Copyright
Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

Undergraduate catalog (Volume 2009/2010) online

. (page 54 of 76)
Online LibraryIndiana University of PennsylvaniaUndergraduate catalog (Volume 2009/2010) → online text (page 54 of 76)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


project on a topic of local 01 regional importance (Also offered as RGPL
412: may not be laken for duplicate credit I

GEOG 415 Remote Sensing 3e-0l-3cr

Deals with air photographs, satellite imagery, thermal sensing, and radar

imager) and their application to deriving information about the earth's

pin steal and cultural landscapes I Also offered as RGPI 41 5: may not be
laken for duplicate credit)

GEOG 417 Technical Issues in GIS 3c-0l-3cr

Prerequisite: (il (Hi 316

A project-based class in which students leant the skills to develop and
maintain a Geographic Information S\stem rhrough cooperative learning.

Students design and implement functional systems. Methods for designing

(ds systems to user specification, data collection, data input, project
management, and system documentation arc covered (Also offered as
RGPL 417; mav not be taken for duplicate credit)

GEOG 418 Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for

Crime Mapping and Social Scientific Analysis 3c-0l-3cr

Prerequisite: 60 completed credits oi instructor permission

Provides knowledge of the theoretical basis of Geographic Information
Systems (GIS) and its applications for criminologists and other social
scientists. In the process of demonstrating some of the capabilities of GIS.
the specifics of selected (IIS and database software packages will also be
covered. Students develop the skills lo use (ilS packages, manipulate and
query geographic data to solve problems, perform simple spatial analysis,
and understand how to utilize GIS in law enforcement social science
problem-solving and decision-making processes.

GEOG 419 Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for
Environmental Applications 3c-0l-3cr

Prerequisite: 60 completed credits or instructor permission
Provides knowledge of the theoretical basis of Geographic Information
Systems (GIS) and its applications foi environmental scientific analysis. In

the process of demonstrating some of the capabilities of GIS, the specifics

of Selected (ilS and database software packages will also be covered Stu-
dents develop the skills lo use (dS packages, manipulate and query geo-
graphic data to solve problems, perform simple spatial analvsis. and
understand how to utilize GIS tor env ironmental analvsis and resource

management,

GEOG 421 Enterprise GIS Management 3c-01-3cr

Prerequisite: GEOG 41" or instructor permission

Principles and methods for creating, operating, maintaining, and managing
data for multi-user geospati.il information systems are studied. Each student
will customize, document, and operate a multi-user geographic information



INDIWAI MMRSin Of PbNNSYl \ ANIA I NDI RdRADl All ( \l \l OG 2009-2010



Page 195



system of his or her design i Also ottered as RGP1 421; ma) not be taken
for duplicate credit i

GEOG 425 Global Positioning Systems (GPS) Concepts

and Techniques 3c-01-3cr

Prerequisites: 60er completed or instructor permission

Provides know ledge of the theoretical basis and practical applications of

Geographic Positioning Systems (UPS). Students will gain hands-on experi-
ence using GPS receivers and OPS observables, as well as the ability to
determine point and relative position fixes from pseudorange and earner
phase measurements. Students will be exposed to industry-standard GPS
hardware and software, as well as appropriate techniques for processing GPS
data to achieve necessary levels of horizontal and vertical positional
accuracy. Integration of GPS and geographic information systems (GIS) will
also be discussed.

GEOG 431 Geography of American Indians 3c-0l-3cr

Focuses on the historical cultural geography of Native Americans. Popula-
tion, resources, land use. development, settlement patterns, and other
selected topics are covered.

GEOG 432 Geography of Crime 3c-01-3cr

The geographical context of crime is examined from historical and
contemporary viewpoints. Relevant concepts and analytical approaches
are introduced.

GEOG 440 Conservation: Environmental Analysis 3c-01-3cr

Problems of exploitation and utilization of regional resources such as soils,
minerals, forests, and wildlife are considered in relation to population
growth and regional planning and development. (Also offered asRGPl
440. may not be taken for duplicate credit).

