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OCOOO5,524


124,040


70,334


71,410.87


36,530






East coast of United States to
Far East:


5

7
6


18,581
32,766
25,431


26,042
37,311
33,568


29,915

47,315
38,072


18,621
32,183
25,358


23,226.25
40,446.60
31,788.75


31,386




33,856




44,776






Totals


18


76,778


96,921


115,302


76,162


95,461.60


110,018


Europe to west coast of South
America:

British

Dutch


5
3
1
3

2

1
1


22,438
11,421
3.21)5
12,538
7,495
2,629
4,120


27,023
16,731
4,081
15,098
9,015
4,135
5,518


36,358
18,613
5,280
20,251
12,426
4,301
7,578


22,009
11,350
3,228
12,673
7,625
2,606
4,402


28,047.50
14,276.25
4,006.25
15,672.50
9,368.75
3,286.25
5,150.00


20,762
18,031




3,235




18,165




1,241




5,760




200






Totals


16


63,846


81,601


104,807


63,893


79,807.50


67,394


Europe to west coast of United
States:


1

1
4
1
4
2
2


4,306
4,223

16,197
4,909

13,441
6,854
8,755


5,043
5,338
20,780
6,732
18,362
10,802
10,313


6,533
6,652
26,187
8,109
22,187
11,346
14,174


4,178

4,246
16,082

4,883
13,51)2

8,546

8,836


3,630.96
3,843.36

18,408.09
6,136 25

14,955.55
8,081.62
9,253.96










8,383


German


8,232

8,416


United States


4,774
9,020


Totals 15


58,685


77,370


95,188


60,363


64,309.79


38,825



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



455



ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC— Continued.





No. of

vessels.


TONNAGE.


Tolls.




Nationality.


United

States

equivalent.


Panama
Canal
net.


Registered
gross.


Registered
net.


Tons
of cargo.


East coast of United States to
Australasia:


7
1
1


31,359
2,168
3,604


41,131
4,010
4,480


46,503
3,677
5,816


29,552
2,161
3,604


$38,966.25
2,710.00
4,505.00


35,424




6,200




4,390






Totals


9 37.131


49,621


55,996


35,317


46,181.25


46,014










Europe to Australasia:


6
1
1


39,748
2,707
4,357


51,548
3,921
5,162


63,098
4,693
6,889


39,706
2,789
4,446


49,685.00
3,383.75
5,446.25


43,071


Dutch


5,478




2,771








8


46,812


60,631


74,680


46,941


58,515.00


51,320






Europe to west coast Canada:


1

5
1
1


3,455

22,382
5,763
4,609


3,986

29,431

7,619

5,214


5,020

35,713

9,338

7,434


3,580

22,300

5,808

4,662


2,869.92

26,875.60

7,203.75

5,761.25




British


6,987


Dutch


3,229


Italian


1,116






Totals


8


36,209


46,250


57,505


36,350


42,710.52


11,332






East coast of United States to
west coast of Canada:


5
1
1


16,001
3,436
4,268


22,317
4,834
5,529


27,549
5,760
6,895


18,184

4,268
4,268


16,068.24
3,480.48
5,335.00








United States


9,100








7


23,705


32,680


40,204


26,720


24,883.72


9,100






East coast of United States to
Gatun Lake:
Honduranean


3

4


3,006

2,710


5,422

2,784


5,094
4,874


3,159
2,818


3,757.50
3,340.80










Totals


7


5,716


8,206


9,968


5,977


7,098.30








Foreign vessels in ballast, U. S.
coastwise:
British


1
1
1


2,973

3,416

869


4,452
4,240
1,574


4,796
5,438
1,593


2,997
3,389
1,055


3,205.44
3,052.80
1,086.25








Swedish








Totals


3


7,258


10,200


11,827


7,441


7,344.49








Cristobal to west coast of
South America:
Norwegian


2
1


1,198
173


1,370
172


1,994
233


1 , 171
166


1,241.95
206.40


656


Panaman. . . .


