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Annual reports of the officers of state of the State of Indiana online

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I am but a poor advber, for my whole life has been spent in re-
gretting to-day the errors of yesterday. I speak, therefore, with
trembling lips and faltering tongue, I hope those to whom shall be
commuioated what I ha^e said, in response to their addraas, will be-
lieve me when I say that I have spcAen sincerely. I have said soon
things because I would impress upon the young and unaiispeetai^
upon the pure and the spotless, (who, in buffeting the rough billows
of the world, have many things yet to learn,) that tlie way ef
die transgressor is hard, but that the paths of virtue are both plete-
ant and peaceful. These are the paths that they now porsoe, aad
Oom which I trust they will never deviate*



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ADDRBSS OF THE SCHOLARS.



To ike Hon. Members of the Legislature ef Indiana :

It. is with feelings of the grcAtost pleasura tfiat we agaia preseal
ouEaelvee .before the Legislatiure of our State, to give lUterence to
our.gratiitide9 tor their oontiaued kiodBess towards us: thoiigh we
ffsel that words are inadequate to express the emotions that swell our
hearts^ when we contemplate the blessings that surround us; bless-
io0i» which. under God we owe to you.

Before the rays of knowledge illuminated our minds, we pursued
a sUent wayt solitary pilgrims on lile's desert waste, aliens from our
race, joyless, and alone.

But BOW, how changed the scene 1 brought here^ by the hand of
friendship^ and b^nevoIeRce h^ve found companions, to whom we
are, bound by the tiiss of a comqoon affliction, and in who^e society
we,enjoy the pleasures of friendly communion, and the happiness of
sooiallife,. Here, wn have alsofoun^ those, who devote all theii'
talents to our benefit, who have, in then: generous labors bestowed
upon us as it were, a new. existence; their cheering words have en~
couraged. our trembling steps to tread the paths of wisdom, impart-
ing to us knowledge that elevate man, to be but a little lower than
the angeUrand a language in. which to express thoughts, feelings^ am)
desires, which would otherwise, have been unknown, and unrevealed.
To every teacher in the Institution we feel, we owe a debt of the
wannest gratitude, for -benefits more valuable, than all the riches of
earth could repay. Since we last came before you, we have been
called upon to rejoice in the possession of a home, erected for us by
the liberality of the people and Legislature of this State, which in



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S98

the beauty of its exterior and comfort of its accommodatioDs, far
exceeds our utmost expectations.

These blessings have filled our hearts with jov* and we now ^
pear before you a happy throng, chastened but not cast down,
afflicted, but not foi-saken. And, when in the course of yean, we
shall leave these pleasing scenes, when bidding farewell to teacben
and friends, we go forth, to encounter the trials and duties of life,
the benefits we have received/ will ever be vemembeored with the
warmest gratitude, and the instructions of our teachers will remain,
to guide us through this world, and all its sorrows.

In view of these things, we feel, that in founding, and snstainii^
the Institutions of benevolence, no State in the Union surpasses la-
diana ; for here the woi^d witnessed, for the first time, a gov^rnmeat
levying a tax on the people, not to support the pride, and pomp of roy-
alty , not to send (brth hosts of armed men to lay the fair oarlh desolate ;
but to raise the feeble from the dust, to pour the light of kBOwfedgs
on the darkened mind, and cheer and bless the troubled spirit It is
in Indiana alone, that we see the rich and the poor meet together, lo
share alike, without money and without price in the aospeakaUe
blessings of education* In the number of those whom her noUe
beneficence has aided, Indiana also stands pre-eminent« In this Insti-
tntion, there are 136 pupils, being more in proportion to the popda-
tion, than are supported by any other State.

And, in conclusion, permit us to say, that when the faeor shall
come, which summons the spirit to an unseen world, the thought
may fall, tike balm upon the soul, that in the hour of strength and
power, ye had not forgotten the children of sorrow, that the oat
talent had increased to ten, and happiness descended to maays
heart, that else had remained, desolate, and forsaken. Such thoogba
as these will impart joy, when all earth's pleasenss have passed away.
And in that happier world, where the fetters that bind us b«re shaH
be burst asunder, where in songs of praise, ae lip shall be muta, so
voice shall be silent, your joy shall be full, when ye meel thsff
whom on earth you have aided, fireed from all sorrow, rejoiciag for-
ever in the presence of God.

MART 8t. C. B£LCSB8, JdRoMa.

MARY & ORCHARD, Moatsa.

CYRUS MoCARTER, Rnaii.

EDWIN N. BOWES, Laporte.



