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Panama Canal record (Volume v.17 1923-24) online

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Grace Line

Panama Raikoad Steamship Line
Spanish Line



Arrived.



October
October
October
October
October
October
October
October
October
October
October
October
October
October
October
October
October
October
October
October
October
October



21...

21...

21...

21...

22...

23...

24...

24...

24...

24...

24...

2.5...

25...

25...

25...

25...

25...

25...

26...

27...,

27....

27....



Departed.



October 21.
October 22.
October 23.
October 24.



October 24.
October^G.
October 26.
October 25.
October 25.
October 25.
October 26
October 25 .
October 25.



October 26.
October 27.



Cargo —



Discharged Laded



Tom.

37

253

670

174

109

168

12.287

4

128

663

1

(■)

18

458

72

2,603

3,250

727

(■)

172

308

111



Ton*.



80
27S
290
342



(0



35



613

117

172

50

2

(')
4



(')



■ No cargo discharged.



' No cargo laded.



Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing
from Port of Balboa for Week Ending November 3, 1923.



Name of vessel


Lin* or charterer.


Arrived.


Departed.


Cargo-




Discharged


Laded.


Santa Maria


Santa Maria Steam.ship Co

Pacific Mail Steamship Co

Pacific Mail Steamship Co

Union Oil Co


October 31...
November 1 .
November 2. .
November 3 . .


November 1 . .
November 2. .
November 3 . .
November 4 . .


Tont.

10,500

113

3

10.000


Tont.


Ecuador

Venezuela




Coalinga











Postal and Cable Addresses of The Panama Canal.

The postal address is. "The Panama Canal, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or "The Panama Canal,
Washingtan, D. C."

Mail for ships passing through the Canal or touching at either of the terminal ports should be
addressed to "Cristobal, Canal Zone."

The cable address of The Panama Canal, on the Isthmus, is "Pancanal, Panama;" in the United
States, "Pancanal. Washington. "



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD

UFFICIAL PUBLICATION OK THE PANAMA CANAL.
PUBLISHICD WEEKLY.

Sub.'icription rates, domestic, S0..')0 per year; foreign, SI. 00; address

The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or

The Panama Canal. Washington, D. C.

. Entered as second-class matter February 6, 1918, at the Post Office

at Cristobal, C. Z., under the .\ct of March 3, 1879.

Ceriificalc. — By direction of the Governor of The Panama Canal the matter contained herein is published as atatistical
information and is required for the proper transaction of the public business.





Volume X\'II. Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 14, 1923. No. 14,

Traffic Prospects.

*

The following forecast of traffic through the Panama Canal in the
early future has been compiled from information furnished by local
steamship agents and from other available sources.

Ten local steamship agencies replying pfior to November 12 to the
questionnaire mailed at the beginning of the month, report 199 tran-
sits handled by them in September and 221 transits in October. For
November they anticipate 225 transits. These agents represent about
half the shipping which uses the Canal.

From the Canal's own records and from various ofificial and trade
publications the following additional information has been compiled
bearing on traffic prospects :

CALIFORNIA OIL TRADE.

In a paper read before the American Association of Petroleum Geologists at Los
Angeles in September, Joseph Jensen, geologist of the Amalgamated, Associated and
Pacific Oil companies, expressed the opinion that the 3 principal oil fields of Southern
California (Huntington Beach, Long Beach, and Santa Fe Springs) had reached the
peak of production in that month, with a daily output of 702,000 barrels. He sub-
mitted a detailed estimate of future production, month by month to December, 1924,
at which time he thinks it will have declined to 98»000 barrels a day. Some of his
intermediate estimates are: December, 1923, 550,000 barrels; March, 1924, 331,000
barrels; June, 1924, 219,000 barrels, and September, 1924, 153,000 barrels.

If this forecast of oil production proves to be substantially correct, and it is con-
firmed by other expert opinions recently published, then the tanker traffic from the
California fields will decline very rapidly, and may disappear completely before the
end of 1924. The number of tanker transits has already fallen off; there were only
154 in October, as compared with 159 in September, a shorter month, 173 in August,
171 in July, and 173 in both June and May.

