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Panama Canal record (Volume v.14 1920-21) online

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4,623

24,220

335,136






Commodity.


Totals





THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



765



Norwegian Shipping and the Panama Canal. 1

The following is a statement of the Norwegian vessels passing
through the Panama Canal in either direction during each fiscal year
since the inauguration of traffic in August, 1914.



Year.


Atlantic

to
Pacific.


Pacific

to
Atlantic.


Total.




16
19
74
145
56
46
76


26
26
76
151
72
60
64


42


1916


45




150




296


1919


128




106




140








432


475


907







It will be noted that the transits were most numerous during the 2
last years of the war, 1917 and 1918. The following year, 1919, was
marked by a sharp decline, which continued through 1920. There was
an increase in 1921, but the figures are still far below the 1918 peak.
Passages from Pacific to Atlantic have exceeded those in the opposite
direction, but the difference is not great.



NORWEGIAN SHIPPING USING THE PANAMA CANAL DURING THE FISCAL YEAR,
SEGREGATION BY TRADE ROUTES.



1921



Trade route.



Vessels.


Cargo tons.


22


205,666


23




2


19,500


2




2


19,300


24


116,038


'21


99,910


'8


32,107


9


61,577


'7


17,769


8


48,912


3


16,250


3




3




>2


108


1


750


140


637,887



Mexico to west coast of South America

West coast of South America to Mexico

Mexico to Balboa

Balboa to Mexico

Mexico to west coast of United States

Atlantic and Gulf ports of United States to west coast of South America .
West coast of South America to Atlantic and Gulf ports of United States

Europe to west coast of United States

West coast of United States to Europe

Europe to west coast of South America

West coast of South America to Europe

Atlantic and Gulf ports of United States to Australasia

East coast of United States to west coast of United States

East coast of South America to west coast of United States

East coast of South America to west coast of South America

West coast of United States to Cuba

Totals



Of the 140 voyages through the Canal under the Norwegian flag in
1921 , 51 were made by a fleet of four tankers under time charter to an
American oil company and used in the trade between the Mexican
oil fields and South America, with occasional voyages from Mexico to
Balboa and the west coast of the United States. One of these tankers
passed through the Canal 16 times, two 15 times each, and one 5 times.
Their return voyages were made in ballast.

In the trade between Atlantic and Gulf ports of the United States
and the west coast of South America 17 of the 24 southbound vessels
carried coal cargoes. Of the 21 northbound vessels 10 carried nitrate,
3 copper bars, 1 copper and silver ore, 1 sugar, 1 cacao, and 4 general
cargo.

In the trade between Europe and the west coast of South America all
of the 8 northbound vessels carried nitrate cargoes.

The majority of the sailings in the trade between Europe and the
west coast of the United States were due to a fleet of 3 modern motor

"This is the second of a series of articles on trade through the Panama Canal under different national flags during
the fiscal year 1921.
l 2 Total includes 1 vessel in ballast.



766



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



ships maintaining a regular bimonthly service. Two of these motor
ships passed through the Canal 5 times during the year, and one 4
times. Of the 9 cargoes from the west coast to Europe 2 were wheat,
2 flour, 2 general, 1 barley, 1 barley and general, and 1 flour and general.

Of the 3 cargoes from the United States to Australasia 2 were sul-
phur shipped from Gulf ports and 1 case oil shipped from New York.

The principal Norwegian owners interested in the Canal traffic
during 1921 were: Wilh. Wilhelmsen whose vessels made 55 transits;
Fred Olsen & Co., 14; Bruusgaard Kiosteruds Dampskibsaktieselskab,
9; Grefstads Rederi, 6; and Nordenfjeldske Dampskibselskab, 5.

Commercial Traffic Through the Panama Canal for the Fiscal Year 1921,
by Nationality of Vessels.