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Ctani%;

ORLANDO OMOOD, 0Mrboni.

HENRY WUiK)N» 'Rp^eottoa.

ALBERT UNDERWOOD, JdUtton.

FRANCI8 A. GRUMPTON, Fountain.

JAMES 8. LATTIN» Floyd.

JOSEM POLLERS, Cftmn.

JOHN 6. WICKERSHAM, Ttppmno*.

LAFAYETTE BROWN, Rnah.

JOHN J. MBD^ARIS, Wayne.

DAVIDKISER, Tlppeottnoa.

CALTXN W. WALL, Tlppacaaoe.

JAMES M. LOYD, Oniige.

GIDEON KEPNGR, Fottntala.

JOSEPH 8URBER, Marioo.

THOMAS J. COMPTON, Elkhart.

ROBERT P. HOPKINS, Vigow

ELIAS UNDERWOOD, Joluuan.

BENAJAH NARDYKE, WMta.

RICHARD H. HATTON, HamlKoa.

WILLIAM W. WARD, Uaiaa.

TIMOTHY SIMMONS, Jan&inga.

ABRAX WININGS, OUo.

NORMAN LEAP, Swltzarland.

ALLAN W. MEHARY, Montgomery.

ANDREW KBPNER, FooHtalm.

JAMES MoPARLAND, Mtail.

MICHAEL SWARTZ, Floyd.

WILLIAM WAY, Oiaaga.

ELEABBR ITARKfiR, Daeaton

AMOS HADLBY, Maigaa.

JOHN H. B7ULTZ, H«niltaii

ASHBR TANNER, DeKalK

JOSEPH MILLER, Laporte.

LUTHER P. WALL, Tlppeeaaoo.

JOHN H. GOODWIN, Rnah.

JAMES GOODWIN, Rush.

JOHN D. COLLINS, Shelby.

JAMES SEBRING, Allen.

JOHN W. SENIOR, JoAsma.

JOHN R. MOORE, Montgomery.

JOHN H. LAWSON, Decatur.

WILLIAM WOLF, Fimnklin.

EMANUEL STULTZ, Hamilton.

CLINTON SHIMBR, Randolph.

HENRY M. TIFFANY, Montgomery.

HENRY MILLSAP8, Latmnee.

PETER N. NICOLES, Miami.

B. GOODWIN, Owen.



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314

iVismct. Gnmf|r.

WILLIAM WOLF, Franklin.

EMANUEL STULTZ, HamUton.

CLINTON SHIMER, Randolfifa.

HENRY M. TIFFANY, Montgommy.

HENRY MILI^AFS, Lawrence.

PETER N. NIC0LE8, Miami.

B. GOODWIN, Owen.
ELISHA L. GRAHAM, Shelby.

C. GOODWIN, Rusli.
ELLEN MILLER, Gllwon.
SARAH SHIMER, Randolph.
PRIALLA R. McLEAN, Fountain.
CYNTHA J. VORIS, Switzeriand.
REBECCA HARTMAN, Boone.
MARY E. VEST, Floyd.
SUSANNAH HADLEY, Morgan.
MARY ANN OWENS, Switzeriand.
MARY J. MADDOX, Montgomery.
ELISABETH HATTON, Hamilton.
MARY JANE HATTON, HamUton.
MARGARET E. HOLDEN, Deaxborn.
MARY JANE BARKER, Decatar.
RACHEL DAY, DeKaib.
COMFORT JANE FULTON, Orange.
ELIZABETH VANDERPOOL, Monroe.
MARY ANN DAYWALT, Hnntlngton.
LOUISA W. OSBORN, Marion.
ELIZABETH LIECHNER, Deariwm.
MARY E. GRIMES, Vanderbargh.
MARY DINSMt)RE, Monroe.
ELLEN BUCHANNAN, Switzeriand.
CATHARINE DBBOY, Wayne.
RUTH POOL, Clinton.
MARGARET OWENS, Switzerland.
ANN ELIZABETH McCOY, Decatur.
EMELINE B. HULL, Venniffion.
LYDIA CARPER, Marion.
ELIZABETH DEBOY, Wayne.
MARY E. ARNETT, Montgomery.
MARY GOODWIN, Owen.
ROSETTA MESSLER, Elkhart
MARY J. ELLIS, Hendrieki.
ELIZA J. FORD, Deoatnr.
LUCINDA MICHAEL, Clinton.
MARY A. EDMISTER, Jenninga.
AUSTIN W. MANN, Henry.



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Doc. No. 8.] [Part H.