GROWTH OF GENERAL TRAFFIC.

While California oil has been the most important single factor in the traffic of
1923, there has been a healthy growth of other trades through the Canal. The cargo
in transit, exclusive of California oil, in September, 1923, was 1,258,824 tons, as com-
pared with 1,080,122 tons in September, 1922. The increase is equivalent to 16.5
per cent.

UNITED STATES INTERCOASTAL TRADE.

While all authorities are agreed that the United States intercoastal trade is over-
tonnaged, this does not seem to deter the extension of existing services and the en-
trance of new companies. The total cargo handled is still increasing at a fairly con-
stant rate. Westbound cargo, for instance, aggregated 764,565 tons during the first
quarter of the fiscal year 1923, as compared with 489,159 tons in the corresponding
quarter of 1922. In the case of eastbound cargo it is difficult to segregate the general
business from the oil business. It is reasonable to expect that increasing competition
will result in a more intensive solicitation of cargo and result in a further expansion
of the intercoastal trade to the benefit of the Panama Canal, althoiigh individual
steamship lines may find the business unprofitable. The only thing likely to check
this expansion would be a general business depression in the United States, which
is not anticipated at this time.

Three new steamship companies have recently been incorporated to handle cold
storage cargoes in the intercoastal trade. These are the Ocean Fruit Express, the



204 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD

California-New York Steamship Company, and the California Fruit Ship Line.
Reports in the various marine publications indicate that these companies have ample
^capital and are closely allied with the large shippers of Pacific Coast fruit. Some fruit
Wis already finiling its way to east coast markets by water, but the volume of these
shipments has not been large, and none of the existing lines appears to be making
a specialty of this business. When the Pacific Coast fruit business is properly devel-
oped it will be important.

CANADIAN DEVELOPMENTS.

Beginning with the steamer Canadian Winner on October 29, the Canadian Gov-
ernment Merchant jM-'irine is establishing a new monthly service from Vancouver,
B. C, to Avonmouth, England. The second sailing is scheduled for November 20.
Four steamers of 8,400 tons deadweight capacity will be used in the service.

A second Canadian intercoaslal service, with monthly sailings, has been announced.
The Anchor- Donaldson Line will provide the tonnage. Sailings will be from Mon-
treal in summer and fall and from St. John's, N. B., in the winter. Vancouver is
the Pacific terminal. The first steamer in this service left Montreal on October 20.

TR.\DE BETWEEN UNITED STATES AND FAR EAST.

The heavy shipments of reconstruction material to Japan, anticipated in some
quarters, have not as yet developed. Cargo moving through the Canal from the
United States to the Far East in recent months has been:

Ton.":.

Julv.. 110,665

August 116,525

September 76,489

October t 102,386

It is quite possible, however, that this trade may ultimately be stimulated. Com-
mercial Reports contains the following from our commercial attache at Tokio:

"It is estimated in Tokio that the rebuilding of the devastated area of Japan will
be extended over a period of from 5 to 7 years and that the full employment of labor
over that period will cause great prosperity throughout the Empire. This prosperity
will not only be reflected in the foreign purchases of building and construction mate-
rials * * * Ijij^ ^^,jj| increase the purchasing power of the
masses at large and cause the imports of all necessities and so-called luxuries to show
increases. Plans and specifications for the rebuilding of the affected area are being
drawn up at present by the capital restoration board, and it is expected that they
will be completed in time to be submitted to the Diet when it convenes on November
10. Meantime no permanent construction is permitted, and temporary buildings
are springing up like mushrooms throughout the stricken area."

SOUTH AMERICAN TR.\DE.

Reports concerning the nitrate trade are still uniformly optimistic. South Ameri-
can trade as a whole is increasing. During the first quarter of the fiscal year 1923
cargo routed through the Canal to South .\merica totaled .i00,255 tons, as compared
with 256,814 tons in 1922, and exports from South America during the same period
totaled 952, .S56 tons, as compared with 587,729 tons in 1922.

