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Panama Canal record (Volume v.17 1923-24) online

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117


855,487.72

36,224.77

114.00


191

7
3


983,871

32,286

416


982,545.79


Motor ships


29,057.94


Motor schooners


331.05






Totals


202


1,036,598


891,826.49


201


1,016,573


1,011,934.78







Of the 403 steam vessels, 302 were oil burners, 100 coal burners, and one burned
either coal or oil.

NONCOMMERCIAL TRAFFIC.

The following statement shows the tonnage and amount of cargo carried by vessels
transiting the Panama Canal free of tolls during the month of April, 1924. If tolls
has been assessed against these vessels at commercial rates, the amounts would
have been appro.Kimately as indicated:







Atlantic to Pacific.




Pacific to Atlantic.


Class.


No.
of

ships.


Tonnage.


Tolls.


No.

of

ships.


Tonnage.


Tolls.


U. S. Naval vessels:

Battleships


9
2

29
2
1
1
1
1
2

12
3
5


■293,000

■22,000

■63,700

■21,225

■ 6,320

'3,963

■30

■6,000

■ 25,500
■9,604

■ 16,908
'25,149


$146,500.00

11,000 00

31.8.50 00

10, 612. .50

7,, 584. 00

4 , 755 60

15 00

3,000 00

12,750.00

4,802.00

8,454 00

30,178.80








Cruisers . .








Destroyers








Destroyer tenders








Collier


1


'6,320


$7,584.00


Hospital ship












Mine sweeper . . .








Repair ships








Submarines


2
1
1

1


■990
■9,000
'5,270
■1,000


495.00


Sub tenders


4,500.00


Supply ships


6,324.00


Tug


500.00












U. S. Army vessels:

IjMllIH'hpS


2
1
2


■ 70
■ 1,208
3 5,928


35 00

604.00

7,410.00










1


■ 1,208


604.00














Totals


73


500,605


279,550.90


7


23,788


20,007.00







Indicates displacement tonnage.



' Indicates Panama Canal net tonnage. ^ Indicates registered net tonnage.



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



609



The foregoing noncommercial vessels transiting the Canal free of tolls, carried
cargo as follows:



Directions.



Atlantic to Pacific.
Pacific to Atlantic.

Totals



Tons.



17,695
1,820



19,515



The following statement shows the number of launches transiting the Canal during
the month; these launches, although paying tolls, are excluded from the statements
concerning commercial traffic:



Direction.


Number.


Tonnage.


Tolls.




5
12


32
49


S30.60


Pacific to Atlantic


50.35








Totals


17


81


80.95









STATEMENT OF TERMINAL OPERATIONS.

Details of the business transacted at the Atlantic and Pacific terminals of the
Panama Canal during the month of April, 1924, are shown in the following tabula-
tions:



Cristobal.



Balb oa.



Totals.



Local cargo arriving tons. .

Local cargo shipped tons . .

Transit cargo arriving tons. .

Transit cargo clearing tons . .

Cargo received for transshipment tons. .

Cargo transshipped tons. .

Vessels supplied with bunker coal:

Army and Navy vessels

Commercial, other than Panama Railroad



Total vessels supplied with coal .



Coal supplied to above vessels:

.\rmy and Navy vessels tons.

Commercial, other than Panama Railroad tons.

Total coal supplied to vessels tons .

Coal issues, miscellaneous:

Panama Canal departments tons .

Panama Railroad Co tons .

U. S. Army, excepting vessels tons .

Individuals and companies tons.

Totals tons.



Total issues from Panama Canal deposits:

April, 1924

.A.pril, 1923

April, 1922



tons,
-tons.
. tons .



Coal on hand, May 1, 1924 tons.

Coal on hand, April 1, 1924 tons.

Coal received during the month tons.

Fuel oil issued from Panama Canal tanks:

Panama Canal departments bbls .

Panama Railroad Co bbls

Army and Navy bbls

Total issues and sales bbls.

Fuel oil received during April, 1924 bbls.

Fuel oil on hand. May 1, 1924 bbls.

Diesel oil sold during April, 1924 bbls.

Diesel oil on hand. May 1, 1924 bbls.

