Ireland. National Education Bd.

Annual report of the commissioners ..., Volume 21, Part 2 online

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proach of winter, bnt it is intended to re-bpen it as soon as the weather
will permit. Ddring the short period the dass was in existence very
considerable progress was made, and sereral of the Teachers have, we
understand, introdnced the study of this branch into their schools.

Fvhlic Examination. — The public examination was held on the 14th
of November. The attendance of visitdrs was krge and inflaentiaL
Amongst those present were, The Marchioness of Headfort, LtUljr
Virginia Sandars, the Bev. F. Fitspatrick, Rector of Larah ; the Very
Rev. M. McQnaid, P.P. ; the Rev. P. White, P.M. ; the Rev. W. Bell,
P«M. j end the Bev. J. Mon«ghftii, B.C.€!. . Besides these there were
also present a large ttmnbor of the req)eotabl0 inhabitants of the town
and neighboorhoml, as well as manv of the parents and relatives of the
children. The examination occupied six honra, and embraced all the
subjects taught in tlie scliooL The ready and correct answering ol the
pupils evinded th^ care bestowed on them by their teachers, and gave
evident satisfiiction to all preseiit At interval during the day the
following pieced, amongst others, were sutig by the ptfpils with tast^
and feefing: — "Hard by a fountain,** *fWhat are the wild waves
saying f "See our oars," "I saw from the beiMsh," "Harvest Song,*'
and " The 'Wheel," concluding with the National Anthem.

On the day following, the Marquess and Marchioness 6f Headfort^ in
the presence of a large number of visitors, distribnted the t>rizes to the
successful candidates, accompanying each with i^ few appropriate re-
marks calculated to incite the pupils to still greater diligence. After
the distribution of the prizes, his Lordship addressed the pupils, com-
plimenting them on the great number of premiums presented, which,
with the superior answering of the classes he had the pleasure of
hearing examined, told, he said, an honourable tale of their industry
and good conduct, as well as of the seal and capabilities of their pre-
ceptors. He said that, not having expected such a brilliant display in
the various brauchesof education, he felt at aloss to express his sentiments
at such an unexpected pleasure. He then pointed out the many advan-
tages they were deriving from such a valuable institution^ and advised
them to walk steadily in the path they were pursuing. In conclusion,
he wished them many happy returns of such an interesting occasion,
and hoped that after having left school, while following their various
avocations, they would all enjoy those blessings which must result from
Huch an extensive and useful education as they were then receiving.

Visitors, ^e> — We append the following extracts from the " Visitors*
Observation Book,'* the general tone of which, it will be seen, is highly
&vourable to the institution: —

Male Department.

lOth January. 1854.
This Ib my first visit to the Bailieborough District Model School. I reipret
that I had not time to hear more than one class examined. Mr. MacDonald
questioned the pupils in astronofny out of Br. SuUivan's *' Geography Gene-
ral! zed. '* Their answering exhibited the most gratifying proof of their mdustry
and quicknesSt and of the superior qualifications of their able Teacher. Mr.
8hcil conducts the music class very successfully ; his pupils have made satis-
factory progress, and deserve every encouragement. The drawing class has
only recently commenced.

Maurice Cross,
Secretaiy to the Commissioners of National Education.
VOL II. B 2



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S2

Appendix G»

I. Repurts on
Distriet Model
Schools.

BaiUeboro9igk,



Appendix to Twenty-first Report of Commissioners [1854

J&nuaiy SOth, 1854.

I visited tho schools this day, and I hare great pleasure in bearing testimony
to the orderly manner in which they have been conducted ; to the intelHgeDo
manifested by the pupils of the fourth class of boys, and their accurate know*
ledge of geography, as well as of the derivation of words.

I am happy, also, to record my conyiction of the great progiess the pupils o
the music class have made. /

Fatbick White,

Presbyterian Minister.

May 31st, 1854.

Visited this Model School, and was present at an exercise in geography, ii
which great knowledge was displayed by the pupils, whilst their manner clearlj
proved that all their faculties were called into action.

i{f James Browne.

July 21st, 1854.
The lAdy Olivia l^ttspatrick and the Hon. Miss Vivian have heard thi
third and fourth classes examined, and were very much pleased.

/^ October 7th, 1854.

Lady Toung visited the School, and was much gratified, as usual

October 7th, 1854.
Mr. Henry Cole, C.B., inspected the drawing classes. The children appearoi
most practised in model drawing. It would be well that the school should \n
supplied with some few ornamental casts, and with some mechanical drawing
copies. The use of the lead pencil should be introduced.

October 19th, 1854.
I have visited the Model School, and heard the fourth class of boys examined ;
the pupils seem to have made very good progress. I have also examined s
number of drawings in the school, with which I am much pleased.

