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in good work to such a degree as at the Cristobal shops.

"3. It is gratifying to note that the spirit of cooperation does not stop in the
general office, but extends down through the foremen to the various workmen on t'le
jobs themselves. This opportunity is taken to express my appreciation of the cooper-
ation of the foremen and assistants, and the complete harmony with which all worked
with the Commanding Officer."

The work on the 0-15 included renewing bridge and providing recess
in chariot bridge for coil antenna; renewing forward plates on side
of superstructure and superstructure deck; installing A-frame and
clearing line for new loop antenna; removing hydroplanes; cleaning
and painting underwater hull; grinding-in all valves; making minor
structural repairs; installing additional impulse tank in superstructure
with cross connections; removing superstructure flood and vent
valves and making superstructure free flooding, and plugging holes
'through hull; taking stern tube and strut bearing clearances and
repacking stern tube glands; calibrating all gauges; repairing ballast
pump, water-tight doors in bulkhead frame and battery vent ducts;
cleaning, painting, and testing all ballast, trimming, and fuel tanks;
installing indicators on all ventilating valves, and larger bow planes;
and general overhauling.



Pioneer Commercial Vessel Through Canal Reported Sold.

The Luckenbach Steamship Line has announced the sale of the
freighters Pleiades and Hattie Luckenbach, of 3,002 and 3,407 registered
net tons, respectively, which have been operating in the United States
intercoastal trade between Pacific coast and Gulf ports.

It is reported that the two vessels will be replaced by the steamers
Lena Luckenbach and Horace Luckenbach, of 4,211 and 5,100 registered
net tons, respectively. The Lena Luckenbach has been operating be-
tween the Pacific coast and North Atlantic ports of the United States,
and the Horace Luckenbach, formerly the Eastern Trader, has just
been purchased by the Luckenbach Line from the United States Ship-
ping Board, and heretofore has been operated by the Tampa Inter-
ocean Steamship Co., in the United States Far East trade.

The assignment of the Lejia Luckenbach and Horace Luckenbach to
the Gulf- Pacific coast trade to replace the 2 smaller vessels sold, is due
to the heavy freight offerings over this route in both directions. It is
announced that the new service will give regular sailings every 16 days,
effective from Gulf ports immediately, and from Pacific coast ports
with the sailing of the Jacob Luckenbach in early December.

The* Pleiades was the first commercial vessel to pass through the
Canal from the Pacific to the Atlantic ocean, making the transit on
August 16, 1914, the day after the opening of the Canal, with the



THE PANAilA CANAL RECORD



185



passage of the steamship Ancon in official service. Because she was
the first vessel through the Canal, the Luckenbach Company continued
to operate the Pleiades under her original name, though all the other
vessels of the line have been renamed for members of the family.

Both the Pleiades and the Hattie Luckenbach were built at Sparrow's
Point, Md., the former in 1900 and the latter in 1901. It is reported
that both vessels will operate out of New York to Spain under the
Spanish flag.



Notice to Mariners.

The Panama Canal, Executive Office,
Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 20, 1922.
This office is in receiptof letter dated November 15, 1922, from the Acting Manager,
United Fruit Company, Almirante, R. P., as below:

"Listed below in their order as approached by a vessel entering the harbor are the 4 new lights
with relative position to other lights and characteristics identifying each:

No. 1 — Channel Light (Red).

"This light which is just outside harbor is located about 100 feet S. S. W. of where old light was.
"Characteristics — Four-second eclipse, 3-second flash.

No. ,2 — Careening Cay Light (Red).

"This light which is on the starboard side is located about 65 feet N. by W. J W. of where old light
was.

"Characteristics — Five-second eclipse, 2-sacond flash.

No. 3 — Nances Cay Light (White).

"This light is on the port side about 70 feet S. S. E. of former location.
"Characteristics — Three and one-half-second eclipse, 1-second flash.

No. 4 — Pall.\s Shoal Light (Red).

"This light is on the starboard side, same location as old one.
"Characteristics — Four and one-half-second eclipse; i-second flash.

"The difference in locations between these new lights and the ones which they replaced are not.
in the opinion of the U. S. Submarine Flotilla now in Almirante Bay, great enough to be indicated."

Jay J. Morrow,

Governor.



Ships at Canal Repair Shops.