Oil pumped for individuals and companies bbls.

Miscellaneous transfers bbls.

Gasoline pumped for Panama Canal .bbls.

Gasoline pumped for individuals and companies : . . .bbls.

Total gasoline and fuel oil handled bbls.

■ Borrowed from U. S. Navy at Balboa and returned at Cristobal.
3 Includes 20.19 barrels transferred to fuel oil stock.



50,211

7,333

155,225

158,413

26,876

29,821



6

47



53



159
18,124



18,283



166

21

400

301



19,171



19,171
18,812
19,342



88,967

100,911

7,227



4,169.70

1,314.45

520.80



6,004.95



14,343.38

1,074.57

39,838.13

591,467,58



908.12



599,455.22



45,8.56

241

2,154,421

2,154,421

2

23



19
82



101



104



■ 104

776
7,345



104



19,549.79

509.50

2,305.93



22,365.22



'20.19

49,593.77

330.19

575.42

498,843.81

1,197.32

4,617.60

2,651.94



529,706.08



96,067

7,574

4,309,646

4,312,834

26,878

29,844



7
54



61



178
18,206



18,384



169

21

400

301



19,275



19,275
19,588
26,687



88,967

100,911

7,331



23,719.49
1,823.95
2.826.73



28,370.17



»20.19

63,937.15

1,104.76

40,413.55

1,090,311.39

1,197.32

5,525.72

2,651.94



1,129,161.30



' Transferred from diesel oil to fuel oil stock.



610



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



Admeasurement of vessels:

U. S. equivalent certificates issued or made. .
Measured for Panama Canal net tonnage. . .
Remcasured for Panama Canal net tonnage.

Panama Canal net tonnage corrected

U. S. equivalent tonnage corrected



Services of harbor equipment:

Tugs, total operating hours

Launches, total operating hours.



Revenues from tug service, pilotage, etc.:

Tug revenue

Pilotage

Seamen

Launch service

Ships measured

Wharfage

Miscellaneous cash collections



Vessels repaired at Panama Canal shops:

Commercial

• U. S. Army and Navy

Canal equipment



Vessels dry docked:

Commercial

Panama Canal equipment.
U. S. Army and Navy



Clearances issued. . .
Bills of health issued .



Cristobal.



16

4

14

8
14



416
1,257



$12,686.25

15,169.00

7,500.00

1,596.00

170.00

13,771.07

1,368.90



31

7
5



259

267



Balboa.



2781
1,424



$8,680.00
6,354.00
8,280.00
2,905.00
50.00
3,999.43
827.00



24
13
15



278

278



Totals.



:;i

5

18
10
20



6941
2,681



$21,336.25

21,523.00

15,780.00

4,501.00

220.00

17,770.50

2,195.90



55
20
20



537
545



ALL VESSELS ENTERING AND CLEARING PORT.





Port of Cristobal.


Port of Balboa.




No.
of

ships.


Registered

gross
tonnage.


Registered

net
tonnage.


No.

of

ships.


Registered

gross
tonnage.


Registered

net
tonnage.


Ships entering.
All vessels, including those transiting Canal.
Vessels entering port but not transiting Canal .
Vessels transiting Canal and handling passen-
gers and cargo at terminals


500

54

75


3,484,637
307,523

457,656


2,362,789
179,615

282,248


489
9

90


3,199,029
33,311

555,246


2,193,754
20,768

341,522






Ships clearing.
All vessels, including those transiting Canal . .
Vessels entering port but not transiting Canal .
Vessels transiting Canal and handling passen-
gers and cargo at terminals . . ...


498
54

77


3,491,544
313,382

464,122


2,367,633
183,752

286,550


489
10

88


3,208,253
32,429

553,965


2,197,806
21,454

340,768

















MOVEMENT OF PASSENGERS.





At Cristobal.




Kt Balboa






First
class.


Others.


Totals.


First
class.


Others.


Totals.


Disembarking:

From Atlantic ports


933
143


681
96


1,614
239


23
125


51
127


74


From Pacific ports


252






Total disembarking '. . . .


