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Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section

with the following specifications:

Mathematics: MATH 121

Natural Science: CHI M 1 I 1-1 12 or 113-114

Liberal Studies Electives: 4cr. MATH 122. no courses with

(d OS prefix

Major:
Geoscience Core:

GEOS 201 Foundations of Geology

GEOS202 Quantitative Methods in the Geosciences

GEOS 203 Surlicial Processes

GEOS '01 Mineralogy and Petrology

GEOS 302 Structural Geology

One course from the follow ing: ( 1 )

GEOS J03, 401-402. 403-404. 405-406. 407-40S



50



53



4er
2cr
4cr
4cr
4cr

4c r



(d (1S4-0
GEOS 4mi
PHYS III
PHVS 121
PHYS 112
pins 122



Research Methods in the Geosciences

( ieoscience Seminar

Physics I I ecture
Physics I Lab
Physics || I ecture

Physics II I ali
Controlled Klectivcs:
Select I9cr from the following: (2)
One 100-or200-level Ol OS course
\n\ 100-level GEOS course
Any 400-level GEOS com sc
BIOI 111. 112

( 111 M 231. 232. 322. $23, '41
GEOG 316,415
MATH 216 or 217. 241
PHYS 342
COSC 250, 310, 362

Other Requirements:

Foreign Language Intermediate I evel (3)

Free Electives:

Total Degree Requirements:

(1)



2cr
2cr
Jcr
Icr
Jcr
Icr
I9ci



0-6

0-6cr

11-17
120



Up to 4cr of a summer field camp, internship, or independent study,
all of which must be approved by the department, may substitute for
GEOS 303 or a Geoscience I ield Workshop.

(2) Only one Geoscience Field Workshop (including prerequisite Icr
Seminar) may be applied toward controlled electives. Credits from up
to two non-GEOS courses may be applied toward controlled electives

(3) 6cr of computer language may substitute for the foreign language
requirement: COSC 1 10 and 210 (recommended), other higher-level
COSC courses with department permission in consultation with the
Computer Science Department



Bachelor of Science-Geology/Environmental Track

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section

with the following specifications

Mathematics: MAIM 121

Natural Science: CHEM 111-112 or CHEM 113-114

Liberal Studies Electives: 4cr. MATH 122. no courses

with GEOS prefix

Major:

Required Courses:

BIOL 1 1 I Principles of Biology I

GEOS 201 Foundations of Geology

GEOS 202 Quantitative Methods m the Geosciences

( A t is 203 Surficial Processes

GEOS310 Environmental Geology or

GEOS 31 1 Geochemistry
GEOS 3 12 Hydrogeoloi
One course from the following: ( I )

GEOS 303, 401-402. 403-404, 405-406, 407-408
GEOS 470 Research Methods m the Geosciences
GEOS4S0 Geoscience Seminar
Pins III Physics I Lecture
PI I YS 121 Physics I Lab
Controlled Electives:
Select 20cr from the following: (2l
One 100- or 200-lcvcl GEOS COUTSe

Any 300-level Gl oScou.se
Any 400-level GEOS course
BIOL 112. 250
( HEM 231, 232. 322, 523, 541

GEOG 316.415
MATH 216 or 21". 241
Pins 112-122. '42
COSC 250, HO, 162



50



53



4cr
4cr

4cr

4cr

lei

4cr
2cr
2cr
3cr
Icr
20



Page 136



INDIANA I \l\ I Ksin HI PI WsYI\ \\l \ I MH RGRADI Ml CATALOG. 2009-2010



< >ilu i Reqnli ements: 6

I oreign I inguage Intermediate I evel I 6( i

I re* I lectivee: 11-17

ratal Degree Requirement! 120

ili Up to 4a "i .i summa Geld camp, internship, ot indepcndcnl study,
.ill of which must be approved by the department, may substituti
i ,1 1 is (03 ,.i ,i i ieosciencc I ield Workshop
i ink one < leo« ience I ield Workshop (including prerequisite lei
Seminar) may be applied toward controlled electives < redits from up
to two non-GEOS courses may be applied toward controlled electives

i -i i>ii ol computet language may substitute foi the foreign

requirement COS< 1 10 and 210 (recommended), othei higher-leveJ
i i ist courses with department permission in consultation with the
i omputei Science Departmenl