Below is shown in tabular form the commercial traffic through the
Panama Canal for the fiscal year 1921, by nationality of vessels. An
analysis of this traffic shows American and British vessels far in the
lead of those of any other nation. In cargo tons, American vessels
carried approximately 45 per cent of the total traffic passing through
the Canal, and British vessels 32 per cent, with Japanese vessels third
with approximately 7 per cent, and Norwegian vessels fourth with a
little less than 6 per cent. The vessels of these four countries carried
89 per cent of the commercial cargo through the Canal.

For 1921, the tons of cargo passing through the Canal was greater
by 231 P er cent than for any previous fiscal year. The tonnage and
tolls have kept pace with the cargo; the tolls for the past fiscal year,
exceeding by $2,762,956.46, or 32| per cent, the greatest amount col-
lected during any preceding fiscal year.





No. of
ships.


Tonnage.


Tolls.


Tons of
of cargo.




United States
equivalent.


Panama
Canal net.


Registered
gross.


Registered
net.


Belgian

Brazilian


2

1

970

63

4
16

1
60
50

2
44
19
25
136

2

4
140

8
60

4

44

25

1,212


6,309 !

3,511

3,230,830

104,727

10.564

2,606

578

197,504

185-,561

4,293

143,113

51,561

82,610

538,205

3,902

4,133

462,890

1,382

86,786

9,725

101,141

74,665

4,037,270


8,092

4,566

3,965,613

159,727

12,098

2,784

702

236,512

248,801

4,281

155,889

67,334

102,783

613,245

4,508

5,032

548,227

1,370

157,495

11,279

117,400

113,661

4,874,477


10,144

5,472

5,035,686

201,231

16,645

2,983

1,050

287,579

279,261

4,620

204,727

81,023

147,507

808,961

6,370

5,884

719,138

1,568

239,045

15,844

155,150

119,810

6,172,717


6,188

3,523

3,150,061

116,413

10,624

1,971

577

188,667

182,151

4,361

134,638

50,421

87,689

527,693

4,068

3,553

453,777

1,340

127,292

8,641

100,995

90,134

3,9S4,464


57,886.25

4,388.75

3,976,395.33

147,023.75

13,187.10

2,952.78

722.50

241,411.86

229,248.94

5,137.20

164,575.94

62,908.95

103,206.60

655,176 51

4,877.50

4,354.36

523,311.94

1,463.50

107,160.64

12,156.25

118,548.41

93,331.25

4,797,463.60


12,700

6,700

3,721,932




61,737




14,400


Costa Rican


2,112
1,200




322,059


Dutch


216,488




7,101




132,836




73,837




47,988




758,617




8,325




3,785




637,887




1,500




105,322


Russian


11,343
143,076




128,919


United States


5,179,350


Totals


2,892


9,343,866


11,415,876


14,522,415


9,239,241


1I.276.8S9.91


11,599,214



In addition to the commercial traffic, as shown above, 426 Govern-
ment vessels transited the Canal during the fiscal year, with tonnage
as follows:

Panama Canal net tonnage 467,503

Displacement tonnage '898,663

These vessels transited the Canal free of tolls, carrying 453,769 tons
of merchandise.

'Displacement tonnage represents battleships, cruisers, etc., where Panama Canal tonnage is not obtainable.



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



767



Repairs to French Cruiser.

The French cruiser Jules Michelet, while transiting the Canal on the
13th instant, en route with the mission to attend the Centennial Cele-
bration of the Republic of Peru, was damaged by striking the bank of
the Canal, just north of Gamboa, at about 10.45 a. m., on account of
steering gear failure.

The Mechanical Division was informed by telephone a few hours
later that dry-docking would be necessary, and immediately arrange-
ments were made for a representative of the division to board the vessel
at Mirafiores Locks to obtain the docking plans and such information
as was available regarding the nature and extent of the damage.