1,076


777


1,853


148


178


326






Embarking:

For Atlantic ports


1,130
177


671
115


1,801
292


46
66


70
48


116


For Pacific ports


114






Total embarking


1,307


786


2,093


112


118


230






Remaining on board vessels:

From .\tlantic to Pacific ports


683

1,158

524


2,664

1,645

62


3,347

2,803

586


422
1,380


2,743
1,746


3,165


From Pacific to .Atlantic ports


3,126








106


177


283












Total remaining on board


2,365


4,371


6,736


1,908


4,666


6,574






Total arriving


3,441
3,672


5,148
5,157


8,589
8,829


2,056
2,020


4,844
4,784


6,900


Total departing


6,804







THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



611



COMMISSARY SALES TO VESSELS.

Following is a statement of commissary sales to all vessels during the month of
April, 1924:





Ice.


Groceries.


Cold
storage.


Laundry.


Miscel-
laneous.


Totals.


Sales at Cristobal to:

U S Government vessels


.5141.39

24.30

408.90


S3, 158. 13

25.10

6,519.08


$6,172.82

1,912.24

13,770.16


$73.72
748.36
891.66


$2,616.93

411.44

1,267 .35


$12,162.99


Panama Railroad vessels


3.121.44


Other commercial vessels


23,857.15


Total sales, April, 1924


574.59


9,702.31


21,855.22


1,713.74


4,295.72


39,141.58






Total sales, April, 1923


1,248.19


6,075.01


14,917.01




2,358.77


24,598 98






Total sales Anril 1922


1,545.13


4,140.21


21,009.23




1,710.27


28,404 84








Sales at Balboa to:

U. S. Government vessels

Commercial vessels other than Panama
Railroad


841.40
447.95


10,680.47
1,546.65


28,890.81
7,599.91


1,008.30

107.22


3,843.45
4,979.71


45,264.48
14,681.44


Total sales, April, 1924


1,289.35


12,227.12


36,490.72


1,115.52


8,823.16


59,945.87


Total sales, April, 1923


942.35


2,954.62


17,428.53


593.47


2,924.61


24,843.58


Total sales, April, 1922


656.33


2,700.85


15,023.45


1,013.73


794.70


20,189.06



The aggregate sales to government vessels during the month were S57,427.42,
to Panama Railroad vessels $3,121.44, and to other commercial vessels, $38,538.59;
making a total of sales to all vessels of $99,087.45.

LOCK OPERATIONS.

The following tabulations show the number of lockages, number of vessels passing
through the locks, and the consumption of water for lockages, during the month of
April, 1924, as compared with the corresponding month in 1923 and 1922:



Locks.



NUMBER OF LOCKAGES.



Commercial.



North.



South. Total.



Noncommercial.



North. South.



Total.



Comparative
grand totals.



April,
1924.



April,
1923.



April, '
1922.



Gatun

Pedro Miguel.
Miraflores



195
197
197



196
198
198



Gatun

Pedro Miguel.
Miraflores



391
395
395



30
42
40



34

47
46



425

442
441



397
435

427



235
261
248



Number of vessels put through locks.



214


214


206


206


206


206



428
412
412



21
34
37



85

98

101



106


534


456


132


544


503


138


550


483



266
300
303



CLASSIFICATION OF NONCOMMERCIAL VESSELS.



Gatun.



Army and Navy vessels. . .
Panama Canal equipment.



92
14



Pedro
Miguel.



86
46



Miraflores.



92
46



The total consumption of water for lockages, maintenance, and loss in leakage was
as follows:



Lockages. . . .

Leakage

Maintenance.



Gatun.



Cubic feet.
1,389,860,000
20,000,000



Pedro
Miguel.



Cubic feet.
1,048,350,000
10,330,000
4,970,000



Miraflores.



Cubic feet.
1,010,420,000
, 20,000,000



During the dry season, which ended about April 20, some efforts were made to
economize in the use of water in the operation of the locks and the generation of elec-
tricity by the use of the shorter lock chambers for ships under 450 feet in length,
tandem lockages, crossfilling, and by transferring appro.ximately 90 per cent of the



612



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



power load from the Gatun hydroelectric plant to the oil-burning steam generating
plant at MiraHores between January 2, and March 10, 1924.

