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Isthmian Canal Commission (U.S..

Panama Canal record (Volume v.18 (1924-25)) online

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ed 14,400 cubic yards of material during the first part of the month, making the total
yardage removed from this slide since October 28, 1923, 1,382,450 cubic yards.

West Culebra slide has shown a slight general movement between stations 1,770
and 1,795, west. This movement amounted to 3.5 feet toward the Canal for the
month.

All other slides, including Cartagena, Cucaracha, and East Culebra, were quiescent
during the month. There was no interference with Canal traffic.

The total excavation during the month was 313.950 cubic yards as follows:




27,150
19,700
21,550
.23,000
14,400
92,550
30,700
50,900
34,000



4,350
4,200
4,250
0,000
13,700
87,350
30,700
42,700
34,000



22,800
15,500
17,300
17,000
700
5,200



8,200



Maintenance

Maintenance

Maintenance

Maintenance

Maintenance

Maintenance

Aux. maintenance..
Imp. project No. I.
A un. maintenance..



Gailkrd Cut, west Culebra slide

Gaillard Cut, east Culebra slide

Gaillard Cut, La Pita improvement project.

Gaillard Cut

Gaillard Cut, west Lirio slide

Gaillard Cut, Empire reach

Balboa inner harbor

Balboa inner harbor

France Field



Gamboa.
Gamboa.
Gamboa.
Gamboa.
No. 83.
No. 83.
Cascadas.
Cascadas.
No. 86.



VITAL STATISTICS.

A total of 163 deaths occurred during the month of August, 1924, among the
population of the Canal Zone, and the cities of Panama and Colon, which is equivalent
to an annual death rate of 15.66 per 1,000. The leading causes of death were: Tuber-
culosis (various organs), 26; diarrhea and enteritis (including colitis), 22; pneumonia
(broncho and lobar), 18; nephritis (acute and chronic), 13; organic diseases of the
heart, 13. There were 9 deaths from cancer, 4 from apoplexy, and 3 from bronchitis.
Of the total deaths, 60, or 37 per cent, occurredamong children under 5 years of age.
There were 12 deaths among nonresidents of the Isthmus; these are not included in
• the above statistics.

There were 258 live births reported during the month, and 22 stillbirths. Including
stillbirths, this is equivalent to an annual birth rate of 26.91 per 1,000 population.
Deaths among children under 1 vear of age numbered 39, giving an infant mortality
rate of 151.16 per 1,000 live births.

The total number of malaria cases reported during the month was 165. Of these, 9
cases were reported from Panama City, 3 from Colon, 112 from the Canal Zone, and
41 originated outside of our sanitated area. Of the total, 21 were employees, 42
were nonemployees, 102 were Army and Navy. There was 1 death from malaria.



OCCUPANTS OF QUARTERS.

The number of persons occupying Panama Canal and Panama Railroad quarters
is shown in the following table, as compared with August, 1922, and 1923:





As of August 31, 1924.


Comparative totals.




Men.


Women.


Children.


August,
1924.


August,
1923.


August,
1922.




2,491

81

4,244


1,960

29

2,677


2,228

69

6,659


6,679

179

13,580


5,804

165

12,924


5,667




215




12,322









6,816


4,666


8,956


20,438








Totals August 1923


6,481


4,341


8,071




18.893












6,288


4,393


7,523






18,204











WORKING FORCE.



The following tabulations show the number of gold and silver employees as of
August 20, 1924, by departments, together with a comparison of the working force
for the preceding month and for August, 1923:



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



109





As of August 20, 1924.


Total employees.




Gold.


Silver.


Total.


July,
1924.


August,
1923.


Operation ;ind Maintenance:

Office


28
162

72
205
170
485
175

10


37

180

477

592

1,006

1,021

618

91


65
342
549
797
1,176
1 506
793
101


64
334

567

799

1,051

1,238

728

57


61
304

477


Electrical

Municipal Engineering






Mechanical

Marine

Fortifications


1,068
723
93


Totals


1,307


4,022


5,329


4,838


4,496


Supply Department:

Quartermaster

Subsistence

Commissary ..........