GEOG 464 Land Use Policy 3c-0l-3cr

Introduces and provides an overview of land use issues at the regional,
state, and federal levels. Emphasizes the evolution of contemporary policy
strategies, constitutional issues, and regional controversies involved in de-
regulation of metropolitan growth, central city decline, and management
of public lands. (Also offered as RGPL 464: may not be taken for duplicate
credit)

GEOG 481 Special Topics 3c-0l-3cr

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content

Offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore topics not in-
cluded in the established curriculum. A given topic may be offered under any-
special topic identity no more than three times. Special topics numbered
481 are primarily for upper-level undergraduate students. (May also be of-
fered as RGPL 481: may not be taken for duplicate credit under same title)

GEOG 482 Independent Study var-l-3cr

Prerequisite: Prior approval through advisor, faculty member,
department chairperson, dean, and Provost's < Iffice
Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the
curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty mem-
ber. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of
resources

GEOG 483 Honors Thesis \ar-l-6cr

Prerequisites: Admission to departmental honors program: prior
approval through advisor, faculty member, department chairperson, dean.
and Provost's Office

An intensive, focused study involving independent research culminating in
a written thesis approved by a thesis director and two facult) readers
committee members May he taken more than once In a maximum older.

GEOG 484 Field Studies in Geographv and Social Studies var l-3cr
Prerequisite: Instructor permission

Immerses the student in a regional environment. Helps the student to see
critically and to interpret a cultural landscape. The experience is predomi-
nant!) oil campus. Using a combination of Structured field exercises.

culturally specific readings, primarj ami secondai) data, and standard
geographic field techniques, the course strives to develop a deepei affective



ami cognitive understanding of a cultural region. May be repeated under a
different study area title.

GEOG 493 Internship \ar-3-12cr

Professional learning experience vvilh emphasis on application ol academic
background. Open to majors and minors in geography with a total of 57cr
and I5cr m the major Sec internship supervisoi foi additional information

GEOG 4 UU Independent Studv var-3-6cr

Independent research and study under faculty direction Interested students
should approach department chairperson tor information.

GEOS: Geoscience

Department of Geoscience

College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics

GEOS Hll The Dynamic Earth 3c-01-3cr

Prerequisite: No Geoscience majors minors

Examines the constant changes that affect the rocky surface of our planet.
from volcanic eruptions and catastrophic earthquakes to the slow drift of
continents and passage of ice ages, earth processes have shaped the history
of life and altered the development of human civilization.

GEOS 102 The Dynamic Earth Lab 0c-2l-lcr

Prerequisite: No Geoscience majors minors

Corequisite: GEOS 101

Introduces the techniques geologists use to stud) the earth and reconstruct

its past. Labs cover minerals, rocks, map interpretation, fossil identifica

tion. Includes field trips during the scheduled lab period

GEOS 103 Oceans and Atmospheres 3c-0l-3cr

Prerequisite: No Geoscience majors minors

The earth's oceans and atmosphere play a crucial role in determining the
pace and extent of changes occurring to our global environment Examines
the composition and character of these components and their interaction
with other major components of the earth system

GEOS 104 Oceans and Atmospheres Lab 0c-2l-lcr

Prerequisite: No Geoscience majors minors

Corequisite: GEOS 103

Introduces the techniques oceanographers and meteorologists use to studv

the earth's oceans and atmospheres and reconstruct their evolution I il

cover seawalcr processes, oceanic circulation, marine life, atmospheric

structure, and weather.

GEOS 105 Exploring the Universe 3c-0l-3cr

Prerequisite: No Geoscience majors minors

I \amincs the history of time, the reasons for the seasons, the characteris-
tics of the planets, moons, stars, and galaxies, and the history and future ol
space exploration.

