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dance classes: DANC 250, 260. 270. 280. 290. 485, or by instructor
permission

Introduces the necessary teaching skills and curriculum development needed
to understand the pedagogical structure for teaching dance. Students leam
the approaches to teaching that are unique to dance and will learn to design
dance curriculum.

DANC 355 Dance Production: Administration to
Creation 3c-0l-3cr

Prerequisites: Two of the following introductory- or advanced-level
dance classes: DANC 250. 2<>0. 270. 280, 290, 485, or by instructor
permission

A sequential development of the dance production process from audition to
opening, focusing on the practical application to private studio and aca-
demic and professional settings. Explores the evolution of dance produc-
tion and the future of dance, from both administrative ami artistic
perspectives, taking into consideration the constantly changing world of
technology.

DANC 481 Special Topics var-l-6cr

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content
Offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore topics not
included in the established curriculum. A given topic mav be offered under



an} special topic identity no more than three times Special topics

numbered 4M are primarily for upper-level undergraduate students

DANC 482 Independent Study var-l-6cr

Prerequisite: Prior approval through advisor, faculty member,
department chairperson, dean, and Provost's Office

Independent sludv in dance mav be cither purely academic or may be a
practical production project, supported by a written document giving
evidence of significant scholarly investigation or original, creative effort
May be repealed to a maximum of 6cr. Approval is based on academic
appropriateness and availability ot resources

DANC 485 Dance Studio 3c-0l-3cr

Prerequisite: DANC 250. 260, 270, or 2X0 (beginning technique class
taken must be the specific dance genre of the Dance Studio class offered);
or by instructor permission

Furthers the development of the dancer at the intermediate level of a
specified genre of dance. Development in dance requires the integration of
both technique and artistic development. The specific genres vary from
semester to semester, including modem, ballet, tap, and jazz as alternating
semester options. May be repeated with a different focus each time.

DEDU: Distributive Education

Department of Technology Support and Training

Eberly College of Business and Information Technology

Note: Except for Accounting. Business Education, and nonbusiness majors
who have met the required prerequisites, students scheduling 300 and 400
courses are expected to have achieved junior standing as described in the
Eberly College of Business and Information Technology Academic Policies

DEDU 281 Special Topics var-l-3cr

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content
Offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore topics not
included in the established curriculum. A given topic mav he offered under
any special topic identity no more than three times. Special topics
numbered 281 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate students

DEDU 331 Modern Merchandising 3c-0l-3cr

Techniques for planning and controlling inventory, analyzing sales,
working with modem systems for handling cash, and using color, line, and
design. Practice in preparing merchandise display units

DEDU 413 Methods and Evaluation in Marketing
Education 3c-»l-3cr

Prerequisites: BTED 111. DEDl 533, I DSP 102, and MKTG 320
Includes two sections of special methods and evaluation in this field.
Objectives arc to acquaint students w ith the basic principles of group and
individual instruction in various subject mattei areas, as well as methods ol
presentation. Unit plans, lesson plans, demonstrations, and evaluations arc
prepared. Students select sections needed foi certification.

DEDU 481 Special Topics 3c-0l-3cr

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content
Offered on an experimental or temporal) basis to explore topics not
included m the established curriculum. A given topic may be offered under
an\ special topic identity no more than three tunes Special topics
numbered 481 are primarily, for upper-level undergraduate Students

DEDl 1 482 Independent Study var-l-3cr

Prerequisite: Prior approval through advisor, faculty member,
department chairperson, dean, and Provost's Office

Students with interest in independent smdv of a topic not offered in the

curriculum may propose a plan ot studv in conjunction with a faculty
member Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availabilil
resources.



Paec I" 7 :



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2009-2



D\ S I : Developmental studies
Department oi Developmental Studies
College off ducatfon






l>\ m 070 Reading skills for ( ollege Stud) 3c-0l-3cr

\smsis 111 the developmenl ol college-level reading skills with emphasis on
textbook reading Includes literal and critical comprehension skills, vocabu-
lary development, and reading efficienc) t arries iiisiiiiiinm.il. nondegree
credit, and attendance is required