( 'attic Industry, plantations


167

36

182

5

7
7


1,201

87
852
121

84
165


1,368
123

1,034

126

91

172


1,308

92

1,037

115

90
168


1,073

87

942

210

89








Totals


404

199
231

464


2,510


2,914


2,840










B

727
215


207
958
679


205
938
635










681




Totals


894


950


1,844


1,778


1,813




Panama Railroad:

Superintendent


48
65
74
43


200
105
887
319


248
170
961
362


270

170

1,049

437


290
180
752
576


Receiving and Forwarding Agent




Totals


230


1,511


1,741


1,926


1,798


Grand totals, August, 1924


2,835


8,993


11,828












Grand totals, July, 1924


2,761


S,(I21




11,382












2,633


8,058






10,691









RECEIPTS AND SALES OF MATERIALS AND SUPPLIES.

The total value of material ordered on United States requisitions and received on
the Isthmus, cash sales from stock, etc., during the month as compared with the
preceding month, and with the corresponding month in 1923, were as follows:





August,
1924.


July,
1924.


August,
1923.


Material received on United States requisitions:


$304,613.70
12,951.77


$281,368.15
13,356.22


$288,039.74
5,886.69


For other Panama Canal departments




Totals


317,565.47


294,724.37


293,926.43




Cash sales on the Isthmus:

Stock


25,012.86
182.43
349.12
380.36


25,154.21

1,861.12

603.63

1,170.78


19,403.99

171.18

1,917.26

392.37










Totals


25,924.77


28,789.74


21,884.80





FINANCIAL STATEMENT.

The following statement shows in a condensed form the aggregate revenues and
expenditures during the fiscal year to the beginning of the month'of August, that is
to July 31, inclusive. It is impossible to submit the figures for August, at the time of
writing this report, since all of the bills, charges, etc., involved in the accounting have
not been completed. As July is the first month in the fiscal year, the tabulation below
covers only that month, and at the same time shows the status in the fiscal year; in
subsequent reports there will be included, in addition to the figures for the month
reported, an adjoining table covering the fiscal year to date:



110



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD





Month.




July,
1924.


July,
1923.


Transit revenues:

Tolls


$1,935,272.58
246,532.08


$2,124,429.57
242,726.85








2,181,804.66
896,091.70


2,367,156.42
839,151.99








1,285,712.96
607,190.13


1,528,004.43
606,409.71








678,522.83


921,594.72






983,114.50
875,298.32


782,040.05










107,816.18
52,542.06


80,756.56
52,753.54








55,274.12


28,003.02






2,931,252.06

1,537,722.92


2,919,031.80










1,393,529.14
659,732.19


1,608,760.99










733,796.95


949,597.74





Respectfully,
M.



L. Walker,

Acting. Governor.



Recent Hurricanes in the Caribbean Area.

The unsettled conditions in the Caribbean area, where three hurri-
canes have originated in the past month, have probably been the
cause of abnormal rainfall conditions on the Isthmus of Panama. The
low barometric pressure which precedes the actual formation of a
hurricane draws air from all directions, and in the case of the Isthmus
results in a prevalence of winds from areas to the south. These south-
erly winds cause a heavy precipitation on the southern side of the
Continental Divide, and a lessened precipitation on the northern side.
At Balboa the August, 1924, rainfall totaled 15.64 inches, the greatest
in 26 years of record, as compared with the average of 7.74 inches for
August. At Colon, on the Atlantic or north side of the Isthmus, the
rainfall for August was 7.42 inches, compared with an average August
precipitation of 14.92 inches. The average for Colon is derived from
54 years of record, in only three of which has there been less rainfall
than in August of this year. The conditions in the first part of Sep-
tember have been similar, and slightly more pronounced.

The Hydrographic Office at Balboa Heights, has noted that hurri-
canes in the Caribbean area are frequently preceded, for several days
before they are reported, by winds over the Isthmus from the south.

The United States Weather Bureau maintains a weather service
over the Caribbean, receiving telegraphic reports from various sta-
tions, including the Hydrographic Office on the Canal Zone, and
sending out advisory notices and warnings. Its system has been ex-
tremely successful in detecting hurricanes and determining their paths.
With the frequent notices broadcasted by radio it has been possible
for ships to avoid the worst of the disturbances. This one-time terror
of the seas is becoming less and less a practical danger, or even source
of discomfort.



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 111

(Continued from page 93.)

Of the 65,502 passengers transiting the Canal, 40,496 were bound from
Atlantic to Pacific ports, and 25,006 were en route from Pacific to
Atlantic ports. .

