Iowa. Board of Railroad Commissioners.

Annual report of the Board of Railroad Commissioners for the ..., Volumes 3-4 online

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$79,533,503.72 is funded debt; $2,631,007.16 is unfunded or floating
debt.

STOCK AND DEBT.

The stock and debt of the roads amount to $188,883,940.19, or
$40,363.55 per mile, an increase during the last year of $28,027,694.



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1880.]



BOARD OF RAILROAD COMMISSIONERS.



167



The following table shows the amount of stock and debt per mile
of each company as gleaned from their returns to this office:



NAME OF ROAD.



STOCK AND
DEBT PER
MILE.



The Burlington, Cedar liapids & Noi*thern

The Burlington & Southwestern

The Kansas City, St. Jo. & Council Bluffs

The Chicago, Burlington & Quincy

The Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul \

The Sioux City & Dakota

The Chicago & Northwestern

The Chicago, Iowa & Nebraska

The Cedar Rapids & Missouri River

The Des Moines & Minneapolis

The Iowa Midland

The Maple River

The Toledo & Northwestern

The Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific

The Keokuk & Des Moines

The St Paul & Sioux City

The Des Moines & Fort Dodge i

The Dubuque & Dakota

The Grinnell & Montezuma

The Cedar Falls & Minnesota

The Dubuque & Sioux Citv

The Iowa Falls* Sioux City

The Iowa Railway, Coal and Manufacturing Co

The Minneapolis & St. Paul

The Fort Dodge & Fort Ridgely

The Missouri, Iowa & Nebraska.'

TheSioux City & Pacific

The Wabash, St. Louis & Pacific

The Burlington & Northwestern

The Chicago, Bellevue, Cascade & Western

The Waukou & Mississippi

TlieCrooked Creek

The Des Moines, Adel & Western

The Fort Madison & Northwestern

The Hill and West Dubuque Street Railway

Average per mile $21,442.62



« 25,628.10
38,667.00
43,390.16
43,319.16
25.084.00
29,096.00
63,747.00
65,615.32
41,343.00
13,085.00
22,440.75
17,482.00
27,467.00
64,312.00
42.386.00
36,380.00
46,489.00
20.966.00
19.229.00
39,026.00
41,110.00
42,003.00
17,145.00
46,377.00

4,197.00
41,963.60
62,629.26
66,82997

9,381.00

9,627.00
15,038.00
10.765.00
14,007.66

8,333.33
19,250.00



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158



THIRD ANNUAL REPORT OF THE



[CI.



The following roads show an increase or decrease of their capital
stock, and their increased mileage:



<D QO fl



NAMES OF RAILWAY COMPANIES.



INCREASE
DURING
THE YEAR.



DECREASE
DURING
THE YEAR.



116.90



373.71



285.94
65.20

108.00
13.40
(50.00
33.00



15.70

4.47

87.67



21.50
12.00



Chicago, Burlington & Quincy

Chicago, Clinton, Dubuque & Minnesota

Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific

Keokuk & Des Moines

St. Paul & Sioux City

Dubuque & Dakota

Minneapolis & St. Louis

Fort Dodge & Fort Ridgely

Minnesota & Iowa Southern

Missouri, Iowa & Nebraska

Sioux City & Dakota

Toledo & Northwestern

Burlington & Northwestern

Chicago, Bellevue, Cascade & Western. .

Crooked Creek

Des Moines, Adel & Western

Fort Madison & Northwestern

Des Moines & Minneapolis



1,137.55



:$ 21,210,719.94



Total increase of capital stock $ 64,181,505.51



20,980,000 00

271,400.00

6,400,000.00

565,000.00

2,000,000.00

111,400.00

10,000.00

988,225.00

600,000.00

33,4.50.00

1,960.57

180,1.50.00

66,.500.00i

225,.S00.00

400,000.00

137.400.00



4,160.00



The following roads show the added mileage and increase or de-
crease of debt during the year:



INCREASED
MILES.



68.04.

116.90

348.'0().
15.70.

* 33.00.

3.77.
37.67.

"2.00.

'21.60.
121.30.



NAMES OF RAILWAYS.



Burlington, Cedar Rapids & N. . .