THE

ADDRESS

OP

COL. JAMES H. LANE.

PRESIDEKT OF THE SENATE,
05 PRSSBNTI5G TO THE SENAT£ THE

ADDRESS OF THE PUPILS

OP THE

DEAF AND DUMB ASYLUM,

TO THB

LEGISLATURE:
AND ALSO THAT ADDRESS.



50M COPIES OSOEKED TO BE PRINTED.



IMOIAHAPOLIS:

S. p. CHAPMAN, STATE PRINTER.
1851.

SD90



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Doc. No. 9.] [Part II.

REPORT



OFTHB



JOINT COMMITTEE,



APPOWTED BY THE



SENATE AND HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES



TO INVESTIGATE CERTAIN CHARGES AGAINST THE



COMMISSIONERS AND OTHER OFFICERS



OFTHB



INDIANA HOSPITAL



VOBTHB



INSANE.



MM COPIES ORDERED TO BE PRIHTBD.— FEB. IS



INDlANAPOLISs

J. P, CHAPMAN. STATE PHIHTBB.

1851.
3D31



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REPORT.



Mb. PRBSIDXlfT:

The Joint Committeey appointed to investigate charges against the
Superintendent and officers of the **Indiana Hospital for the Insane**'
beg leave to submit their report:

The serious nature of the charges, coupled with the respectable
character of the individual making them, induced the committee to
nistitute a thorough investigation.

To effect this, they have examined patiently every witness within
their reach, where evidence could be supposed to develope or eluci-
date any facts necessary to enable them to arrive at a correct con-
clusion.

If charges against tbe Institution of ^'Extravagance, Corruption
and Cruelty to the Inmates" be true, the public have a right to know
it, with a view to their correction; if untrue, the standing of those
implicated, no less than the credit of our State, demands a prompt
exposition of the slanders.

The committee unite in expressing their conviction from the evi-
dence adduced, that the Board of commissioners have in the dia-
charee of their official duties, been guided by a commendable zeal
for the welfare of the Institution, and the benefit of that unfortunate
class of society who constitute its inmates. During the erection or
furnishing the building, no case has been presented leading even to
the suspicion, that any member of the Board has directly or indi-
rectly engaged with any of the contracts. A By-Law of the Insti-
tution requires that ''no resident officer, attendant or assbtant, shall
be directly or indirectlv, interested in the purchase of any article for
the use of the Hospital.*' The committee have abundant evidence
to convince them that instructions in accordance with the spirit of
this law, have been repeatedly delivered to the Steward. If any vi-
olation did occur, it was in the fact adduced on this investigation,
that an account of an inconsiderable amount for articles of suppliev



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330

was made by the Steward, and settled by the Boards (but not with-
out a remark of its impropriety) with a mercantile house of this
city, one member of which firm is likewise a member of the Board
of Commissioners. This was done by the Steward without instnic-
tions to do so» and because he alleged he could procure these articles
at a lower price and better quality than elsewhere.

The charge of extravagance in the purchase of the carriage al-
luded to» the committee are of opinion is unfounded, and they would
report the selection as entirely proper and economical under the cir-
cumstances. Their examinations in relation to alleged abuses of
Gtients extended back to the earliest period of the existence of the
ititution. Facts were elicited clearly, proving to all, that instances
of severity of treatment towards inmates had occurred, and their
frequency at the early period of its history, resulted from the want
of a sufficient number of attendants present, their inexperience and
the fact that every class and grade of patients were then crowded
together in the same ward.

1^0 case was proved to have been so treated under the eye of the
Superintendent, without receiving his prompt and unqualified disap-
probation ; nor could we learn of an instance of any abuse perpe-
trated by attendants, coming to his knowledge without meeting from
him with severe rebuke. Another cause of the more frequent oc-
currence of these abuses at that period was attributable to the fact
proved, that the subordinates (in the neglect of their duty,) failed to
report the same to the Superintendent, who we are well assured was
ignorant of their occurrence, until developed in an examination held
before the Board of Commissioners in the fall of 1849.

Since that time^ a period of seventeen mont/is, not a single case of
abuse or maltreatment is even alleged to have occurred^ if we except
the case of the individual who lost his eye. If for this, any blame
be attached to Doctor Patterson, it can be but an error of judgment,
to justify which, it may be said he was following a practice pursued
under like circumstances in other institutions. The unfortuuate se-
quel was no less the result of accident, than the favorable condition
of the patient at the time to the development of that inflammation
which destroyed his eye. Added to this the patient himself intro-
duced into the already highly inflamed organ, lime, sand and like
irritants calculated to efiect its destruction, and at the same time
violently opposed the application of proper remedial means for its
relief. The evidence moreover shows clearly that neither the pa-
tient himself, or any of his friends, attached any blame to the Super-
intendent for any intentional injury. This is the only case among
those alleged in which even the most trifling injury was inflicted.