D\si ir^ Reading and Stud) skills Applications lc-01-lci

\ssisis 111 the applications of college-level reading and study skills to
content-area coursework I 01 freshman students in poor academic standing
who need additional and ind» idualized guidance in the transfer ol learning
strategies into da) to da) reading and coursework Students participate in
small-group instruction .is well .is individual appointments with the instruc-
toi < .11 iks nisiitiiiKin.il. nondegree credit. Attendance is required.

d\si log Introduction to ( allege Math I 3c-0l-3cr

Prerequisite: Ma) no) be taken aftei successful!) completing an) course
offered b) the Mathematics Department without the written approval of
the Department ol Developmental Studies directoi
Reviews basic computational skills and theii applications Includes opera-
tions with whole numbers, decimals, and tractions; the concepts ol ratios,
proportions, and percents; basic geometric principles; and an introduction
to algebra i arries uisinuiioii.il, nondegree credit Attendant e is required

i>\ si 091 Developmental Mathematics, Arithmetic

Operations lc-01-lcr

Prerequisite: M.i> not be taken after successfull) completing any course

offered b) the Mathematics Department without written appi » -s . 1 1 ol the

Department of Developmental Studies director

I xplores the basics ol counting principles, place value, arithmetic opera

linns, exponential notation, and fractional notation through a base 8 per-

spective Vocabulary, concept development, and algorithms related to the

above topics are presented in a lecture formal Supplemental Instruction is

pro\ ided t .lines institutional, nondegree credit Attendance is required.

DVST 092 Developmental Mathematics, Elemental Topics lc-01-lcr
Prerequisite: Ma) not be taken alter successfully completing any course
offered b) the Mathematics Department without written approval of the
Department of Developmental Studies director
l'ro\ ules minimal algebra skills prior to introducing basic probability and
descriptive statistics concepts as well as a review ofbasic geometr) con-
cepts and algorithms Ibpics include identification and simplification of
terms and expressions, mean, median, mode calculations; bar. line, and
circle graph construction and interpretation; application and calculation of
plane geometry formulae Carries institutional, nondegree credit. Atten-
dance is required.

DVST 093 Developmental Mathematics, Elements of

Algebra lc-01-lcr

Prerequisite: Ma) not he taken alter successful!) Completing an) course

offered b) the Mathematics Department without written approval of the
Department of Developmental Studies director

Introduces algebraic concepts and algorithms with a comparison of Arith-
metic algorithms to associated Algebraic algorithms. Topics include
properties and operations on real numbers, simplifying expressions, onlei
ol operations, solving equations and inequalities, formulas, exponential and
scientific notation, and operations on polynomials. Carries institutional,
nondegree credit. Attendance is required.

DVST 095 Introduction to College Math II 3c-0l-3cr

Prerequisite: Ma) not he taken alter successfully completing an> COUISC
offered by the Mathematics Department, without written approval of the
Department of Developmental Studies director

Introduces beginning algebraic concepts, including signed numbers; rules and
properties of equations, exponents, polynomials; factoring: algebraic
fractions; graphs and linear equations, inequalities, and radical expressions
(.arries institutional, nondegree credit. Attendance is required.



n\si mi Introduction to < rltkal Reading and fnlnklng 2c-0l 2a
Focuses on the development it kills related to the pro<

ol understanding anal) ing and assessing college-level texts and othct
demic readings Synthesizes written information from a

and content areas Note I Ol sections paired with specific content
course sections, students ate required to registet lor both courses

DVST 150 introduction to Higher Education lc-01-lcr

Introduces the system ol highei education and skills that promote effective

educational planning ami academic success ( incuts students to the systems,
resources, policies, and procedures ol II IP and to the Liberal Studies

curriculum I mphasizes goal setting, decision making, self-monitoring, and
time-management skills

l)\si 160 Learning Strategies lc-01-lcr

Encourages students to develop and use effective and efficient stud) strate-
gies on a consistent basis Students examine academic goals and implement

Stud) strategics to help achieve those goals Includes the topics ol goal set-
ting and self-monitoring, learning styles, test preparation and test taking,
lecture and textbook note taking, time management and concentration,
and general strategies lot learning Snulenls are required to give evidence ol
application of the studv Strategies to other courses in which they are

current!) enrolled Active participation in class meetings is expected

D\si 170 Career Exploration U-OI-lcr

Introduces the theoretical and practical framework with winch to explore

careers compatible with overall academic skills, aptitudes, ami hie goals
Students examine the world ol work, assess their interests and abilities, and
make realistic decisions on academic majors and careers l< tOSS-Usted as