M. Taylor.

I visited at the same time, and was equally gratified.

f James Taylor, M.D.

' ' November 16th, 1854.

I observed a drawing of one of the boys which gave promise of much talent
a chorus of the children was admirably well sung, and in perfect time.

Headfort.

November 16th, 1854.
Yesterday was my first visit to a Model School, and it happened to be the dai
for the general inspection. I was present during the whole of the examination
and I have great pleasure in stating that I was not only agreeably 8uvprisc<
but exceedingly pleased with the answers and abilitv displayed on the occa
siou. The way in which every thing was conducted reflects great credit on thd
instructors. ^

Frances Headfort.

Female DeparimenU

^ January 10th, 1854.

Notwithstanding the extreme severity of the weather, I found 46 girls present
and 74 on the rolls. I bea^d a class of the juvenile children examined in gcc
graphy. Their progress surprised and gratified me. The school-room is ver
neat ; the children were orderly, and every thing I saw and heard regarding to
femalo department reflects great credit on Miss Cussen, the Teacher.

Maurice Cross,
Secretary to the Commissioners of National £ducatiai|

April fith, 1854. i

Their answering was exceeding]

The cox)y-book8 are very cleaul



\feard a class examined on geography.
eredita1[)le to their Teacher and Uicmbclves.
kept, and the writing good.



Wm. Whitb,
Pres. Minister* Down.



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1854.] qfNatioiial Edueation in Ireland. 5S

April 27th, 1854. Appendix G.
I hare listened with mnch attention to the answering of a class nnder exami- j ^ ^^ ^^
ELaUon by Miss Cnssen, and it affords me much pleasure in stating that never in Djatr^ Model
my life hare I heard from any class more correct answering, or have I seen Schools,
g^reater evidence, under ar^ circumstances, of satisfactory progress than that ...^
^vrhich the pupils of Miss Cussen evinced. BaUieborvt^K

Cecil P. Stonb,
Cor. Member of Montreal U. 8. Society.

May 10th, 1854.

I have heard a class examined in geography by Miss Cossen, and was yery
much pleased and surprised at the good answering of the children.

Anna M. Bsrespoed.

May 81st, 1854.

Visited the female school ; was present at the 'exercises in reading and geo-
graphy, and was highly gratified by the perfect accuracy and graoeM manner
•f answering of the pupils.

i{f Jaxss BftowmB*

July 21st, 1854.

Lady Olivia Fitzpatrick and the Hon. Miss Vivian have just heard, with
great pleasure, the singing class, and were much surprised at the great profi-
ciency they have made in so short a time ; they liave likewise seen the drawings,
and with equal surprise and pleasure.

August nth, 1864.
Visited the female department of the school ; heard Miss Cussen examine the
first class in geography ; the answering was remarkably good, refiecting the
greatest credit on the Teacher.

John 0'Keii.lt,

B. Academy.

September 20th, 1854.
I<ady Young visited the schools and was delighted at the improvement, since
she last visited them, in singing and drawing.

I visited the female department of the Model Schopl and feel great pleasure
in being able to state that the system of education a^d the acquirements of the
children, according to their difierent ages, surpass any thing I have yet wit-
nessed under the National Board.

J. MONAGBAV, B.C.C.

October 6th, 1854.
Xady Young visited the schools and examined the girls' first and fourth
classes ; they answered remarkably well.

November 16th, 1854.
I have been highly gratified by the answers of the children this day. Many
of them displayed a degree of intelligence beyond their years, and all seemed to
have profited by the instructions of their Masters and Mistresses. I observed,
also, a great degree of emulation amongst them,

Hbadfobt.
December 12th, 1854.
We have this day viewed specimens of the drawing in the Model School of
Bailieborough, and we think they exhibit considerable talent and progress, and
do great credit to their instructor.

Fredbbick Fxtzfatbxck, Bector.

I fhlly concur in the opinion expressed by tllft Bev. F. Fitzpatrick relative to
the specimens of drawing in the school-room ; and in addition, may add, I have
great pleasure in bearing testimony to the efficiency of the pupils in acquiring a
knowledge of both the theory and practice of music, as well as of literature,
agriculture, and science, exhibited on the day of our annual examinations.

Patrick White,
Presbyterian Minister, 1st Bailieborough.

Condusion, — ^The respectable position which this School has atcainedy
and its success as a training establishment, as is manifested by the
desire of Managers to secure the services of its pupils as Teachers^



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H Appendix tQ Tv^P^-^^t ftfipon qf C^m^^^ [18fi4.

A-^?W>?> ^« realize, we should hope, the wise views of the Commissioners in its

I. ftepoiti 911 establishment ; whilst the harmony and good feeling with which per-

Distrtct Mod4 sons of all creeds co-operate in promoting the wel^re of the school

Schools^ prove satisfactorily the practicability of a mixed system of education.