Minor-Geology 18

Required ( nurses:

iiliis^m Foundations of Geolo 4cr

i, I OS202 Quantitative Methods in the Geosciences 2cr

I At from the following: I2cr

GJ OS 203 Surficial Geology

\m 100-levelGI OS course

\nv 400-lc\ cl Gl OS course, except GE< )S 470 and 480 ( I )

1 1 1 Only one Geoscience held Workshop (including prerequisite Seminar)
can be counted toward the minoi



Bachelor of Science in Education-Earth and Space
Science (*)



I iberal studies: \s outlined in Liberal Studies section
with the following specifications:
Mathematics: MATH 121

Natural Science: ( 111 \l I I 1-112

Social Science: PSYC 101

I iberal Studies Electives: 6cr, MATH 217, I'HYS III.

no courses with III * >S prefix

College:

Preprofessional Education Sequence:

t (i\i\i 103 Digital Instructional Technology

I DSP 102 I durational Psychology

Professional Education Sequence:

EDEX 301 Education ol Students with Disabilities in

Inclusive Secondary Settings
I Dl \ 323 Instruction of English Language Learners

with Special Needs

I DSP 4" Assessment of Student Learning: Design

and Interpretation of Educational Measures

I Dl C 242 Pre-Student leaching Cluneal Experience I

I Dl t 542 Pre-Studenl Teaching Clinical Experience II

1 Dl i 441 Student Teaching

EDUC442 School Lav.

EDUC 451 Teaching Science in the Secondary School

Major:

Required Courses:

BIOL 111 Principles of Biology I

GEOS 2l 1 1 Foundations of Geology

( .1 1 is 2<>2 Quantitative Methods in the Geosciences

GEOS 54 1 Planetary Geology

i.l i IS342 Stellar Astronomy

GEOS 353 Paleontology

GEOS 370 Oceanography

GEOS 371 Meteorology

PHYS121 Physics I Lab



52



31



3cr

3cr



Icr

Icr
Icr
I2cr

Icr
3cr



4cr
4er
2cr
4cr
4cr
4er
4cr
»CI

Icr



39



< ontrolled I let lives

Selct i 9< i from the follow in

i,i i is.'n; Surficiat Geology

\n\ 100 level Gl OSco

\n\ 40(1 level dl us course, except <d us 470 and 4.so

PHYS 112 Physit ■ II I ectuie

fins 122 Physics U Lab la

tiii.ii Degree Requirements: 120

(•) See requirements leading to teacher certification titled '-step
Process lor reacha I duration,' in the ' olli ■ of I ducation and
I durational fechnology section ol Ihi



Department of Mathematics

Website: wwvt iup.edu math

Francisco t. Marcon, Chairperson; Adkms, Baker, Balenovich, Burch,
Burkett, ( olen, Dahma, Donley, Dubovsky, Feldman, Kuo, I attanzio,
Maier, Met/. Morgan, Navarama, Pararai, Radelet, Rav. Rcilly. Sharp.
Steelman, Stempien, Stoudt, Walker, Wisloski, /hang, and professors

emeriti Angclo. \iins. Broughlon. Buriok, Das is. < nbson. Ilanman.

Massey, D McBride, R McBride, Mitchell. Mueller, I lakes, J Reber,

Reltig. Shawer, I Smith. W. Smith. Stilwell. Willison, Woodard

I he Department ol Mathematics pupates students lor work in industry

gi. ulii. He school mathematics, and teaching Degrees offered by the depart-
ment are the Bachelor of Science degree with a major in Mathematics, the
Bachelor ol Science degree with a major in Applied Mathematics, the
Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in Economics Mathematics, and the
Bachelor of Science in Education degree with a majot in Mathematics

Education The first two degree programs are offered withm the College ol
Natural Sciences and Mathematics, the third is shared with the I COnomJCS
Department, and the fourth is in conjunction with the College of Education
and Educational Technology. I he departmenl also oilers a minor in