ADA I nil Ihese courses may be substituted foi eachothei and he used

interchangeably lor D or I repeals but may not be counted lor duplicate
credit I

DNS I 201 Vocabulary Expansion 2c-OI-2cr

Assists students to develop an enriched vocabulary through learning and
applying knowledge of I aim and (neck word parts and mastering the
meanings and use of mature words based on those word parts. The primary
emphasis is on developing the reading vocabulary, but attention is also
given to students' writing, listening, and speaking vocabularies

D\ SI 250 Role of the Peer Educator: theory.

Practice, anil Assessment lc-01-lcr

Prerequisites: Instructor permission

Prepares selected students lor the role ol a peer educator within the higher

education setting. Topics include student learning and problem solving.

facilitate c helping ami interpersonal communication, peer leadership, and

assisting peers with how to effective!) and efficient!) succeed at the college

level (Roles include Supplemental Instruction leader, tutor, peer advisor.

w orkshop leader. )



ECED: Earl) Childhood Education/PrcK-(Frade6

Professional Studies in Education

College of Education and Educational Technolog)

Vote Courses in Earl) Childhood Education PreK-Grade 6 are restricted to

majors with a 3.0 cumulative GPA.






ECED 180 Orientation to the ECED/PreK t.rade 6

Program lc-01-lcr

Prerequisite: Declared Early Childhood Education PreK-Grade 6 major

Familiarizes Students with the professional development school communi-
ties in which they will become actively involved throughout the program.
Provides an overview ol the Earl) ( hildhood 1 ducation PreK-Grade <>
teacher certification program ol study Offered Spring semester only

ECED 200 Introduction to Early (hildhood Education 3c-0l-3cr

Prerequisite: Admission to the Earl) Childhood Education PreK-Grade 6

Program

Introduces prospective teachers to the historical, sociological, and political

aspects of early childhood education Emphasizes appreciating diversity in

the early childhood classroom ami developing keen observation strategies



1\DI \\ \ I \I\ I RSITY Ol PI NNSVIAAMA I NDI RC'.R AIM Ml t AlALOCi. 2009-2010



Pace 173



to both heighten understanding of children and evaluate programs that
•.one them. Five hours oi sen ice learning are required.

ECED 220 Childrcn"s Literature to Enhance Emergent
and Beginning Reading 3c-01-3cr

Prerequisite: Admission to the Early Childhood Education PreK-Grade 6
Program

Focuses on the study of young children's acquisition of speaking, listening,
reading, and writing skills and the importance of a de\elopmentally appro-
priate and effective language an - curriculum lor young children. Empha-
sizes strategies lor developing children's literacy skills and integrating
children's literature throughout the early childhood curriculum. Observa-
tions, interviews, and teaching experiences are an integral part of the
course. Seven hours of sen ice learning are required (Writing-intensive
course)

ECED 280 Maximizing Learning 3c-0l-3cr

Prerequisite: Admission to Farly Childhood Education' PreK-Grade 6
Program

Furthers an understanding of the organization and management of func-
tional learning environments and the use of curriculum development prin-
ciples and strategies to design, implement, and evaluate educationally sound
and developmental!) effective learning experiences lor young children.

ECED 281 Special Topics var-l-3cr

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content
Offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore topics not
included in the established curriculum. A given topic may be offered under
an} special topic identity no more than three times. Special topics
numbered 281 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate students.

ECED 310 Science and Health in the Literacy-based
Early Childhood Curriculum 3c-0l-3cr

Prerequisite: Admission to the Early Childhood Education PreK-Grade 6
Program

Emphasizes the need for high-quality, meaningful science and health
experiences in early childhood, across a developmental curriculum. Teaches
how to provide young children with unique opportunities to explore phe-
nomena, use skills of scientific inquiry, cultivate scientific dispositions, and
build a foundation for understanding core scientific and health concepts.

ECED 314 Creative Experiences to Enhance

Literacy Acquisition 3c-0l-3cr

Prerequisite: Admission to the Early Childhood Education PreK-Grade 6
Program

Provides the knowledge and skills necessary to incorporate creative music.
art. movement, and play activities into the comprehensive early childhood
curriculum Integration of creative experiences to enhance literacy acquisi-
tion is emphasized, as well as the historical, theoretical, and research base
for the integration of creative experiences into the curriculum. Students
engage in superv ised field experiences during which they engage preschool
students in literacy-focused creative experiences. Eight hours of service
learning focusing on early literacy acquisition are required.