Burlington & Southwestern

Central Iowa

Chicago, Burlington & Quincy. . .
Chicago, Clinton, Dubuque AM..
Kansas City, St. Jo. & Council B.
Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul. . .

Chicago & Northwestern

Toledo & Northwestern

Cedar Falls & Minnesota

Iowa Falls & Sioux City

Missouri, Iowa & Nebraska

Sioux City & Pacific

Sioux City & Dakota

Burlington & Northwestern

Chicago, Bellevue, Cascade & W. .

Waukon & Mississippi

Hill & West Dubuque Street R'y

Crooked Creek

Des Moines, Adel & Western

Wabash, St. Louis & Pac..(estim*d)



DEBT
INCREASED.



$ 606,000.00
200,000.00



2,319,900.00

655,000.00

4.277.87

6,424,276 00

3,198,000.00

469,930.96



44,793.26
701.812.90



182,461.79

192,702.14

8,500.00



16«.43<^..^5
3,344,847.50



S18,111,649.33



DEBT
DECREASED.



925,000.00



28,500.00



519,741.04

12.142.72

154,000.00



20,000.00



»I,6.59.383.76



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1880.]



BOARDOF RAILROAD COMMISSIONERS.



159



The increase in the number of miles is 581; the total increase of debt
1118,111,649.33. Six roads however report $1,659,383.76 less indebted-
ness than last year, which leaves the net increase $16,452,265.57 or
f 24,553.05 per mile.

COST OF ROADS.

The table for cost of roads is by no means satisfactory, the account
of, and charges to, construction, not having been carefully kept. Many
of the roads have been purchased on foreclosure of mortgages, while
others show the intervention of construction companies to such an
eitent that it is profitless to follow it up, if it is expected to ascer-
tain what the roads actually did cost or should have cost.

COST OF ROAD AND EQUIPMENT AS REPORTED.



NAME OF ROAD.


COST OF
ROAD AND
EQUIP-
MENT.


STOCK AND
DEBT.


Cbicago, Burlington & Quincy

Chicago^ Clinton, Dubuque & Minnesota.

Sioux Citv & DubuQue


$ 74,146,430.68

6,473,062.60

3,600,40^.84

73.937,696.23

54.004.820.40


$ 81,277,301iJl

7.206.440.00

3,287,867.29

76.711,791.41

66.960,000.00


Chicago & Northwestern


Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific



These figures represent all that can be ascertained on the subject, the
amounts usually falling somewhat short of the amount of stock and
lx>nds.

GROSS EARNINGS.

The entire earnings of the roads in Iowa are:

Passenger, mail and express $ 6,209,386.34

Freight and miscellaneous 18,628,169.01

Total earnings for the year ending June 30, 1880. .$ 24,837,646.35
Total earnings for the year ending June 30, 1879. . 21,340,709.44

Increase of earnings over last year $ 3,496,835.91

All of the roads show an increase of earnings over last year.



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160



THIRD ANNUAL REPORT OF THE
INCREASE OF EARNINGS OVER LAST YEAR.



[CU



NAME OF ROAD.



INCREASE.



J^urliiiffton, Cedar Rapids & Northern

Central Iowa

Cliicrigo, IJurlinjrton & Quincy

"Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul

Clucajro & Northwestern

Chicapfo, Rock Island & Pacific

Illinois Central

Missouri. Iowa & Nebraska



$ 525,823.49
167,486.79
891,736.17
791,920.95
684,198.79
697,573.55
183,946.54
40,717.5ft



EARNINGS PER TRAIN MILE.



NAME OF ROAD.




Burlinuton, Cedar Rapids & Northern. .

Central Iowa

Chicago, Burlington & Quincy

Kansas City, St. Jo. & Council Bluffs —

Chifcago, Milwaukee & St. Paul

Chici^o, Clinton, Dubuque & Minnesota

Sioux City & Dakota

Chicago & Northwestern

Iowa Midland

Toledo & Northwestern

Chicjigo, Rock Island & Pacific

St. Paul & Sioux City

Des Moines & Fort Dodge

Grinnell & Montezuma

Illinois Central

Minneapolis & St. Louis

Fort Dodge & Fort Ridgely

Sioux City & Pacific

Chicago, Bellevue, Cascade & Western . .