The following vessels were at the Cristobal shops for repairs during
the week ended November 1 8 :

Steamships Albaro, make 3 valve stems, 2 valve rods, 2 piston rings and machine
piston grooves; Manavi, electric weld teeth of driving gear of anchor windlass,
cut 6 manholes for trimming coal bunkers, repair ceiling in No. 2 hold, hatches, ice
box, lifeboat, and screening in staterooms, renew door in locker and double eyebolt
and spectacle piece of forward davit of No. 1 lifeboat, etc.; Unibamba, repair tele-
motor system; Lena Ltcckenbach, furnish diver to examine propelbr and furnish 24
steel balls; Colon, repair scuppers in ice bo.x aft, top of tunnels in No. 3 hatch,
and lifeboat, as directed; install new pieces in wooden rail on saloon deck as directed.



Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing
from Port of Balboa for Week Ending November 18, 1922.



Name of vessel.


Line or charterer.


Arrived.


Departed.


Cars





Discharged


Laded.


U. S. S. Patoka


U. S. Navy


November 12.
November 12.
November 13.
November 13.
November 16.
November Id
November IS.
November 12.
November 11.
November 14.
November 16.


November 14.
November 13.
November 13.
November 15


Tons.
3,142
552
145

430


Tom.


Ginyo Maru




189






41


Suruga


Barber Line




Laura C. Hall . . .




48


Ecuador


Pacific Mail Steamship Co


November 17.
November 16.
November 18.
November 12
November 14.
November 18.


49






41


Baja California.






2,320
505


Borglum


0. K. Hansen




Manavi


Pa<'ific Steam Navigation Co

Pacific Steam Navigation Co


1




Alvwado


1,295







186



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



Official Circular.

Handling of Cargo at Pier 6, Cristobal.

Panama Railroad Company,
■ Panama Railroad Steamship Line,
Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 14, 1922.
Agents of all Steamship Lines:

Effective November 16, 1922. the Panama
Railroad Company will handle at Pier No. 6,
Cristobal, cargo up to four hundred (400) tons
for ships desiring to take oil, but no single cargo
package weighing more than two and five-tenths
(2.5) tons will be handled over this pier. How-
ever, the use of this pier for cargo purposes shall
always be subordinated to its use for supplying fuel
oil to ships.

S. \V. Heald,
Superintendent.



Official Publications of Interest to Shipping.

Masters may obtain from the office of the
Captain of the Port, at either Cristobal or Balboa,
without charge, the "Rules and Regulations for
the Operation and Navigation of the Canal —
Sailing Directions — General Information," and
the current Tariff of charges at the Canal for
supplies and services.

Requests for Canal publications sent by mail
should be addressed to: The Panama Canal.
Balboa Heights, C. Z.

The Hydrographic OflSce at Cristobal main-
tains at all times a complete stock of navigational
charts and books, including charts of all parts of
the world, sailing directions of the world, nautical
tables, light lists, tide tables, nautical almanacs,
etc.

Copies of current issues of Pilot Charts, Notices
to Mariners, and Hydrographic Bulletins may
be obtained in return for marine information.

Observations of weather, ocean currents, and
other marine data collected, and blanks, instruc-
tions, barometric comparisons, etc., furnished.

Correct time is maintained and chronometers
rated.

Information from American Consuls.

The Consular officers of the United States at
seaports all over the world are ex officio repre-
sentatives of The Panama Canal for the purpose
of furnishing information to shipping and allied
interests as to conditions, charges, etc., at the
, Panama Canal affecting the operation of ships.
The current publications of The Panama Canal
of interest to shipping are furnished to the Con-
sular officers and filed for reference.

It is not desired that inquiries of a general
nature be addressed to the Consular officers, or
that they be burdened with requests which should
be made direct to The Panama Canal; but
ships' operators who may not be sufficiently
advised as to charges, supplies, facilities, etc.,
at the Canal will often save time by applying to
the nearest American Consul.

Trips Through the Canal.

The following lines operating passenger vessels
through the Canal carry local passengers from
one terminal to the other: Pacific Mail Steamship
Company, Pacific Steam Navigation Company,
Grace Line, South American Steamship Company
(Chilean Line). The Pacific Mail charges $6 for
the trip, the others $10. The several services
together afford about 5 transits of the Canal
each way every week.



Binders for The Panama Canal Record.

Cardboard covers, punched and fitted with
brass fasteners, forming binders for The Panama
Canal Record, are offered for sale at 25 cents
a set, for the benefit of those who wish to keep
a file of the issues for ready reference. Orders
may be addressed to The Panama Canal, Balboa
Heights, Canal Zone, or The Panama Canal,
WashitigtoQ. D. C.