ECED 451 Teaching Primary Reading 3c-0l-3cr

A methods course to assist in developing the reading abilities of young
children. Deals with instructional issues related to teaching reading and
introduces students to v arying reading and pre-reading processes vv Inch are
effective with young children. Also emphasizes diagnostic and assessment
strategies for teaching reading

ECED 480 Professional Seminar: Teacher as Researcher

and Advocate lc-01-lcr

Prerequisites: Admission to student teaching: enrollment limited to Earl)

Childhood Education PreK-Grade 6 m.i|ors Must he taken in conjunction

with EDUC 441.

Provides ongoing support related lo candidates' work in earlv childhood

classrooms. Students conduct a rudimentary action research project focused

on literacy acquisition, engage in informed advocacy efforts for young

children and the profession, and examine the theoretical and research base

for multicultural and anti-bias educational practices



ECED 481 Special topics var-3cr

Prerequisite: Prioi approval through advisor, faculty member.

department chairperson, dean, and Provost's Office

ropics m education appropriate for the Early Childhood Education setting

ECED 482 Independent Study \ar-l-3cr

Prerequisite: Prioi approval through advisor, faculty member,
department chairperson, dean, and Provost's Office
Students with interest in independent study of a topic n"i offered in the

curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty
member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of
resources

ECON: Economics

Department of Economics

College of Humanities and Social Sciences

ECON 101 Basic Economics 3c-0l-3cr

Scarcity, role of prices in determining production and the allocation "1
resources, business cycle analysis, policy options for reducing unemploy-
ment and inflation, economic role of government, international trade, and
selected current economic problems are studied For those who do not plan
to take more than 3cr of economics. Note: May not be taken after success-
ful completion of or concurrent registration in any other ICON course.

ECON 121 Principles of Macroeconomics 3c-0l-3cr

Nature and methodology of economics; mixed capitalism and market
economy; national income: employment theory, including economics ot
fiscal policy: money, banking, and Federal Reserve System: international
trade and finance.

ECON 122 Principles of Microeconomics 3c-0l-3cr

Economics of the firm: theory of consumer demand: determination of
price and output in different market structures: distribution of income,
economic growth.

ECON 223 Economics of Crime 3c-01-3cr

Economic analysis of criminal activity and its impact on the allocation ol
scarce resources. Uses fundamental economic models to explain crimes
against people, property crime, "victimless crime." and organized crime.

ECON 239 Economics of Sports 3c-0l-3cr

Student gains a better understanding of the sports industry. Explores how

economics applies to both amateur and professional sports Addresses a
variety of areas, including labor issues in sports (e.g.. free agency, reserve-
clause, unions, strikes, and discrimination), the legal relationship between
sports and government (e.g., I itle IX and antitrust law ). and public finance
issues (e.g.. location of sports franchises and public ownership of Stadiums
and arenas). Guest speakers and a multimedia approach are used

ECON 281 Special Topics \ar-l-3cr

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content
Offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore topics not
included in the established curriculum \ given topic ma) he offered under
any special topic identity no more than three times. Special topics
numbered 2S1 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate students

ECON 325 Monetary Economies I 3c-0l-3cr

Prerequisites: ECON 121. 122

Organization, operation, and economic significance of U.S. monetary
institutions; commercial banks and I ederal Reserve System; survev ol
monetary theory and policy; mechanism of international payments

l(<>\ 326 Monetary Economics II 3c-0l-3cr

Prerequisite: It ON $25 01 instructor permission
\ detailed siudv of monetary theory; tasks of central banking, principal ob-
jectives of monetary policy; intensive siudv oi recent monetary experi-
ence; complementary and competing aims of monetary and fiscal policy