Mathematics, a minor in Applied Statistics, and a concentration in

Mathematics for Elementary Education majors

The program for a mathematics major in the I ollcgc of Natural Sciences
and Mathematics is two phased. A student may pursue a degree in Applied
Mathematics or Mathematics, ["hose completing a degree in Mathematics
will be prepared to continue their studies in mathematics in graduate school,
though some may enter business, industry, or government service. Students
receiving a degree m Applied Mathematics will be primarily prepared to
enter business, industry, or government service in an area where mathemat-
ics or computer science is used or to continue their studies in applied
mathematics or computer science in graduate school. This student would
not be expected to continue graduate studies in pure mathematics

1 he department shares in a joint degree with the Economics Department.
Students with ability and interest in economics discover that a solid back-
ground in mathematics is an essential prerequisite lor advanced theoretical
and applied work in the discipline Similarly, students with talent and in-
terest in mathematics find economics an excellent field in which to employ
their skills and knowledge I he B \ degree with a majoi m Economics
Mathematics allows students to combine these complementary subjects in a
joint degree program administered cooperatively bv the departments ol
Mathematics and Economics. Enrolled students will he assigned an advisor
in each department.

I hose completing the program will have an exceptional background for
graduate studv in economics and such related fields as business, public policy,
or operations research. They also will be ideally prepared to fill a wide
variety of technical and quantitative positions in both government and
private industry

The program leading to the B.S.Ed with a major in Mathematics Education
prepares the student lor teaching mathematics in Grades "-12. Many
graduates, however, continue their formal education in mathematics at the
graduate level or work in government or industry

Elementary Education majors may elect to take a concentration of at least
15 credits in mathematics. The program of courses for this concentration is



INDIANA I Nl\ I RSIIY HI I'l NNSYIAANI \ I NDI RC.RADL ATE CATALOG 2009-2010



Page 137



.is follows: in addition to MATH 151 and 152. select 9 credits from tin-
following courses: MATH 317, 420, 456, 457, 458, 459. 471. or 4S1.

Minor in Mathematics

The minor consists of a minimum of I 7 credits in mathematics. The minor
in Mathematics may offer preparation for advanced study in areas such as
Economics. Computer Science. Physics, and other natural sciences. Any
student who is required to take a year of calculus should consider this minor.

Minor in Applied Statistics

The minor in Applied Statistics, consisting of 16 credits, may be of interest
to students who are required to take a calculus course and a course in
probability and statistics. This includes, but is not limited to. students with
majors in business. Safety Sciences, or Computer Science.

A cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 in MATH courses is required for a minor
in Mathematics or Applied Statistics. The department will not certify a
minor for a transfer student unless at least two of the courses counting for
the minor have been completed in the Mathematics Department.

Bachelor of Science-Applied Mathematics

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 53

with the following specifications:

Mathematics: MATH 125

Liberal Studies Electives: 9cr, no courses with MATH prefix

Major: 37-38

Required Courses:

MATH 126
MATH 171
MATH 216
MATH 225



Calculus 11 for Physics. Chemistry. Mathematics 3cr



Introduction to Linear Algebra
Probability and Statistics for Natural Sciences
Calculus 111 for Physics. Chemistry,
Mathematics
MATH 241 Differential Equations
MATH 271 Introduction to Mathematical Proofs I
MATH 272 Introduction to Mathematical Proofs II
MATH 480 Senior Seminar
Controlled Electives: ( 1 I
Two courses from the following:

MATH 371. 421, 422, 423, 427, 476. 477
One of the following two-course sequences:

MATH 142 447 or COSC 451 /MATH 451;
MATH 363/364: MATH 445446
A minimum of 3 additional cr from the list of courses
above or the following: MATH 353. 465. 481

Other Requirements:

Computer Science:

COSC 1 10 Problem Solving and Structured Programming

COSC 250 Introduction to Numerical Methods

Foreign Language Intermediate Level (2)

Free Electives:



3cr
3cr

3cr
3cr
3cr
3cr
Icr

6cr

6-7cr



3cr



6-12



3cr
3cr
0-6cr



17-24
120



Total Degree Requirements:

( U A student may select courses to fulfill requirements for specialized

track.