PROBABLE DECLINE OF TOTAL TRAFFIC.

Considering all the factors involved, it seems probable, owing to the loss of Cali-
fornia oil shipments, that traffic through the Canal may drop in the early future from
the high mark of 2,000,000 net tons a month to approximately 1,500,000 net tons
a month. It may even go lower, but normal increase in other trades should prevent
a further decline.



"Service to Ships."

The October, 1923, issue of The American Officer published a letter

from the master of the steamship Agwisea, from which the following

is quoted :

"There is no port in the United States where the shipmaster receives the assistance
and cooperation he does in the Panama Canal. This is the general opinion expressed
by both American and foreign shipmasters, as everything is done to assist them in
their duties and expedite shipping."



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



205



Tanker Traffic Through the Panama Canal in October, 1923.

The total number of tankships transiting the Canal during the
month of October, 1923, was 154. This is 5 less than the month of
September and 19 less than the month of August. Tankers comprised
about 36 per cent of the total number of vessels through the Canal in
October, about 43 per cent of the Panama Canal net, and carried about
41 per cent of the total cargo.

The following tabulation shows the number, aggregate net tonnage,
tolls, and cargo of tankships transiting the Canal during October, 1923,
segregated by nationality of vessels and direction of transits:



Nationality.


No. of
vessels.


Panama

Canal net

tonnage.


Tolls.

$46,712.40
327,057.27


Tons of
cargo.


.\tlantic to Pacific:

British

Tnited States ....


10
73


52,683
448,003


43,938
23,800






Total, October, 1923


83


500,686


373,769.67


67,738


Total, September, 1923

Total August 1923


70
95


403,550
558,087


300,127,25
414,114.74


41,023
68,148






Pacific to .Atlantic:

British


7
64


34,483
390,363


35,862.42
402,810.00


57,437




745,757






Total, October 1923


71


424,846


438,672 42


803,194






Total, September, 1923


89


521,9,53


544,243.53


982.297


Total, August, 1923


78


471,268


493,727 78


886,519







Of the total tanker trafific shown above, the following is a summary
of the vessels giving Los Angeles as their port of origin or destination :



To Los Angeles:
October, 1923..
September, 1923.
August, 1923.,,.



From Los Angeles:
October, 1923 .
September, 1923.
August, 1923 ..



No. of
vessels.



71
57
81



67
82
70



Panama
Canal net
tonnage.



438,156
341,605
482,677



407,398
481,630
361,388



Tolls.



$316,678.35
2i7,448.41
348.840 65



421,704.10
504,616.25
380,780 17



Tons of
cargo.



780,082
926,479
720,084



Proportion of Tanker Traffic to Total In Past Year.

During the year, November 1, 1922, to October 31, 1923, there were
4,693 commercial transits of the Panama Canal, made up of 3,221
general cargo vessels and 1,472 tankships. Of the total number of
transits during this period, 31.4 per cent were tankers and 68.6 per
cent general cargo carriers.

As nearly all of the tankers passing through the Canal show some
port on the west coast of the United States as the port of origin or
destination it would indicate that the large increase in traffic through
the Canal during this period is due primarily to the development of
the oil fields in that region.

From the following table, which shows the commercial transits
through the Canal for the period segregated between tankships and
general cargo carriers, it will be seen that the daily rate of transits



206



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



by general cargo carriers for the months of November, 1922, and
October, 1923, was ahnost the same:.



1922-1923.



Total Commercial Transits.



Tankers. General. Total.



November.
December .
January
February . .

March

April

May

June

July

August

September
October..



39

39

51

73

119

14S

173

173

171

173

l.i9

154



255

265
301
253
290
256
246
244
303
281
254
273



294
304
352
326
409
404
419
417
474
454
413
427



Average Daily Transits.



Tankers. General



1.3
1.3
1.7
2.6
3.8
5.0
5.6
5.8
5.5
5.6
5 3
5.0



8.5
8.5
9.7
9.0



4
5
9
1
8
1

8 5
8 8



Total.



