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A Icr elective for senior nursing majors designed to help foster clinical

judgment skills by focusing on critical thinking and test-taking. Emphasizes

preparing students with the skills thai are essential fol success on the \.i

tional Council I icensure Examination foi Registered Nurses (NCI I VRN).

MRS 411 Advanced Health Assessment 2c-3l-3cr

Prerequisites: Registered Nurse or permission

I his cluneal course builds upon the basic assessment techniques of the
registered nurse Provides the student with the ability lo assess the health
status ol adults 1 nables the student to collect a comprehensive health
lusioiv and perform complete physical examination on adults from various
backgrounds I ocuses on examination techniques and identification ol
deviations Bom normal.

M RS 412 Professional Nursing III 2c-OI-2cr

Prerequisites: Nl RS 312, 537, 339 or permission

< (.requisites: \t RS 432. 4>4. and 435 or 436 and 43~. or permission



Page 22S



INDI \N.\ I M\ I Rsin dl l-l N\svi\ \M \ l \|)| Rt.K \l)l Ml CATALOG. 2009-2010



I he professional nurse is expected lo use clinical, managerial, and personal
leadership -.k ilK lo ensure the deliver) ol high quality i osi efTc« \i\
hi divergent health care deliver) ivstems I eadcrship and managemeni
skills and processes are approached as inherenl elements foi .ill levels ol
nursing practice rhe role ol dcsignei managei coordinaloi ol care in
professional nursing is examined in depth

M ks 41: Psychiatric Mental Health :. 01 :.i

PnnqnJattta: m Ks (36 | 19 ,.i permission

i'i 11 «c|ihmu s in ( orequlaites: N1 Ks 412, 434, 435

I ocuses en the principles and concepts thai guide nursing practice in .1

variet) ol psychiatric mental health settings I Ik- role of the nurse in

primary, secondary, and lertiar) prevention intervention is addressed .is il

relates 10 individuals, families, and aggregates

M Ks 434 t ommunlt) Health 2c-OI-2cr

Preca qa laltes: M Ks 136 137, 138, 139 01 permission
Prereqalsites 01 * orequisltes: M KS 412. 432. 435 01 permission
Focuses i'n nursing care thai is population and communit) oriented.
I tnphasizes the communit) as .1 client, perspectives and influences ol the
health care deliver) systems, theoretical frameworks applicable to commu-
nit) health, contemporar) issues in communit) health nursing, and nui
1. 'lev .is designers, managers, and coordinators ol care in the community.

M Ks 435 Communit) and Psychiatric Menial Health

Clinical Oc-lSI-Scr

Prerequisites: Nl RS 136, $37, 138, $39 01 permission
Prereqaititt or ( orequisite: NURS 412. 432. 434

I ocuses on community-based and communit) health nursing experiences to

enable students 10 provide health promotion, risk reduction, and disease

prevention in a wide variet) of community settings and with diverse popu-
lations Students also have experiences within acute and community-based
psychiatric care facilities, working .is members of a multidisciplinar) team
to provide primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention intervention.
I mphases are also on nursing management and development of nursing
strategies to assist at-risk families, aggregates, and groups, while considering
health eaie on a continuum throughout the life span. Opportunities for
individual mentoring in a clinical area are an integral part of the course

M KS 436 \dult Health II 4c-(ll-4cr

Prerequisites: Nl KS 536, 337, $38, $39 01 permission
Prerequisite or (orequisite: NURS 412
Corequisite: M RS 437

Builds on Adult Health I. focusing on the adult family coping with complex
health problems I he relationships among disease states, treatment, and
associated nursing responsibilities arc emphasized as students build their
knowledge base of pharmacology, therapeutic procedures, rehabilitation
needs, and teaching-learning strategies Principles underlying the use ol
technology in clinical practice provide a basis for the concurrent clinical
course

M KS 437 Adult Health Clinical II 0c-l5l-5cr

Prerequisites: \l RS 336. 337. 338. 339 or permission
Corequisite: M KS 436
Prerequisite or (orequisite: MRS 412

Provides opportunities for clinical practice as a provider of care for com-
plex, acutel) ill clients in a variet) of settings including intensive care unit.

monitored units, medical-surgical units, and rehabilitation settings 1 ocuses

on secondary prevention intervention for long-term, critically ill patients
Emphasizes the role of designer manager coordinator of care with oppor-
tunities to apply management principles and practice leadership skills m
the acute care and rehabilitation setting. Opportunities to receive pre-

ccptormg with a Registered Nurse are an integral component.

