Isaac Haight Beardsley.

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34 ECHOES FROM PEAK AND PLAIN.

house to hear what the newly-converted would say. A prayer
and class meeting was being held. Scarcely were they seated,
when the eldest of the young converts arose, and in a firm and
clear voice, said, "I have taken more solid comfort in the last
three days than in all of my life before." What a revelation that
single sentence was to the writer! That was the first time the
idea ever crossed his mind that religion produced happiness, and
was not an irksome duty.

A few years later, Rev. Noble Lovette was appointed junior
preacher on the circuit, and his sermons, exhortations and
prayers had a wonderful efifect on the writer, and were among the
means of leading him to Christ.

January 25, 1851, President Flack addressed the students in
the seminary chapel on the importance of Bible study, closing
his remarks with the following request: "All of you who will
promise to read one chapter a day in the New Testament until
you have read it through, please raise your right hand." This
waiter's went up with many others, and down as quickly, for fear
it would be seen. "Conscience makes cowards of us all!" He
indeed wanted to be a Christian, but did not wash it to be
known. At that time he supposed that Christian people were a
set of cowards, and w^ere afraid to die, or they w^ould not pro-
fess religion. His idea then was that the only brave ones were
on the other side. What a mistaken notion! The truth is di-
rectly the reverse. It takes real manly courage to be an out-
and-out Christian. Sinners are cowards, because their deeds are
evil; "they prefer darkness to light."

In reading the New Testament, the way of life was learned
more perfectly. The views of infidels and of the so-called liberal
Christians, were as familiar to him as the multiplication-table.
But the recollection of that mother's life and triumphant death
gave the He to all such nonsense.

One Sabbath afternoon he called at Lewis Multer's. Dinner
was just over, and he was invited to partake. As he sat down
at the table, Lewis said, "Eat, drink, and be merry, for to-morrow
ye die." It was impossible to eat. "What if that should be true?
I shall be lost forever." That one remark was "a nail in a sure
place," and never w^as removed until at the foot of the cross.



SPIRITUAL LIFE. 35

Early in that summer a camp-meeting was announced to be
held in the grove near the "Morse Church," Jefferson Town-
ship, Schoharie County, New York. This resolve was quickly
made, "I will go to that meeting, and if there is such a thing as
religion, I am going to have it."

All through haying and harvesting he worked hard, early and
late, so as to finish before the camp-meeting began. That was
before the days of mowers, reapers, and self-binders. The hay
had to be cut w-ith a scythe, and grain with a cradle. The steel
horserake, on wheels, had not yet been invented. A revolving
wooden rake and a coil-wire rake had been in use for three or
four years. Either of these had to be lifted by the hands when
the driver came to the windrow. They were a great improve-
ment over the "handrake" of the fathers; but not equal to those
now used.

Saturday noon the last load was in the barn, and the meeting
was to begin on the following Monday afternoon. Dinner over,
preferring not to ask for money needed for necessary expenses
at the camp-meeting, he walked down to Samuel Martin's, and
upon meeting that tall, Aenerable form in the front yard, gave
the usual salutations, when he hesitatingly inquired, "Do you
want help for a few days to finish your haying?" The reply was,
"Yes, come with your scythe on Monday morning." As he
walked homeward, this thought was revolving through his mind,
"If you go to God with the same confidence, your sins will be
forgiven, and you will get religion." This was quite encourag-
ing to him at the time. That afternoon his scythe was put in
order. Sunrise on Monday morning found him in Squire Mar-
tin's field, one mile from home, ready for a full day's work. Two
days and a half, at one dollar per day, were put in mowing by
hand, spreading, raking, and pitching hay, from sunup until after
sundown.

Wednesday noon the "Squire's" hay was all under cover, and
help paid off. The "Squire" always enjoyed a good joke. Here
is one, which occurred not long before. A couple came on a hot
summer evening to be married. The family had retired, the
"Squire" with the rest. A rap was heard at the door, the
"Squire" bade them "Come in." The room was dark. They



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FXHOES FROM PEAK AND PLAIN;



OR,



Tales of Life, War, Travel, and
Colorado Methodism.