GEOS 106 Exploring the Universe Lab 0c-2l-lcr

Prerequisite: No Geoscience majors minors

Corequisite: GEOS 105

introduces the techniques astronomers use to studv the celestial sphere

Constellations, seasons, motions of Sun. Moon, planets, and siais.

characteristics oi stars and galaxies includes two observations which are

held at nigh!

GEOS 201 Foundations of Geology 3c-3l-4cr

Prerequisite: Geoscience majors minors. Science or Science I ducalion

majors minors, Anthropology, Geography, and Regional Planning majors,
or instructoi permission

An introduction to the geological sciences, including the Stud) of the
earth's interior; plate tectonics; minerals and crystallography; igneous.

sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks and their cycling, geologic time;
itust.ti deformation; and earthquakes. I aborator) exercises emphasize
hands on learning ol basic geolog) skills, including mineral and rock
identification, understanding the geometry of subsurface geologic struc-
tures, and topographic and geologic map leading.



Page 146



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA UNDIRt.R \Dl Ml < \l \1<>U 2009-2010



t.ios 202 <.>ii. itlve Methods In the Geoiclence 2< 01 2ci

Prerequisites: Geoscience "i I .nth and Space Science majors/minors
only, "i instnictoi permission; must be token aftci 01 concurrentl) wnh
GEOS20I

\ quantitative introdux Hon to the geologic .il sl icnt es, in< luding the stud)
ni the l arm's interior plate le< tonics; minerals and crystallograph) .
igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks and theii t yi lin
time; crustal deformation; and earthquakes Introduces students to
foundational mathematical skilK and techniques used in the geosciences

GEOS 2u< Surflcial Processes 3c-31-4cr

Prerequisite: Grade ol < "i bettei in Gl OS 201
Introduces thi il processes which shape the I arth's surface, from

uplifl and erosion "i mountains to the transport ol sediment and subse-
quent formation ol sedimentarj rocks Focuses are on the interaction ol
underlying tectonic forces with the natural cycles ol the Earth's atmo-
sphere and hydrosphere and the subsequent evolution of both landscape and
surface deposits

(.mis 250 Geolog) ol National Parks 3c-0l-3cr

Prerequisite; No Geoscience majors minors
l xplores geological processes and earth history, using the classic rock
formations ol America's national parks. Includes national parks such as
Arches, Bryce Canyon, Carlsbad i avems, i irand Cms on. < rreal Smokies.
Mammoth Cave, Shenandoah, Yellowstone, Yosemite, Zion, and others.
(OfTered as GEOS 150 prior to 2009-2010)

GEOS 251 rhe Age of Dinosaurs 3c-0l-3cr

Prerequisite: No Geoscience majors minors

A thorough introduction to dinosaurs and the world the) inhabited. Topics
include the most current theories regarding dinosaur biology (behavioi
metabolism, evolution), ecology (greenhouse climate, associated plants and
animals), and extinction (asteroid impact, volcanism, climate change).
(Offered .is Gl OS 151 priorto 2009-2010)

(.tos 252 Physical Resources of the Earth 3c-01-3cr

Prerequisite: No Geoscience majors/minors
\n introduction to mineral, energy, mil water resources of the earth;
genesis ol ore depositions, exploration, exploitation, and utilization of
resources; impact of exploitation of resources on the environment and on
humankind (Offered as Gl OS 221 prior lo 2009-2010)

(,K)s 253 Konnsic Geolog) 3c-01-3cr

Prerequisite: No Geoscience majors/minors
\n introduction to the use of geological information in criminal investi
tion. Emphasizes the use of geochemistry, geochronology, geophysics, and
soil characteristics in tracing the origins and history of criminal evidence as
well as the development ol new techniques for authenticating artifacts and
an. (Offered as GEOS 226 prior to 2009-2010)

GEOS 254 Exploration of Space 3c-0-3cr

Prerequisite: No Geoscience majors minors

(.overs the history, technical considerations, and scientific and social issues
of the exploration ol the planets and smaller objects of the solar system.
Earl) rocketry, the race to the Moon, and pas! robotic missions provide a
perspective to consider current and future science missions and human
settlement beyond Earth. Includes Held observations and activities thai
may occur on e\ enings and weekends.