M KS 4511 \ Cognitive Approach lo Clinical Problem

Solving 3c-0l-3cr

Prerequisite: Nl RS 435 or 437

focuses on advanced clinical problcni-solv ing and decision-making skills
needed h\ professional nurses I actors that influence clinical problem
solving arc examined to facilitate higher-level thinking in simulated clinical
situations.



M Ks 4*4 Health Pi "i "i Families \armt tin-

I lit span 1, III ti i

P r ereqn lal tt II Ks 04

Ihe tiisi p.in focuses on the underlying theories and ft i"i Dun

ils structure, function, and m applies

Hon and evaluation "t families in the context ol health promotion

is studied across the life span I 1
cultural diversit) and the stressors thai impact fun

• >i hie Required to conduct a tent in the commi

m ks 455 Introduction to Nnrting Informatics li 01 '11

Prerequisite: Registered Nurse or instructor permission

\n introduction and overview in the application ol Ihe disciplines ol nut
ing science, computer science, and information science in collecting pro
ceasing, and managing information to promote decision mal mg.

M Ks 467 Leadership Practicum ue-M-2cr

Prerequisite: ni Ks | $4

Prerequisite or (orequisite: M KS 412

! 01 uses on role development in management and leadership lor tl

tered Nurse Planned individualized experiences will afford opportunitie

apply management and leadership theories m a workplace setting. Faculty
members will guide the student in theory -based practice and synthesis ol
theory to practice experiences

Nl KS 4f>9 Communit) Health Practicum lle-ol-2cr

Prerequisite: NURS 334

Prerequisite or (orequisite: Nl RS 4*4

Allows the Registered Nurse to apply knowledge to the practice ol
community -based and community health nursing. Emphasizes health
promotion, risk reduction, and disease prevention in a wide variety of
community settings and with diverse populations.

MRS 480 Seminar in Nursing var-l-3cr

A seminar which provides a forum for the exploration and discussion of
issues relevant to the professional nurse Emphasizes the development of
professional values, critical thinking, decision-making, and communication
skills. A selection of topics on current issues and trends is offered: each
focuses on a particular theme related to nursing practice.

Nl KS 481 Special Topics var-l-3cr

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content
( Iffered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore topics not
included in the established curriculum. A given topic may be offered under
any special topic identity no more than three times. Special topics
numbered 481 are primarily for upper-level undergraduate students

Nl KS 482 Independent Study \ar-l-3cr

Prerequisite: Prior approval through advisor, faculty member.
department chairperson, dean, and Provost's Office
Students w ith interest in independent stud) of a topic not offered in the
curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty mem-
ber Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of
resources

Nl ks 49.3 Internship \ar-l-12cr

Prerequisites: NURS 236 or Licensed Practical Nurse or Registered
Nurse. 57cr completed: minimum 2.0 GPA

A supervised experience in a practice setting which extends and comple-
ments coursework in nursing. Ihe types of practice settings may include
acute care hospitals, outpatient health centers, and community agencies

PHIL: Philosophy

Department of Philosophy

College of Humanities and Social Sciences

PHIL 101 ln.*.rmal logic: Methods of Critical Thinking Jc-0l-3cr

Develops ability to analyze critically deductive and inductive argumenta-
tion, rhetoric, and persuasion by examples drawn from media, textbooks,
advertising, scholarly works, personal contacts, etc



INDIANA I NIX I KS11Y Of PI NNSV1 A \N1\ I NDERGRADUATl: I 2<)(W-;<)|0



Page 229



PHIL 110 Reasoning and the Law 3c-0-3cr

Emphasizes development of critical thinking in the context of legal
reasoning. Students are exposed to issues in the law and to modes of
reasoning required in that domain and others. Application of principles and
methods to detailed analysis of well-known judicial eases.

PHIL 120 lntroduetion to Philosophv 3c-01-3cr

Acquaints the beginning student with philosophical problems and methods
in such areas as metaphysics, epistemology, logic, and value theory.

PHIL 221 Symbolic Logic I 3c-01-3cr

An introduction to fundamental concepts in deductive logic with an em-
phasis on teaching the basis of clear, logical thought. Some of the historical
origins of logical theory are explored. Students learn to symbolize argu-
ments in the truth-functional logic and the predicate logic. Ways of testing
arguments lor validity as well as proofs arc covered, with a stressing of
application to actual arguments drawn from numerous sources in the media,
philosophical issues, and moral problems.

PHIL 222 Ethics 3c-0l-3cr

An investigation of efforts to rationally justify moral judgment. Deals with
fundamental issues such as: What is morality'.' Arc moral notions cultural,
rational, divine, or innate in origin? Arc they relative or absolute? Are they
freely chosen or determined by genetics and or environment? Covers a
\ariet> of ethical theories significant both historically and contemporarily
and applies those theories to current issues which involve moral dilemmas.