ISAAC HAIGHT BEARDSLEY,

OF THE COLORADO CONFERENCE,

Author of " The True Sabbath," "Genealogical History of the Beardsley
Family," Etc.



INTRODUCTION



REV. DAVID H. NIOORE, D. D.

Editor of the Western Christian Advocate.



CINCINNATI : CURTS & JENNINGS.

NEW YORK: EATON & MAINS.

1898.



^^i



COPYRIGHT, 1898,
BY ISAAC HAIGHT BEARDSLEY.



f r»m the Library dri



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in

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DEDICATORY.



To the rank and file of the great itinerant host,

who, in humble positions,

toil on from year to year on scant pay and with little

encouragement ;

To their devoted wives, cheerful students of

economy from day to day ;

And to all who have been led to Christ, or encouraged on their heavenward

journey through our ministry,

This volume is sincerely and prayerfully

BY THE Author.



PREFATORY.



THIS book is the outcome of a lifetime of active service,
covering more than threescore years. It is not a biog-
raphy, yet it contains much that is biographic. It is not a
history, yet it is full of historical matter. Those reading it
will, I trust, be instructed and helped the more bravely to
fight the battles of life.

The aim of the writer has been to present facts in a
plain way, not to give occasion to the chronic croaker, but
to cheer the voyager on life's rough sea. This book has
been prepared from the standpoint of the "Rank and File"
in the itinerancy, and as a stimulus to all laborers in the
Master's vineyard.

Heartfelt gratitude is hereby expressed to those who
have aided in the preparation of this volume, either by fur-
nishing facts and sketches, or otherwise — especially to Peter
Winnie, Esq., secretary of the Colorado Conference Histor-
ical Society, who has cheerfully given access to all its ar-
chives ; also to my brother, the present well-known secre-
tary of the Colorado Conference, Rev. H. L. Beardsley, for
permission to examine every document in the Conference
trunk; to Rev. W. F. Steele, D. D., professor in the Ilifif
School of Theology, for consultations, freely given, and for
sundry suggestions while reading the manuscript.

It is my intention that, as soon as the sale of this book
shall have met the cost of production and publication, both

5



6 PREFATORY.

book and profits shall then become the property of the
" Preachers' Aid Society," for the support of the superannu-
ated members of the Colorado Conference of the Methodist
Episcopal Church, their widows and orphans.

Craving the Divine blessing upon this volume and its
readers, now and through the years to come, I will close
with the words of a writer of old :

" If I have done well, and is fitting the story,

It is that which I desired ;
But if slenderly and meanly,

It is that which I could attain unto."

I. H. B.

Denver, Coi^orado, 1897.



INTRODUCTION.



'T^HB volume its author now gives to the public has
been in preparation for nearly all the years of his
ripe life. What a sensible thing it is to keep a carefully-
written diary! Besides training one to habits of methodical
perseverance, such a journal becomes a thesaurus of valu-
able facts, a priceless prompter to memory, and an unfail-
ing solace in loneliness, sorrow, or age. Its manifold use-
fulness appears when it becomes the anatomy of a biography,
whose literary flesh and blood are added in the rounded
fullness of a noble career.

Few men have seen more phases of life in more varied
fields than has its author. Perhaps none has entered
into more intelligent sympathy with all that he has seen.
This fact gives a quaint relish to his pages. He sets out to
tell a simple tale simply. Therein lies the charm of his
book, and its helpfulness as well. He puts his reader in
the social environments of a half-century ago, as he de-
scribes the characters, customs, and scenes of his childhood.
You are there. You touch them. You see them. They
fill you. They ensphere you. Then you rub open your



8 ■ INTRODUCTION.

eyes to the dawning Twentieth Century, and set the con-
trasts, and mark the advancements, and learn the lessons.

His fifteen years of fruitful labor in Ohio links his earlier
ministry in New York with his later in Colorado; thus giv-
ingf the whole broad land an interest in his volume.

