Copyright
Isidore Singer.

The Jewish encyclopedia : a descriptive record of the history, religion, literature, and customs of the Jewish people from the earliest times to the present day (Volume 11) online

. (page 40 of 160)
Online LibraryIsidore SingerThe Jewish encyclopedia : a descriptive record of the history, religion, literature, and customs of the Jewish people from the earliest times to the present day (Volume 11) → online text (page 40 of 160)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


they, in their turn, were subordinate to the gover-
nor-general of Ccele-Syria. The well-known high
priests and so-called Tobiads, Jason and ]Mp:nelaus,
are, according to Biichler, to be considered as
political governors; and, since tradition generally
regards them as higli priests, Josejilius is justified
in saying (" Ant." xx. 10, i^ 3) that Antiochus V.,
Eiipator and his viceroy Ijvsias were the first to
depose a high priest (i.e., jVIeiielaus). This refer-
ence is apparently an evidence of a favorable atti-
tude on the part of the Syrians; but the financial
burdens imposed upon the Jews make their C(jn-
dilion appear very wretched. References to these
taxes are fouiul in a pseudo-Antiochian decree ex-
empting the elders, the priests, the scribes, and the
singers in the Temple from the payment of the
poll-tax, the crown-tax, and other dues (ih. xii. 3,
§3).

Additiniial information is derived from incidents



165



THE JEWISH ENCYCLOPEDIA



Seleucidaa
Selig'iuau



of tlie reign of Seleucus IV., Philopator (187-
175), when Heliodokus forced his way into the
Temple at Jerusalem to seize its treasures for the
king. In addition to the Idgh priest Onias III., a
certain Simon seems to have officiated as political
governor at that time; and it was apparently he,
and not the high priest, who was responsible for the
ta.xes, and who consequently called the king's
attention to the treasure in the Temple (II Mace,
iii. 4).

During the reign of Antiochus IV., Epiphanes
(175-164) Jason paid 360 talents for the dignity
which the king had conferred upon
Taxation, him, and an additional 80 talents from
another source of revenue (II Mace.
; iv. 8). The fact that part of this sum is mentioned
■ as an "additional" sum justifies the inference that
it represents an excess offered by Jason over the
regularly established amount of the ta.x ; indeed, it
is probable that even the sum of 360 talents included
such an excess, the established sum evidently being
300, which very likely had been paid during the
reign of Seleucus IV. as well. Indeed, Sulpicius
Severus asserts (" Sacra Historia," ii. 17) that the
Jews under the high priests paid Seleucus 300 talents,
and he also mentions a similar sum as having been
given to Antiochus Epiphanes. This statement
agrees with the circumstance that Jonathan offered
King Demetkius II. the sum of 300 talents to
exempt Judea from, taxation (I Mace. xi. 28).

Seleucus IV. was extolled because he held the
Temple in high honor, and also because he person-
ally defrayed the cost of the sacrifices (II Mace. iii.
3); but the only statements concerning Antiochus
IV. record his brutal excesses against the Temple
as well as against the Jewish people and their relig-
ion. How this policy finally caused a crisis and put
an end to the Seleucidau dominion in Judea is
described elsewhere (see Jonathan Maccabeus;
Judas Maccabeus; Simon Maccabeus).

The succeeding members of the Seleucidan dy-
nasty may be more briefly enumerated. The say-
ing, generally ascribed to Joseplius, that after the
death of Antiociu;s VII., Sidetes, the Seleucidai
were no cause of concern to Hyucanus I., must be
considerably modified ; for the dynasty had not yet
relinquished its claims to Judea, and
The Later it was still to cause the Jews many
Seleucidse. difficulties. Antiochus IX., Cyzice-
Nus devastated Judea ; and it was only
when he had been deserted by his Egyptian allies
and had suffered great losses in warfare against his
brother, that llyrcanus ventured to besiege Samaria.
Antiochus hastened to relieve the city, but was re-
ludsed by the sons of Hyrcanus; so that, after an-
other raid through Judea, he was obliged to leave
the Jews in peace.

Alexander Jann.eus was much more powerful
than liis father, Hyrcanus, yet he was attacked and
completely defeated by the Seleucid Demetrius III.
at Shechem during the civil war brought on by the
Pharisees, while even one of the last of the Seleu-
cidte, Antiochus XII., Dionysus, was strong enough
to break through the fortifications of Alexander
Jann.Tus and to march straight across Judea against
the Arabs.



