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International Company of Mexico.

Description of lands in Lower California, for sale by the International Company of Mexico. Absolute patent title from the federal government of Mexico online

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Online LibraryInternational Company of MexicoDescription of lands in Lower California, for sale by the International Company of Mexico. Absolute patent title from the federal government of Mexico → online text (page 1 of 3)
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Cou/^r .:.



Qaliforpia.






RICH : AND : PRODUCTIVE

LANDS

LOWER CALIFORNIA

CHEAP.

ABSOLUTE PATENT TITLE FROM THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT OF MEXICO.



Given in Each Case t>y the



INTERNATIONAL * COMPANY * OF * MEXICO,

Who are authorized agents of the Government of Mexico.



Parties desiring homes or investments, where the finest land, abund-
ance of water, and balmy, healthful climate, will attract thousands of home-
builders, and health-seekers, are requested to investigate the advantages
which are offered by our cheap lands.

We will take pleasure in giving full information and in showing our
lands. It is no trouble to answer questions.

This section is easily reached from San Diego by the fine new steamer,
"Carlos Pacheco," which leaves Babcock& Story's wharf, San Diego, every
Monday, Wednesday and Friday, at 6 :30 P. M.



INTERNATIONAL COMPANY OF MEXICO

LAND DEPARTMENT.

CHARLES B. TURRILL,

Assistant Land Commissioner,

Room 6, First National Bank Building,
SAN DIKQO,



DESCRIPTION OF LANDS



-IN-



LOWER CALIFORNIA.



FOR SALE BY THE



International Company of Mexico.
ft



ABSOLUTE PATENT TITLE FROM THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT
OF MEXICO.



SAN DIEGO,

FEROUSON, BUMGARDNER & Co.,
JULY, 1887.






THE * INTERNATIONAL * COMPANY

- O F -

MEXICO,



PRESIDENT :
EDGAR T. WELLES, . ' - New York.

VlCE-PRESIDENt AND GENERAL MANAGER :

GEORGE H. SISSON, San Diego.

ASSISTANT GENERAL MANAGER :
THOMAS G. WELLES, Ensenada.

TREASURER :
RICHARD A. ELMER, - - New York.

RESIDENT DIRECTOR :
LUIS HULLER, - City of Mexico.

LAND COMMISSIONER :
W. E. WEBB, - New York.

ASSISTANT LAND COMMISSIONER :
CHARLES B. TURRILL, San Diego.

RESIDENT AGENT :
CHARLES SCOFIELD, San Diego.

RESIDENT AGENT:
M. BERNSTEIN, Knsonada.

CHICAGO REPRESENTATIVE :
GEORGE \V. SNYDKR. M. D.

WESTERN LAND AGENTS:
HANBURY & GARVEY, San Diego and Ensenada.

Ei; HOPE AN HE PRESENT ATI VE I

CAPTAIN FRANCIS PAVY, - London^

NENV YORK OFFICE, 1(>0 Broadway.
SAN DIEGO OFFICE, - First National Bank Building.

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE, Room 7, 328 Montgomery St.

LONDON OFFICE, No. 4, Bank Building, E. C.

CHICAGO OFFICE, - Burke's Hotel.

KNHEXADA OFFICE, - No. 7 Ryerson Avenue.




q
Bancroft Library



LOWER CALIFORNIA,



During the past tow years, marked by the peace and order which
has coino to tho pooplo of Mexico as an outgrowth of the troubles of
the French Intervention, which unified the Nation as nothing hither-
to had done, there grew up a desire for those advantages enjoyed by
other peoples as incidents of national growth, development of natural
resources and quickened intercourse with each other and the outer
world. A vast railroad system has resulted, telegraph lines have
been carried across mountains and uninhabited zones to distant bor-
der colonies within their territories, and the postal service greatly
enlarged.

Desiring a more rapid increase of population, public sentiment
was formulated in the law of December 15th, 1.HX.S, or the "Coloniza-
tion Act," so-called, passed by Congress after full deliberation, and
promulgated by the Chief Executive with due formality, as the date
named above.

In this act a general invitation is given to citi/ens of other na-
tions to share in the advantages of a new country, rich in all natural
wealth, and full of rare possibilities for good, and provision is made
for segregating and distributing the public lands 011 a liberal scale
far in advance of American ideas to date.

lender this law, and in full conformity with its provisions, 'Tin-;
IXTKKXATIOXAL CoMPAXY OK Mexico," a corporation existing under
special charter from the State of Connecticut, and having its head-
quarters in Hartford, has acquired, as the virtual distributing agent
of the Mexican Government, A COMPLETE AND PERFECT TITLE TO

EIGHTEEN MILLION ACRES OF LAND IN THE MEXICAN TERRITORY OF

LOWER CALIFORNIA. For two years this corporation was engaged in
surveying these lands. One-third of the public lands so surveyed
passed to the company without further cost, as payment for services
so rendered the other two-thirds being acquired by purchase from
the Federal Government.