BifiiklHMVf^h. " ® cannot concluae this Report without expressiuff our thanks for the

cordial support which w.e have at all times receivea from the clergy of

the different denominations in ihe town and neighbourhood, whicfa,

beyond doubt, has very materially contributed to the success of this

Institution.

We are. Gentlemen, your obedient servants,
James Patten,

Head Inspector.
Thomas MoIlbot,
^ District Inspector.

The Secretaries,

Education Office, Dublin.



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Appendix to Twenty-first Report of ComrnUsumers [1854.^



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I. Reports on
District Model
Schools.



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60

Appendix G.

I. Reports on
District Model
Schools.

BaUieborough,



Appendix to Twenty-first Report of Commission's [1854.



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6i Appendix to Twenty-fint Repwt of Ctymmisd^ [1864.

^"^:^^- ApPiSNDIxD-l.

District Model Pboobammb of Studibs Prepared for Examination in Malb
®^^^^ Dbpabtmbnt, November, 1854.

'^^^'^ ' Fira Class. — ^Lesson Book : Senior Division — As £ar as page 30.
Spelling-Book Superseded : Junior Division — Four columns of Verbal
Distinctions. Senior Division : from the beginning to the end of page
29. English Grammar : a portion of Orthography in ''Sullivan's
English Grammar ; to distinguish the Articles, Nouns, Verbs, and Ad-
jectives in First Book of Lessons. Geography : the Preliminary Defi-
nitions in " Sullivan's Introduction to Geography ;" to name and point
out on the Map of Europe the principal countries and their chief towns.
Arithmetic : Senior Division — Notation and numeration to thousands ^
some of the multiplication and pence tables. Natural History : to tell
the division, class, and order of each animal mentioned in the lesson.
Sacred Poetry : to repeat any of the first five pieces.

Second Glass. — Lesson Book — As far as page 91. Spelling-Book
Superseded : first and second classes of Verbal Distinctions, and three
rules for spelling. English Grammar : Orthography in " Sullivan's
English Grammar," and to point out the principal Parts of Speech in
reading lessons. Geography : all the Preliminary Definitions in " Sul-
livan's Introduction to Geography," the outline of the Map of the
World, and to have a correct knowledge of the Map of Europe.
Arithmetic : to be able to write numbers to six places,, to work easy
exercises in Addition, Subtraction, and Multiplication, to know the
Multiplication and Pence' Tables, and the Tables of Weights and Mea-
sures. Natural History : to know the division, class, and order of the
animals mentioned in the lesson book. Sacred Poetry : to repeat eight
selections.

Sequel Class, — Lesson Book : Sequel No. 1 as far as page 83, Sequel
No. 2 as far as page 41. Spelling-Book Superseded : to know the First
and Second Classes of Verbal Distinctions, and all the Rules for Spell-
ing. English Grammar : to know the text of " Sullivan's English
Grammar" as &r as the Verb, and to parse a sentence etymologically.
Geography : to have a fiiir knowledge of the Map of the World, and
some acquaintance with the Maps of England and Ireland. Arithmetic :
to be able to work exercises in the simple and compound rules, and
Reduction of Money. Natural History : to be acquainted with the
outline ffiven in Sequel No. 2. Sacred Poetry : to repeat eight selections.

Third Class, — Lesson Book : as far as page 140. English Grammar:
'' Sullivan's English Grammar" as tftr as Syntax, and to parse a simple
sentence. Spelling-Book Superseded : all the Verbal Distinctions,
Rules for Spelling, Prefixes and Affixes, and the Latin Boots. Geo-
graphy: three first chapters in '^ Geography Generalized," and the
Maps of Scotland, Africa, Asia, and America. Arithmetic : to be able
to work sums as £Eur as Proportion. Book-keeping : Board's Treatise,
two first sets. Mensuration : Board's Treatise, first four problems in
Superficies. Algebra : Definitions, easy exercises in Addition, and a
few Simple Equations. Geometry : Definitions, and a few propositions
in first book. Natural History : same as junior classes. Money
Matters : the lessons on Money, Exchange, Commerce, and Coin.