The Seleucidan dynasty gradually degenerated
into condottieri, who served the powerful Greek
cities with their mercenaries. As lords without
lands, they led a precarious existence, and were able
to demonstrate their military strength only when
the vital interests of the Hellenic cities were at stake.
Such an occasion was the war against the Jews
which threatened the very existence of the Greek
cities. The civil war which raged uninterruptedly
after the year 112 B.C. finally broke the power of
the Seleucidae (Gutschmid, "Kleine Schriften," ii.
309).

The Seleucidse are mentioned but rarely in rab-
binical literature. An allusion in Seder '01am Kab-
bah XXX., which Zunz, however, de-
In Rabbin- clares to be an interpolation, runs as
ical follows: "In the Diaspora [Babylon

Literature, being the place especially implied]
documents were dated according to
the era of the Greeks" (comp. 'Ab. Zarah 10: "in
the Diaspora they reckon only according to the
kings of the Greeks ''). Eight monarchs are then
enumerated (all Diadochi, excepting Alexander the
Great), among them Seleucus (Nicatoi-), Antiochus
(III., the Great), and Antiochus Epiphanes (comp.
Seder 'Olam Zuta, ed. Neubauer, in "M. J. C." ii.
71). A midrash on Ps. ix. 8 (comp. Yalk., Ps. 642)
says that Alexander built Alexandria; Seleucus,
Seleucia, i.e., Seleucia on the Tigris (see " R. E. J."
xliv. 38); and (this is stated first in the midiash)
Antiochus, Antioch. The Jewish sources show a
more intimate knowledge of Antiochus Epiphanes
only, this being due to I Mace, which makes him
the immediate successor of Alexander the Great,
as do also various other chronicles ("R. E. J."
xlv. 28).

BinLior.nAPHv: In addition to the passages in Polyliius, Dio-
dorus, Livy, and Justin, tlie main sources are / and 11 Mace;
.losephus, ^iHf. boolfs xii., xiii.; Eusebius, Chrnnicon: and
Jerome on Dnii. xi. See also Clinton, Fasti Hellenici; Droy-
sen, Gfscfi. iles Hellenismut<. )ld ed., 1877-78: Holm, (Jriech-
irsclic, Gcschiclite, vol. iv., Berlin. 1874; Niese, Gexcli. der
(li-icchi!<chiii iDid Makcdiniisc'Jitn Staaten, 1899; Herzfeld,
Gesch. dfs \'nIkc.-< Jisnwl, i., pagsim ; Griitz, GencJi. ii.. 111.,
pns.su/i ; Scliiirer, Gcticli. 3d ed., i. 1C5-179; Wellhausen, I. J.
G. 4tli ed., ])p. :i58 ct tseq.

J. S. Kk.

SELF-DEFENSE. See Homicide.

SELIGMAN : American Jewish family having
its origin in Baiersdorf, Bavaria. The eight sons of
David Seligman have formed mercantile establish-
ments spiead throughout the chief commercial cen-
ters of the United States. The eldest, Josei)h, went
to the United States in 1837; he was followed by his
two brothers William and James in 1839, and by
Jesse in 1841. These established a small clothing
business at Lancaster, Pa. They then removed to
Selma, Ala., and from there opened branch stores at
Greensboro, Eutaw, and Clinton. In 1848 the Selig-
mans, who had been joined bj^ their younger broth-
ers Henry and Leopold, determined on settling in the
North. Accordingly Henry and Jesse established
themselves in Watertown, N. Y., where the latter
became acquainted with Lieutenant (afterward Gen-
eral) Grant. In 1850, at the outbreak of the gold-
fever in California, Jesse established a store in San
Francisco, in the only brick building then existing,
which escaped the fire of 1851.









<

O
J

u

«3









S

x:



a



V

c

«^

o

V

o







2

s
o

•c

o

a

X
OP

>



1
£

P



a

eg

V

a
^^

%-t
o

£

.a

a

0)

a
s.

a

0)

I

■5
c

03

U



OS

x:



s



5;

3
a



e
2;



b:
o

z



3; 0-



i I






m ^ ~






c o
cd u

C as



Is

< .






-•a

00

gZ gf^

CO -H -r '-' ■=

=« _- 5; _: =

^ u ^.

3j ^



S|



CO
00



•JL.