Nothing widens a man's life more than the experience
of war; and no war of the century compares with our Civil
War. In this the author bore an honorable part, as a
preacher of good tidings, in the name of the Lord. The
incidents of grace abounding, in bivouac and hospital, on
the march and on the battle-field, will touch the heart and
stimulate the faith of the Christian reader. Those entering
their country's service — especially as chaplains or wearers
of the Red Cross — could do no better than to ponder these
well-told and thrilling experiences. And many an old sol-
dier will light anew the altar-fire of patriotism, as he goes
from chapter to chapter that brings up the storied past.

Our brother tells of his travels, abroad and at home,
with that same naivete that makes his other narrations so
attractive. From his own peculiar angles of vision he gives
us original impressions and descriptions that one so fre-
quently misses in more pretentious works. An intrusive
vein of humor, as charming as Mark Twain's, pushes up
among the strata of his observations. It is Beardsleyan
throughout; and therefore nothing if not genial, and prac-
tical, and helpful.

But the historical value of the work is most evident in



INTRODUCTION. 9

the concluding chapters, which are devoted to the introduc-
tion and growth of Methodism in Colorado. Upon this the
author has expended much research, and has produced alto-
gether the most comprehensive and complete history of his

chosen subject yet published. Doubtless some would have
given more prominence to this and less to that personage or

event ; it may be that some deserving character or achieve-
ment has been overlooked ; but, all in all, the consensus of
opinion will doubtless award Mr. Beardsley great credit and
praise for having wrought with such impartial fidelity a work
that will be indispensable to all future historians of Col-
orado or American Methodism.

Ten years of Colorado fellowship gave the writer an
interest in the author and his devoted wife, which these
"Echoes from Peak and Plain" start into newer and
quicker vibrations of sympathy and love. The work not
only gracefully rounds out the author's life, but also guar-
antees the indefinite perpetuation of its benign influences.

DAVID HASTINGS MOORE.
Editoriai, Office of
Western Christian Advocate,
June, 1898.



CONTENTS.



PAGE.

Introduction 7

PART I.— ECHOES FROM LIFE IN THE ITINERANCY.

Chapter I. — Early Life, 19

Birth — Parentage — School-days.

Chapter II. — Spirituai. Life, 31

Conversion — Entire Sanctification.

Chapter HI. — Ministerial Life, 49

Divine Call — Way Opened.

Chapter IV. — Itinerancy Begun, 58

North Amherst and Huron — Bryan Circuit.

Chapter V. — Itinerancy Continued 69

Waterville — Plymouth Circuit — Sullivan — Orange — Dover —
Lake Shore — Dalton — Nashville — Newcomerstown — Bolivar —
Canal Dover.

PART IL— ECHOES FROM LIFE IN THE ARMY.

Chapter I. — Off to the Army, 117

United States Christian Commission — Work in Louisville, Ky.
■ — New Albany, Ind. — Run the Gauntlet — Nashville, Tenn.

Chapter II. — Battle in Front of Nashville, 126

What a United States Christian Commission Man saw and did
on the Field of Carnage for three days.

Chapter III. — On to Murfreesborough, 139

W.J. Breed, Esq. — Guerrillas — "Contraband" Camp — Hospitals

— Hostages.

II



1 2 CONTENTS.

PAGE.
Chapter IV. — The; Chapi^aincy, = 145

i88th O. V. I. — Stone River — Tullahoma — Chattanooga — Ivook-
out Mountain — Lightning — Nashville — Intermittent Fever and
Jaundice — Mustered out — Homeward Boiind — Discharged.

PART III.— ECHOES FROM ABROAD.

The Plains — Ocean — Scotland — England — France — Rhine Valley —
Switzerland — Alps — Italy — Egj'pt — Suez — Joppa — Solomon's
Pools — Hebron — Bethlehem — Mar Saba — Dead Sea — Jordan —
Jericho — Bethany — Mount of Olives — Jeriisalem — Bethel — ^Ja-
cob's Well — Nablous — Shiloh — Samaria — Jenin— Jezreel — Foun-
tain — Shunem — Nazareth — Tiberias — Capernaum — Flowers .
— The Drink Habit — Merom — Dan — Banias — Mount Hermon —
Damascus — Baalbec — Beyrout — Bishop Kingsley's Grave — Cy-
prus — Patmos — Constantinople — Athens, Greece — Smyrna — Tri-
este, Austria — Tyrol Alps — Saltzberg — Restaurant — Danube —
Vienna — Prague — Dresden — Berlin — Frankfort — Worms — May-
ence — Cologne — Rotterdam — London — Spurgeon —Bedford —
Homeward Journey 153

PART IV.— ECHOES FROM COLORADO METHODISM.

