6cr (5)



Other Requirements:

Additional Writing:

ENGL 322 Technical Writing

1 oreign language Intermediate I evel

Additional Mathematics:

\l Mil 214 Discrete Mathematics

Free Electives:

rota! Degree Requirements:

ill \l Mil I 25 can be substituted by MATH 121

|2| Select at leasl 6cr from the list of controlled electives.



0-12



$CI

0-6cr



3cr



23-2')
120



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYIVWIA I M>1 RGRADU.M I ( VTALOG 2009-2010



Page 133



(3) COSC 316 cannot he counted for major credit if a student does an
Information Assurance minor.

I J i Credit for both COSC 320 and 493 may be counted toward the degree,
but only one will be counted toward the major requirements. COSC
403 may be selected in either the second semester oi the junior year
or the fu si semester of the senior year, [f COSC 493 is selected and
approved, COSC 380 ma) be taken in the immediate!) preceding
semester. Note: Only 4cr of COSC 493 can be counted toward these
6cr. Additional COSC 493 credits may be counted as free electives

(5) Select at least two additional courses, from at least two different
categories, from the list of upper-level electives.



Bachelor of Science-Computer Science/Applied Computer
Science Track



48



40



Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section

w ith the following specifications:

Mathematics: MATH 125 (1)

Liberal Studies Electives: 3cr. MATH 216, no courses with

COSC prefix

Major:

Required Courses:

COSC 105 Fundamentals of Computer Science 3cr

COSC 1 10 Problem Solving and Structured Programming 3cr
COSC210 Object-Oriented and GUI Programming 3cr

COSC 220 Applied Computer Programming 4cr

COSC 300 Computer Organization and Assembly Language 3cr
COSC 3 10 Data Structures and Algorithms 3cr

COSC 319 Software Engineering Concepts 3er

COSC 341 Introduction to Database Management Systems 3cr

COSC 365 Web Architecture and Application Development 3cr
COSC 380 Seminar on the Computing Profession and

Ethics 2cr

COSC 480 Seminar on Technical Topics I cr

One of the following two courses:

COSC 320 Software Engineering Practice 3cr (2)

COSC 493 Internship in Computer Science 12cr (3)

Controlled Electives: 3cr from the following: (4)
COSC MATH 250 Introduction to Numerical Methods 3cr

COSC 3 16 Host Computer Security 3cr (5)

COSC 345 Computer Networks 3cr

COSC/IFMG 354 Testing and Controlling LANs 3cr

COSC 355 Computer Graphics 3cr

COSC 356 Network Security 3cr

COSC 362 Unix Systems 3cr

COSC 481 Special Topics in Computer Science l-4cr

(only sections approved lor majors)
COSC 482 Independent Study l-4cr

IFMG 455 Data Warehousing and Mining 3cr

Upper-level Electives by Categories: 3cr from
the following: 3cr (6)

Arli/hial IntclliiU'm-c: COSC 405
( 'omputer Architecture: COSC 410
Database Management: COSC 444
Numerical Methods COS( 427,451
Systems Programming: COSC 430, 432
Theon oj Languages: COSC 420, 424, 460

Other Requirements: tv-12

Additional Writing:

ENGL 322 Technical Wining Jcr

Foreign Language Intermediate Level 0-6cr

Additional Mathematics:

MATH 219 Discrete Mathematics lei

Minor: Complete a minor from one of the following areas: 8-18

Information Assurance I gci

Any department in the College of Natural Sciences

and Mathematics S-],Ser



Designated Business courses

Designated Economics courses
Designated < ieograph) courses
Designated Communications Media courses

Free Electives:

Total Degree Requirements:



18cr
I5cr
I Scr
I8ci



2-18
120



(1)
(2)

(3)



(4)



(5)



(6)



MATH 125 can be substituted by MATH 121.