Preparations were promptly made for docking the cruiser. It was
necessary to refloat the dredge Gamboa, which was then in the dry
dock. The cruiser was docked late in the afternoon of July 14 and
everything was in readiness, so that within 15 minutes after the dock
was unwatcred and pumping stopped, work was commenced on the
damaged hull. The vessel was undocked 48 hours later.

The damage consisted of several bad dents in th ? shell plating, and a
number of frames sprung; also the forward end of the starboard bilge
keel was badly bent and torn. Several compartments were flooded
through the opened seams and rivet holes.

The repair work, which was of a temporary nature as requested by
the commanding officer, consisted of cutting out and redriving several
hundred loose rivets, and calking seams from E to H strake, starboard
side, from frames 16 to 40; installing 5/16-inch doubling plate on G-H
strake from frames 25 to 31 ; installing wood filler and 3/16-inch chafing
plate under the bottom of the armor belt, frames 12 to 40; pouring
concrete in the wake of the worst damage at seam on G— H strake from
frames 12 to 20, and from the protective deck to the first stringer at
bulkheads 20, 24, and 27. Also the ragged portion of the bilge keel
was burned off and the edges reriveted and welded up.

The commanding officer of the vessel expressed himself in a letter
to the Superintendent of the Mechanical Division, as being highly
pleased with the work performed and gratified at the speed with which
it was handled.



Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing
from Port of Balboa for Week Ending July 16, 1921.



Name of vessel.



Speaker

Hawkeye State

Ansaldo San Giorgio

II..

Jamaica

Neptune

Panama

Newport

Ansaldo IV

Manavi

Laura C. Hall

Laura C. Hall

Seiyo Maru

Salvador

Huasco

San Jose

Point Bonita

Jamaica

Empire State

Cauca



Line or charterer.



Harrison Line

United States Shipping Board.



Societa Nazionale di Navigazione .

Pacific Steam Navigation Co

United States Navy

Panama Railroad Steamship Line.

Pacific Mail Steamship Co

Societa Nazionale di Navigazione.

Pacific Steam Navigation Co

Pacific Metals Transportation Co.
Pacific Metals Transportation Co.

Toyo Kisen Kaisha

Pacific Steam Navigation Co

South American Steamship Line. .

Pacific Mail Steamship Co

Pacific Mail Steamship Co

Pacific Steam Navigation Co

United States Shipping Board. . . .
Pacific Steam Navigation Co



Arrived.



July 2..
July 3..

July 4. .
July 4. .
July 3..
July 6..
July 7. .
July 7. .
July 7. .
July 7..
July 9. .
July 10.
July 10.
July 12.
July 14.
July 15.
July 15.
July 16.
July 16.



Departed.



Cargo —



July 2..
July 3..

July 5..
Julv4..
July 5. .



July 7..
July 7..
July 8. .
July 8. .
July 9. .
July 12.
July 10.
July 12.
July 15.
July 16.
July 15.
July 16.
July 16.



Discharged.



Tons.



1

1

3

1,000



101
10



686*

3

80

7

203
4



Laded.



Tons/ l
..24



67



768



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing
from Port of Cristobal for Week Ending July 16, 1921.



Name of vessel.



Caribbean ....

Metapan

Urubamba

Advance

Somersetshire

Manavi

Heredia

Salvador . .

Jamaica

Ulua...... ...

Buenos Aires. .

Metapan

Columbia

Sixaola

Allianca

Santa Marta. .

Huasco

Ucayali

San Jose

La Paz

Venezuela

San Bruno

Point Bonita. .

Benedict

Hector



Line or charterer.



Panama Railroad Cattle Industry.

United Fruit Co

Peruvian Steamship Line

Panama Railroad Steamship Line.

Pacific Steam Navigation Co

Pacific Steam Navigation Co

United Fruit Co

Pacific Steam Navigation Co

Pacific Steam Navigation Co

United Fruit Co

Spanish Line

United Fruit Co

N. 0. & S. A. S. S. Co

United Fruit Co

Panama Railroad Steamship Line.