^ oc — • —

*. O/^"' ^ —

-■? . — x: J ».
^ -I









^5



■i, o ""^ • -~~ *^ (11 ^ QJ

- fc:,-*o5- a « a 3



&aj=



II









'~ II



t'oij



Mas'"






00 «
05 ~



.00 06^

"5 *^ ^ ^ "

rs C.D.-

£i!a^






^


s


^
1




y;


-^


^^


'a;






T-


1-


a


1.










































-


4?


O-M




;^


'"'


r/3


X










«








II


S








a il



5.?? '-^s'p.^-



= <;iS<2sCc



I:



■■ "^ — =L =* ~

5 I- in «t-— : C S

: «o{o»3.2 «

s Z "^ 0-t S """



-I is



1



- ca —

3 O.









5,-=??
— ?^S•
s"<—









— lifsg

S L. .2 ■» •?



ZJ=



2zS



v" » '^ i:: ■-













X






x:Z."_












' — 5r 1; ^ic












5 o< —






"2^-








X


i
















cd




X



^- —5 ■ — ^ 1.

£ II "



■/;i?5 i_





V




.-^


0^


o;


1


x:


a-
Q


s




00


>


3;










>J


Ex.


II












1




i


£











^


i


X.


;:;'


.-'


.*


3;


~r


























>


1




"*


w


-1


.-d


-


>


'/■


X


■c
















-^


'x:




. —


>-




^






^


#



fc-CC I^ —

,2. 05 ■e >^ 5-



c






■/;



1-



= ;Sr o 5 1- o S S
i.r II ^ffi









tf I.












-Z ^ <, ;

£Z\






~- .• — X '

-S3-
Z h









■*■< — ".=



.5 <o



^S=^ = 3

^■S^ ar
S;f^93



a
SQ



^OCX M
•— f— * 3



0)
03



|i



03



- ~"65Z3

x:- I, K



t; C C8 ^

iZS:::



OJCIi

aj •

- 0. ~^

3






3-'



s '■


V^-Tj-


S.£


"^3;


.-►^


3^^


02 '


El-






San
Sept


i^






•= II


~ c'



H -

oo~



^^

x:_
""x



-2-3 I



IX.

Is



a o

en Z



5a;



5-^



y:*















a









rl\














.§2-1


1

d Abraham
. March 26,
1886)


I — -Ss


J

■Hef

— 1^


1

Addie S.
(b. July 24,

1879)
= (May 29,

1!KK))

Hermann

Uhlfelder

(Issue)


^








g5

0/


■3














^














































-■ ■ ~ x

- - II
















Herbert S.
(b. April 22, 1880)




T


ȣ i| 5""
C5 ^










1

Robert S.
. Nov. 2, 1878)


1

Clara S.
March 6, 1875)
mund D. Sehlos

( Issue 1












.2


. u














■ —


£w
II


a; . ~










00 I




— §"2












5?




<










ja o


.a! 30














«|


lien
24,1
ue)


rX.-^












J2


~£S:>>S


i^r


y.












-d^"


-^^g


c/j^ ^ s ^










S^


II £


^e


1

ilton
. Dec.
1866)
(Feb.
1897)
ric G
issue










~ 3l-






^- II 1










~^S












'^


W5


^^


»7








1

is


1
,ac S.
Dec. 2

834)
Jan. 6
869)

Mess


i
e Sarah &.
ay 9, 1873)
ry R. Lewis


00~


erts.
14, 18'






a

cs

a

be


o


-= II 3


1

Arthu

. July 1

Edith

(issu


Herb
b. July


1
lian S.
July 2,

186.5)




flj






£ II


-^


.^£




tXl






•gSS










■^






s^-=










>






.3=^11










o










??






o

S

■o
a






a


f




.>!t m aj








1

3b. 5, 1871 )
pold Hir.sc
; issue)


1
Oscar S.
Dec. 8, li


b. May 2

1863)

(March

1882)

Eugen

tettheim

(issue)




3i






_.


£ii


- II -^^




Q






~^ II




^:;f


cT El 1










02 5^ =


Lawry S.
June 5, 1867)


Edgar I.

(b. April

1867)


1

(b. Nov. 1
1861)
= (March
1882)
Herman St
(issue)






a:


1
Abraham S.
(b. April 20,

1833;
d. Jan. 20,

1885)

= (May 19,

18ta)

Elennore Levi


ge II




1

Florence S.

(b. Aug. 31, 1865)

= A. H. Mayer

( is.su e)


(b. July 19,

18611)
= ( Feb. 6,

1881)

Salli Stern

(issue)






























> >.
