PHIL 223 Philosophy of Art 3c-0l-3cr

Investigates some of the major problems in the philosophy of art, e.g.. the
nature of beauty and the aesthetic experience, the ethics and politics of art,
creativity, the nature of the work of art and aesthetic objects, the concept
of fine art. and the evaluation of works of art and aesthetic objects.

PHIL 232 Philosophical Perspectives on

Love, Marriage, and Divorce 3c-01-3cr

Examines the philosophical foundations of contemporary Western
institutions and ideologies of romantic love. Considers major positions in
both the history of philosophy and contemporary philosophy. Investigates
the concepts, problems, and philosophical theories central to understanding
romantic lose, marriage, and divorce.

PHIL 281 Special Topics var-l-3cr

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content
Offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore topics not
included in the established curriculum. A given topic may be offered under
any special topic identity no more than three times. Special topics
numbered 281 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate students.

PHIL 321 Symbolic Logic II 3c-0l-3cr

Prerequisite: PHIL 221

Reviews sentential and predicate logic as presented in PHIL 221. Metalogi-
cal results concerning relations between derivability and entailment arc
studied in detail. Techniques and results important for mathematics
computer science are highlighted. May explore modal logic or nonelasMc.il
sentential logics.

PHIL 323 Political Philosophy 3c-0l-3cr

An inquiry into the philosophical concepts underlying the major political
theories from ancient Greece to the modem era. Emphasizes major authors
and texts to demonstrate a continuum of ideas and their modifications,
replacement, and revival, as well as novel political ideas. Possible topics:
commonality, peace: internationalism; sovereignty; nature of the stale,
law; the ruler: cosmopolitanism; nationalism; social contract; liberty;
obligation: property; racism: sexism; slavery.

PHIL 324 Ancient Philosophy 3c-01-3cr

Explores the foundations ol Western Philosophy through examination of
important philosophers ol the Ancient period, such as the Pre-Socratic
philosophers. Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. Topics may include the nature
of the physical universe. Plato's theory of Forms, the nature of happiness,
and the possibility of morality



PHIL 325 Modern Philosophy 3e-0l-3cr

A Study of exemplary philosophical texts from the laic sixteenth through

the late eighteenth century. I igures may include Descartes, Hobbes, Locke,
Spinoza. Berkeley. Leibniz. Hume, and Kant I Kplores such topics as the
nature of matter and mind, the possibility and limits of know ledge, and the
emerging scientific challenge to church and ancient authority.

I'll II. 32(> Phenomenology and Existentialism 3c-0l-3cr

A studs of the phenomenological method as developed In Edmund llusscrl
and of the subsequent phenomenological movement as exemplified in the
works of such representative figures as Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, and Paul
Ricoeour and of existentialism both as an independent movement of
thought and as influenced by phenomenology and exemplified in the works

ol such representative figures as Kierkegaard. Jaspers. Marcel. Buber, and
Sartre.

PHIL 330 Philosophy of Science 3c-0l-3cr

An investigation into the nature of formal and empirical sciences: structure
ol scientific thought and its dependence upon or independence of theory;
the logical and metaphysical status of scientific laws and theoretical
concepts; reductionism in science: the concept of causality: the logic of
explanation; problems in confirmation theory: science and value No
special background required. Recommended for math and science majors.

PHIL 400 Ethics and Public Policy 3c-0l-3cr

An analysis of the ethical dimension of public policies. Provides a general
understanding of ethical theories, then focuses on their application to
specific policy issues. Topics vary from semester to semester. See current
schedule of classes.

PHIL 405 Justice and Human Rights 3c-01-3cr

An introduction to theories of justice and an analysis of the concept of
human rights which is central to a just society and to much moral, political,
and legal dispute. Explores relevant major positions in the history of phil-
osophy, but major focus is contemporary and raises issues such as women's
rights, black rights, animal and environmental rights, welfare rights, and
rights to life (or death).