Without an exception, the testimony of every one proves that the
demeanor and conduct of the Superintendent, Dr. Patterson, has
been universally kind, courteous and polite. The manner in which
the duties of Assistant Physician, Matron and Steward [are dis-
ehargod,] is worthy of all praise and commendation. Kindness i6



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321

patients and watchful carefulneaa are strenuously enjoined on and
observed by the attendants.

The committee^ in the dischai^ of the duty assigned them, visited
the Hospital, and were fully admitted into and inspected every por-
tion of the building. From a thorough examination, they report
that the order, cleanliness and apparent comfort of every part calls
forth their warmest approbation.

Among the charges was an implied censure of the course of treat*
ment of the patients by the Superintendent The committee would
reply by saying, that they are assured the selection of Doctor Pat*
terson was made by the Board solely from the recommendations of
competent persons abroad, and as a proof of the wisdom of their
choice, they simply state the fact that the proportions of cures in
this Institution has been really greater, in comparison with the ad*
missions, than in any asylum in the country.

Nor will the committee close without giving expression to an as«
surance to every citizen of Indiana who may now have, or mav
hereafter commit, a friend to the care of the Institution, that with
its present officers, and under its recent organization, they have a
guarantee of the utmost kindness for their comfort, and correct treat-
ment for their relief.

And the joint committee ask, respectfully, to be discharged from
any further consideration of the subject.

JAMES S. ATHON, Ch%
GEO. B. GRAFF,
N. EDDY,
JOHN HUNT,
BENJAMIN HENTON,
W. G. MONTGOMERY,
ROBERT H. CRAWFORD,
ELI LEWIS,
L HUTCHINSON.
IniianofoHsi February 13, 185L



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Doc. No. 10.] [Part IL

MESSAGE



OF



GOVERNOR WRIGHT



on BSTUSHIHG TO TBX



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES



BILL NO. 330, PASSED AT THE LAST SESSION OF THE LEGISLATURE,
FOR THE RELIEF OF ANN BLYTHE8T0NE, OF ALLEN COUNTY.



IKDIAM APOLIS:
J. P. CHAPMAN, STATE PRINTER.
1851.
3D32



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MESSAGE.



To the House of Representatives:

Gentlemen — The accompanying bill, entitled, an act for the relief
of Ann Biythestone, of Allen county, No. 330, was passed at the
last session of the General Assembly, but not having been presented
to me for approval until within the last two days before the final
adjournment, the same is now returned as provided by the Constitu-
tion, with my reasons briefly stated for withholding my signature.

The principle involved in this bill is, that of referring claims upon
the treasury to the final adjustment of pei-sons wholly irresponsible,
to tribunals specially constituted, thereby involving additional' ex-
penses, &c.

The Legislature itself possesses the power to decide all such
claims. It has the right to send for persons and papers, to appoint
the appropriate committees to investigate the claims of our citizens
against the State. If such claims are just, they should be allowed
and paid. It is far better to appropriate the money direct, than in
this indirect manner to cripple the treasury, by subjecting it to de-
mands uncertain in amount, and frequently unjust in their character.

If the principle of referring claims upon the treasury to self-con-
stituted and wholly irresponsible tribunals for adjustment is adhered
to, we shall lose sight of the doctrine of the responsibility of repre-
sentatives to their constituents in the appropriations of the public
money.

The correct rule is, that the members of each session are, and
should be responsible for their own acts ; and that no money or
claims should be appropriated or allowed, either directly or indi-
rectly , without making, at the same time, provision for their payment
by taxation or otherwise. Do not refer a matter of dollars and
cents, against the State, to any tribunal for investigation. It b your
province to decide it yourselves.

The people have a clear right to ask their representatives to vote
directly upon all appropriations of money from the public treasury.



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328

The State has suffered greatly when the L^latare has been per-
suaded to create special tribunals to settle long standing or rejected
claims.

This claim may be a meritorious one. If you should believe it is
just and proper, appropriate the amount directly, and I am sure you
will hear no objection from me. It is the principk involved which
induces me, in accordance with the rule thai i have laid down for
my government in my first address to the Legislature, to return this
bill, and ask at your hands a reconsideration of the same.