5






Totals


3


1,371


1,542


2,227


1,340


1,448.35


661






Cristobal to west coast of Cen-
tral America:


2
1


1,286
1,167


1,441
1,549


2,298
1,974


1,304
1,161


1,607.50
1,458.75


1,641


United States


938






Totals


3


2,453


2,990


4,272


2,465


3,066.25


2,579


East coast of South America to
west coast of United
States:
Eritish . .


2

1


5,991
3,522


7,209
4,914


9,557
5,652


5,871
3,522


5,190.48
4,402.50






5,927






Totals


3


9,513


12,123


15,209


9,393


9,592.98


r ,927






Cristobal to west coast of
United States:


2

2

1
1

1


6,965

7,676

1,854
4,523

2,531


8,234

9,848

2,188
5,627

3,374


11,133

12,617

3,090
7,093

4,174


6,925

7,744

1,852

4,479

2,584


5,928.48

9,595.00

2,317.50
5,653.75

3,163.75




East coast of Canada to Aus-
tralasia:


6,301


East coast of United States to

west coast of Mexico:

British


2,616


Europe to Hawaii:


5,392


Europe to west coast of
Central America:


2,794



456



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC— Continued.





No. of

vessels.


TONNAGE.


Tolls.




Nationality.


United

States

equivalent


Panama

Canal

net.


Registered
gross.


Registered
net.


Tons

of cargo.


Cristobal to Balboa:




69

2,861

3,215
6,228

1,144
3.219

156

7,774
5,004
1,515


69

3,311

4,119
8,495

1.879
4,053

173
7,874
5,879
2,959


123

4,800

5,162
10,534

1,909
5,187

299
10,831
8,461 '
4,617


72
2,949

3,205

6,195

1,172
3,222

160
7,530
5,960
2,427


$51 75

2,383 92

2,965.68
7,785.00

1,430.00
4,023.75

124.56
5,830.50
4,232 88
1,893.75




Africa to west coast of Centra
America:




Egypt to west coast of United
States:




Around the world:


3,193

2,000
6,300


East coast of Mexico to
west coast of Mexico:

Danish '■*....

West Indies to Australasia:


West Indies to west coast of
South America:
British


East coast of Canada to west
coast of South Amer-
ica:
British




East coast of Canada to west
coast of United
States:
British




East coast of South America
to west coast of South
America:


1 249






Totals, February, 1926


215


827,976


1,052,228


1,334,709


833,513


921,402.72


602,370


Totals, February, 1925


206


767,768


980,156


1,250,563


772,529


853,315.61


583,587


Totals, February, 1924


219


873,586


1,099,914 11,392,547


874,930


963,469.60


679,815



PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC.



United States intercoastal:

United States

West coast of South America
to east coast of
United States:

British

Chilean

Danish

Italian

Japanese

Norwegian

Swedish

United States

Yugo Slav

Totals

West coast of Canada to
Europe:
Belgian ......

British

Danish

Dutch , .
French .

German

Italian

Japanese

Swedish

United States

Totals

West coast of United States
to Europe:

Belgian

British

Dutch

Japanese

Norwegian

United States

Totals



18,620
3,512
3,880
3,416
4,991

23,707
7,486

44,840
3,280



113,732



3,187
61,237
5,188
8,989
4,196
3,807
3,980
4,268
3,430
3,665



101,947



3,224
42,078
2,730
4,266
4,509
14,741



il,548



374,457



24,711
4,705
4,418
3,922
5,107

28,355
8,917

53,959
5,208



139,302



1,041
79,525
5,663
12,981
5,020
5,001
4,028
4,665
5,533
5.C33



132,147



4,045
51,060
4,432
4,670
5,637
19,937



89,781



31,169

7,310

5,702

5,430

6,710

34,231

30,676

78,175

5,283



204,686



5,121
92,732

6,913
14.S21
6.798
6,097
5,411
5,831
5,554
5,849



155,157



5,085
64,776
4,429
5,825
7,116
23,802



111,033



19,031
3,976
3,583
3,391
4,800

22,043
8,762

44,890
3,292



113,768



3,130
58,526
5,218
9.010
4,268
3,814
3,428
4. 2.' 7
1.225
3,664



1,519



3,106
42,152
2,749
4,225
4,493
14,281



71,006



S365.929.75



23,275.00
4,390.00
4,481.25
4,270.00
6,128.40

29,387.80
9,357.50

55,784.60
4,100.00



141,174 55



3,983.75
76,376.25
6,485.00
11,230 25
5,245.00
4.75S 75
4,875.60
5,335.00
4,287.50
4.5S1 25



127,164.35



4,030.00
52,217.20
3,412.50
5,332 50
5,636.25
18,426 25



89,054.70



151,003



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



457



PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC— Continued.





No. of
vessels.


TONNAGE.


Tolls.




Nationality.


United

States

equivalent.


Panama
Canal
net.


Registered
gross.


Registered
net.


Tons
of cargo.


West coast of South America
to Europe:


2
2
2
2
2
1
3


8,515

6,656
7,564
6,700
6,915
3,696
8,708


10,848
8,914
9,150
8,113
8,241
4,610

10,841


13,943

10,604
12,531
10,847
11,472
5,975
12,632


8,759
6,684
7,910
6,633
7,327
3,591
8,050


$10,643.75
8,320.00
9,455.00
8,375.00
8,643.75
4,620.00
10,885.00


13,703


Dutch


12,686




15,057




14,505




8,380




2,213




20,784






Tota^


14


48,754


60,717


78,004


48,954


60,942.50


87,328






West coast of Canada to
east coast of United
States:


6
3
3
2


15,907
4,459

10,444
5,813


20,533
5,780

13,495
8,552


26,160
7,499

15,872
9,283


16,041
4,524

10,522
5,695


19,883.75
5,573.75
13,055 00

7,26f;.25


36,472




10,043




22,695




12,287






Totals


14


36,623


48,360


58,814


36.7S2


45,778.75


81,497


Australasia to Europe:

British

Norwegian


6

1


34,228
3,210


48,727
5,458


54,598

5,143


34,472
3,200


42,785 00
4,012.50


37.332
8,612


Totals


7

1
2

2


37,438

81
1,198
2,504


54,185

92
1,370
5,364


59,741


37,672


46,797.50


45,944


West coast of South America
to Cristobal:
■ Colombian


153
1,994
7,922


68
1,174
3,941


101.25

1,497.50
3,130.00


157
1,739




3,747








5


3,783


6,826


10,069


5,183


4,728.75


5,643






Far East to east coast of
United States:


3
2

1

1


10,815

6,965

648
1,384


12,985

8,234

735
2,606


16,085

11,133

1,128
2,461


10,300

6,925

650
1,384


13,428.40

8,706.25

810.00
1,730.00


12,962


West coast of United States to
Cristobal:


15,090


West coast of Central America
to Cristobal:


1,099




2,632








2


2,032


3,341


3,589


2,034


2,540.00


3,731






West coast of Central America
to Europe: .


2

1
1

3

4


2,810

3,231
36

3,006
2,710


4,472

4,058
34

5,422
2,784


4,734

5,408
57

5,094
4,874


2,800

3,321
33

3,159
2,818


3,512.50

4,038.75
27.00

3,757.50
3,340.80


3,807


Australasia to east coast of
Canada:

British

Balboa to Cristobal:


3,200


Gatun Lake to east coast of
United States:
Honduranean


795
1,214






Totals


'7


'5,716


'8,206


'9,968


'5,977


'7,098.30


'2,009






Totals, February, 1926


209


732,627


938,899


1,190,207


731,251


913,823.75


1,536,837


Totals, February, 1925.


173


640,094


809,291


1,020,072


640,290


795,649.27


1,256,032


Totals. February, 1924.