Actuarial/Statistics: MATH 363. 364. 366. 371. 421, 446, 465

Math Analyst Engineering: COSC 451. MATH 342/447, 371. 423.
451

Operations Research: MATH 371. 421. 44 s 446. 447
( 2 ) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Liberal Studies



Bachelor of Science-Mathematics

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section

with the following specifications:

Mathematics: MATH 125

Liberal Studies Electives: 9cr. no courses with MATH prefix



53



Major: 37-38

Required Courses:

MAUI 126 Calculus II for Physics, Chemistry, Mathematics 3cr

MATH 171 Introduction to Linear Algebra 3cr

MATH 216 Probability and Statistics for Natural Sciences 3cr
MATH 225 Calculus 111 for Physics. Chemistry,

Mathematics >cr

MATH 241 Differential Equations J«

MATH 271 Introduction to Mathematical Proofs I 3cr

MATH 272 Introduction to Mathematical Proofs II 3cr

MATH 480 Senior Seminar lcr

Controlled Electives:
Four courses from the following: I 2cr

MATH 371. 421. 422. 423, 427, 476. 477
A minimum of 3 additional cr from the list above or the 3-4cr

following: MATH 342, 350, 353. 355. 363, 364.

445, 446. 447. 465. 481



Other Requirements:
Computer Science:

COSC 110 Problem Solving and Structured Programming 3cr
Foreign Language Intermediate Level ( I ) 0-6cr



3-9



Free Electives:

Total Degree Requirements:



2(1-2"
120



( 1 ) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Liberal Studies
electives



Bachelor of Arts-Economics/Mathematics

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section

with the following specifications

Mathematics: MATH 125

Social Science: ECON 121

Liberal Studies Electives: 9cr. no courses with ECON or MATH prefix



Major:
Core:

ECON 122
ECON 421
ECON 422
MATH 126
MATH 171
MATH 216
ECON
MATH 225



48-49



Principles of Microeconomics 3cr

Macroeconomic Analysis 3cr

Microeconomics Analysis 3cr

Calculus II Physics. Chemistry, and Mathematics Jcr

Introduction to Linear Algebra 3cr
Probability and Statistics for Natural Sciences or

355 Statistics for Economists 3cr
Calculus III Physics, Chemistry, and

Mathematics lei



Economics Electives: (1.2)

Students arc especially encouraged to take 1 C( >\ ' <4

and 356. but an) course except I. CON 101 may he used.

Mathematics Electives:

At least one of the following two-semester sequences

MATH 241 and 371, MATH J63 and $64, or

MATH 445 and 446
Three additional courses eithet from the above or from the

following M Mil r\. 272. 342. 417 or 418 (hut not

both). 421. 422. 423. 42". 451. 465. 476, 477

Other Requirements: College:
Foreign Language Intermediate Level i J)

Free Electives:



I2cr



I5-I6cr



0-6

12-19



Total Degree Requirements: 120

( 1 ) No more than 6cr of internship credit mas He applied toward major

(2) No more than one I < < >\ t ontrolled I lective may he a 200-level

course



Page 138



l\DI \\V UNIVERSITY <>l PI Wil \ \M \ I MM Rt.RAlM Ml t VTALOG 2009-2010



' i Intermediate level I oreign I anguagc mas be included in I iberel Studiei
elcctivcs



Bachelor of Science in Education-Mathematics Education (')

Liberal Studies: \s outlined in I iberel Studies section with the ' s

following specifications

Mathematics: \i \i II 125

Social Science: PSY< 101

Libera] Stadlei I lectivea: ; . courses with MAI II prefix

College! 31

Preprofesslonal Education Sequence:

COMM 103 Digital Instructional rechnolo lei

I DSP m: I dik.uu.iul Psychology 3cr

Professional Education Sequence:
I \i\ \ 101 Education ofStudents with Disabilities in 2cr

Inclusive Secondary Settin
I |)| \ 123 Instruction ol I nglish I anguage I earners with

Special Needs
EDSP477 Assessment ol Student I earning Design and

Interpretation of Educational Measures
I 1H C 242 Pre-Student reaching Clinical Experience I
I im i 142 Pre-Srudenl reaching Clinical 1 xperience II
I Di t 441 Student reaching
line 44: sciu.oii.iw
1 IH < 4m> leaching Math in the Secondary Schools



at

Jci
Icr
I or
I2cr

lcr
Jci



3cr

3cr
Jci

3cr
3cr

3cr
3cr

3 cr
3cr
3cr
3cr

3cr
3cr



}6



Major:

Required Courses:

MAIN 126 Calculus II Physics, (. hemistry, Mathematics

\l\lll l"l Introduction to Linear Algebra

\l \l II 21o Probability and Statistics for Natural Sciences

\l\lll 225 Calculus III Physics, Chemistry, Mathematics

MAI II 271 Introduction to Mathematical Proofs I

\l Mil 272 Introduction to Mathematical Proofs II

MM II 340 Principles of Secondary School Mathematics

MMII 350 History of Mathematics

M Mil 353 rheor) ol Numbers

MMII ^ s Foundations of Geometry I

MMII 430 Seminar in reaching Secondary School

Mathematics
MMII 460 rechnolog) m Mathematics Instruction

Other Requirements:

I tisi no Problem Solving and Structured Programming

Free Electives: 4

total Degree Requirements: 122

(*) Sec requirements leading to teacher certification, titled "3-Step
Process tor feacher I ducaiion." in the College of Education and
Educational Technology section of this catalog.



Minor-Applied Statistics 16

At least I tier selected as follows

a) Introductory calculus course: MATH I I 5 or 121 or 123

b) Introductory statistics course M Mil 214 or 216 or 217
O MAUI 417

d) MATH 418
The remaining credits mas be chosen from the following

a) \ second calculus course: MATH 122 or 124

b) MATH 171
el QBUS215

d) An> course for mathematics majors approved by the
Applied Statistics Ads isor



Minor-Mathematics 17

Requll i<l < on i ses: Xcf

M Mil I2I and I V or M Mil I23 and I 24

( ..im nihil i lectlvei: I li

Othci courses foi math majoi M Mil 219 mas be in< lu. led

ih I he lollowi, ue excluded MATH 100, 101, 105, 110

117,214,217 417,418 and courses for the Elementary Education

t ..iKcnii.iiii.il iii Mathematics



Natural Science

Website: mvw iup.edu/preprofessional
I awrence Kupchella, < oordlnator

I he program leading to the H S degree w uh a majoi in Natural Science is
designed to prepare students foi admission to professional schools chiro-
piactic. dentistry, optometry, physical therapy, pharmacy, and podiatry \
separate track prepares students for further studs in engineering I he H S

degree with a majoi in Natural Science will be earned bs students who trans-
fer to professional schools which base an articulation agreement with IUP.

Ill some cases, students interested m obtaining a four-year baccalaureate
degree before entering a medical or professional school should enroll in a
ii leading to a HA or B.S. degree in the departments of Biology or

Chemistry. Students considering a professional career in a high-technology

business or health-oriented businesses or industries mas wish to obtain a
foundation in the Natural Sciences while using then free electises to pursue

additional work in areas such as Molecular Biology, Biochemistry, Psychol-
ogy, Economics, Pre-Law, or Athletic I raining. The U.S. degree with a
major in Natural Science mas not be used for a second major or a second
degree bs majors in the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics I or
further information, contact the Natural Science Program coordinator.

Bachelor of Science-Natural Science



Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section
with the following specifications:
Mathematics: MATH 121
Natural Science: (MUM 1 11-112
Social Science: PS iC 101

Synthesis: not required for three-year students who transfei

to a professional school with an articulation agreement
Writing Intensive: writing-intensive course only required for
three-yeai students who transfer to a professional school with
an articulation agreement

Liberal Studies Electives: BT1 D/( OS( II MG 101; no
courses ssith SCI prefix



49



.Major:






Required Courses:




Biology :






BIOl III


Principles of Biology I


4er


BIOL 112


Principles of Biology u


4cr


BIOL 150


Human Anatomy


la


BIOL 151


Human Physiology


4cr


BIOL 241


Genera] Microbiology


3cr


BIOL2M


Genetics


3cr


Chemistry:






( HEM 231


( Irganic Chemistry 1


4cr


t III M 232


Organic Chemistry II or




i ill M 351 Biochemistry


4cr


Physics:






pins in


Physics 1 Lecture


3cr


pins 121


Phvsics 1 Lab


Icr


PHYS 112


Physics II Lecture


3cr


pins 122


Phvsics II Lab


Icr


Mathematics






M Mil 216


Probability and Statistics for Natural Sciences


3cr



41



INIM \N \ I M\ I Rsm i 'I PI NNSM\ \NI \ I N|)| |{i,R.\ni Ml I M U < >< .. 20O')-2tH0