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The lands begin at the United States boundary line, fifteen miles
below San Diego, California, or parallel 32 degrees 42 minutes north
latitude, and run south to parallel 28, north latitude, and extend
from the (lulf of California on the east to the Pacific Ocean on the
west. This vast territory is now for sale.

Lower California is practically an unknown country to the pres-
ent generation. Three and a half centuries ago it became known to
the adventurous spirits of that date, and expedition after expedition
was fitted out to seek its shores, many returning successful in their
search for wealth. In later times our own Boston merchants have
shared large profits in this field one ship alone yielding net returns
of nearly two millions of dollars in a single trip. Well understood
causes have intervened to change events, until the order of things
now presented by the Mexican Government once more brings this
rich and attractive country to public notice. For the first time in
its history it is now open for settlement bona fide and in legal form,
and a way presented for the giving of perfect titles and actual pos-
session.

The southern one-half of Lower California has a population of
about twenty-five thousand people, mostly of Spanish descent, with a
few American families, and more German and other foreign nation-
alities represented. The northern part of this peninsula, or that por-
tion owned and controlled by this corporation, has about five hun-
dred settlers within its limits, most of whom speak the English
language.

This marked difference in population arose from,

FIRST The early discovery of pearls in the South, and the conse-
quent expeditions that followed thereto;

SECOND The finding of valuable dyes and other woods, which
yielded cargoes for ships, thus compelling the early locating
of ports of entry; and

THIRD The people naturally drawn there; all Pacific coast steamers
of this latitude stop regularly at these ports.

Many valuable mines having subsequently been discovered, oc-
cupation has >een afforded to a large laboring class, which, together
witli farming, stock-raising and fruit culture, keeps up a large com-
mercial current. Had not an almost insuperable mountain range
intervened, dividing the territory about midway, this people would
naturally have drifted north. As it is, however, the northern part
being only easy of access from the United States border, this portion
has been unoccupied, while California has been filling up with
settli

Our so-called American frontier having disappeared, we are pre-
sented with a new field in this peninsula land, which for fertility of



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soil, diversity of adaptability, favoring climate and beauty of
scenery, is not inferior, and in many things superior, to the State
of California.

The new railroad system, the later steamship lines now running,
and the opening of several ports of entry, render the isolation of this
region a thing of the past.

A mountain uplift, extending north and south through the pen-
insula, gives us table lands, foot-hills, large and small valleys, and
vast plains. Running streams, springs of hot and cold water, living
Jakes and pools, are features here found; while wells can be sunk
almost without limit, some flowing, and all of them inexhaustible.
The mountain range has a vast pine belt, easy of access. The foot-
hills are covered with live-oak and other growths. Everywhere there
is abundant grass. One may drive for five consecutive days over
clover, alfilaria and wild oats, which shall measure twelve to
eighteen inches in height. The foot-hills and mountains, from base
to summit, have bunch-grasses and edible shrubs on which cattle
thrive and are fat the year round. The little farms already occu-
pied, here and there, show luxuriant growths of grapes, oranges, limes,
figs, bananas, dates, cocoanuts, pineapples and other products.
Wheat, barley and corn is grown everywhere and with abundant
yield. On the table lands and in the higher valleys the fruits inci-
dent to the State of New York, such as apples, peaches, pears, plums,
cherries and small fruits, grow well. The finest raisins and the
choicest wines are produced here, and everywhere in fact throughout
the peninsula.

Lying midway between the northerly winter rains and the
southerly summer rains, this land partakes somewhat of the charac-
teristics of each range. The most rain falls in winter. There is no
snow, or ice. or frost, except on the most elevated tables, valleys and
peaks. The sun shines during some portion of the day for at least
three hundred and fifty days of each year. It is never very hot, and
is never cold. The average summer heat is 74 degrees. In winter
it rarely falls below 47 degrees. There are ten thousand possible
mines here, for everywhere in the mountains is found gold, silver,
copper, nickel, antimony, quicksilver, sulphur and iron, while partial
explorations have also revealed vast deposits of marble, red sand-
stone, hone-stone and alabaster. A salt deposit, practically inex-
haustible, is found at San Quintin Bay, and is of great value for
use along the west coast.