PHIL 410 Contemporary Analytic Philosophy 3c-0l-3cr

Examines Anglo-American philosophy from the early twentieth century
onward. Explores early attempts to solve traditional philosophical prob-
lems with newly developed methods of logical ami linguistic analysis, and
also later challenges to such attempts. Authors may include Frege, Russell.
Moore. Wittgenstein. Aver. Austin. Quine, Davidson. Straw son. and Scllars

PHIL 420 Metaphysics 3c-0l-3cr

Explores the nature of reality through investigation of such concepts as
substance, cause, freedom, and God. Draws on both historical and contem-
porary writings. Other topics may include the nature of space and time, the
role of language in comprehending reality, the possibility of non-sensory
knowledge, and the nature of possibility and necessity

PHIL 421 Theory of Knowledge 3c-OI-3cr

I xamines various views concerning the nature ol knowledge, belief, and
justification. Readings drawn from a wide range of historical and contempo-
rary authors. Additional topics may include perceptual know ledge, common
sense, skepticism, and the relation between a knovvcr and the community.

PHIL 450 Philosophy of Law 3c-0l-3cr

An examination of the nature of law and its relationship to such questions

as morality, obligation, judicial review, justice, rights, punishment, liberty
Combines philosophical theory with consideration of selected court cases
to develop a philosophical and legal understanding of law and its place m
society.

PHIL 460 Philosophy of Language 3c-oi-3cr

An investigation ot issues in the philosophy of language and related issues

in linguistics i including anthropological linguistics, sociolinguistics, and
psycholinguistics) ropics include, for example, the influence of language

on perception, rationalist empiricist perspectives on language acquisition,
language and political control, reference, meaning, and truth



Page 230



INDIANA UNIYI RSII V ol IM WSM \ \\l \ I MM R(,R \|)l Ml ( \l \l («, 2009-2010



i' 1 1 1 1 -tsii ii.. in. is Semlnaj in Phlloiopb) U-III-.Ut

Prerequisites: Philosophy honors students oi instructoi permission

les .in advanced forum foi detailed exploration >>i a single topic .m
single author, subject to instructor's choice I nrollmenl limited i>> students
designated as candidates fbt honors, to members .>i the Honors < ollege who
saiisi\ .mi. additional prerequisites set bj instructor, and to othei Philo
phy majors hv invitation oi permission

imiii 4X1 Special topics vat i lei

Prerequisite: Vs appropriate to course contenl
Offered on an experimental >>i temporary basis to explore topics not
included in the established curriculum V given topic may be offered undci
.m\ special topic identity no more than three times Special topics
numbered 481 are primarily foi uppei level undergraduate students

I'liii -is: Independent simi\ var-l-t>cr

I'u 1 1 (jinsici-: I'no i approval through advisor, faculty member,
departmeni chairperson, dean, and Provost's 1 1
Students with interest in independent stud] ol .i topic noi offered in the
curriculum may propose a plan ol study in conjunction with a facult* mem-
bei Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability o
sources May be taken more than once to a maximum ol 6ci ( rhis option
is available to both Philosophy majors and nonmajors i

I'llll 483 Honors rhesis var-l-6cr

Prerequisites: Vdmissian to departmental honors program; prior
approval through advisor, faculty member, department chairperson, dean,
and Provost's Office

\n intensive, focused study involving independent research culminating in
a written thesis approved hv .i thesis director and two faculty readers
committee members May be taken more than once to a ma\innim of 6sh

I'llll 493 Internship in Philosophy var-3-6cr

Prerequisites: Permission of the department, junior or senior PHIL

majoi or double major, 2.5 GPA

\ supervised experience of no longer than one semester and no less than

five weeks This would take place in cither a public or private organization
in areas that either extend and develop or complement coursework in phi-
losophy. Log and or major paper required. Internships are to he done with a
clear analysis, argumentation, and examination of governing principles.



PHYS: Physics

Department (if Physics

College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics






PHYS 100 Prelude to Physics 3c-0l-3cr

Prerequisite: M Mil 100 or equivalent high school preparation
Prepares students for their first course in quantitative physics by reviewing
fundamental concepts involving measurement and error, graphing, motion,
and applications ofNewton's I aws in developing problem-solving skills

\lso presents a historical perspective as well as introduces the main
opportunities that exisl for those with a background in physics.

Pins mi Energy and Our Environment 3c-0l-3cr

An overview of the areas of energy, transportation, and pollution These
topics are approached via the relevant concepts of physical science and
pin sics \ nonlaboratory course for Liberal Studies requirements

PHYS III? The Physics of light and Sound 3c-0l-3cr

The study of light and sound as applied in the production of objects of art
and the production ot music Includes the study of vision, light in nature.
photography, and artistic media and the study of hearing, musical sound,
musical instruments, and room acoustics



PUNS III Physics I Lecture

Prerequisites: Elementary algebra and trigonometry

General college physics; mechanics, wave motion, and sound.



3c-01-3cr



3c-01-3cr



PHYS 112 Physics II Lecture
Prerequisite: PHYS I 11

Electricity and magnetism, heat, light, atomic and nuclear physics, and an
elementary introduction to relativity and quantum theory.