Chapter I. — Colorado, 217

Gold found — Excitement of 1858-9 — " Pike's Peak or Bust."

Chapter II. — Methodist Beginnings, . 224

Reconnoitering.

Chapter III. — Foundation Buii^ders, 240

"Pike's Peak Mission" from i860 to 1863.

Chapter IV. — Picket-line Extended, 254

South Park — Blue River — California Gulch — Colorado City —
San Luis Valley.

Chapter V. — The Conference Organized, 271

A Proposition of Bishop Ames — From 1863 to 1869.

Chapter VI.— How the Writer Came to go to Colorado, .... 284
Incidents of the Journey — Ascend the Mountains.



CONTENTS. 13

PAGE.
Chapter VII. — The Colorado Conference as He Found it in

June, 1869 290

Sketches of those Preseut.

Chapter VIII. — Georgetown, 301

First Appointmeut — Official Board — Queer Happenings.

Chapter IX. — Journey to Conference at Puebi,o in 1S70, . . . 312
The Exciting Trip described — New Members.

Chapter X. — Pi^easurable Saunterings, 333

Second Camp-meeting — Ministerial Association — Hot Sulphur
Springs — A Forsaken Cabin — An Unwilling Camp.

Chapter XI. — The Conferences of 187 1-2, 345

Bishop Foster — A Resume.

Chapter XII. — Methodism in Denver, 356

Begun by a Carpenter — The First Society^Sunday-school —
Views of Churches — Flood — Aggressive Work — A Happy Wed-
ding — City Missions.

Chapter XIII. — Educationai. Methodism, 387

The Incipient Step — Building erected — Embarrassments — The
Struggle — The Uplift — Light dawns — Friends — Endowment —
University Park and Hall— Iliflf School of Theology— The
Great Telescope.

Chapter XIV.— Second Decade of the Conference History, . 410
1873 to 1883 — Sketches of the Laborers and Work done — New
Fields.

Chapter XV. — Personal History, 466

Nevada — Erie and Platteville — Black Hawk — Del Norte — Trin-
idad — Wheat Ridge and Argo — St. James, Denver.

Chapter XVL — Third Decade of the Conference History, . . 481
1883 to 1893 — A Wonderful Period of Church-building— Growth
in all Departments of Church-work — Epworth League intro-
duced.



14



CONTENTS.



PAGE.

Chapter XVII.— Personal History, Concluded, 558

St. James, Platteville and Fort Lupton — A Marvelous Revival —
Arvada, Church begun — Loveland — A Trip to the British Isles
— Released from Duty — Lecturing Tour and Revival work.

Chapter XVIII. — A Brief Epitome of the Conference from 1892

TO the Close of 1896, 566

Four Valuable Summaries — Concluding Note.



ILLUSTRATIONS.



NO
I.
2.

3-
4-
5-
6.



8.

9-
lo.
II.

12.

13-

14.

15-
16.

17-

18.

19-
20.
21.
22.

23-
24.

25-

26.

27.

28.

29.
30-

31-
32.

33-



PAGE.
The Author — Frontispiece.
New York Conference Sem-

inar^', 40

German Lasher, 41

The Old Home, 53

John R. Colgan, 67

An Italian Funeral Proces-
sion, 171

View of the Bathing-place of

the Jordan, 192

Jerusalem from Olivet, . . .196
Olivet from Jerusalem, . . . 198
The Spanish Peaks, .... 223

Jacob Adriance, 225

Henr^- Reitze, 227

Central City Church, .... 229

A '59er Mansion, 234

Conference Group of 1865, . 277
George Richardson, .... 2S1

John L. Dyer, 292

B. T. Vincent, 295

Geo. H. Adams, 298

R. J. Van Valkenberg, . . . 300
The Railroad Loop, . . . .311

Palmer Lake, 316

Glen Park, 318

Garden of the Gods, .... 319

F. C. Millington, 325

Thomas Harvvood, 326

Mrs.'E. J. Harwood, .... 327

E. C. Brooks 330

H. J. Shaffner, 331

Glenwood Springs, 343

J. H. Merritt, 346

Gray's Peak, 347

B. F. Crar\-, 351



NO

34-
35-

36.