S CS
















OS










z


^ -: I




s:


=








o

Q
2;






' —


-i^








9 =^ ^';^r^






^2 =


V. . r-




^Z.^ 'Xj^^ Q








O


j£ II »-






David EmIl
, March 11.
•]lhH Beddi
(issue)


Fro (MIS

EUzaheth ;

(b. Mav 24

1859)

= (March 2

1880)

Alfred

Rosenthal

(issue)






H


•-■






si'K








b:


, «






"II








p
















ij Uiau U-ou i-^








CO »






•<


0; . i— ' ^^ "— ' "^








O ^n






b:


= £ II «








Jesse Leon
(b. Feb. 1

1&J8 ;

d. Dec. 2(

1903)





Seligman
Selig^Bohn



THE JEWISH ENCYCLOPEDIA



168



In 18o7 the clotliing business had become so hicia-
tive that it was decided to supplement it by a bank-
ing business, Josepli Sclignuui, the

Dealings liead of the tirni, going to Europe and
with Uni- establisliing rehitions with German
ted States bankers, at the same time placing

Govern- United States bonds on the Frankfort

ment. Stock Exchange; since that period

the lirm of Seligman Brothers has

been concerned with every issue of United States

bonds.

In 1862 Joseph Seligman establislied the firms of
J. & W. Seligman & Co., New York; Abraham Se-
ligman tt Co., San Francisco (subsequently merged
with the Anglo-Californian Bank); Seligman Broth-
ers, London; Seligman Freres et Cie., Paris; and
Seligman & Stettheimer, Frankfort-nn-the-^Iain.

An interesting feature about the formation of
these firms was that tlie profits and losses of all of
them were divided equally among the eight brotheis,
who tlnis followed the business policy established by
the RothschiUls and pursued by that family for many
years. In 1879 the Seligmans, with the Rothschilds,
took over the whole of the .8150,000,000 bonded loan
of the United States. They have been financial
agents for the Navy and the State Department of
the United States since 1876, and are the accredited
agents of that government both abroad and at home.
Besides their interests in United States bonds, the
firm of J. S: AV. Seligman is connected with many
railway companies, especially in the Southwest.

In 1905 the members of the family established at
their original liome in Baiersdoif an institution for
the training and support of childicn during the ab-
sence of their ])arentsat work, and open to all the in-
habitants of Baiersdorf without distinction of creed.

Bibliography: In Memoriam Jcs.sc SrU<j)naii, New York,
privately printed, 18!U.

Edwin Robert Anderson Seligman : Amer-
ican political economist; born in New York April
25, 1861; educated at Columbia University (Ph.D.
1884); studied at tlie universities of Berlin, Heidel-
berg, Geneva, and Paris. He became prize lecturer
at Columbia in 1885, full professor in 1891. ami is now
(1905)head of the faculty of economics and sociology.
He has particularly devoted liimself to the economics
of finance, on which he has written two important
treatises: "Essays in Ta.xation," 3(1 ed. 1900; and
"The Shifting and Incidence of Taxation," 2d ed.
1899. He lias written also " Railway Tariffs," 1887:
"Progressive Taxation in Theory and Practise."
1894; and "Economic Interpretation of Historv,"
1902.

Seligman has been president of the American Eco-
nomic Association, besides being connected with
many scientific and philanthropic societies. He was
a member of the Committee of Seventy and secre-
tary of the Committee of Fifteen in New York city ;
having shown gre;it interest in municipal reform, lie
became 'president of the Teneinentllouse Building
Company of New York. He is likewise president
of the Ethical Culture Society of New York.
BiBi.ioiiRAPiiv : WIio's TTlio in America, liM).").

Isaac Newton Seligman : Ameilcan banker and
communal worker; boin in New York July 10, 1855;



educated at Columbia Grammar School and Columbia

College, from which lie graduated in 1876. He was

one of the crew which won the universitj^ eight-oar

college race (m Saratoga Lake in 1874. In 1878, after

having finished an apprenticeship in the firm of

Seligman ct Hellnian, New Orleans, he joined the

New York establishment, of which he became head

in 1880, on the death of his father, Joseph Seligman.