GEOS 281 Special Topics \ar-l-3cr

Prerequisite: Vs ap pr o pr iate to course content
Offered on an experimental or temporal) basis to explore topics not
included in the established curriculum A given topic ma) be offered under

an) special topic identit) no more than three limes Special topics
numbered 2S1 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate students.

GEOS 301 Mineralog) and Petrolog) 3c-31-4cr

Prerequisites: Grade ofC or better in GEOS 201 and 202

Introduces crystallography, crystal chemistry, optical properties and phase
equilibria of minerals pertinent to geology, Earth resources, and technol-
ogy. Introduces the origins of igneous and inelamorphic rocks based OS a

plate tectonic framework emphasizing melting and crystallization pro-



cesses as well as metamorphic reactions I aboratoi

mineral and rock identification and interpretation as well as quantitative

techniques such aa • n») diffractometr) and optical mici

GEOS 102 Structural Geolog) )c-3f-4cr

Prerequisite*: Grade ol < oi bettei in GEOS 201 and 202
A stud) ol the geometry, kinematics and dynamics ol the primal)
structures ol the I art] ocuscs on the geometric relations between

I .mi ii i topography, the di
structures such as foliations, lineations, folds and fractures, the constraints
on i ru ital motions, and the relation between stress and strain Students are
introduced to the tools ol rock mechanics and sph ietr) I he

ItOI) includes extensive work with geologic maps and profiles, the

Brunton compass, and orthi raphic projections Includes

Held trips which m.iv OCCUI on weekends (( MIcrcd as ( ,1 ( )S <2^ prior to

•009 !0I0)

GEOS .'ill Field Geolog) 3c-3l-4cr

Prerequisites: < hade ol < or bettei in GEOS 201 and 2112

Principles and techniques of Held geolog) Willi an emphasis on developing

field skills using a Brunton compass, topographic maps. Jacobs staff,

stereographic projections, Geld computers, and the Global Positioning S
tem Field projects involve techniques of field note-taking measuring and

describing stratigraphic sections, bedrock mapping and analysis, en
mental assessment, and construction of geologic maps and structure sec-
tions. Includes Held trips which ma) occur on weekends. (Offered asGI OS
326 pnoi to 2009-2010)

(.1 os 3KI Environmental Geolog) 3c-3l-4cr

Prerequisites: Grade ofC or better in GEOS 2112 and 203
The stud) of human interactions with the Earth from a geological perspec-
tive. An emphasis is placed on the scientific concepts necessai) to under-
stand these interactions, including groundwater How. soil formation and
destruction, waste disposal, geologic hazards, stream hydrology, climate
change, and natural resources Contemporary environmental issues are
explored through primary scientific literature and news media. Includes
Held tups which may occur on weekends.

GEOS 311 Geochemistry 3c-3l-4cr

Prerequisites: till M III. Grade ol C or heller in GEOS 201 and 2(12
An introduction to low-temperature chemistry of the earth's surface and
near-surface; includes discussions ol chemical activity, solution chemistry,
organic geochemistry, trace elements, stable and radiogenic isotope
geochemistry, and the chemistry of natural waters (Offered as GEOS 332
prior to 2004-21)101

GEOS 312 HydroRcology 3c-0l-3cr

Prerequisites: tirade ofC or belter in GEOS 201 and 202; MATH 121 or
125 or instructor permission.