One portion of the country is rich in fibre plants from which
such a large trade has sprung up in Yucatan. Another large tract
is densely covered with a species of palm, which produces the finest
wood-pulp known to the paper trade. The London Telegraph news-
paper is printed upon paper made from the same material gathered



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in a similar locality in California, where this plant grows somewhat
sparsely.

In climate, soil, and characteristic production, many portions of
this land are favored duplicates of Los Angeles. Riverside and San
Diego, so noted in California. Our people now coming in are selling
out their properties at high prices in California, Oregon, Kansas,
Iowa, Illinois, and as far east as Pennsylvania, and intend to dupli-
cate their experiences and the profits of fruit-culture, grain-growing
and stock-raising with us.

Lower California, as little known as Africa, is to-day the A men-
can frontier. If ever earth and sky and air joined in invitation, it
is here.



IJ* DETAIL!.

The peninsula of Lower California may be specially recom-
mended for the following purposes, amongst others, to-wit :

FIRST. The growing of grains and of fruits, being adapted to a marked
degree to the latter named, on account of soil, sunny weather
without too great heat, absence of frost to injure, and a just
mean as regards moisture. As a result, all fruits ripen well,
the characteristic flavor is preserved, the grapes destined for
raisins develop much saccharine matter, while those of the
wine-making variety distill a wonderful bouquet.

The wines made here by the Jesuit fathers and their pupils
in early days resembled the notable and costly vintages of Im-
perial Rome. These are history now, yet one may drink the
dame in some old mission town in Lower California to-day.

The growing of wheat, barley and corn is recommended
for the reasons: There is a large demand for these along the
entire Pacific coast of Mexico far beyond the present output;
the deficiency is made up from abroad; the import duty is
heavy, and as a result those who grow these grains within the
country liave a much larger margin of profit thereby.

SECOND. Stock-raising. Emphasis is permissible here for reasons:
The climate inflicts none of those terrible penalties upon herds,
such as are incident to the latitudes embraced within the States
of Kansas, Nebraska, North-western Texas and Colorado, and
the territories of Northern New Mexico, Northern Arizona, all
of Dakota, Wyoming, Nevada and part of Utah. Loss and ruin
to owners, and cruel suffering and death to stock are well-known
features and need no comment; while in fortunate years an in-
crease of sixty-five per cent, would be notable. Per contra in



Lower California such a thing as Buffering to herds from cold,
wandering or drifting before a storm, are tilings unheard of, and
to the natives seem an impossible tale. Nor arc cases of fever
known, either at home or as an after development when driven
north, such as accompany the north-bound herds from Chihua-
hua, Texas, Indian Territory, Southern New Mexico and South-
ern Arizona. The annual average increase, i. e., calves branded,
in Lower California, is always ninety per cent, or better. By ordi-
narv care, and the occasional changes and additions to the bull
herd, an increase of ninety-five per cent, may be safely relied on.

The customary plan for herding stock in all Northern
Mexico is the dividing into bands of 500 to 1,500 head, and
locating each band at a well, spring or running stream, placing
it under the direct care of a head of a family, who shall reside
at this center as a part of his duty. These bands have a reason-
able range allowed them, an occasional change being made, and
thus becoming attached to home and guardian, a domestic stock
is raised, which is easily cared for, always in sight, and which
fattens readily as a natural resultant. Water is fairly distribu-
ted. If wells are used, as is common, these can be sunk almost
anywhere, and 500 to 1,000 head of stock are commonly watered
from a single well, which is operated either by mule power or by
a windmill.

({rasa is plentiful. The varieties are wild oats, wild clover,
alfilaria and mountain bunch-grass. Cattle fatten also and feed
greedily upon a thousand varieties of shrubs with which the
mountains and foothills abound. A noteworthy fact in the
growth of cattle is this : That a steer of two years old will equal,
in measure and weight, his "three-year-old" brother in the
North. No storage of winter feed is ever necessary.

Stock begins to fatten the last of December. " In February,
March, April, May, June, July, August and September, they are
ready for the market at the pleasure of the owner.

At present about 5,000 head could be sold annually as fat
cattle for the local and San Francisco markets. Many addi-
tional thousands, however, could be sold for sock purposes to
Northern herdsmen, who are rinding it more profitable to buy
and fatten, than to rear with the heavy loss incident to young
stock in the North. These demands are rapidly increasing,
since Northern California is going out of the cattle trade and
into fruit. The climate permits the introduction of grade cattle,
and of rapid improvement of "blood" in the herd.

The same advantages of climate, shelter, food and water,
apply with equal force to the rearing of horses, mules, sheep and
goats.



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The horses raised in this latitude and section of country are noted
for endurance.