39-
40.
41.

42.
43-

44-
45.
46.

47-
48.

49-
50.

51-
52.
53-

54-
55-
56.
57-
58.

59-
60.
61.



PAGE.

C. A. Brooks, 353

Where Methodism was Born

in Denver, 357

Birthplace of the Colorado

Conference, 359

Lawrence Street Methodist

Episcopal Church, .... 361
Trinit}- Methodist Episcopal
Church (small cut), .... 363

John Evans, 365

Peter Winne, 367

Christ Methodist Episcopal

Church, 370

St. James Methodist Epis-
copal Church, 371

Asbury Methodist Episcopal

Cliurch, 377

Bishop H. \V. Warren, . . . 3S4
Colorado Seminary,, .... 393
University of Denver, . . . 398
Mrs. Elizabeth IlifF Warren, 399

William S. IlifT, 401

University Hall, 402

Girls' Cottage 404

The IlifF School of Theology, 406
Chamberlin Obser\-atory, . . 407
Telescope at Chamberlin

Observaton.-, 408

L.J. Hall, . ' 412

C. W. Blodgett, 414

W. L. Slutz, 415

J. F. CofFman, 419

O. L. Fisher, 421

R. H. Rhodes, 422

H. L. Beardsley, 424

H. C. King, 427

15



i6



ILL USTRA TIONS.



NO. PAGE.

62. John Collins, 429

63. T. A. Uzzell, 434

64. J. F. White, 436

65. E. Cranston, 440

66. Conference Group of 1879, . 443

67. T. C. Iliff, 445

68. S. W. Thornton 447

69. D. H. Moore, 449

70. C. S. Uzzell 451

71. N. A. Chamberlain 458

72. C. H. Koyl, 460

73. J. F. Harris 462

74. J. A. Long, 463

75. C. W. Brewer, 483

76. A. C. Peck, 485

77. Mrs. F. E. Peck, 486

78. Interior of Haymarket Mis-

sion, 487

79. E. J. Wilcox, 490

80. Longmont Church and Par-

sonage, 491

81. Conference Group of 1885, . 493

82. J. A. Ferguson, 495

83. W. C. Madison, 498

84. H. A. Buchtel, 500

85. D. L. Rader, 503

86. H. D. Seckner, 505

87. J. W. Linn, 506

88. O. J. Moore, 508

89. G. W. Ray, 512

90. A. L. Chase, 513

91. Kent White, 515

92. J. R. Wood, 516



93-
94-
95-
96.

97-
98.

99-
100.

lOI.

102.
103.
104.
105.
106.

107.
108.
109.
no.



III.

112.

113-

114.

115-
116.
117.
118.
119.
120.
121.
122.



PAGE.

C. B. Allen 517

B. F. Todd 522

J. W. Flesher 524

I. F. McKay, 526

J. ly. Vallow, 529

R. A. Chase, 530

J. C. Veeder, 532

W. F. McDowell, 535

R. M. Barns, . 536

A. A. Johnson, 538

A. B. Glockner, 545

H. E. Warner, 546

R. A. Carnine, 548

Trinity Methodist Episcopal

Church, Denver (large cut), 550
Robert Mclntyre, .... 553

J. R. Shannon, 554

Wm. John, 556

Loveland Methodist Epis-
copal Church and Parson-
age, 565

Claudius B. Spencer 567

W. F. Steele, 568

W. I. Taylor, 569

J. T. Pender, 570

R. Sanderson, 573

J. C. Gullette, 575

M. F. Sapp, 576

C. M. Cobern, 580

W. F. Conner, 581

A. H. Briggs, 582

J.F.Smith, 583

Grace Church, Denver, . . . 584



N. B.— Over two-thirds of the cuts in this book -were made by The Williamson-
Haffner Engraving Co., Denver, Colorado.



PART I.