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THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION QF THE PANAMA CANAL.
PUBLISHED WEEKLY.

Subscription rates, domestic, $1.50 per year; foreign, $2.00; address

The Panama Canal Record; Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or

The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C.

Entered a.s second-class matter February 6, 1918, at the Post Office

at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879.

Ctrtificate. — By direction of the Governor of The Panama Canal the matter contained herein is published as statistical

information and is required for the proper transaction of the public business.





Volume XVI. Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 29, 1922. No. 16.

Assembly of Stern-wheel River Steamer and Barge at Cristobal Shops.

A task out of the usual run of work at the Cristobal shops of The
Panama Canal was the recent erection and launching of the stern-
wheel river steamer San Francisco, all of the machinery and parts for
which had been shipped knocked-down from the United States. The
vessel is a shallow-draft stern paddle-wheel steamer, approximately
104 feet long by 24 feet beam, and is now being used by the South
American Gold and Platinum Company on the Atrato River, in
Colombia.

At the same time the shops force assembled and launched a barge,
^0 feet in length by 16 feet wide, to be used in connection with the
operation of the steamer. After the completion of the work, the two
vessels were towed to the mouth of the Atrato River, in the Gulf of
Uraba. The San Francisco was towed by the motor schooner Arabia,
and the barge by the motor schooner Lawra C. Hall.

In commendation of the service received from the shops, the South
American Gold and Platinum Company wrote to the Superintendent
of the Mechanical Division, under date of November 7, 1922, as
follows :

I wish to take this opportunity of expressing to you my appreciation of the services
rendered by your department in connection with the assembly and fitting of the
stern paddle-wheel river steamer San Francisco and barge.

The work on these two vessels has been different from the work usually done by
the force, but they have handled the work skillfully and made excellent time. I
feel that we have obtained e.xcellent workmanship, and a satisfactory job.

I wish to express to you, and through you to the various men, my appreciation of
their willing, intelligent, and skillful service, and their loyal cooperation in solving
the various problems that arose.

I am more than satisfied with the way that our work has been handled, and wish
to thank you for your courtesy and consideration.

Very truly yours.

South American Gold and Platinum Co.,
By Clinton Bernard.



Notice to Mariners.— Aids to Navigation.

The Panama Canal, Executive Office,
Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 23, 1922.
The following message was received through the Balboa radio by the Chief Hydro-
grapher :

"Until further notice. Swan Island beacon light will be extingiiished on account of
lack of power."

Jay J. Morrow,

Governor.



188



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



CANAL WORK IN OCTOBER.

The following is the report of the Governor to the Secretary of War,
of Canal work in the month of October, 1922:

Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 24, 1922.

The Honorable, the Secretary of War,

Washington, D. C.
Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of The Panama Canal for
the month of October, 1922:

CAXAL TRAFFIC.

Traffic through the Canal during the month was greater than that during any other
month since the opening of the Canal. New high records were set for number of
vessels, tonnage, tolls, and cargo carried. The following summary shows the October
traffic as compared with the previous record traffic for any month, and as compared
with the average month for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1922 :



October
traffic.



Former
record month.



-Average montli
for fiscal year end-
ing June .30. 1922.



Number of ships

United States equivalent tonnage

Panama Canal net tonnage

Registered gross tonnage

Registered net tonnage

ToUs

Tons of cargo



294
1.049.256
1,300,392
1,652,435
1,042,966
SI, 2.55,. 508. 00
1,445,863



I 279

'924,309

^1,127,871

U, 419, 754

■■917,441

' -SI, 105,536.55

^1,211,100



228
76ii,8Jl
951,4.55
1,196,7.57
762.601
.S933, 152.70
907,076



' January, 1921.



'March, 1921.



■ July, 1922.



For the fourth successive month of the current fiscal year, the amount of tolls
collected from vessels transiting the Canal has exceeded the SI, 000, 000 mark.
The average monthly tolls for the first 4 months of the present fiscal year, beginning
July 1, 1922, are $1,106,259.18, which average slightly exceeds the tolls collected
during any month since the opening of the Canal prior to the one just closed.

Eastbound traffic — Cargo in transit through the Canal from the Pacific to the Atlan-
tic totaled 880,788 tons, and represents the greatest one-way cargo movement during
any month since the opening of the Canal, Heavy shipments of nitrate, wheat,
barley, lumber, oil, iron ore, and canned goods formed the bulk of the Pacific-to-
Atlantic cargo movement. Total shipments of these 7 commodities made up a little
more than three-fourths of all cargo moving eastbound through the Canal.