Credit for both COSC 320 and 493 may be counted toward the

degree, but only one will be counted toward the major requirements

COSC 493 may be selected in either the second semester of the junior

year or the first semester of the senior yeai II I OS( 493 is selected

and approved, COSC 380 may be taken in the immediately preceding

semester Note: Only 4cr of COSC 493 can be counted towards major.

Additional C( )SC 493 credits may be counted as free electives.

Select at least 3cr from the list of controlled electives and or the list

of upper-level electives

( t ist 316 cannot be counted for major credit if a student does an

Information Assurance minor.

Select at least one additional course from list of upper-level electives.



Bachelor of Science-Computer Science/Languages and
Systems Track

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 48

with the following specifications:

Mathematics: MATH 125 (1. 2)

Natural Science: Must choose Liberal Studies Natural Science Option 1

Liberal Studies Electives: 3cr. MATH 126, no courses with

COSC prefix (1.21



Major:

Core Courses:

COSC 105 Fundamentals of Computer Science 3cr

COSC 110 Problem Solving and Structured Programming 3cr

COSC 210 Object-Oriented and GUI Programming 3cr
COSC 300 Computer Organization and Assembly Language 3cr

COSC 310 Data Structures and Algorithms 3cr

COSC319 Software Engineering Concepts 3er
COSC 341 Introduction to Database Management Systems 3cr
COSC 380 Seminar on the Computing Profession and

Ethics 2cr

COSC 480 Seminar on Technical Topics Icr
Required Courses:

(.(ist 145 Computer Networks 3cr

COSC'4%2 Introduction to Operating Systems Jci

t OSC460 Theon ol Computation 3ci
Controlled Electives: 12cr from the following: (2)

C< ISC \1 VII I 25(1 Introduction to Numerical Methods 3ci I i)

COS( sio Host Computer Security 3cr

COSC 320 Software Engineering Practice or 3ci

COSC 493 Internship in Computer Science 12cr (4)

Computer Graphics 3cr

1 ni\ Systems 3cr

Web Architecture and .Application

Development or

Productivity Tools and fourth Generation

Language-. }ci

Artificial Intelligence ici

Computer Architecture 3cr
Modem Programming Languages or

Compiler t onstruction 3cr



45



COSC 355
COSC 362
COS< 565

COSC 444

COSC 405

( use 41(1
COSC 420

( ust 424
( OSC481



Spcei.il rbpics in t omputer Science

las approved for majors)

Other Requirements:

ENG1 522 lcehnie.il Wilting I

( Ine science w ith lab in addition to the Liberal Studies

requirement



l-4cr



19



3cr

4er



Page 134



INDIANA I \l\ I KSin (H 1*1 \\sn l\ \\IA UNDERtiRADl Ml ( VTALOG. 2009-2010



Mathematics: \ minoi in mathematics including the
follow

\l\lll I I Introduction to Lineal Algebra
\i\iii 216 Probability and Statistics foi Natural Sciences
\i Mil 219 Discrete Mathematics
\i\ili 225 > ilculus 111 i"i Physics, Chemist!) .mil
Mathematic s or
MATH 250 Introduction to Numerical Method

I i n I lecttves:

[total Degree Requirements:



I2ci



i:o



ill \l\lll 125 and 126 can be substituted b) MAIN 121 and 122.

(2) \i\iii i ' s ind 126 (taken as Liberal Studies requirements) are also
counted towards the minoi

i 1 1 t i ist \i \i 1 1 250 maj be counted as a < omputei Science elective oi
.is .i pari i'i the Mathematics minor, Inn nol both

iii ( i isc 493 ma) be selected in eithei the second semestei of the junior
\ en oi the in si semestei of the senioi yeai n i OS< 493 is selected
and approved, ( < 1S< $80 should be taken in the immediatel)
preceding semestei Nolo: < ml) -Jit can be counted towards majoi
Additional i 1 >S( 493 credits ma) be counted .is free electives