The strictly passenger traffic as outlined in the foregoing is exceeded
greatly by the aggregate members of the crews of vessels entering Canal
Zone waters. During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1924, there were
5,230 commercial transits of the Panama Canal, 616 vessels entered the
port of Cristobal but did not transit the Canal, and 123 vessels entered
the port of Balboa but did not transit the Canal, making a total of
5,969 commercial vessels which entered Canal Zone waters during the
year. Estimating the average crew of these vessels to be 45, a total of
268,605 persons is given. To this figure should be added the passen-
gers and personnel of Government vessels calling at Canal Zone ports
or transiting the Canal; during the year, there were 418 transits of
Government vessels, on which the total number of persons may be
estimated conservatively as 35,000.

A summary of the foregoing figures sh ows the following:



Total passengers arriving and departing

Passengers remaining aboard vessels

Personnel of vessels entering Canal Zone waters.
Personnel and passengers on Government vessels.

Total persons entering Canal Zone ports



56,398
77,859
268,605
35,000



437,862



In the last two items of the above tabulation there are necessarily a
number of duplications. The 5,230 commercial transits of the Canal
during the year were made by 1,481 vessels; in the 418 transits of
Government vessels there are a number of transports, both of the Navy
and Army that made several transits; and the Pacific Fleet of the
United States Navy made two transits, one northbound and one
southbound. The same applies to vessels calling at Balboa or Cristobal,
as there are many vessels that made several calls.

A similar resume of the visitors to the Canal during the calendar
year 1923, published in The Panama Canal Record of February 27,
1924, showed a total for that period of 432,088 persons, made up as
follows :



Total passengers arriving and departing

Passengers remaining aboard vessels

Personnel of vessels entering Canal Zone ports —
Personnel and passengers on Government vessels.

Total



55,140

66,948

275,000

35,000



432,088



Second Full Cargo of Molasses Through Canal in Two Months.

The tankship Carrabulle transited the Canal on September 22,
carrying 6,543 tons of molasses in bulk from Honolulu to Mobile, Ala.
This is the second transit of this vessel with full cargo of molasses in
bulk from Hawaii to Mobile in two months, the first having been on
July 25 with 6,100 tons. The two westbound transits were in ballast.

The Carrabulle is owned and operated by the Cuba Distilling Co.,
and chartered to G. U. Snyder & Co.

Ships' Chandlery Supplies.,

Panama Canal Storehouses stock a complete line of ships' chandlery supplies
available for sale to shipping at cost prices plus 25 per cent surcharge, which sur-
charge includes freight, handling, and other costs.



112



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



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0,0,2,0,0,0,0,0,0,



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



115



Cost of Tolls per Ton of Cargo Through the Panama Canal.

From the opening of the Panama Canal to commerce on August 15,
1914, to the close of August, 1924, 25,826 commercial vessels were
passed through. These vessels carried 111,981,418 tons of cargo, and
paid $101,508,114.83 tolls, an average cost on all commercial traffic
of 90.64 cents per cargo ton. In the total tolls are included the tolls
for vessels in ballast. Tolls are levied on net tonnage, without reference
to the kind of cargo which the ship may be carrying.

In the following tabulation are shown the transits, tolls, tons of cargo
carried, and cost of tolls per ton of cargo for each calendar year since
the opening of the Canal, segregated by direction of transits:





No.

of

transits.


Tolls.


Tons

of
cargo.


Cost per
cargo
ton.




Calendar year 1914-


176
174


$728,378.36
780,359.20


743,795
1,014,830


$0.9792




.7689










350


1,508,737.56


1,758,625


.8571




Calendar year 1915.






573
581


2,109,449.90
2,188,017.21


2,061,979
2,831,443


1.0233




.7728




Calendar year 1916.




Total for year


1,154


4,297,467.11


4,893,422


.8782




608
609


1,811,105.91
1,860,056.77


1,984,462
2,790,360


.9127




.6666










1,217


3,671,162.68


4,774,822


.7688




Calendar year 1917.






921
1,039


2,775,180.86
3,332,515.77


3,087,507
4,356,103


.8988




.7649










1,960


6,107,696.63


7,443,610


.8205




Calendar year 1918.






850

1,220


2,324,897.28
3,992,558.11


2,221,174
5,062,985


1.0463




.7885










2,070


6,317,455.39


7,284,159


.8673




Calendar year 1919.






964



Online LibraryIsthmian Canal Commission (U.S.Panama Canal record (Volume v.18 (1924-25)) → online text (page 16 of 99)