Cargo originating on the west coast of South America was 147 per cent greater
than for October of last year, and made up a third of the total eastbound cargo.
The two commodities from South American ports showing the greatest increase in
shipments over a year ago were nitrate and iron ore, shipments of the former alone
totaling more for the past month than the combined shipments of all commodities
from South America a year ago.

Cargo originating on the west coast of North America showed a 40 per cent increase
over October a year ago, and made up approximately 62 per cent of the total Pacific-
to-Atlantic cargo tonnage. Shipments of commodities showing the greatest increase
over a year ago were those of crude petroleum and lumber.

Cargo shipments from the Far East and Australasia were but 53 per cent and 20
per cent, respectively, of the total cargo shipments from these countries in October
of last year. Together, they made up only 4.2 per cent of the total eastbound cargo
through the Canal during the past month.

Approximately 55 per cent of fhe total eastbound cargo was routed to the east
coast of North America, of which all but 5 per cent went to the Atlantic-Gulf seaboard
of the United States. Of the remaining, 3.2 per cent was destined for north African
ports and the balance to the British Isles and Continental Europe. For October, a
year ago, only about one-third of the eastbound cargo was destined for the east coast
of North America, the remaining two-thirds going to the British Isles and Continental
Europe.

Westbound traffic — The amount of cargo in transit westbound through the Canal was
77.6 per cent greater than in October a year ago, and was practically the same
amount as transited the Canal westbound in September, but has been exceeded several
times during the past 2 years.

Of the total Atlantic-to-Pacific cargo in transit through the Canal, 62.5 per cent
originated on the Atlantic-Gulf seaboard of the United States as compared with 73.7



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



189



per cent for the preceding months, and 64.9 per cent a year ago. Of the remaining
26.2 per cent originated in the British Isles and Continental Europe, 6 per cent from
the east coast of Mexico, and the remaining 3 per cent was divided among the east
coast of Canada, east coast of South America, the West Indies, and Cristobal, C. Z.

Of the westbound cargo, almost one-half was made up of shipments of iron and
steel, railroad material, machinery, and crude and refined mineral oils. A consider-
4ble portion of the remaining was composed of miscellaneous small manufactured
articles too numerous to segregate, and classified as "general cargo."

Approximately 45 per cent of. the westbound cargo was en route to the west coast
of North America, 20 per cent to the west coast of South America, 20 per cent to the
Far East, and 15 per cent to Australasia. As compared with October traffic of a year
ago, South America shows the greatest increase and the Far East the most serious
loss in assimilating westbound cargo tonnage, and distribution a year ago being as
follows: West coast of North America, 38 per cent; west coast of South America, 11
percent; Far East, 36 per cent; and Australasia, 15 per cent.

Twenty-eight vessels transited the Canal westbound in ballast during the month,
13 of which were tankers.

NUMBER OF VESSELS TRANSITING CANAL.

The total number of vessels and craft of all kinds transiting the Canal during the
month of October as compared with the preceding month and with the corresponding
month of last year, was as follows :



Commercial vessels

Noncommercial vessels

Launches, etc. (under 10 tons measurement)

Total vessels and craft through CanaL .



October,
1922.



294
.5
20



319



Sep-
tember,
1922.



240
18
11



269



October,
1921.



255
29



281



In addition to the foregoing, Panama Canal equipment consisting of floating cranes,
barges, dredges, tugs, launches, etc., was passed through the locks in October, as
follows :





North-
bound.


South-
bound.


Total.


Gatun


13
18
18


7
21
21


20
39
39


Pedro Miguel


Miraflores





COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC'

Comparative Traffic Statistics.

The following tabulations permit a ready comparison of commercial traffic through
the Panama Canal during the month of October, 1922, with that of the preceding
month and the corresponding month of last year along the lines indicated at the
head of the various tables :

TO^fNAOB, TOLLS, AND CARGO CARRIED.



October,
1322.



September,
1922.



October,
1921.



Average

per month for

past year.