United Fruit Co

Chilean Steamship Line

Peruvian Steamship Line

Pacific Mail Steamship Co

Pacific Steam Navigation Co

Pacific Mail Steamship Co

United Fruit Co

Pacific Mail Steamship Co

Pacific Steam Navigation Co

Royal Netherlands W. I. Mail. . .



Arrived.



July 10.



July 10.



July 11.
July 11.
July 12.
July 12.
July 12.
Juiv 13.
Julv 13.
July 13.



July 13.
July 13.
July 14.
July 15.
July 15.
July 15.
July 16.
Julv 16.
July 16.
July 16.



Departed.



July 10.
July 10. .
Julv 11..
July 11.
July 12..
July 13..
July 14.
July 16..
July 15.
July 13..
July 15.
Julv 13..
July 13..
July 14.
July 14. .
July 14.
July 16.



July 16.

July 16.



Cargo-



Discharged. Laded.



Tons.

"(■)"



987
813
122J

560

350

3

610



39
243
968
243
39
63
25
573
120
294



Tons.

107 i

72

312

891

(•)

n

223

396J

123 \

164

492

10

263

\

1.392

683

415



No cargo discharged.



1 No cargo laded.



A Statement of Commercial Traffic Through the Panama Canal from its

Opening to Date.

Herewith is given a comparative statement of the commercial traffic
passing through the Panama Canal from its opening on August 15,
1914, to June 30, 1921. In the instances where tonnage figures have
been omitted, it is due to incomplete records being kept during the
early years of Canal traffic.





No. of




TONN


AGE.




Tolls.














Tons of




ships.


United States


Panama


Registered


Registered


cargo.






equivalent.


Canal net.


gross.


net.






July, 1920


225


705,643


856,798


1,109,079


702,951


$842,312.05


886,814


August, 1920


266


782,415


951,345


1,208,471


770,320


936,209.44


1,040,740


September, 1920


256


832,742


1,008,785


1,293,470


817,810


1,010,150.63


1,009,557


October, 1920


238


762,013


935,579


1,190,936


754,540


911,825.58


991,066


November, 1920


238


765,817


929,875


1,184,072


756,223


933,912.11


984,910


December, 1920


265


832,407


1,027,918


1,298,864


823,758


1,007,849.32


1,076,539


January, 1921


279


894,689


1,094,323


1,383,778


883,362


1,095,857.46


1,177,053


February, 1921


241


763,925


916,838


1,179,979


752,022


917,412.49


952,904




255


924,309


1,112,818


1,417,220


917,441


1,105,536.55


1,084,563




227


771,116


955,503


1,203,087


757,576


927,977.09


907,613


May, 1921


210


694,896


864,617


1,092,602


692,747


835,882.77


792,735


June, 1921


192


613,894


761,477


960,857


610,491


751,964.12


694,720






Fiscal year, 1921.


2,892


9,343,866


11,415,876


14,522,415


9,239,241


11,276,889.61


11,599,214


Fiscal year, 1920.


2,478


7,089,230


8,546,044


11,059,819


7,037,875


8,513,933.15


9,374,499


Fiscal year, 1919. 2,028


5,193,812


6,145,094


7,876,603




6,172,S28.59


6,946,540


Fiscal year, 1918. 2.068


5,410,114


6,584,073


9,371,339




6,438,855.55


7,533,031


Fiscal year, 1917.


1,806




5,817,607


8,530,821




5,631,781.66


7,083,045


'Fiscal year, 1916.


760




2,385,284


3,596,529




2,399,830.42


3,063,371




1,072




3,772,167


5,416,787




4,343,383.69


4,926,145











1 Canal was closed to traffic from September 18, 1915, to April 15, 1916.
' Canal was opened to commercial traffic August 15, 1914.



Postal and Cable Addresses of The Panama Canal.

The postal address is, "The Panama Canal, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone,," or "The Panama
Canal. Washington, D. C."