Echoes from Home and Itinerant Life.



17



Saved Through and Through.

t^ t^ 5^

Bom of the Spirit! O wondrous new birth I
Bom of the Spirit 1 O hear, all ye earth I
Saved evermore, I am saved through and through,
Saved by the blood of the Faithful and True.

Out of my vilcness and hatred within,
Out of my nakedness, out of my sin,
Into a kingdom of life and of love.
Sweetly my soul has been bom from above.

Life everlasting my soul has received.

Life in Christ Jesus on w^hom I believed;

Born of the Spirit, created anew^,

Glory to Jesus, I 'm saved through and through I

Come, precious soul, and be bom from above I

Jesus is waiting to fill thee w^ith love;

Come unto him and be saved through and through.

Saved by the blood shed for me and for you.

— Melville W. Miller.
i8



I.

EARLY LIKK.

Birth. — In a lovely valley where two roads meet, forming
an acute angle, stands a story-and-a-half frame house, wherein
was born, October i, 1831, a child so frail of body that he
"was not considered worth dressing until six weeks old." That
fragile form was laid on the hearth by the fire, wrapped in
flannels, the nurse expecting to find him dead each time the cover
was lifted. To her utter surprise he kept breathing, and after a
time began to grow. His mother often wept over the puny form
of this her first-born, fearing that he would never reach a vigor-
ous manhood. No one then thought he would develop into a
man of near two hundred pounds, and live to cross the "dead-
line" of sixty; but such is the fact. That birth occurred in North
Harpersfield, Delaware County, New York, before the days of
cook-stoves or of lucifer matches in that locality. Large fire-
places were then used, in which wood was liberally burned. At
night the coals were covered with ashes to preserve them. Did
the fire ever go out? If so, a flint was struck; that failing, a fire-
brand was secured from a neighbor, with w'hich to ignite the
tinder. To sit in front of one of those wide-open fireplaces on
a frosty night, and watch the frisky flame ascend the capacious
chimney, was a cheerful sight.

What a contrast between life tJicn and noiv! Potatoes were
baked in the hot ashes on the hearth, and were invariably good.
Brick, or stone, or Dutch and tin ovens were in vogue for other
baking purposes. The latter was an open reflector set before the
fire, in which biscuit were usually baked. The women spun and
wove the cloth used, out of material grown on the farm, whether
of linen or of flannel. From the wool they carded and spun
the yarn for knitting the socks and mittens needed in the family.
Out of the flax they also spun thread for sewing purposes.
Ofttimes a "hank of flax" was exchanged with a neighbor. The
effort then was to see which could make the smoothest and
nicest thread therefrom. Their carpetless floors were swept with

19



20 ECHOES FROM PEAK AND PLAIN.

Splint brooms, made by hand from a small hickory-tree. It was
considered extravagant to drink "store coffee," except on Sun-
day mornings. "Parched-corn coffee" was drunk on other days
of the week. Soap was made from hardwood ashes, leached, and
scraps of grease, combined in proper proportions. "Store sugar"
was seldom used ; maple being cheaper, and much preferred. The
prevailing light of the family was their own "dipped or molded
candles." The custom was for each family, when attending re-
ligious services at night, to carry a candle for illuminating pur-
poses. This practice ceased largely in 1861, when kerosene was
introduced.

This charming locality, with its modest hills, wooded slopes,
maple-groves, apple-orchards, broad meadows, cultivated nooks,
crystal springs, rippling rills, neat farmhouses, stone walls, and
well-kept roads, form a landscape that a painter might well covet.

The stream that flows down that beautiful valley is known
as the Middle Brook, probably so called for a family by that name
living in Connecticut, whence most of the original settlers came.
It is one of the many rivulets formed by bubbling springs among
the northwestern spurs of the Catskill Mountains, the water flow-
ing westward, uniting with other little streams farther down, to
form the southern branch of the Suscjuehanna River.

The farmhouses are more numerous now than then, many
of the early structures having given place to those of more



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