The lowest level to which Gatun Lake fell was 83.93, on April 20. On April 22,
the lake began to rise and mandatory crossfilling and short lockages were discon-
tinued.

The overhaul of the locks at Gutun, previously reported, restricted the use of the
intermediate valves, prevented crossfilling, and hindered any great saving of water
at that end of the Canal. Nevertheless, by employing all feasible devices from about
February 12, and with increasing care as the season advanced, the use of water
for lockages was reduced from 81.6 cubic feet per second per vessel per diem in
January, to 76.5 cubic feet per second in February, and to 60 cubic feet per second
in March. In the wet-season months of July and August, 1923, when no efforts
were made to save water, the consumption for lockages exceeded 85 cubic feet per
second.

METEOROLOGY AND HYDROGRAPHY.

In the following tabulation the meteorological and hydrographic conditions over
the Canal Zone and vicinity during the month of April, 1924, are shown in compara-
tive form:



Rain.'ai; for month.



April,
1924.



April.
1923.



April — Years of record.



Maximum. Minimum



Mean.



Pacific section

Central section

Atlantic section

Maximum recorded on any one day

Gatun Lake watershed

Chagres River watershed above Alhajuela

Maximum recorded for month at any one point.
Minimimi recorded for month at any one point.

Hydrography.

Discharge of Chagres River at Alhajuela

Maximum momentary discharge for the month. .

Gatun Lalve watershed, total yield

Gatun Lake watershed, net yield

Draft on Gatun Lake for lockages and power. . .



Inches.
2.64
6.58

12.80
4.80
9.46
7.64

17.80
1.51



Inches.

.64

.53

2 28

1.05

1 38

2.37

5.93

.00



Inches.

7.70

9.12

12.83

■ 12.25

12.00

16.06

21.73



Inches.
.06
.27
1.18



Inches.
3.32
3.74
5.75



.87
.51



49
48



.00



C. /. s.
1,175
16,528
3,044
2,303
2,275



C.f. s.

558

1,245

676

-185

2,371



C.f.s.
3,140

= 27,085
6,263
5,400
2,371



C. f. s.
304



C.f.s.
1,026



328

-706

J 1,019



1,946

1,196

U,784



' This represents the maximum 24-hour rainfall recorded on the Canal Zone and immediate vicinity since American
occupation. Recorded at Gatun on October 23 and 24, 1923. (Note — Extreme outlying stations in the Republic of
Panama not included in this report.) " April 3, 1915. ■= Not including April, 1914.

SEISMOLOGY.

Four seismic tremors were recorded at Balboa Heights, occurring on the 1st, 14th,
and 21st of the month. Two tremors were recorded on the 14th.



ELECTRICAL — POWER AND WORK.



The gross output of the Gatun hydroelectric station and of the Miraflores steam
plant, the power distributed to consumers, the loss of power in transmission, etc.,
as compared with the corresponding month in 1923, and 1922, are shown in the fol-
lowing tabulation:



Item.

Gross output, KWH:

Gatun hydroelcctrie station

Miraflores steam plant

Power distributed to consumers KWH.

Loss of power in plants, accessories, transmission, and trans-
formers KWH .

Per cent of loss of power to gross output

Water consumption cubic feet

Oil consumption barrels.



April,
1924.



April,
1923.



April,
1922.



4,620,400

114,370

4,094,674

640,096

13.51

3,458,310,044

1,740.70



4,324,900

200

3,757,755

567,345

13.11

3,305,507,335

1,050



4,471,000

250

3,743,444

727,806

16.27

3,589,299,000

2,009



Thirty-two work orders covering electrical installations and repairs on 25 vessels
were completed during the month, as well as the usual operation, maintenance, and
repair work.

There were 279 work orders issued during the month for work performed by the
different sections of the Electrical Division, as compared with 236 work orders issued
during March.



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



613



SHOP, FOUNDRY, AND DRV DOCK WORK.

During the month, miscellaneous repairs were made on 43 vessels at Cristobal, and
52 at Balboa. Of these 4 were in dry dock at Cristobal and 7 at Balboa. The more
important repair work during the month included the following:

The renewing of rotten planking, calking, and cementing of the entire bottom of
the hull of the schooner Irene S. Wilkinson.