Des Moines, Adel & Western

Waukon & Mississippi



We estimate from the returns the amount received from the several
railroad companies for transporting the mails in the State at $483,-
332.00.



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••]



BOARD OF RAILROAD COMMISSIONERS.



161



OPERATING EXPENSES.

The total operating expenses returned to the Board are. $13,982,653.77
The total operating expenses returned last year 12,904,420.92

An excess over last year of $ 1,078,282.85

The excess of earnings over the previous year was $ 3,497,835.91

Making increased net earnings for the year $ 2,419,603.06

The operating expenses per mile of road were $ 2,812.27

OPERATING EXPENSES PER TRAIN MILE.



NAME OF ROAD.

hurlington. Cedar Rapids & Northern .

Central Iowa

Chicago, Burlington & Quincy

Kansas City, St. Jo. & Council Bluffs . . .

Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul

Chicago, Clinton, Dubuque & Minnesota

Sioux aty & Dakota

Chicago & Northwestern

Iowa Midland

Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific

St Paul & Sioux City

Bes Moines & Ft. Dodge

Orinnell & Montezuma

lUinois Central

Minneapolis & St. Louis

Fort Dodge & Fort Ridgely

Sioux City & Pacific

Wabash, St. Louis & Pacific

Burlington & Northwestern

Chicago, Belle vue, Cascade & Western. . .

Des Moines, Adel & Western

Iowa Eastern *.

Waiikon & Mississippi ,

Toledo & Northwestern



PER TRAIN MILE.



$1.04
.90
.89

1.89
.92

1.02

2.19
.76
.92
.85
.93

1.22
.50
.76
.96
.60

1.05
.62
.70
.90
.81

1.16
.55
.61



The excess of earnings over operating expenses for the year ending
June 30, 1880, on the 4,977 miles of railroad in Iowa, was $10,854,-
891.58, or per mile of road, $2,181.01. For the year ending June 30,
1879, on 4,396 miles, the excess was $8,436,288.52. The increase of
net earnings for the same period was $2,419,603.06. The increased
amount of road run was 581 miles.

OPERATING EXPENSES CLASSIFIED.

Maintenance of way '. 27.2 per cent

Motive power and cars 14.4 per cent.

Conducting transportation 45.4 per cent.

General expenses 13.0 per cent.

100.0 per cent
21



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162 THIRD ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [CI.

PERCENTAGE OF OPERATING EXPENSES IN DETAIL.

The percentage of operating expenses may be classed under the fol-
lowing heads, which will give a pretty correct idea of the details of
railroad expenditure:

Taxes as reported to Commissioners 4.46

Superintendence SJUl

Station service 11.68

Legal expenses .60

Advertising, foreign agencies and stationery 2.29

Train and station supplies 1.62

Loss and damage to property and injuries to persons 1.36

Miscellaneous 3.73

Repairs of road-way and track 12.92

Repairs of bridges and culverts 4.11

Repairs of buildings, fences, crossings, etc 2.66

Repairs of locomotives 5.89

Repairs of passenger and baggage cars 1.28

Repairs of freight cars 7.17

Repairs of tools and machinery .34

Renewal of rails 4.63

Renewal of ties 2.65

Locomotive service 9.41

Passenger train service 1.09

Freight train sei*vice 6.14

Fuel for locomotives 9.48

Oil, waste, etc 1.12

Water supply .37

Telegraph expenses 70

Car hire (debit balances car mileage) .72

Insurance 17

Total $100.00



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1880.] BOARD OP RAILROAD COMMISSIONERS. 163

OPERATING EXPENSES COMPARED WITH EARNINGS.



Oh



NAME OF ROAD.



2 »^



Burlington, Cedar Rapids & Northern.

Oentnil Iowa

Chicago, Burlington & Quincy

Kansas City, St. Jo. & Council Bluffs.

Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul

Chicago, Clinton, Dubuque & Minn

Sioux City & Dakota

Chicago & Northwestern

Iowa Midland

Toledo & Xorthwestem

Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific

SL Paul & Sioux City

Pes Moines & Fort I>odge



'Grinnell & Montezuma

Illinois Central

Minneapolis & St. Louis

Fort Dodge & Fort Ridgely

Sioux City & Pacific

Wabash, St. Louis & Pacific

Burlington & Northwestern

■Chicago, Bellevue, Cascade & Western.