Mail for ships passing through the Canal or touching at either of the terminal ports should be
addressed to "Cristobal, Canal Zone."

The cable address of The Panama Canal, on the Isthmus, is "Pancanal, Panama;" in the
United States, "Pancanal, Washington."



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 769

Ships at Canal Repair Shops.

The following vessels were at the Balboa shops for repairs during the
week ended July 16:

Steamship Western Knight, line up and adjust main engine; repair crosshead
slipper; Katrina Luckenbach, open up main turbines for inspection and repair as
necessary; French cruiser Jules Michelet, dock; repair hull where damaged; repair
hull zincs; repair sea valves; repair propellers and shafts; connect ship to salt water
line; manufacture adapters for fire hose; steamship Panama, reboilering and general
overhaul; tug Cocoli, manufacture 3 eccentric rods for generators, and electric weld
back end of boilers; steamship Potosi, open up and repair throttle; motor schooner
Laura C. Hall, muffler repairs; launch P—l, rebuilding of hull; dredge Gamboa, dock,
stage, clean and paint bottom; open up, clean, grind in, and repack sea valves;
install new bottom castings, port and starboard spud wells; renew bad order plates
in wake of castings, and repair or renew spud well liners.

PREVIOUSLY REPORTED.

Steamships Guardian, docking and miscellaneous repairs; Liberty Land, miscel-
laneous engineer's department repairs; supply boat No. 2, general repairs and docking;
steamship Paifa, perform miscellaneous wood and pipe work and repair condenser and
anchor windlass; scale boilers; tug Cocoli, install new engine; steamship Maricopa,
miscellaneous repairs to boilers, engines, and auxiliary machinery; and docking,
cleaning, and painting; launch Taboga, general overhaul of hull; U. S. submarines
R-24, miscellaneous repairs, welding armature cores on main motors to spiders, and
stiffening motor frames and foundations; R-26, general .epairs and docking.

The following vessels were at the Cristobal shops for repairs during
the week ended July 18:

Steamships Cristobal, Allianca, General W. C. Gorgas, and General 0. H. Ernst,
miscellaneous repairs and painting to engine, deck, and steward departments;
Cauca, dock and undock; clean and paint bottom; pack stern gland; clean sea in-
lets; weld pinhole in tank top; get crane at 3 p. m. to lift 30 fathoms of chain to dock;
fit new checks on port boiler; Solana, supply two 6-inch cast-iron low-pressure gate
valves; supply two 6-inch cast-iron low-pressure elbows; supply four 6-inch low-
pressure screw pipe flanges; supply two lengths of 6-inch low-pressure pipe 16
feet long and threaded on each end to fit the above-mentioned 6-inch flanges; all
flanges, elbows, and valves to have 6 holes drilled; supply 48 bolts and nuts to
make joints for same; San Jose, rebrick and repair baker's drum; make 2 sheet
bronze diaphrams for reducing valve in auxiliary steam line; overhaul and put
reducing valve in working order; make 3 turns white metal packing for L. P. piston
rod main engines; supply machinists and helpers to work in engine department as
directed; West Kedron, manufacture, fit, and install H. P. piston rod gland; line
up piston rod guide and assemble pump, main air pump; Acajutla, manufacture one
brass attached bilge pump valve chest; Caribbean, renew staybolts, nuts, and
washers in both port boilers, machinist to repair bilge pump discharge valve and over-
haul valve gear forward dynamo; U. S. submarine 0-11, electric weld headers, U. S.
Navy coal barges, make bridles for barges; steamships Hector, Point Bonita,
Santa Marta, Heredia, and Metapan, and launches Cruces, Nard, and MaryB, minor
repairs.

PREVIOUSLY REPORTED.