An overview of groundwater geology, including How equations, graphical
solutions to flow problems, and computer modeling of flow systems, as well
as the geotechnical and social implications of groundwatet utilization. Field
trips ma) occur on weekends it rffered as GEOS 331 prior to 2009-2010)

GEOS 313 Soils and Soil Geochemistry 2c-3l-3cr

Prerequisites: Grade ofC or belter in GEOS 201 and 2*C
An introduction to the formation, classification, and geochemistry of soils.
Emphasizes geology, climate, hydrology, and plant-soil interactions to

investigate soil evolution and fertility, nutrient dynamics, and the role ol
soils in the global carbon cycle. Laboratory topics include assessment til
soil structure, mineralogy, chemistry, and fertility as well as quantitative
treatment of carbon cycling in soils. Includes Held inps which ma) oclui
on weekends (Offered as GEOS 133 pnoi to 2009-2010)

GEOS 341 Planetary Geolog) 3c-3l-4cr

Corequisites: MAUI 121. I'llYS 111 or instructor permission
Materials, motions, and evolution of the solai system, with an emphasis on

observational methods, mechanics, spatial relationships, geology, and
origin of the solar system.

GEOS .U2 Stellar Astronomy 3c-3l-4cr

Prerequisites: MAUI 121, I'llYS 111 or instructor permission



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVAN1 \ I Mil -RCiRAIH All CATALOG 2009-2010



Page 197



Evolution and nature of objects in the universe, including the Sun. stars,
and galaxies. A study of methods foi gathering astronomical data on
motion, distance, and composition.

GEOS 351 Historical Geology 3c-3l-4cr

Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in GEOS 202 and 203
An introduction to the historical development of geology as a scientific
discipline and a re\ iew oi the major global events in Earth's history and the
methods employed in reconstructing the geologic history of regions and
continents (Offered as GEOS 131 prior to 2009-2010)

GEOS 352 Sedimentation and Stratigraphy 3c-3l-4cr

Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in GEOS 202 and 203
An introduction to the concepts and methods applied in defining and estab-
lishing the spatial and temporal relationships of stiatigraphic units the
material packages of sediment rock and the intervals of time that are
derived from them. Includes field trips that may occur on weekends.
(Offered as GEOS 412 prior to 2009-2010)

GEOS 353 Paleontology 3c-3l-4cr

Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in GEOS 201 and 202

An introduction to the study of prehistoric life, the process and products of
organic evolution, and the utility of fossils as tools for solving geological
and paleobiologies problems. Includes field trips which may occur on
weekends. (Offered as GEOS 330 prior to 2009-2010)

GEOS 354 Geomorphology 2c-3l-3cr

Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in GEOS 202 and 203
A study of the origin of the earth's landforms. including relationship of
geologic structure to landform types and role of geomorphic processes in
landscape development. (Offered as GEOS 327 prior to 2009-2010)

GEOS 355 Sedimentary Petrology 2c-3l-3cr

Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in GEOS 202 and 203
The study of sediments and sedimentary rocks with emphasis on interpret-
ing ancient environments of deposition utilizing sieve analysis, hand lens,
and petrographic microscope. Includes field trips which may occur on
weekends. (Offered as GEOS 41 1 prior to 2009-2010)

GEOS 362 Plate Tectonics 2c-3l-3cr

Prerequisites: PHYS 111-112 and a minimum of 20cr of geology
An introduction to formal theory of plate tectonics. Topics include
magnetic anomalies, first motion studies, thermal structures of the plates,
kinematics, cnistal generation, sea floor spreading, collision, and subduction
deformation.

GEOS 370 Oceanography 3c-3l-4cr

Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in GEOS 201 and 202
An introduction to physical, chemical, geological, and biological nature of
the ocean: bathymetry, submarine geology, and sedimentary deposits. In-
cludes field trip(s) which may occur on weekend(s). (Offered as GEOS 361
prior to 2009-2010)

GEOS 371 Meteorology 2c-3l-3cr

Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in GEOS 201 and 202

An introduction to meteorological sciences; composition and structure of

the atmosphere; radiation principles; elementary thermodynamics ami heat
balance.