Fourth Glass — Lesson Book : the whole of the Fourth Book. Spell-
ing-Book Superseded : the whole of the book to the end of English
Etymologies. English Grammar : the whole of '' Sullivan's English
Grammar," and to parse any sentence selected from the Lesson Book.
Arithmetic : the Rules of Commercial Arithmetic, Vulgar and Decimal



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I8S4.} ifNatumal EducoHM *i Ireland. 61

FnetioBfl^ Intoliitioii and Erobition. Geography : the whole of the AwBmrt Ck
" Qeogmpliy Generalised,** inclnding the Chapter on Astronomy, Blank j iteporti on
Mapd, Ste. Book-keeping : the first six sets in Board's Treatise. Men- Distrkt Model
snation ! Board's Treatise, the first twenty-eight problems in Section Scho ob.
n.,aiid the whole of Section Til. Algebra : to Quadratic Equations,
fbiitical Economy : '^ Easy Lessons on Money Matters.'* Reasoning :
the first twelve leasons in " Easy Lessons on Reasoning.** Natural
Philosophy : the Natural Philosophy giren in Fifth Book of Lessons.

Writing, — All write on paper except First Class ; the Seqnel, Third
ftn<l Fonrth (^asseto write from dictation.

MenM Af%(hMetiC'^ - ^AJA are exerofoed in this occaaionaHy.

Alsxahbkb MAoDovAiin.
Literaiy Teacher.



Affsvpzx D — 2.
pBoajL^MMB of Stvpixs of Aa&iouLTUSiii Class.

Farms and Offices* — Choice of forms — diyision of fimns, and forma-
tion of fiddfl — situation of houses and offices — the difierent rotation^
—soils to which they are best suited. Drainage. — ^Evii effects of an
excess of moisture in the soil with reference to the growth of crops on
ilH-mannre applied to it — ^Ubour and climate-^yarious systems of
draining, and materials used, &c.

Trmjcking and SubsoUing, — The value of these operations in in-
creasing the productive powers of soils — ^when they should be executed^
And tiie various means etnployed in their performance.

CuUimtion. — The different varieties of wheat, oats, bariey, and rye,
and the several green and green-fallow crops-^season for, and various
methods of sowing and planting— quantities of seeds and manures—^
after-cnHore, harvesting, &c

Soili. — ^Whence derived — several kinds occurring in Ireland — ch^
racter and physical properties — organic and inorganic constituents.

i/anures.— Composition of iftie solid and liquid excrement of the
Tarious domesticated animiils — ^general character of the farm-yard
and liquid manures — Collection and preservation — character and ap-
plieatioti of portable manures, such as guano and bones, mineral and
vegetable manures.

Vhemuiry, — Atmospheric air — importance to animal and vegetable
life-^propertles of its several gases ; water — its use and properties ;
constituents of plants, organic and inorganic.

John Stiwabt, AgricuHnrist.
KovembeTi lS5i.



Appendix D — 3.



FloaBAAMB of Stvdibs Prepared for Exahtnation in Fsxaln
Dbpabtxsnt, November, 1854.

^vrst Clan. — ^Lesson Book: reading, spelling, and explanation to
page 29. Grammar : to be able to point out the Nouns, Adjectives, and
Verbs as they occur in the reading lessons. Geography : to be ac-
quainted with the outlines of the world. Tables : to know the Multi-
plication Table to *^ five times." Sacred Poetry : to be able to repeat
eix aelectionfl.



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64



Appendix to Twmty-firdt Report of Commissioners [1854.



Appendix O. Second Clan. — Lesson Book : spelling, reading, and explanation, to
RaportTon *^® 130th page. Spelling-Book Superseded : to know Class First of
District Model Verbal Distinctions, and the First Rule for Spelling. Gnunmar : to be



SehooU.
BaiUeboromgh.



able to distinguish the Parts of Speech as they occur in the reading
lessons. Arithmetic : to be able to work sums readily in Addition and
Subtraction. Tables : to be familiar with the Multiplication and Pence
Tables. Geography : to be acquainted with the Map of the World.

Sequel CkuB, — Lesson Book : reading, spelling, and explanation, to
page 179 of Sequel No. 2. Spelling-Book Superseded : to be ac-
quainted with Glass First of Verbal Distinctions, and to know four
Kules for Spelling. Grammar : to bo familiar with the text of " Sul-
livan's Grammar" as far as the Relative Pronoun, and to be abl# to
parse a simple sentence from the Lesson Book. Geography: to be
acauainted with the ** Introduction to Geography** as far as page 25,
ana the Maps of Europe and Ireland. Natural History : to be familiar
with the lessons on Natural History contained in Sequel No. 2. Arith*
metic : to be able to work accurately and readily sums in the simple
rules and Compound Addition. Tables : to know the Multiplication
Table and the Tables of Weights and Measures. Writing from Dic-
tation : to write any sentence selected from Lesson Book.

Third Clcus. — Lesson Book : reading, spelling, and explanation of
Third Book to the 176th page, with the Roots, Prefixes, and Affixes, as
they occur. Spelling-Book Superseded : to be acquainted with the



Online LibraryIreland. National Education BdAnnual report of the commissioners ..., Volume 21, Part 2 → online text (page 8 of 64)