Great profit can be realized by raising mules of larger size
than are now common the demand for large mules is limitless,
and prices are good.

Sheep do well here, producing a wool of remarkable evenness
an incident of the uniformity of climate. In northern wools
an expert can tell the number of severe storms, or the duration
of drought, by the breaks in the fibre.

Many persons will be surprised to know that goats are a
profitable animal to breed.

It is a fact that this business is not inferior to that of sheep-
raising in point of profit, and goats are bred with remarkable
ease and success here.

Under the present head it is not out of place to note that
manufacturing interests, such as woolen-mills, grist-mills, tan-
neries and meat-preserving companies, have opened to them, by
reason of the higli tariff upon imports, the demands of the peo-
ple, and the peculiarities of climate, a field of unusual profit
here.

THIRD. As a health resort, Lower California stands at the very front.
The purity of the air; the increased number of hours permis-
sible daily for open-air exercise; good water; no swamps; gentle
winds; freedom from extremes of heat or cold; any desired alti-
tude from sea-level to one thousand, two thousand, three thous-
and, five thousand or even eight thousand feet above the sea; a
variety of profitable occupations if desired or of sport, such as
hunting and fishing (plenty of either and of the very best of each),
boating, riding, driving, with most attractive natural surround-
ings; and withal a delightful sense of freedom from the weight
and care of life; these are the common heritage of dwellers on
this peninsula.

Where disease of the heart is indicated, or there is intima-
tion, or even marked development of throat and lung troubles,
no place can be found equal to this for their relief. In middle
life or more advanced age the dangers of winter time are well
known to those suffering from cardiac affections. For these the
sea level and equable climate of Lower California are advised.

Rheumatic affections yield rapidly to the climatic influ-
ences, and severe cases of an inflammatory character have ex-
perienced speedy relief.

This mild climate must not be confounded with that of
Florida, or other Southern localities within the United States
for where in the latter there is present a feeling of lassitude, here
every breath gives "tone," and action is a pleasure.



Subordinate to farming, fruit-growing and stock-raising may
be mentioned

Mining : Copper mining has been extensively carried on for
the past ten years, while many other copper fields known are
quite equal in promise to those referred to, yet lie idle. There
arc also very extensive gold placers in two large fields, upon
which little is don* 1 . Lack of capital, difficulty of access
hitherto, and other obstacles which are removable, have pre-
vented development. Vet these placers tire believed, by those
who know, to be not inferior to any yet worked upon the whole
American continent. Gold-quartz ledges, which "prospect" well,
may be found in a hundred or more localities. Silver ores are
known. Coal has been discovered, but its extent not determined.
Sulphur deposits, of vast extent, are known, as also those of
alum, nitre, soda, borax, talc, kaolin, and mines of quicksilver,
tin, nickel, antimony, iron, lead, zinc, manganese and chro-
mium. Much stress is put upon the value of the great salt
deposits, the guano deposits, the grindstone, hone-stone, alabas-
ter, gypsum and beautiful red sandstone for building purposes.
For special reasons these all are of great importance on the
1'aciiic coast. All t'le above named lie idle, waiting for the
hand of energy.

rvlantafactULring : The system of taxation in Mexico is
simply "Import" and "Stamp" duties. Land is not taxed.

One's capital, whether invested in cattle, manufacturing,
etc., bears, as capital invested, a small tax.

All this moans heavy import duties. As the people them-
selves have no capital, there is little or no production at home,
and their wants must be filled from abroad. Now, by a mo-
ment's reflection, and a brief reference to the tariff list, any one
with a little capital, and a taste for manufacturing in any line,
no matter what, may here find all the suggestion he needs.

All such articles as flour, cotton goods, woolens, utensils of
wood, glass, paper, iron, brass, tin or copper, tools of iron or
steel, machinery, hardware of every kind, iron castings, stoves,
agricultural implements, household furniture, wearing apparel,
shoes, harness, saddles, leather and all goods of leather, pottery,
China and dishware, canned goods of fruits, vegetables or



(10)

meats all are taxed at port of entry, from 100 to 300 per cent,
upon their value.

Carefully noting the above, additional weight attaches to
the argument, as conditions incident to the concessions from the
Government to "THE INTERN ATION A L COMPANY," namely :

ALL PURCHASERS OF LAND FROM TIIK 1 .NTH K NATION A L COMPANY,
WHETHER THEY BECOME COLONISTS MERELY WITHOUT R ENOUNCING
ALLEGIANCE To THEIR PRESENT GOVERNMENT, OR NATURALIZED

CITIZENS OF MEXICO IN FACT EITHER OF WHICH IS A MATTER OF

CHOICE HAVE THE RIGHT FOR TWFNTY YEARS To IMPORT FOR

THEIR PERSONAL USE, ALL HOUSEHOLD A N I > PERSONAL EFFECTS, ALL
FARMING IMPLEMENTS, SEEDS, HORSES AND CATTLE FOR USE AND
FOR BREEDING, TOOLS OF TRADE OR PROFESSION, BUILDING MATE-
RIAL, AND MACHINERY OF ANY KIND FOR MANUFACTURING PURPOSES,

FREE OF DUTY.