Bachelor of Science-Computer Science/Information
Assurance Track

Liberal Studies: As outlined in 1 ibeial Studies section 48

with the following specifications
Mathematics: MATH 125 (1)

Social Science: (RIM 1(11 (2)

liberal Studies Electives: tcr, MAIM 216, no courses with

( OSC prefix

Major:

Required Courses: 43

COS< 105 Fundamentals of Computer Science 3cr

COS< I Ki Problem Solving and Structured Programming Jcr

I OSC210 Object-Oriented and GUI Programming Icr

COSC 220 Applied ( omputer Programming 4cr

i i isc 300 Computer Organization and AssembI) Language 3cr

COS) (10 Data Structures and Algorithms 3cr

COSC319 Software Engineering Concepts 3cr

COSC 341 Introduction to Database Management Systems 3cr
( i >S< $80 Seminar on the Computing Profession and

Ethics 2cr

(list 480 Seminar on Technical Topics Icr
Information Assurance Required Courses:

COSC316 Host Computer Security 3cr

COSC 356 Network Security 3cr

One of the following two courses

i i isi 'Oi Software Engineering Practice 3cr

( ( >S( -I'M Internship (Information Assurance) 12cr (3)

Controlled Electives: 3cr from the following:

COSC 345 Computer Networks 3cr

COSC IFMt. 154 resting and Controlling LANs Jci

COSC 362 Unix Systems 3cr

COSC 365 Web Architecture and Application Development 3cr

( ( isi 4S I Special Topics in ( omputer Science

(as approved for majors in this track) 3cr

IFMG382 Auditing for EDP Systems 5cr
Upper-Level Electives: 3cr from the following:

COSC 42^ Introduction to Cryptography Jci

i i isi 432 Introduction to Operating Systems 3cr

COSC 482 Independent Study 3cr

COSC 400-level course with department approval 3cr

Minor in Criminology 15 (2)



oilier Requirements:

Additional \\ i Itlng:

I m.i 122 rcchnical Writing

I on i lermediate I evel

Additional Mathematics:

M M ll 219 Discrete Matbem

I ree I lectives:

Inial Degree Requirements:



6-12



lei
Jcr



2-8
120



ih MATH 125 i. hi be substituted b) MATH 121

I i KIM KH (taken as pan ol the social science requirement) is counted

as pan ol the l *ci < riminolog) minor; 1 5 additional cr ol < KIM are

requit
si 493 ma) be selected in eithei the second semester of the junior

i 01 the llrsl semester ol the senior yeai ll ' ' IS( 4 l >3 is selected

and approved, C< )S( 'so ma) he taken in the immediatel) preceding

semester Note: < >nl\ 4ci oi ( ( ISI 4'H may he counted towards the
major. Additional ( < )S( 4 l H credits may he counted as free eleclnes



Minor-Computer Science 18

Required Courses:

At least one course from the following

COSC210 Object-Oriented and Gl [Programming 3cr

COSC 220 Applied (omputer Programming 4cr

COSC 300 Computet Organization and Assembly Language 3cr

( (isi electives (1, 2. 3) I5cr

( 1 ) At least 6cr of the elective 1 5cr must be COSC courses numbered

higher than 200.
(2) COSC 101 is an appropriate entry course for minor. However, ( ' ISI

101 cannot be counted as part of a Computer Science minor by

Management Information Systems majors.
1 3 ) See Computer Science minor advisor for suggestions.



Minor-Information Assurance (1) 18

Required Courses:

( OSC 110 Problem Soh mg and Structured Programming 3cr (3 1

COS( U6 Host Computer Security 3cr

COSC 352 LAN Design and Installation 3cr

CRIM 101 Crime and Justice Systems (2) or 3cr

CRIM 102 Survey of Criminology i2 i

CRIM 321 Cybersecurity and Loss Prevention 3cr

CRIM 323 Cybersecurity and the Law 3cr

( 1 ) Computer Science Information Assurance Track majors are not

eligible to take this minor: instead, they must take a Criminology

minor.
(2) Criminology majors cannot count CRIM 101 or 102; instead, they

must take one additional course from the following: COSC 341. 356.