He has been connected with almostall the important

social-reform committees in New York, and is a

trustee of nineteen important commercial, financial,

and other institutions and societies, including the

Munich Lite Assurance Company, St. John's Guild,

and the McKinley Memorial Association, and has

been a member of the Committee of Seventy, of

Fifteen, and of Nine, each of which attempted at

various times to reform municipal government in

New York ; of the last-named body he was chairman.

lie is a trustee of Temple Emanu-El and of the

Hebrew Orphan Asylum, as well as of the United

Hebrew Charities, though he is also a member of the

Ethical Culture Society.

Biiu.ioi.RAPnv : Tinii/ff ns' Maonzine. March, 1899; Union
llistiiiicnl As.«>ciati()n, 1901, special issue; Aew York Trib-
inn , .Iiily 4, 1S99.

Jesse Seligman : American banker and pliilan-
tiinipist; bornat Baiersdorf, Bavaria, Aug. 11, 1827;
(lied at Cor(mado Beach, Cal., April 23, 1894. He
followed his brothers to the United States in 1841,
and established himself at Clinton, Ala. In 1848
he removed with his brothers to Watertown, N.
Y., and thence, with
his brother Leopold,
went to San Fran-
cisco in the autumn
of 1850, where he be-
came a member of
the Vigilance Com-
mittee, as well as of
the Howard File
Company. lie re-
mained in California
till 1857, when lie
joined his l)rotlier in
establishing a bank-
ing business in New
York. With his
brother Joseph he
helped to found the
Hebrew Orphan
Asylum in 1859, and

was connected with it till his death. At the time of
his death he was a trustee of the Baron de Hirsch
Fund. He was a member of the Union League
Club, of which he was vice-president, and from
which he resigned in 1S93 when the club for racial
reasons refu.sed to admit to membership his son
Theodore. He was head of the American Syndicat(;
torined to place in the United States the shares of
the Panama Camil.

Bii!I,io(;raphv : Tn ^[rm(n■i(lnl Jesse >ieli<i)n(in. New York,
privately printed. Is94, p. 2-'9.

Joseph. Seligman: Founder of the firm of Se-
ligman Brothers; born at Baiei-sdorf, Bavaria, Nov.
23, 1819; died at New Orleans April 25, 1880. He
was educated at the gymnasium of Erlangen, from




Jesse Seligman.



169



THE JEWISH ENCYCLOPEDIA



Seligman
Selig-sohn



which he graduated in 1838. He then studied med-
icine, and in the same year went to the United States,
where he acted as casliier and private secretary to
Judge Asa Packer, president of tlie Lehigh Valley
Railway. Establishing himself as a dry-goods mer-
chant at Greensboro, Ala., he was joined by his
brothers, and soon acquired sufficient capital to open
an importing house in New York (1848). At the out-
break of the Civil war lie founded tlie banking-liouse
of J. & W. Seligman & Co., New York, having vis-
ited Germany in order to acquire financial connec-
tions in that country. In large measure the financing
of the Civil Avar, so far as European capital was con-
cerned, was managed by the Seligman firm. In 1877
he rendered an important service to the Navj' De-
partment of the United States by holding over till the
following fiscal year a large debt due to the firm ; for
this he received the oflicial thanks of the department,
of which his firm was thenceforth the financial rep-
resentative. He was an intimate friend of President
Grant, by whom he was at one time offered the post
of secretary of the treasury, which he declined.

Seligman was the founder of the Hebrew Orphan
Asylum, and was one of the founders of the Society
for Ethical Culture, toward which he contributed
large amounts, and of which he was president till his
death. For a number of j'^ears he Avas a member of
the Board of Education of the City of New York, and
he was chairman of one of its most important com-
mittees, lie was a member of the famous Committee
of Seventy, during the Tweed regime. The first
Rapid Transit Commission, which initiated the
whole plan for better transportation facilities in
New York, was presided over by him, and he was
an early president of the American Geographical
Society, in which he took much interest.

In the summer of 1877 great indignation was

arou.sed by the refusal of Judge Hilton, on racial

grounds, to receive Mr. Seligman and

The Judg-e his family at the Grand Union Hotel

Hilton in Saratoga. It was the first incident

Affair. of this kind that had occurred in the
United Slates. It called forth most
emphatic expressions of disapproval bj^ represent-
atives of various races and religions, and evoked a
long eulogy (June 27) on the Hebrew race by Henry
Ward Beecher. It is understood that the incident
caused the ruin of A. T. Stewart's store, then man-
aged by Judge Hilton, and which was afterward
taken over by John Wanamaker of Philadelphia.