9.8
9.8
11 4
11.6
13 2
13 5
13.5
13.9
15.3
14.7
13.8
13.8



The following table shows the net tonnage and tolls segregated for
the same period :



1922-1923.



November

December

January

February

March "

April

May

JllIlL' ...

July

August. . .
September
October .



Panama Canal Net Tonnage.



Tankers.



227.118

222,604

297,485

4.54,492

713,259

884,890

1,017,185

1,005, Itii)

l,000,2t)7

1.029,355

925,503

934,. 532



General.



1,110.162
1,149,059
1.313,207
1,0»5,0.55
1,274,933
1,122,800
1,111.229
1,030,733
1,309,760
1,203,235
1,119,049
1,214,933



Total.



1,337,280
1,375,263
1,610,692
1,529,. 547
1,988,192
2,007,690
2,128,414
2,035,902



310,02:
232,, 590
044,. 552
139,465



Tolls



Tankers.



$194,
203,
254,
397,
627,
782,
906,
901,
888,
907,
844,
812,



159.04
017.79
735 56
267.71
017., 58
934 . 76
731,91
241.91
112 95
842.32
370 78
442.09



General.



.? 1,070
1,109
1,250
1,026
1,200
1,098
1,065
996
1,236
1,142
1 ,058
1,176



,277.50
,559 33
,549.99
,686 .50
,700,86
,003 39
,430.13
,801 89
,297 37
,814 65
,082,83
,165 60



Total.



$1,264,
1,313.
1,505,
1,423,

1,827,
1,878,
1,972,
1,898,
2,124
2,0.50,
1.902,
1,988,



436. 54
570.12
285.55
9.54 21
718.44
938.15
162 04
043.80
410.32
656.97
4.53,61
607 69



From the above table it will be seen that there has been little
fluctuation in the net tonnage and tolls during fhe year except in
the tanker traffic.

The peak of the tanker traffic seems to have been reached in the
period from May to August, inclusive, there having been slight de-
creases in each of the succeeding months. The general traffic seems
to be holding about even or to be slightly on the increase.



Executive Order.



Order of Transfer.

Ry virtue of the authority vested in me as President of the Tnited States of
America, it^ is hereby ordered that Buildings Nos. 1107, 1113, 1409 and 1411,
located at Cristobal, Canal Zone, be, and the same are hereby transferred, exclusive
of the sites thereof, but including free use of such sites, from the Panama Canal
to the War Department.

CALVIN COOLIDGE
The White House,

October 16, 1923.

[\o. 3917.]



Ships at Canal Repair Shops.

The following vessels were at the Cristobal shops for repairs during

the week ended November 10:

Steamships Chuky, install one 36-inch steel closed chock; renew one staving plate;
renew two deck plates, fair beams and frames and patch doublcr under deck in wake
of damages; repair port lights; repair refrigerator manifold valve, and safety valve;
Hercules, dock and undock; install patch on hull; Tulsagas, furnish services of diver



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



207



and outfit to examine hull ; calk leaky rivets and seams inside and outside of forepeak
tank; repair engine room ventilators, ice machine, circulator and main condensers ;
manufacture blower engine parts and repair ventilator gear; Toco, draw H. P. piston
rod on main engine; overhaul metallic packing and stuffing boxes; manufacture
piston rings for ballast pump; repair auxiliary pipe, bilge pipe, fire system, and circu-
lating watet pipe; furnish steam to assist in firing up ship; 5. M. Spalding, repair
telemotor gear; 7/z;go/oM, dock and undock; calk leaky rivets in hull; furnish services
of diver and outfit to examine propeller; remove broken propeller blade and install
spare; Ta/ara/iVe, dock and undock; clean and paint hull; repair boilers, sea valves,
miscellaneous auxiliary units in engineer's department, auxiliary steam piping, deck
pipe, cargo tanks, anchor chains, and general miscellaneous repairs in all depart-
ments; Rio Clara, examine blower; remove, test turbine; repair and reinstall;
Charles Pratt, remove part of superheater cowls; manufacture two plugs; repair
superheater drain lines and manufacture 8 piston rings; Willpolo, furnish diver's
service to examine hull; manufacture and install temporary bulkhead in wake of
damages; Radnor, repair feed pump and blower engine; motorship Alrato, weld
cylinder head, cylinder and cylinder frame of Diesel engine and make necessary
repairs to engine in wake of damages; dredge Culebra, make miscellaneous minor
repairs to engine and deck departments; dock and undock; paint underwater body
and upper work; manufacture and install temporary hatch covers, bulkheads,
sheathing, etc., to put dredge in ocean-going condition; U. S. submarine 0-1, dock
and undock; paint and routine docking repairs; steamships Akera, Betterton, Eelbeck,
Legato, Rimutaka, Rotorura, Cecil County, Dean Emery, lowan, Minneola, Robin Gray,
and Suportco, minor repairs.