Crooked Creek

Bes Moines, Adel & Western

loledo & Northwestern

waukon & Mississippi

Dw Moines & Minneapolis

Hill and West Dubuque Street Railroad



1.04
.99
.895

1.28
.92

1.02

1.09
.76
.92
.61
.b5
.98

1.22
.50
.76
.96
.60

1.05
.62
.70
.90



.81



.56



•a

la



1.64

1.62

1.498

1.90

1.60

1.63

1.34

1.65

.75

.26
1.54
1.27
1.98

.97
1.45
1.60
1.11
1.69

.97
1.40

.51



1.47



.89



X



O) as

0-1



ai



c« o



o s






63.5

60.9

59.5

67.5

55

71.6

81.3

44.05
119
214

55

73

62

51

51

58

54

62

64.5

50
1.7S
1.19

54

82

62
1.38
1.30



5.3
3.22

5.4
6.7
2
6
12.35



4.6

6.8

1.9

4.75

6.2



1.8



2.63



3.22

"5.2*
6.5
2.22
.50

12.22







8.8


9.3


1.7


1.7


2.5


4.2


2.2


2.2


4





4.8

6.8

2J2

4.75

6



1.7



2.57



The Iowa Midland Road costs to operate above earn-
ings 19 per cent.

The Toledo & Northwestern Road costs to operate above

earnings 114 per cent

The (Chicago, Bellevue, Cascade & Western Road costs

to operate above earnings 78 per cent.

The Crooked Creek Road costs to operate above earn-
ings 19 per cent.

The Des Moines & Minneapolis Road costs to operate

above earnings 38 per cent

"The Hill and West Dubuque Street Railway costs to op-
erate above earnings 80 per cent



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164 THIRD ANNUAL REPORT OF THE [CU

Three of these roads are now controlled by the Chicago & North-
western, and as this report differs materially from the former ones, it
is more than probable that extraordinary expenses are returned as op-
erating expenses. We suppose the same is true of the Chicago, Belle-
Tue, Cascade & Western, which we believe is now controlled by the
Milwaukee system.

The lowest percentages of operating expenses to earnings on the
standard gauge roads are: the Chicago & Northwestern 44, the Illinois
Central 51, the Grinnell & Montezuma 51, the Chicago, Milwaukee &
St. Paul 55, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific 55, the Chicago, Bur-
lington & Quincy 59.

PERCENTAGE OF NET EARNINGS TO CAPITAL STOCK AND DEBT.



NAME OF ROADS.



^ So



Burlington, Cedar Rapids & Northern reports.

Central Iowa

Kansas City, St. Jo. & Council Bluffs

Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul

Chicago, Clinton, Dubuque & Minnesota

Sioux City & Dakota

Chicago & Northwestern

Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific

St. Paul & Sioux City

Des Moines & Fort Dodge

Grinnell & Montezuma

Dlinois Central

Sioux Citv & Pacific

Wabash, Saint Louis & Pacific

Burlington & Northwestern

Des Moines, Adel & Western

Waukon & Mississippi



6.3
3.22
5.4
6.7
2
6

12.35
8.8
1.7
2.5"
2.2
4

1.9
4.75
6.2
1.8
2.6



It is probable that at no time in the history of the State have the
railroadj been more prosperous than during the last year, yet only one
road earned more than ten per cent on its capital and debt. The dis-
position manifested to extend branches by most of the leading lines
indicates faith in the future of the State and its ability to furnish
traffic that will sustain them.



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1880.] BOARD OF RAILROAD COMMISSIONERS. 165

Seventeen roads show an excess after deducting operating expenses,
interest, taxes and rentals:

The total excess is $6,952,993.76

Nine roads sliow a deficit of 235,565,60

Leaving the net income of all the roads $6,717,428.16

Which would give an average net earning for stock-
holders, per mile, for all roads in the State $ 1,349.69

Which is six per cent on $22,493.83 per mile.

TAXES PAID BY THE RAILROADS.