Page 139



Other Requirements:

Foreign Language Intermediate Level

Free Electives:

Total Degree Requirements:



0-6
0-6cr

24-30

120



Bachelor of Science-Natural Science/Pre-Chiropractic
Track (*)



Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section

with the following specifications:

Mathematics: 4cr. MATH 121

Natural Science: CHEM 111-112

Social Science: PSYC 101

Synthesis: not required for three-year students who transfer

to a professional school with an articulation agreement

Writing Intensive: writing-intensive course only required for

three-year students who transfer to a professional school with

an articulation agreement

Liberal Studies Electives: COSC 101. no courses with SCI prefix



49



Major:

Required Courses:

BIOL 1 1 1 Principles of Biology I

BIOL 1 12 Principles of Biology II

BIOL 1 50 Human Anatomy

BIOL 151 Human Physiology

BIOL 241 General Microbiology

BIOL 263 Genetics

CHEM231 Organic Chemistry I

CULM 232 Organic Chemistry II or

CHEM351 Biochemistry

PHYS 1 1 1 Physics 1 Lecture

Pin'S 121 Physics I Lab

PHYS 112 Physics II Lecture

PHYS 122 Physics II Lab



4c r
4cr
3cr
4cr
3cr
3cr
4cr

4cr
3cr
Icr
3cr
lcr



MATH 216 Probability and Statistics for Natural Sciences 3cr

Other Requirements:

Foreign Language Intermediate Level

Free Electives: ( 1 )

Electives to meet minimum of 90 1UP cr and minimum of
24cr in Humanities and Social Sciences for admission to
affiliated chiropractic colleges after three years at IUP

Maximum cr for work at affiliated chiropractic school 30cr

Total Degree Requirements:



0-6



0-30



120



(*) Accelerated three-year New York Chiropractic College. Logan Chiro-
practic College, Sherman Chiropractic College, and Parker Chiro-
practic programs. A maximum of JOcr ol work may be transferred
after the first year at one of the chiropractic school programs. Upon
completion of the first year of studies at one of the chiropractic
school programs, a transcript from that school is to be sent by the
student to the dean of the College of Natural Sciences and Mathe-
matics with a note requesting application materials lor graduation.

( 1 ) Student is to work with his her advisor to select appropriate free
electives for professional school. Additional courses in Biology and
HPED 315 or 345 are recommended.



Bachelor of Science-Natural Science/Pre-Dentistry Track (*)

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 49

Willi the following specifications

Mathematics: MAIM 121

Natural Science: (III M 111-112

Social Science: PSYC 101

Synthesis: nol required for three-year students who transfei

to a professional school with an articulation agreement



Writing Intensive: writing-intensive course only required foi
three-year students who transfer to a prolession.il school with
an articulation agreement
Liberal Studies Electives: < !< (S< 101. no courses with SCI prefix

Major: 41

Required Courses:

BIOL I I 1 Principles of Biology 1 4cr

BIOL 112 Principles of Biology II 4cr

BIOL 150 Human Anatomy Jcf

BIOL 151 Human Physiology 4cr

BIOL 241 General Microbiology Jcr

BIOL 263 Genetics 3cr

( III M 231 Organic Chemistry 1 4cr

CHEM 232 Organic Chemistry II or

CHEM 351 Biochemistry 4cr

PUNS 111 Physics I Lecture 3cr

PHYS 121 Physics I Lab Icr

PHYS 112 Physics II Lecture 3«

PHYS 122 Physics II Lab Icr

MATH 216 Probability and Statistics for Natural Sciences 3cr

Other Requirements: 0-6

Foreign Language Intermediate Level

Free Electives: ( 1 ) 0-30

Electives to meet minimum of 90 IUP cr and minimum of
24cr in Humanities and Social Sciences for admission to
affiliated dental school after three years at IUP

Maximum cr for work at affiliated dental school 30cr

Total Degree Requirements: 120

(*) Accelerated three-year Temple University School of Dentistry pro-
gram. A maximum of 30cr of work max be transferred after the first
year at Temple University School of Dentistry. Upon completion of
the first year of studies at Temple I Iniversity School of Dentistry, a



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