United States equivalent net tonnage

Panama Canal net tonnage

Registered gross tonnage

Registered net tonnage

Tolls

Tons of cargo



1,049,256
1,300,392
1,652,435
1,042,966
$1,255,508.00
1,445,863



843,113
1,070,410
1,333,101

837,935

$1,020,064.55

1,138,188



866,196
1,069,554
1,335,812

863,676
$1,047,935.62

985,775



815,821
1,019,140
1,281,637

812,264

$993,587 34

1,046.423



' Commercial traffic includes all ocean-going vessels paying tolls. Vessels in the direct service of the United States
Government, including merchant vessels chartered by the Government, do not pay tolls. Shipping Board vessels in
commercial service pay tolls. Statistics on vessels not paying tolls are shown under "noncommercial traffic."



190



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



.4VER.4GE TONNAGE, TOLLS, AND TONS OF CARGO CARRIED PER VESSEL.



United States equivalent net tonnage

Panama Canal net tonnage.

Registered gross tonnage. . . '

Registered net tonnage

Tolls

Tons of cargo (including vessels in ballast)
Tons of cargo (laden vessels only)



October,
1922.



3,593
4,453
5,658
3,572
,270.43
4,951
5,497



September,
1922.



3,513
4,460
5,555
3,491
$4,250.27
4,742
5,221



October,
1921.



3,397
4,194
5,238
3,387
$4,109.55
3,866
4,694



UNITED STATES COASTWISE TONNAGE.





Atlantic to Pacific.


Pacific to Atlantic.




No. of
ships.


P. C. net
tonnage.


Tolls.


Tons of
cargo.


No. of
ships.


P. C. net
tonnage.


Tolls.


Tons of
cargo.


1921.

October

November

December

1922.

January

February


22
24
20

28
25
34
24
32
34
31
35
34
44


113,712
136,349
104,152

138,928
117,512
162,572
114,283
152,260
161,981
155,758
159,982
175,211
218,319


$116,752 05
131,5,58.19
106,549.80

141,404.35
116, 235. ,50
161,738.65
110,272 10
153,626.80
156,172.74
145,346.51
146,881.68
164,208.35
201,582.70


86,442
91,067
73,967

119,413
94,548
141,648
137,207
173,128
181,651
150,379
158,098
162,955
176,911


19
17
23

20
19
25
26
23
25
25
25
29
29


96,731
86,958
116.482

108,921
89,862
128,988
131,193
108,686
121,156
126,894
127,577
144,231
156,722


8101,710,00
88,339,80
117,600,08

111,440.00
84,133.82
124,465.78
130,010.00
111,151.00
113,. 554. 60
123,615 00
125, 697.. 50
137,377.25
160.497.85


105,951
101.460
105,134

86,862
84,330
123,657


April

May


118,662
108,319


June

Julv


113,692
153,052


August

September

October


164,150
102,300
235,728



UNITED STATES SHIPPING BOARD VESSELS.







Atlantic to Pacific.






Pacific to Atlantic.






No. of
ships.


P. C. net

tonnage.


Tolls.


Tons of
cargo.


No. of
ships.


P. C. net
tonnage.


Tolls.


Tons of
cargo.


1921.

October

November

December

1922.

January

February


10
12
9

6
8

16
7

13
9
9
7
8
6


55,300
74,635
47,604

34,546
39,168
84,766
35,406
68,285
44,694
48,271
39,798
43,796
30,872


$53,475.00
71,525,74
46,318,75

34,756 25
36,706.25
86,531.95
35,006.25
67,898.75
45,091.20
43,558.46
36,247.85
36,661.62
31,203.35


34,593
44,975
44,101

23,575
49,424
90,633
51,244
89.483
50.219
40.739
27.932
33,559
29,742


14
5
6

7
6
9
9
9
4
11
7
5
6


61,980
29,949
32,957

31.550
32.909
51.848
49.140
42.499
18.833
56.504
32.920
24.116
27.656


$62,318.75
29,127.50
32,803.75

30,646.95
31,538.75
46,734.40
.50,900.85
41,595.00
15,957.14
55,439.45
31,665.00
23,363.75
26,533.95


79,129
28,865
28,784

28,831
21.119
37,310




43.783




50.953




16.230


July


58,429


August

September

October


45,532
36.935
39,240



ORIGIN AND DESTINATION OF TONNAGE.

The following statements show, by months, the origin and destination of all
tonnage through the Canal during the past year, the figures representing the Panama
Canal net tonnage:



ORIGIN OF ALL TONNAGE — ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC.



Month.


East coast

of United

States.


Europe.


Mexico.


Cristobal.


Miscel-
laneous.


Total.


1921.
October


262,440
301,680
312,225

279,870



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