ECON 330 Labor Economies
Prerequisites: ECON 121, 122



3c-OI-3cr



Pane P4



INDIANA 1 \l\ I Ksin t'l l'l NNS^ I v \\l x I NOFRGRxDl UI ( x! U OQ 2009-2010



Hmitv itmclure, and operalion ol trade unions and employe! organizi
lions; majoi fetleral laboi leg illcctive bargaining theory

detcrminaiion; currcnl laboi problems

M o\ 131 Industrial Organlzal <. 01 >u

Prerequisite: 1 1 < IN 122 oi instructoi permission

s.k i.il cfTcctiveness ol industries analyzed through measures ol market

structure, market conduct, and market performance

I c (>n 132 Government and Business k-0l-3cr

Prerequisite: 1 1 < >\ 122 oi instructoi permission
\n analysis ol the antitrust laws focusing <>n the maintenance ol competi-
tion, the prohibition >>i unfaii business conduct, and the achievement ol
desirable economic performance

i i on m Regulation »i Industry 3c-01-3ci

Prerequisites: ECON 121, 122 or instructor permission
Examines the theory .nul practice of regulation, emphasizing effects >>i
regulation on economic performance .mil efficiency in the U.S.

M on 334 Managerial Economics 3c-0l-3cr

Prerequkdtes: ECON 121, ECON 122, \l\lll 12] or equivalent
Applications of economic theory using algebra, elementary statistics, .mil
calculus in solve managerial optimization problems including problems "i

istmg .mil risk

K on 335 Public Finance 3c-01-3cr

Prerequisites: ECON 121, 122 m instructor permission
faxatian .mil expenditure theory at the federal level; federal budget and
debt considerations; public vector impact upon economy

M on i.'h State unci local Finance 3c-0l-3cr

Prerequisite: ECON 122 or instructoi permission

\n .m.ilsMs of character and unpad of state ami local government revenue
sources, expenditures, and fiscal systems; intergovernmental fiscal

relations

I ( on 339 I conomic Development I 3c-0T-3cr

Prerequisites: ECON 121. 122

Theory of growth; theory of economic development of underdeveloped

countries,

I ( on 343 Economic History of the United States 3c-0l-3cr

Prerequisite: ECON Ml I or 121 or 122

Applications of economic theory and models of economic development to
the main patterns of U.S. postjevolutionary growth; emphasizes the
history of economic development as a laboratory for testing economic
hypotheses

ECON 345 International Irade 3c-0l-3cr

Prerequisites: 1 t ( i\ 121 and 122 or instructor permission

A stud> of the microeconomic segment of international specialization and

exchange, including theories of international trade and their application to
commercial policies, historical survcv and examination of current problems
of international trade, and the institutional setting of international trade

ECON 346 International Finance 3c-0l-3cr

Prerequisites: I CON 121 and 122 or instructor permission
A studs oi the macroeconomic segment of international specialization and
exchange, including analysis of balance of payments, exchange rates, and
the mechanism of international economic and monetary adjustments;
international macroeconomic policy; historical sur\e\ and examination of
current international financial problems: and the institutional scttin
international payments.

it ON 3511 Comparative Fconomic Systems 3c-0l-3cr

Prerequisite: HON 101 or 121 or 122

An evaluation of premises, practices, institutions, and performance of

capitalist, socialist, and mixed economies using economic theory and
measurement



A stud) oi the theory, institutions, and performance ol the Ku
economy including comparison "i present and paal ..mic

development

icon 155 Statistics foi Eci isis t> Bl-3ci

Prerequisite: I ( ( IN 121 or 122 or instructoi permission

An introduction to economic statistics, including frequency dislributr
probability, distributions ol random variables, functions "i random
variables, and tesis ol economic hypotheses

it on 156 Introduction t" Econometrics Jc-01-3cr

Prerequisites: ECON ,si; or us equivalent or instructor permission

\n introduction to econometrics, including linear normal regression models
ol two or more random variables, special econometric problems, and

solutions oi simultaneous equations.

E< on 3oti Economics <>f Health Services ic-4M-3cr

Prerequisite: l( ( >\ In] 01 122 01 instructor permission
An analysis Of the allocation ol resources in the health sector using demand
and SUppl) techniques, Pricing and output decisions hv physicians,
hospitals, and oilier health agencies are considered along with other current
policy issues

E< ON 361 Environmental Economies 3c-OI-3cr

Prerequisite: I ( ON 101 or 122

An examination ol economic costs and benefits of environmental control



Online LibraryIndiana University of PennsylvaniaUndergraduate catalog (Volume 2009/2010) → online text (page 47 of 76)