Leaky rivets were renewed and welded, also cracks welded in 6 furnaces of the
U. S. S. Sapelo, together with rebricking 6 furnaces, installing two Panama Canal
closed chocks, and repairing feed pumps and reversing engine.

The steamship Westwego was placed in dry dock to repair damage from collision
with approach wall of locks. The stem was removed, straightened, and replaced, and
damaged plates and frames renewed or faired as required.

New propeller shaft was forged for the tug Cocoli, and installed in the dry dock.
The dredge Gamboa was dry-docked and the fitting of stern pontoons begun for the
purpose of giving her additional watertight subdivisions as well as allowing of a deeper
stern fender which will prevent overriding of scows moored astern.

The casings of both high pressure and low pressure turbines were raised on the
steamship Bethelridge, high power motor removed to shop and repaired, and exten-
sive repairs made to auxiliaries. Turbine casings were lifted on the steamship Steelore,
all boilers were opened up, cleaned, tubes reroUed throughout, leaky seams and stays
recalked, and repairs made to auxiliary machinery.

Installation of new roofs on the foundry, forge shop, and sand house was completed.

The output of the foundry in patterns and castings, as compared with the preceding
month, was as follows:







April, 1924.




]


Vlarch, 1924






Patterns.


Castings.


Pounds.


Patterns.


Castings.


Pounds.


Iron


12
2

7


456

332

1,111


27,056^

76,640

16,123^


5
3
4


489
345
486


19,452
60,820
12 245'


Steel


Nonferrous











There were 587 job orders on hand at the beginning of the month, 640 were author-
ized during the month, and 665 completed, leaving 562 on hand at the close of the
month.

There were 361 standing orders on hand at the beginning of the month, 4 were
authorized during the month and one completed, leaving 364 on hand at -the close of
the month.

MUNICIPAL ENGINEERING.

The output of the three filtration plants, the amount of water consumed by the
cities of Colon and Panama, and the sales of water to vessels, are shown in compara-
tive form in the following tabulation:



April,
1924.



.4pril,
1923.



April,
1922.



Pumping stations

Filtration plants

Water consumed by Panama
Water consumed by Colon. .
Sales of water to vessels



Gallons.

619,456,500

365,229,000

91,625,000

52,344,000

12,827,775



Gallons.

708,093,2.50

417,145,000

91,143,000

67,513,700

9,784,860



Gallons.
658,810.000
380,175,000
78,703,000
58,159,750
10,616,628



The extension and enlargement of water system in the Ancon-Balboa district for
fire protection was advanced to 70 per cent of completion.

DREDGING.

All slides were quiescent during the month of April, 1924, with the exception of
West Lirio (south) and West Culebra.

The slide at West Lirio (south), the north shoulder of which had partially broken
up during the period of greatest activity in October, 1923, continued to settle between
stations 1727 and 1731. The dredge has been able to take care of the material as
rapidly as the pushout occurred. The total yardage removed from this slide since
October 28, 1923, is 1,043,060 cubic yards. West Culebra slide has shown a slight
general movement between stations 1776 and 1794. There was no interference with
Canal trafific during the month.



614



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



The total excavation during the month was 292,850 cubic yards, as follows:



Cubic
Yards.



Classified as —



15,600

1,600

700

68,850

10,900

3,100

76,4,50

15,350

2,400

20,100

69,100

11,700



Earth. Rock.



1,500



8,250



800

10,100

3,250



20,100
69,100
11,700



14,100

1,600

700

57,600

10,900

2,300

66,350

12,100

2,400



Character
of work.



Maintenance.
Maintenance.
Maintenance.
Maintenance.
Maintenance.
Maintenance.
Maintenance.
Maintenance.
Maintenance.
Maintenance.
Maintenance.
Maintenance.



Station.



Pacific entrance

Gaillard Cut, Paraiso P. I. improvement project.

Gaillard Cut, Culebra slide

Gaillard Cut, west Lirio slide (south)

(Jaillard Cut, La Pita Point improvement project.