199


807,182


1,008,965


1,294,619


806,536


1,000,685.99


1,563,801



' These 7 vessels entered the Canal at Cristobal and proceeded as far as Gatun Lake. Where, after taking on cargoes
of bananas, they returned to the Atlantic entrance of the Canal. As vessels transiting the Canal as far as Gatun only
are entitled to return to Canal port of entry without payment of tolls for return voyage, the only items taken up in
connection with these transits in the Pacific-to-Atlantic train: statistics is the amount of cargo tonnage loaded at Gatun
Lake.



Publication of Notices and Circulars of Interest to Shipping.

All of the Panama Canal notices to mariners, notices to steamship lines and general circulars of
interest to shipping in its relation to the Canal are published in The Panama Canal Record.
For this reason it is considered unnecessary to make a separate general distribution, away from
the Isthmus of such notices and circulars to those receiving The Panama Canal Record. Shipping
Interest! are advised to look for them in this paper, which is supplied to them without charge.



458



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



German Shipping and The Panama Canal.

The use of the Canal by German shipping began in 1920, over 5
years after the opening of the Canal, on August 15, 1914. Prior to
the opening, the German shipping interests had planned extensive
services through the Canal but the World War drove German shipping
from the seas, and for over a year after the armistice no German ships
appeared at the Canal.

The first transit of the German flag through the Canal was on a
launch of 5 net tons, the Germania, attached to the 4 Hamburg-Ameri-
can ships which were interned in Cristobal Harbor at the outbreak
of the war. The Germania went through the Canal to Balboa on
February 19, 1915. Another German launch, the Emden* made a
similar passage from Cristobal to Balboa on October 15, 1^916. The
first transit by an ocean-going vessel under the German flag was
made on January 2, 1920, when 2 tugs, the Einigkeit and the Schelde,
passed through on their way from Europe to Valparaiso; but these
were under orders of the British Admiralty and were sent out for the
purpose of towing captured German vessels to Liverpool. In the year
1920 there were a number of transits of German vessels of this sort.

On January 5, 1920, the Kosmos Line sent a chartered Danish
steamer, the Alssund, through the Canal on the way from Punta
Arenas, Chile, to Hamburg.

The first regular German service through the Canal, using German
vessels in normal commercial service on behalf of their operators was
begun with the transit of the steamer Murla, of the Roland Line, on
April 8, 1921, en route from Bremen to Corral, in a service operated
jointly by the Roland Line and the Kosmos Line.

From these small and delayed beginnings, with the first regular
service established less than 5 years ago, the traffic of German vessels
has grown until in the calendar year 1925 they stood fourth in number
of transits and tons of cargo carried, being exceeded only by United
States, British, and Norwegian vessels, in the order named. The
following tabulation shows the number of transits of vessels flying
the German flag since the first transits on January 2, 1920, to the end
of the calendar year 1925, with their Panama Canal net tonnage, cargo,
and tolls:



Calendar year.


Number

of
transits.


Panama

Canal net
tonnage.


Tons

of
cargo.


Tolls.




32
13
62
124
165
162


114,737
3 J, 9. 5
219,018
538,703
728,347
727,445


125,455
30,951
222,898
532,1,00
847,039
854,742


$107,004.83




30,870.85




211,240.37




464,982 68




666,450.09




664,547.41








558


2,329.145


2,604,185


2,145.096.23






Totals, all nationalities, 1920 to 1925


J.>,2j8


106,914,004


110,407,636


101,286,883.00



As compared with the total volume of commercial traffic passing
through the Canal during the past six calendar years, vessels of German
registry made up 2.4 per cent of the total number of transits, com-
prised 2.2 per cent of the aggregate net tonnage, carried 2.4 per cent
of the total cargo in transit, and were the source of 2.1 per cent of the
total revenue collected in tolls. In the calendar year 1925 the Ger-



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



459



man ships made 3.4 per cent of the year's transits, comprised 3.2 per
cent of the net tonnage, carried 3.6 per cent of the cargo, and paid 3.1
per cent of the tolls.