BiBLior,RAPi?Y : \eu' Vork TriJnnif. July 4, 1893. Henry
Ward Beeoher's eulogy was reprinted in The Menora)i,
March, 190.5.
A. J.

SELIGMANN, FRANZ ROMEO: Austrian
physician and Persian scholar; born at Nikolsburg
June 30, 1808; died at Vienna Sept. 15, 1892. Edu-
cated at the gymnasium and University of Vienna
(M.D. 1880), he became ])rivat-docent at his alma
mater in 1833. From that year to 1838 he was
assistant at the Allgemeine Krankenhaus; in 1848
he received tlie title of professor; in 1850 he was
appointed assistant professor and in 1869 professor
of the history of medicine. He resigned his uni-
versity position in 1878.

Of Seligiiiaim's works maybe mentioned: " De



Re Medica Persarum " (Vienna, 1832), a translation
and interpretation of the oldest Neo-Persian manu-
script on medicine; " Liber Fundamentorum Phar-
macologife Auctore Abu Mansar" and "Ueber Drei
Hochst Seltene Persische Handschriften," ih. 1833;
"Gotter, Satyren und Faune," ib. 1838: "Die Heil-
systeme und die Volkskrankheiten," ib. 1850; "Adam
Chenot und Seine Zeit," ib. 1861; " Ueber Begrab-
niss in Culturhistorischer Beziehung," ib. 1864.

Bibliography: Eisenberg, Das Geistige TT'ien, i., Vienna,
1893 ; Paget. Biofif. Lex.
s. F. T. H.

SELIGMANN, LEOPOLD, RITTER VON :

Austrian army surgeon; born at Nikolsburg Jan.
18, 1815; brother of Franz Romeo Selig.m.\nn. He
received his education at the gymnasium of his na-
tive town and at the University of Vienna, taking
the medico-surgical course at the Joseph-Akademie
(M.D. 1843). He w^as appointed assistant surgeon
in the army in 1843, and surgeon in 1855, after the
revolution in Italy. He took part in tlie wars of
1859 and 1866, both in Italy; from 1868 to 1876 he
was attached to the Ministry of War at Vienna; he
became surgeon-major in 1871, and resigned in 1876,
with the rank of lieutenant-colonel.

Besides his essays in the professional journals Se-
ligmann has written "GemeinnOtzige Ausziige aus
den Sanitatsvorsehriften zum Selbstuntericht fur
Reservearzte," 1873.

Bibi.iography: Elsenberg, Das Geistige Wien, ii., Vienna,
1893.
s. F. T. H.

SELIGSOHN, MAX : Russian-American Orien-
talist; born in Russia April 13, 1865. Having re-
ceived his rabbinical training at Slutsk, government
of Minsk, he went in 1888 to New York, where he
studied modern languages till 1894, in which year
he went to Paris to study Oriental languages, espe-
cially Semitics (" eleve diplome " of the Ecole des
Langues Orientalcs, 1897, and of the Ecole des
Ilautes Etude-s, 1900). In 1898 he was sent by the
Alliance Israelite Universelle to Abyssinia to in-
quire into the conditions of the Fai..\shas; but,
certain difficulties arising, he was able to proceed
no farther than Cairo, where he taught for eigliteen
months. Returning to Paris, he was invited in 1902
to go to New York to become a member of the staff
of office editors of The Jewish P]ncyci,opedi.\.

Seligsohn is the author of: " Le Diwande Tarafah
ibn ai-'Abd " (Paris, 1900), a translation from the
Arabic into French, with notes and an introduction;
a French translation of " Kitab al-Raml," an Arabic
work on geomancy, with preface and notes; (with
E. N. Adler) "Une Nouvelle Chronique Samari-
taine," Paris, 1903. He is a contributor to the
"Jewish Quarterly Review " and the "Revue des
Etudes Juives," mostly on Judaeo-Persian literature.

A. ' F. T. H.

SELIGSOHN, SAMUEL: Hebrew poet; liorn
at Samoczin, Posen, 1S15; died there Oct. 3, 1866.
He published "Ha-Abib" (Berlin, 1845), an epos.
Another epos, on the destruction of .lerusalem, and
various essays by him remained in manuscript.

Bibliography: Orient, Lit. 1845, No. 22; Allg. Zeit. des Jud.



Online LibraryIsidore SingerThe Jewish encyclopedia : a descriptive record of the history, religion, literature, and customs of the Jewish people from the earliest times to the present day (Volume 11) → online text (page 40 of 160)