Pil\s us Phyilci I i.. i Electro-Optics U H-3cr

Prerequisite: PH\ S 100

Corequlslte oi Prerequisite: MATH

Introduces the mechanical universe through the study ..t the motion ol

matter and waves and the causes oi waves rhe learning ol quantitative

problem sob mg skills is emphasized Includ mponeni

PHYS 116 Physics II foi Electro-Optta Zc-31 '<>

Prerequisite: PHYS 115

Hv applying Newton's I aws ol Motion to atoms and molecules introdu
the basic principles ol between tempera ind

ulai motion al a iundaiiieni.il level < oncepts involved in fluid How.
da n overed I he fundamental

basis for the existence of electrii and i onoi

electromagnetic energy as waves are explored Includes a lab component

Pins 121 Physics I Lata n. H-lcr

( orequlslte: PHYS I ll

Physics laboratory al level ol Physics I. exercises in mechanics, wave
motion, ami s. .mi. I

Pins 122 Physics H lab 0c-3l-lcr

( orequlslte: PHYS 1 12

Physics laboratory at level of Physics II. exercises in optics, electricity and
jnetism, ami radioactivity.

PUNS 131 Physics l-C Lecture Jc-0l-3cr

Prerequisite: MATH 121. 123, or 12". at least concurrently

A calculus-based course in general college physics, topics covered are
similar to those covered in Physics 1 I I but arc treated in more depth
through the use of calculus

Pins 132 Physics ll-C Lecture 3c-0l-3cr

Prerequisite: MATH 122. 124. or 12s, at least concurrently
A continuation of Physics l-C : topics covered are similar to those covered
in Physics II but are treated in more depth through the use of the calculus

PHYS 141 Physics l-C Lab 0c-3l-lcr

Corequisite: PHYS 131

Physics laboratory at same level as Physics l-C ; exercises in mechanics,
wave motion, and sound.

Pins 142 Physics ll-C Lab Oc-31-lcr

( orequlslte: PHYS 132

Physics laboratory al same level as Physics ll-C . exercises in optics,
electricity and magnetism, and radioactivity.

Pins 151 Medical Physics Lecture 3c-0l-3cr

Development of concepts and principles of physics with a strong emphasis
as to their use and application in medical and Othei biophysical areas

Pins 161 Medical Physics Lab 0c-3l-lcr

Corequisite: PHYS 151

Experiments dealing with applications of physical principles to the Held of
medicine. Practical experience with use of electronic equipment, chart
recorders, etc . of type found in modem-day medicine will be introduced.

PHYS 222 Mechanics I 2e-lll-2cr

Prerequisites: PHYS 112 or I In or 132; MATH 122 or 124

(overs the basic laws and concepts of the mechanical universe. I he dy-
namics ol a particle in one. two. and three dimensions are covered. Central
forces, including planetary and satellite motion, arc discussed and analyzed
in detail using Newton's gravitational law. Other topics covered are statics,
multiple particle system dynamics, mechanical energy, and oscillations

Pins 223 Mechanics II 2c-OI-2cr

Prerequisites: MATH 241. PHYS 222

Mechanics of a rigid bodv. constraints, oscillations, wave motion,
introduction to I agrangian and Hamiltonian formulation and relativ istic
mechanics



PHYS 231 Electronics

Prerequisites: MATH 122. 124. or 128; PHYS 112 or 132



3c-3l-4cr



INDIANA UNIVERSITY 1)1 I'l NNSYl \ ANI A I NI)ER( ,K \I>1 Ml CATALOG. 2009-2010



Page 231



Circuit theory, transients, transistor circuits, frequency response, input and
output impedance, feedback and electronic noise. Operational amplifiers
and digital electronics.

PHYS 281 Special Topics var-l-3cr

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content
Offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore topics not
included in the established curriculum. A given topic may be offered under
any special topic identity no more than three times. Special topics
numbered 281 are ottered primarily for lower-level undergraduate students.

PHYS 299 Cooperative Education I var-l-3cr

Prerequisites: PHYS 132; completion of 30cr with a minimum 2.0 GEA
and approval of the cooperative education coordinator
Blends classroom theory with practical application through job-related ex-
perience. Students work in positions offered by the participating industrial
or federal/state work-study program employers under joint supervision of
the Physics faculty and the on-site supervisor I he participant must be a
full-time 1UP student in good academic standing and be planning to return



Online LibraryIndiana University of PennsylvaniaUndergraduate catalog (Volume 2009/2010) → online text (page 64 of 76)