For the past four calendar years the number of transits and the
volume of cargo carried by German vessels in either direction has been
as follows:





Number of transits.


Tons of cargo carried.


Calendar year.


Atlantic

to

Pacific.


Pacific

to
Atlantic


Total.


Atlantic

to

Pacific


Pacific

to
Atlantic.


Total.


1922

1923

192-?


34
65
83
76


28

59
82
86


62
124
165
162


95,840
194.640
343 , 138
306,315


127,058
328,640
503,901
54S.427


222,898
523 , 100
847,039


1925


854,742















Regular services are maintained by the Hamburg-American,
Kosmos, and Roland Lines between Europe and the west coasts of
North, Central, and South America, and practically all transits of
German vessels during the past calendar year have been in these
scheduled services. Distribution of German shipping by trades for
the calendar year 1925 is shown in the following table:





Atlant


c to Pacific.


Pacific to Atlantic.




Number

of
transits.


Tons
of
cargo.


Number

of
transits.


Tons

of
cargo.




17
9

47
3


72,603

16,624

216,788

300


19
11
54

2


126,489




16,709




396,455




8,774






Totals ,


76


308,315


86


548,427







Official Publications of Interest to Shippmg.

Masters may obtain from the office of the Captain of the Port,
at either Cristobal or Balboa, without charge, the "Transit and Har-
bor Regulations of The Panama Canal," and the current Tariff of
charges at the Canal for supplies and services.

Requests for Canal publications sent by mail should be addressed to:
The Panama Canal, Balboa Heights, C. Z.; or, when more convenient,
to The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C.

The Hydrographic Office at Cristobal maintains at all times a com-
plete stock of navigational charts and books, including charts of all
parts of the world, sailing directions of the world, nautical tables,
light lists, tide tables, nautical almanacs, etc.

At the office of the Port Captain in Balboa a limited stock of
navigational charts, books, etc., is also carried, and this office is in a
position to fill practically any order in this connection that a ship might
place.

Copies of current issues of Pilot Charts, Notices to Mariners, and
Hydrographic Bulletins may be obtained in return for marine infor-
mation.

Observations of weather, ocean currents, and other marine data
collected, and blanks, instructions, barometer comparisons, etc.,
furnished.

Correct time is maintained and chronometers rated.



460



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



Current Net Prices on Fuel Oil, Diesel Oil,
and Coal.

Crude fuel oil is delivered to vessels at either
Cristobal or Balboa, from tanks of The Panama
Canal for $2.00 per barrel of 42 gallons.

Diesel oil is sold by the Canal at $2.35 per

Crude fuel oil and Diesel oil are also sold by
private companies with tanks at the Canal
terminals, at prices which will be quoted by them
on application. The prices at present are as
follows: Crude fuel oil, $1.70 per barrel at Cris-
tobal and Balboa. Diesel oil, Balboa only, $2.05
per barrel. .

Coal is supplied to steamships, including war-
ships of all nations, delivered and trimmed in
bunkers at $8.50 per ton of 2,240 pounds at Cris-
tobal and $11.50 at Balboa. For ships in transit
through the Canal, which are directed to take
coal at Balboa, for the convenience of The
Panama Canal, $8.50 per ton at Balboa. When
coal is delivered from lighters in quantities of 50
tons or more, the price is $9.50 per ton at Cristobal,
$12 50 at Balboa. For delivering lump coal for
gallev use, in sacks, $10 additional per ton; but
if vessel furnishes sacks, $5 per ton additional.

Coal for cargo is sold only by special authority
of the Governor, at prices quoted upon applica-
tor trimming on deck, between decks, or
special trimming in bunkers for convenience of
vessel when requested, an additional charge ot
90 cents per ton will be made for extra handling.

Deliveries of coal can be made at the rate of
from 100 to 700 tons an hour, as fast as the ships
can receive it in their bunkers. Oil deliveries
can be made up to 2,000 barrels per hour, rate
depending on gravity of oil, location of shore
tanks, and ship's facilit ies for hand ling.