The amount of taxes paid by the roads in the State, as reported, is
$591,843.08, or about nine per cent of the net income to the stock-
holders. The taxes reported paid by the roads during the year 1878
amounted to $594,912.65; for the year 1879, $584,169.79; for the year
1880, $591,843.08. The increased number of miles of road would seem
to have called for a corresponding increase of taxes, and we can only
account for this condition on the supposition that the rate of taxa-
tion in the different counties was reduced in the ratio that mileage was
increased.

ROADS OWNED AKD LEASED.

Of the whole mileage in the State, 3,762.20 miles are owned by the
companies running them; 1,214.81 miles are leased. Of this amount
the Chicago & Northwestern operates 486.76 miles; the Rock Island,
162.20; the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha, 74.69; the Illi-
nois Central, 402.16 ; the Minneapolis & St. Louis, 89 miles. The North-
western and the Illinois Central own but little, if any, of the stock of
their leased lines; the other companies at least a majority of the
stock.

SIDIKGS.

The total amount of side-track is 539.55 miles, or eleven per cent of
the length of the roads.

DOUBLE TRACK.

The total amount of double track is 24.76 miles. Of this the Chi-
cago, Burlington & Quincy has 21.06, the Rock Island 3.70 miles,
although the latter road uses the leased line from Des Moines to Al-
toona, eleven miles, in connection with the main line as double track.



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166 THIRD ANNUAL REPORT OP THE [01

STEEL RAILS.

The number of miles of steel rails in tracks is:

Burlington, Cedar Rapids & Northern 180.01

Burlington & Southwestern 1.76

Central Iowa 41.08

Chicago, Burlington & Quincy 314.90

Kansas City, St. Jo. & Council Bluffs 86.00

Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul 19.0ft

Chicago, Clinton, Dubuque & Minnesota 6.8&

Chicago & Northwestern 830.09-

Des Moines & Minneapolis 34.00

Toledo & Northwestern 7.60

Chicago, liock Island & Pacific 448.00

Keokuk & Des Moines 36.00

St. Paul & Sioux City 6.09

Des Moines & Fort Dodge 6.60

Dubuque & Dakota , 31.16

Illinois Central 68i)l

Wabash, St. Louis & Pacific 69.00

Total 1,691.61

or thirty-two per cent of the entire road in the State exclusive of sid-
ings.

BRIDGES.

The total number of wooden truss bridges reported is 481. The
length is 41,387 feet. Of iron 76; length 10,022. Of combination 61;
length 12,024. Of wooden trestle and pile 6,488; length 567,063.
Stone culverts, 1,297; length 14,972. Very much has been done in
the last year to improve the condition of bridges and water-ways.

RAILROAD CROSSINGS.

The total number of railroad crossings at grade is 92; over or
under 9.

HIGHWAY CROSSINGS.

The total number of highway crossings at grade is 5,070; over track
50; under track 87; at which there are flagmen, 34,

STATIONS.

The total number of stations reported is 742.



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1880.]



BOARD OF RAILROAD COMMISSIONERS.



167



EMPLOYES.

The total number of persons in the State directly employed in
operating the roads is 18,985, or an increase of 5,467 in the last two
years. Indirectly, probably, fifty per cent more are employed in mat-
ters appertaining to them. We have before, in the li^ht of giving
employment to labor in the State, discussed the necessity of retaining
for our roads all the through business possible, and shall again refer
to it in this report.

EQUIPMENT.

The total number of locomotives in use is 1,950; total number of
can 54,451. Of these 805 are passenger cars, 493 express and bag-
gage cars, 36,195 box freight cars, 3,381 stock cars, 6,947 platform
cars, 3,092 other cars.

TRAIN MILEAGE.

The total number of miles run by passenger trains is. . . 12,201,009

The total number of miles run by freight trains is 41,513,821

The total number of miles run by switching trains 3,628,070

The total number of miles run by construction and other

trains 2,113,098

Total m ileage 59,466,308

Total number of passengers carried 11,423,537

Total number of passengers carried one mile 475,410,765

Total number of tons freight carried 21,297,764

Total number of tons freight carried one mile 3,603,943,923

The total mileage reported is double that reported last year; passen-
gers forty per cent more, and freight thirty-three per cent.