JOSEPH A. WRIGHT.

December 31, 1850.



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f)oc. No. IL] ^ [ Part 11.

VETO MESSAGE



OP



GOVERNOR WRIGHT



/
DM



RETURNING TO THE SENATE



ILL no. ns, PASSBD AT TBB SBBSION OF 18«>S0, BBIKO AR ACT FOR THE RBUBF
OF CBBTAUI PBRBON8 THSRBIN NAMBD, IN WABRKN COUltTY.



INDIANAPOLIS:

J. P. CHAPMAN, STATE PRINTER.
1851.
3D 33



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MESSAGE.



To the Senate of Indiana:

Gentlemen : The accompanying bill, No. 212, an act for the relief
of certain persons therein named, in Warren county, was passed at the
last session of the General Assembly, but not having been pre-
sented to me until the last two days before the final adjournment,
the same is now returned, as provided by the Constitution, with a
mere statement of the reasons why I withhold my signature.

1st. The school fund that is attempted to be released by this bill
(the sum of about $2,500 as I am informed) belongs to the people
of Warren county, and the people of said pounty, or their agents,
have the sole right to release or discharge the same.

2d. That the principle of saying by an act of the Legislature that
no court in this State shall take jurisdiction of such a case, or such
a suit therein named is a violation of a clear vested right according
to the letter and spirit of the decision of the cause of Gantly, les*
see, v. Ewing, Z7. S. Supreme Court Reports^ Sd Howard^ page 717.

According to the doctrine held in this cause the Legislature has
no power ^' under the disguise of regulating the remedy, to defeat an
obligation or con ti act."

In the case under consideration, not only is the remedy attempted
to be regulated, but it is entirely swept away; the debt not only re-
leased and discharged, but all the courts of the country are prohib-
ited from taking jurisdiction of the cause. The only wonder is that
there is not also provided a penalty upon the judge or court who
would dare to enforce the rights of the children of Warren county
to this, their own necessary fund given them by the munificence of
the general government.

3d. If this system is once adopted we shall have numerous ex
parte applications to take away the jurisdiction of courts in actions
asainst the securities of sheriffs, tresurers, &c., the practical effect
of which will be,

4th. To make the Legislature a court of appeals to try^and de-



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332

termine what actions shall be brought, against whom, who shall pay
security debts, and who shall not.

5th. The tendency of such legislation is well calculated to
make unsafe and insecure the rights of the citizen. In this way
their rights are decided in their absence, and consequently the man
who is involved in the greatest amount of security debts will devote
his time in the lobbies of o)ir Legislature, whioh, by this course, will
become the place of management, deciding in this ex parte man-
ner, past rights and duties, in the place of making laws for the
government of the people.

For these reasons merely stated, your attention is again invited to
a reconsideration of this bill.

JOSEPH. A. WRIGHT.

December 30, 1851.






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Doc. No. 18.] [Part II.

STATISTICAL TABLE



OPTHB



SEVENTH CENSUS



[ABRAlfOBO UllBBB SBVSSITT DIPPERBRT HEADS. |



ALSO,



A TABLE SHOWING THE DIFFERENT DENOMINATIONS OF
RELIGIOUS SOCIETIES, &.C.



IH THE



STATE OF INDIANA.



SENATE FEB. 5«li.-«,0W COPIES ORDERED TO BE PRINTED.



IHOIAMAPOLI8:

J. P. CHAPMAN, STATE PRINTER.
1851.

3D34



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MARSHALL OFFICE, |
Indianapolu, February 4, 1S51. )

Hon. Jambs H. Lane,

President of the Senate:

Sir — I have this day completed a statistical table of the seventh
census, from the returns of the Assistant Marshals, arranged under
seventy different heads. Also, a table showing the different denom-
inations of religious societies. The first table contains the number
of inhabitants and statistics of each county in the State, alphabeti-
cally arranged ; the second table contains the number of churches
of the different denominations, and value of church property of
each. Both of which I herewith present to the people of the State
of Indiana, through their Representatives, for the purpose of being
placed in the State Library.

Please lay this communication before the body which you have
the honor to preside over.

Very respectfully.

Your obedient servant,

S. MEREDITH,
U. 8. MaPshaU District of Indiana.



In Senate, February 5, 185L

On motion by Mr. Ellis,
The statistical table was laid upon the table, and 5000 copies or-
dered to be printed and distributed with the laws.

F. EMERSON,
Secretary of the Senate.



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Online LibraryIndianaAnnual reports of the officers of state of the State of Indiana → online text (page 38 of 40)