Facilities for Shipping.

The Panama Canal is equipped with all the
facilities for the fueling, supply, and repair of
ships which are found in modern ports.

The coaling plants, with an aggregate storage
capacity of 700,000 tons, bunker ships at the
rate of from 100 to 500 tons an hour practicaUy
as fast as the nature of the vessel will allow. Oil
can be delivered from 30 tanks aggregating ap-
proximately 1,500,000 barrels of storage capacity,
as fast as the ships can take it. Crude fuel oil.
Diesel oil, and gasoline are sold.

The ships' chandlery storehouses carry a wide
variety of marine supplies and spare parts. I he
commissary stores sell foodstuffs, fresh meats,
fruits, and vegetables, as well as clothing and a
general line of goods for supplying about 30 000
neople resident on the Isthmus. Ice plants, a
large laundry, hotels, hospitals, and restaurants
serve the passengers and crews of ships.

A salvage service operated by the Canal is
available for prompt assistance to vessels within
a radius of a thousand miles of the Canal, or
farther if required. Seagoing tugs or a wrecking
tug with requisite equipment are dispatched on

Sh A\!o O t O-f e oot dry dock, capable of receiving the.
Largest ships built, a smaller dry dock floating
cranes, foundry, and amply equipped shops,
employing about 1,100 men, provide the means
of making practically any kind of marine ^repairs
In general, the services to shipping at the Canal
are such as have been developed and found ample
and effective, in the course of handling large
traffic through the Canal in nearly 10 years of
operation ^^^^^^^^^^__

Sale of Surplus Material and Equipment.

The Panama Canal offers for sale by direct
purchase at moderate prices, a quantity of tele-
phones, telephone ringers and bells, bank check
writers and protectors, small tools and other mis-
cellaneous articles of general utility These ar-
ticles may be inspected at the Obsolete Section
of tne General Storehouse, Balboa, and purchased
through the office of the General Storekeeper
Detailed information with prices may be secured
by telephone by calling Balboa No. 120.






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THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL.

PUBLISHED WEEKLY.

Subscription rates, domestic, $0.50 per year; foreign, 81.00; address

The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or

The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C.

Entered as second-class matter February G, 1918, at the Post Office

at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879

Certificate. — By direction of thg Governor of The Panama Canal the matter contained herein is published as statistical

information and is required for the proper transaction of the public business.





Volume XIX. Balboa Heights, C. Z., March 24, 1926. No. 33.

Heavy Day's Traffic — Record at Gatun Locks.

Twenty-six commercial vessels, having an aggregate net tonnage of
121,200, Panama Canal measurement, transited the Canal on March
20, 1926. Combined tolls on the day's traffic totaled $105,373.77.
In point of number of commercial transits, this established a record
for Canal traffic. Previous records for number of commercial transits
were established on May 25, 1923, January 14, 1924, and March 18,
1925, with 25 commercial transits each.

At Gatun Locks, the day's traffic included 27 commercial vessels
and a government vessel and established a new record for commer-
cial transits in one day at Gatun Locks. One transit each way was
made by a fruit boat, from Cristobal to Gatun Lake and return for
the purpose of loading bananas, and while counted as only one transit
as regards tonnage and tolls, the vessel was handled twice at Gatun
Locks. The total number of lockages for the day was 25, of which 10
were made with full length of lock chambers and 15 using the short
chamber in one or more levels for the purpose of saving water. No
record was established in total number of lockages.



Determination of Displacement Tonnage.

Tolls for the transit of naval vessels other than transports, colliers,
hospital ships, and supply ships, are levied on the basis of fifty cents
per displacement ton. The displacement tonnage is determined or-
dinarily from the draft of the vessel and its displacement curve with
consideration of the density of the water in which the draft is taken.



Online LibraryIsthmian Canal Commission (U.S.Panama Canal record (Volume v.19(1925-26)) → online text (page 64 of 97)