TONNAGE CLASSIFIED.



NAMES OF ARTICLES CARRIED.



TONS.



PER
CENT.



Grain

Flour

Provisions

Animals

Other agricultural products .
Lumber and forest products.
Coal



Salt and lime ,

OU

Iron and steel

Manufactures

Stone and brick

Merchandise and other articles not enumerated.



6,064,589
802,798
358,598

1342,184
372,741

2,794,561

2,156,040

444,453

86,867

1,428,559
999,410
291,201

3,475,773



28.4
3.9
1.9
8.6
1,8

13.2

10.2
2.1
0.5
6^
4.9
1.4

16.3



21,297,764 100.0



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leg THIRD ANNUAL REPORT OP THE [CI.

This total tonnage may be in excess; possibly in some instances the
tonnage may be reported from some of the States in which the Iowa
lines run, and some tonnage passing over two roads may be reported
twice.

It was the wish of the Commissioners to arrive at as nearly as pos-
sible the empty and loaded cars hauled east and west on the Iowa
roads with a view of ascertaining the amount of dead weight carried
over them. The inquiries in that line have not elicited very full re-
plies, but few of the roads keeping this account accurately, not enough
to draw reliable conclusions from. The result obtained from reports
is rather surprising. We have, however, no reason to believe that it is
greatly in error. It shows the percentage of empty cars hauled east
to be about twenty, hauled west about thirty — a condition more favor-
able to cheap transportation than we had anticipated. The best con-
dition of course would be all cars fully loaded both ways. This is im-
practicable and impossible. The nearer it is approached the cheaper
the work can be done. We had expected that about fifty per cent of
the cars going west would be empty, and about ten going east. We
can account for this condition only upon the haulage of lumber and
coal west, the former being thirteen, and the latter ten per cent of the
tonnage. But we think it is not possible for this state of things to
continue. The bulk of the products of an agricultural State must be
much larger and exceed in weight the goods brought in.

In our last year's report we assumed, from what we regarded as re-
liable data, that the local trade of Iowa, that is, the traffic between
points in the State as compared with the through traffic, which we de-
fined as all trade, whether originating in the State or not, that was
carried to points outside of the State, to be fifteen per cent of the en-
tire traffic. As this position provoked criticism, and, if correct, seemed
to limit the power of the State to fix rates to a much narrower field
and a much smaller percentage of the traffic than the public supposed,
we this year instituted inquiries the answers to which, shown in the
reports, have satisfied us that our estimate is in excess rather than
below the correct amount. We have read an ingenious brief on this
point in a case before the Circuit Court of the United States, in which
the attorneys, Cummins and Berryhill & Henry, contend that the
State may regulate inter-state commerce in so far as freight is brought
into or carried out of the State, the theory being that this regulation
injures no citizen of another State and therefore does not affect inter-



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1880.1 BOARD OP RAILROAD COMMISSIONERS. 169

state commerce; that Congress having failed to provide proper regula-
tion, the State has concurrent jurisdiction and may regulate. We
shall look with interest for a decision on this point from the proper
tribunal. We doubt whether the position taken, that no citizen of
another State would be injured by this regulation, would be true.
The question naturally arises, if this be true, why the railway com-
panies were so averse to the system of State control that fixed maxi-
mum rates which affected so little of their business, and why they were
80 anxious for its repeal? The reason, we apprehend, is to be found
in chapter 18 of the laws of the Fifteenth General Assembly, which
reads as follows:

Any railway corporation operating a railway in tliis State intersecting
or crossing any other line of railway of tlie same gauge operated by any
other company shall, by means of a Y or other suitable and proper means, be
made to connect with such other railway so intersected or crossed ; and
railway companies, where railroads shall be so connected, shall draw over
their respective roads the cars of such connecting railway, and also those
of any other railway or railways connected with said roads made to connect
as aforesaid, and also the cars of all transportation companies or persons at
reasonable terms and for a compensation not exceeding their ordinary rates.

It will readily be seen that under the provisions of this section, with
a low maximum rate for short haulage, the Iowa roads might be com-
pelled to gather up and deliver to their competitors on the borders of



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