In addition, those who establish any new industry are re-
leased from taxes for fifteen years.

Illustrations : Canned goods cost in San Francisco, say, 20
cents per can in Mexico they sell for $1.25 per can, the differ-
ence being made up largely in the cost of importation, with
duties added.

Mr. Bennett has bought of us land upon which he has
erected a large plant for canning fruits, etc. He can undersell
importers to the extent of stopping their trade, and still make
larger profits than are realized in the States since the duty
upon each can is 55 cents.

Flour costs in San Francisco $-1.25. per barrel say 200
pounds and sells in Mexico for $12.

The difference lies mainly in the duty, and manufacturers
in Mexico can stop importation if they but meet the demand.
(No finer wheat can be produced than is grown here.) There
are other, many other as important undertakings as the above,
such as cotton and woolen goods, tools, implements, leather and
leather goods, etc.

A large field is open also in paper making, and in the prep-
aration of wood-pulp for the paper trade of Europe and Amer-
ica, there being estimated an extent of not less than one and
one-half million acres of the finest pulp-making material known
to the paper world, readily accessible at different ports, both on
the Pacific and Gulf sides of the peninsula, the property of the
International Company.

Also there are opportunities equally favorable, in position
and extent of territory, in fibre products, similar to those of
Yucatan, from which are made rope and cordage, bagging, mat-
ting and the like.



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Tobacco-raising is profitable. Cuban tobacco-growers buy largely
of Mexican product.

Large fortunes are made in Central Mexico in planting the
so-called century plant, or aloe, from which are made several
varieties of the national drink, called pulque, tequila and mes-
cal. It grows spontaneously here by the thousands of acres,
and for its alcoholic products, or for pure alcohol itself, the de-
mand is greater than the supply. It costs eight to fifteen cents
per gallon to manufacture, and sells for fifty cents to $3 per gal-
lon, according to kind and grade.

In connection herewith it is not inappropriate to state that
in Upper California the known profits on fruit culture, including
nut-bearing trees and figs, bananas, olives, prunes, pears,
peaches, apricots, limes, oranges and grapes, are, in general
terms, fair interest upon a valuation of $250 per acre to as high
as $2,000 per acre.

Improved lands sell for these sums. Unimproved lands
bring $50 to $200 per acre. THIS COMPANY is SELLING LANDS

FULLY EQUAL TO THE ABOVE IN POINT OF FERTILITY, AND WITH
SUPERIOR ADVANTAGES IN CLIMATE AND IN MARKET PRICE FOR
PRODUCT, AT FIGURES SO LOW AS TO BE IN STARTLING CONTRAST
WITH THE ABOVE RATES.

Natural harbors, safe and attractive, abound along our
coast, and three lines of steamers are now making regular trips
thereto.



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OPINIONS OF THE PRESS,



FACTS CONCERNING A COMPARATIVELY UNKNOWN COUNTRY.

The character of the country at large is much the same as that
of Southern California. The soil, productions, agricultural and min-
eral, the climate, are much similar. The altitude of the mountains
is about the same as those equally distant from the coast in the
southern part of this State.

In some parts of the mountainous districts numerous forests of
considerable importance are to be found. The red pine, white
cedar and live oak on the lower slopes comprise the major portion
of the wild forests. The Mexican mahogany is also found in large
quantities in the coast valleys, which can be used in the manufact-
ure of furniture, etc.

A party who is well acquainted with the timber of this section
is at present figuring on establishing a manufacturing industry of
this kind in or near Ensenada. The hills are now covered with
wild oats, alfilaria, burr-clover and an endless variety of wild
flowers, very similar to those of this State.

Grain of all kinds grows in abundance. A disinterested miller
from the East stated that as fine a quality of wheat as he ever saw
was produced here. Barley and corn are grown in large quanti-
ties and pay magnificent profits.

Fruits of all kinds common to Southern California, both citrus
and deciduous, grow in great abundance. Apples, peaches, pears,


1 3

Online LibraryInternational Company of MexicoDescription of lands in Lower California, for sale by the International Company of Mexico. Absolute patent title from the federal government of Mexico → online text (page 1 of 3)