362. 427. 432. 4S2. IFMG 382.
I 3) Computer Science majors cannot count COSC 1 10; instead, they must

take one additional course from the following: CRIM 300, 355, 400.

401. 481, 4S2



Department of Geoscience

Website: www.iup.edu geosi

Steven A. Hovan, Chairperson: Ccreone. Coles. Famsworth. Lewis,

Poage. Taylor: and professors emeriti Clark. Hall. Park. Richardson.

Sutton

( ieolog) is a far-ranging science and encompasses various aspects of the
Earth system In addition to the solid tarth. this system includes the oceans
and atmosphere, climate change, and most aspects of our immediate
environment Professional geologists arc thus engaged in a wide range of
activities, depending on their interests. Scientific questions addressed by



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNsy I \ \\I.\ I NDI RGRADl ATI CATALOG :o(W-20IO



Page 135



geologists include the evolution of life, the origin of volcanic activity, the
assessment of volcanic and earthquake hazards, the evolution of our
planetary neighbors, climate change, and perhaps most importantly, the
human impact on our environment.

I he department offers a B.S. degree with a major in Geology that is divided
into two tracks: Geology ami Environmental. Either track gives students
the necessary foundation to pursue a wide variety of career goals In addi-
tion, education degrees are offered foi students who are interested in teach-
ing. The degrees and courses in the program emphasize hands-on learning,
including outdoor instruction and student-oriented research and professional
experiential learning opportunities In addition to on-campus instruction
and class-related field trips, the department also oilers several regional
geology Field Workshops, which take place in Newfoundland, the Northern
Rockies region. Florida and the Bahamas, and the American Southwest.

The B.S. degree with a major in Ueolog> Geology Track is designed for
students who are interested in pursuing any of the various suhdisciplines in
geology, including oceanography marine geology, climate change, voleanol-
ogy. paleontology, meteorology, and geophysics. There also is considerable
overlap between geology and astronomy, as geologists study the evolution
of other planetary bodies, such as the Moon. Mars, and Venus; the curricu-
lum reflects this link and provides the groundwork for planetary studies.
The Geology Track thus provides students with the foundation needed to
pursue a wide variety of career goals, including research (and postgraduate
studies), teaching, or careers as professional geologists working with private
businesses, environmental firms, or as consultants for federal and state
agencies.

The B.S. degree with a major in Geology En\ ironmental Track is designed
for students who wish to pursue careers in the rapidly expanding environ-
mental field. While our planet has evolved over a 4.5 billion-year history,
our presence has had a significant impact upon our surroundings, in spite of
our brief time of residence. Geologists play a key role in dealing with
environmental issues, and the Environmental Track prepares students to
solve en\ ironmental problems. Graduates from this track will be prepared
for direct entry into jobs with federal or state agencies and private
em ironmental consulting firms, as well as postgraduate studies.

The B.S. in Education degree with a major in Earth and Space Science
prepares students to become certified teachers in Pennsylvania and other
states. Earth and Space Science teachers in middle and high school grades
teach subjects that require a broad and solid foundation in science Course-
work includes study of geology, meteorology, oceanography, and astron-
om) A basic understanding of the cognate sciences, biology, chemistry.
physics, and mathematics is also an essential part of the major. Courses in
pedagogy, including the teaching of English language learners and students
with special needs, complement the subject matter studies. Students create
and present lessons, first in Geoscience courses and then in school class-
rooms, culminating in the student teaching experience in the last semester

The Minor in Geology is designed for students w ho desire a background in
Geology, in conjunction with degrees in business or one of the social or
physical sciences



Bachelor of Science-Geology/Geology Track



Online LibraryIndiana University of PennsylvaniaUndergraduate catalog (Volume 2009/2010) → online text (page 36 of 76)