PREVIOUSLY REPORTED.

Floating caisson No. 1, dock and undock; routine repairs; barge No. 138, dock
and undock; alterations and general repairs; dredge Paraiso, manufacture and install
additional pontoons; U. S. submarines 0-7, and 0-9, routine docking repairs;
steamship Colon, reboilering; general repairs and reconditioning; Columbian coast
guard cutter No. 3, and launch L 55, general repairs.



Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing
from Port of Cristobal for Week Ending November 3, 1923.



Name of vessel.



Line or charterer.



Arrived.



Departed.



Cargo-



Discharged



Laded.



Santa Clara

Leon XIII

Lagarto

.\bangjrez

Pastcres

Santa Elisa

W. R. Irish

Acajutla

Newport

Gen. W. C.Gorgas.
Gen. 0. H. Ernst . .

Lautaro

.San Benito .

Ulua

Cissy

DinteUijk

Carrillo

Venezuela

Sixaola

Abangarez

Santa Tecla

Teno

Strombus

D. Otavi

Panama

Ecaador

Venezuela

Venezuela

Balboa



Grace Line

Spanish Line

Pacific Steam Navigation Co

United Fruit Co

United Fruit Co

Grace Line

Atlantic Refining Co

Pacific Steam Navigation Co

Pacific Mail Steamship Co

Panama Raihoad Steamship Line.
Panama Railroad Steamship Line.

Pa'ific Steam Navigation Co

United Fruit Co

United Fruit Co

New Orleans & S. A. S. S. Line. . .

Holland- American Line

United Fruit Co

Royal Netherlands W. I. Mail

United Fruit Co

United Fruit Co

Grace Line

Chilean Line

AnjJ i-Saxon Petroleum Co

Hamburg-.American Line _ . . .

Panama Railroad Steamship Line.

Pacific Mail Steamship Co

Pacific Mail Steamship Co

Royal Netherlands \V. I. Mail —
Compania Costernia Colombiana .



October 28. .
October 28..
October 28. .
October 29..
October 29..



October 29...
October 29...
October 30...
October 30...
October 30...
October 31...
October 31. ..
October 31...
November 1,
November 1.



November
November
November
November
November
November
November
November



October 28...
October 28 . . .
October 29...
October 29...
October 28...
October 29...
October 30...
October 29...
October 30...
October 30...
October 30...
October 31...
October 31...
October 31...
October 31...
October 31...
November 1.
November 1.
November 1 .
November 1.
November 1.
November 1.
November 5.
November 3.



Tons.



240

542

17

6

535



November 3.
November 2.
November 3.



(■)
12
240
11
195
93
534
(')
1
193
(')

8,053
157
2,807
188
153
2
367



1 case.



' No cargo discharged.



■1 No cargo laded.



Tons.

106

103

(^)

56

148

1,122

2,103

4,054

169

239

137

75

26

65

174#



{>)



{')



300



38



8fi

96

123



Ships' Chandlery Supplies.

Panama Canal storehouses stock a complete line of ships' chandlery supplies
available for sale to shipping at cost prices plus 25 per cent surcharge, which sur-
charge includes freight, handUng, and other costs.



208



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



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Online LibraryIsthmian Canal Commission (U.S.Panama Canal record (Volume v.17 1923-24) → online text (page 32 of 116)