U. S. S. Sciota, calk 6 leaky rivets in frame No. 2 at 12-foot water line and miscel-
laneous engine repairs; motor ship Satoe, general overhauling, including dry-docking;
barge No. 117, renewing plates, etc.; steamship Vera Cruz, miscellaneous repairs to
main engines; U. S. S. Forse, miscellaneous repairs, including dry-docking; barge
No. 19, renewing plates, etc.; U. S. submarine R-25, renew defective rivets in engine
foundation and general repairs.

Transportation on Fort Randolph Branch Trains.

Conductors on Fort Randolph passenger trains have called the
attention of this office to the fact that occasionally passengers question
the right of conductors in refusing to accept certain forms of trans-
portation between 3d Street, Colon, and Cristobal commissary, and
between tower "B" and Cristobal commissary.

This is to advise that a cash fare rate of 5 cents has been in effect
for some time between the above-named points, the same being paid



770



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



to the conductor or collector on the train, who issues cash fare receipt
to the passenger. There are no tickets on sale for travel between these
points, nor will mileage book or any form of pass be accepted.

Children at Sewer Openings.

The Panama Canal, Executive Office,

Balboa Heights, C. Z., July 9, 1921.
All concerned — The attention of parents is invited to the extreme
danger of permitting children to play in the immediate vicinity
of sewers. Gratings have been placed over all sewer openings, but it
is impossible to entirely eliminate the dangerous features in open
storm drains, as during heavy storms the rush of water is so great
that should a child fall or jump in the drain he would probably be
knocked unconscious or killed by striking against the gratings covering
the openings. The cooperation of all parents is requested to prevent
further lamentable accidents.

Jay J. Morrow,

Governor.

Deceased Employees.

The estates of the following deceased employees of The Panama Canal or the Panama Railroad
Company are now in process of settlement, and any claims against these estates, or any information
which might lead to the location of heirs, or to the recovery of property, bank deposits, postal savings.
or postal money order deposits, or any other moneys due them, should be presented at the office of
the Administrator of Estates at once in order that the estates may be settled as soon as possible. All
claims should be itemized, sworn to before a notary public, or other public officer having a seal, and
submitted in duplicate. These names will be published but once:



Name.


Check
No.


Native of—


Isthmian
residence.


Employed by —


Date of death.


James Alexander May-
nard

Eugenio Real, alias
Leal


36918
57725


Panama


La Boca

Camp Bierd


The Panama Canal ....
Panama Railroad Co. .


July 1, 1921.
June 29, 1921.



Official Circulars.



Acting Chief, Police and Fire Division.

The Panama Canal,
Police and Fire Division,
Balboa Heights, C Z., July 11, 1921.
Heads of Departments and Divisions:

Effective July 12, 1921, and during the absence
on leave of Mr. Guy Johannes, Police Inspector
Arthur W. Kennedy will act as Chief of the Po-
lice and Fire Division.

C A. McIlvaine,
Executive Secretary.
Approved:

Jay J. Morrow, Governor.



Reserves for Repairs.

The Panama Canal,
Accounting Department,
Balboa Heights, C Z., July 1, 1921.
Circular No. 308:

Circular to all concerned — Reserves for repairs
were originated with the intention of writing into
monthly operations certain amounts on each
piece of equipment in use to build up a reserve
for periodic extraordinary repairs and overhauling
to avoid charging such heavy repair costs to the
jobs on which the equipment happens to be work-
ing at the time heavy repairs are necessary. It
was intended that small running repairs be
charged to current, operation.

*■ .-However, the practice has grown up of charging
to the reserve accounts all repairs, large and small,
including those made by the Mechanical Division
as well as those made by the divisions themselves.



This practice should be discontinued and only
extraordinary repairs and overhauling charged to
the reserves, and that limited as much as possible
to repairs made by the Mechanical Division.

Up to this time the reserve charges have been
made by the Accounting Department against the
divisions using the equipment, and actual repair
costs have been charged to the reserve accounts



Online LibraryIsthmian Canal Commission (U.S.Panama Canal record (Volume v.14 1920-21) → online text (page 113 of 121)