Gaillard Cut, east barge repair slide

Gaillard Cut, La Pita Point improvement project

Gaillard Cut, Division ofhce slide

Gaillard Cut, East Culebra

Gaillard Cut, barge repair slide

Gaillard Cut, Culebra slides

Gaillard Cut, Cucaracha reach



Equipment.



Cascadas.

Cascadas.

Caacadas.

Cascadai.

Gamboa.

Gamboa.

Paraiso.

Paraiso.

Paraiso.

No. 86 ■

No. 86 ■

No. 86 ■



' Through relay.

The new floating electrical relay pump mentioned in the March report as having
been put in service on March 31, 1924, was continued in service during the month with
very satisfactory results. The indications are that the plant can be depended on to
handle material efftciently to elevations of over 250 feet through short pipe lines
(under 1,500 feet), or through a total pipeline length of about 3 miles for low lifts
(under 20 feet). The delays to operations chargeable to the relay pump in April were
84 per cent of the total delays to the entire plant, and the cost of handling material
with this outfit will be less than 50 per cent of the cost of handling with a dipper
dredge.

VITAL ST.A.TISTICS.

A total of 138 deaths occurred during the month of April, 1924, among the popula-
tion of the Canal Zone, and the cities of Panama and Colon, which is equivalent to
an annual death rate of 13.47 per thousand. The leading causes of death were:
tuberculosis (various organs), 28; pneumonia (broncho and lobar), 24; diarrhea and
enteritis (including colitis), 12; organic diseases of the heart, 8; and nephritis (acute
and chronic), 8. There were 4 deaths from apoplexy, 2 from dysentery, 2 from
cancer, and 2 from diphtheria. Of the total deaths, 56, or 41 per cent occurred among
children under 5 years of age. There were 16 deaths among nonresidents of the Isth-
mus; these are not included in the above statistics.

There were 247 live births reported during the month, and 17 stillbirths. Includ-
ing stillbirths, this is equivalent to an annual birth rate of 25.77 per 1,000 population.
Deaths among children under one year of age numbered 32, giving an infant mortality
rate of 129.55 per thousand live births.

The total number of malaria cases reported during the month was 67. Of these,
one was reported from Panama City, one from Colon, 26 from the Canal Zone sani-
tated area, and 39 originated outside of our sanitated area. Of the total, 7 were
employees, 21 were nonemployees, 39 were Army and Navy personnel. There was
one death from malaria.

OCCUPANTS OF QUARTERS.

The number of persons occupying Panama Canal and Panama Railroad quarters
are shown in the following tabulation in comparative form:





As of April 30, 1924. | Comparative totals.




Men.


Women.


Children.


April,
1924.


April,
1923.


April,
1922.


Americans


2,500

77

4,144


2,036

29

2,603


2,230

69

6.097


6,766

175

12,844


6,296

170

12,766


6,347


Europeans


234


West Indians


12,311






Totals, April, 1924


6,721 4,668


8,396


19,785












Totals, April, 1923


6,588


4,634


8,010




19,232










Totals, April, 1922


6,549


4,502


7,841






18,892











WORKING FORCE.



The following tabulation shows the number of gold and silver employees as of
April 16, 1924, as compared with March, 1924, and April, 1923:



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



615



Operation and Maintenance:

Office

Electrical

Municipal Engineering

Lock operation

Dredging

Mechanical

Marine

Fortifications



Totals.



Supply Department:

Quartermaster

Subsistence

Commi.ssary

Cattle Industry, plantations.

Hotel Washington

Transportation



Totals ,



Accounting Department.

Health Department

Executive Department. .



Totals.



Panama Railroad:

Superintendent

Transportation

Receiving and Forwarding Agent.
Coaling stations



Totals

Grand totals, April, 1924 .
Grand totals, March, 1924
Grand totals, April, 1923.



As of April 16, 1924.



Gold.



31

159
72
207
161
404
174
14



1,222



1,59

12

177

5

8

33



394



191
229
490



910



46
63
75
60

244



2,770



2,769



Silver.



38
180
508
630
874
713
505

35



3,483



1,060

91

840

185

92



Online LibraryIsthmian Canal Commission (U.S.Panama Canal record (Volume v.17 1923-24) → online text (page 95 of 116)