GEOS 401 Northern Rockies Seminar lc-01-lcr

Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in Gl ( IS 201 and 202: instructor
permission required

A seminal introduction to the geology and tectonic historx of the northern
Rocky Mountains. Includes instruction in the techniques of field mapping
and geologic interpretation. Designed to prepare students specifically for
GEOS 402

GEOS 402 Northern Rockies Held Workshop var-3cr

Prerequisites: GEOS 401; instructor permission required
A field study of the major geologic features and relationships involved in
the development of the northern Rocky Mountains. National Park and
Monument areas of South Dakota. Wyoming, and Montana are included



among the areas investigated. (Three weeks, taught in the summer onlv I
(Offered as GEOS 336 prior to 2009-2010)

GEOS 403 Newfoundland Seminar lc-01-lcr

Prerequisites: Guide oft or better in GI.OS 201 and 202; instructor
permission required

A seminar introduction to the geology and tectonic history of Newfound-
land and Labrador. Includes instruction in the methods and concepts
employed in delineation and genetic interpretation ol itratigraphic units
Designed to prepare students specifically for GEOS 404

GEOS 404 Newfoundland Field Workshop \ar-3cr

Prerequisites: GEOS 403: instructor permission and valid passport
required

A field course designed to utilize the exceptional and diverse geologic fea-
tures of Newfoundland for instruction of departmental majors and minors
in the tectonic analysis utilizing sedimentologic. stratigrapbic, and
paleontologic observations, (Three weeks, taught in the summer onlv I
(Offered as GEOS 337 prior to 2009-2010)

GEOS 405 American Southwest Seminar lc-01-lcr

Prerequisites: Grade oft or better in GEOS 201 and 202; instructor
permission required

A seminar introduction to the geology of the American Southwest. Includes
examination of Colorado Plateau stratigraphy, Basin and Range tectonism,
and volcanic events in the eastern Sierra Nevada. Designed to prepare
students specifically for GEOS 406.

GEOS 406 American Southwest Held Workshop var-3cr

Prerequisites: GEOS 405; instructor permission required

A field study of the major geologic features and relationships exposed in
the American Southwest, including the Colorado Plateau, the Rio Grande
Rift, Death Valley, and parts of the eastern Sierra Nevada in California.
(Three weeks, taught in the summer only) (Offered as GEOS 338 prior to
2009-2010)

GEOS 407 Carbonate Geology Seminar lc-01-lcr

Prerequisites: Grade of C or belter in GEOS 201 and 202; instructor
permission required

A seminar introduction to the geological environment and history of the
carbonate rocks and sediments found in Florida. Includes instruction in the
techniques of field analysis and geologic interpretation. Designed to
prepare students specifically for GEOS 408.

GEOS 408 Carbonate Geology Field Workshop var-3cr

Prerequisites: GEOS 407; instructor permission
Two lo three weeks of field study in Florida Revs and at Andros Island.
Bahamas. Conducted from base camps in Florida Revs and ai I orfai
Biological Field Station ( Bahamas I ami consists of both land and marine
studies of the different carbonate environments m the Revs. I londa Bay,
and along the Atlantic reel tract Valid passport ami basic swimming skills
required. (Offered as ( d t IS 44] prior to 2009-2010)

GEOS 470 Research Methods in the Consciences 2c-OI-2cr

Prerequisite: 7 5cr or instructor permission

for students enrolled in all majors within the Geoscience Department Stu-
dents learn the methods oi research in the geosciences by working on a

project of their choosing Students define a problem, propose several

hypotheses, collect data, and perform a quantitative .malvsis to test their

hypotheses and propose a solution final results arc submitted m pro
sional manuscript form As preparation. Students examine various geo-
science problems and data sets through the Semester Cannot be taken



Online LibraryIndiana University of PennsylvaniaUndergraduate catalog (Volume 2009/2010) → online text (page 54 of 76)