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504

4,000

774

14,006

2,035

31,586




396
45
19

957








737








5








Toys
















15


36








Wl8t9










Vfi\




214
498


■ ■• 1










Wheat




578.520
600
38


1,073






1,744,948


Wine






47


500


Wool


























Totals


S. 992. 632


151,644


97,394


3.084.444


26,641


377,881


113,259


2,087,842



Provisions Required by Ships.

The Panama Canal Commissary Division, with facih'ties at Balboa
and Cristobal for delivery of supplies to steamships, carries a complete
line of provisions, such as meats, fruits, vegetables, eggs, butter,
canned goods, cigars, cigarettes, tobacco, etc., which are sold to ships
at the prices which are in effect for employees, no surcharge being
added. Beef especially is available at low prices, hindquarters selling
at 14| cents per pound and forequarters at 11 cents per pound.
. Orders may be placed in advance by radio for delivery on arrival,
or at either terminal for prompt delivery or for delivery at the other
terminal after transit. All vessels are boarded on arrival by a repre-
sentative of the Commissary Division.



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



133



Showing Origin and Destination, Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1929.— Continued.
ATLANTIC— Continued.

(Figures represent tons of 2,240 pounds.)



11

13

O to
TO 1

sll


II

§1

CO §

§s

1.2


West coast of South Amer-
ica to Cristobal, C. Z.


West coast of South Amer-
ica to Europe.


West coast of Central Amer-
ica to Cristobal, C. Z.


West coast of Central Amer-
ica to Europe.

Far East to east coast of
United States.

Australasia to east coast
of United States.

Australasia to Europe.


is

si
P

.1°
^i


3


i
is


3

1


10






48,580
17,928
4,496






70 110 14






48,904






290
39








22,888




'


44,625


1 623








492i 487







7,870










12i 40

1




5

1,159
500


1,224








3


4


55


62,191








::::::::


1




49,623






210
21









140

67






3,858


335




892




7,732


196


2,365
15,400




4,426
6


18,058
16,316




















3








2,199
2
















2,199












8,191








42


15,305


56
















56












:::;::...: i








22














731I


9






7,609






499


6
1,300




2,808


8,453






75,244
5


113,606












35


2.452


5




22
67
3








15


26
21
2


2,081


100


26












293


1








27






3,733
















2,200










15












8


387
















' 20

549
480




20


344




332


1,967

89

431

539

5












12

37

5

18
4
6

718


5,956








670


2,352












233
2,640


980


3










251


197
576




7,483








102




3 911


2,220








613




4,330


3,841




1,560
14


2,976


605| 60


2,464


20,642


7,902




66,158
1,840






2,583


1.14 .^41


1,135


1,803






8,540; 393,365

1


36,638


717,931


1








118












1




1,452


271













3,349 i4,522

1


552


22,232




'30 44








74


1










8,772
280
167


1


35


10,545


5






7








2


1


1,489






19




497


5.003J


136 538


1








1,860


9,049


1


157

371

85


7






4,164


i34


18 336

2 2,323

28 4,308

107 4,357


1









1,847




1


1,542 8.660




13,898

114

1,188


2,365,555


30'


1




130


7,842


3,801


1


7,832! 15,129


8fi.fi74




150,712




1








2.994,043; 397,216


116.672l2,382,935i 55.082! 40,644


121,999 164.746' 573,2121 516,6191 485,581


20.780,486



Facilities for Shipping.

The Panama Canal is equipped with all the facilities for the fueling, supply, and repair of ships
which are found in modern ports.

The coaling plants, with an aggregate storage capacity of 700,000 tons, can bunker ships up to
1,500 tons an hour, practically as fast as it can be handled in ships' bunkers. Oil can be delivered
as fast as the ships can take it, from 46 tanks aggregating approximately 2,361,040 barrels of storage
capacity. Crude fuel oil, Diesel oil, and gasoline are sold.

The ships' chandlery storehouses carry a wide variety of marine supplies and spare parts. The
commissary stores sell foodstuffs, fresh meats, fruits, and vegetables, as well as clothing and a general
line of goods for supplying about 30,000 people resident on the Isthmus. Ice plants, a large laundry,
hotels, hospitals, and restaurants serve the passengers and crews of ships.

A 1,000-foot dry dock, capable of receiving the largest ships built, a smaller dry dock, floating cranes,
foundry, and amply equipped shops, employing about 1,100 men, provide means of making prac-
tically any kind of marine repairs.

■ Ample space exists at either terminal of the Canal for the berthing of vessels, as well as large covered
piers for the storage of cargo. These are modern structures, fireproof, ratproof, in splendid condition,
well lighted and maintained in a clean and orderly condition.

In general, the services to shipping at the Canal are such as have been developed and found ample
and effective in the course of handling large traffic through the Canal in over 13 years of operation.



134 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD

Executive Order.

By virtue of the authority vested in me by law, the area of land hereinafter de-
scribed, to be known as Colon Naval Radio Station, situated in the Canal Zone, is
hereby set apart and assigned to the uses and purposes of a naval reservation under
the jurisdiction of the Secretary of the Navy; but said area shall be subject to the
civil control and jurisdiction of the Governor of The Panama Canal, in conformitv
with the PanamaCanal Act (37 Stat., 569, Title 48, Section 1301, U. S. Code). The
said area is described as follows:

COLON NAVAL RADIO STATION

Beginning at a concrete monument, the geodetic position of same referred to the
Canal Zone triangulation system, being Latitude 9° 17' plus 3973.94 feet, and Longi-
tude 79° 54' plus 3821.44 feet; thence due east a distance of 7 19. 70 ^feet to a concrete
monument; thence due north a distance of 670.59 feet to a concrete monument;
thence due west a distance of 814.14 feet to a concrete monument, located 16 feet
east of the east curb of the Bolivar Highway; thence south 9° 19' east and parallel to,
and 16 feet distant from, the east curb of said road, a distance of 438.30 feet to a con-
crete monument; thence on a curve to the right with a radius of 1864.50 feet, and
parallel to, and 16 feet distant from, the east curb of said road a distance of 239.30
feet, to a concrete monument, the point of beginning. (All bearings are true bear-
ings.) The above parcel of land is shown on Drawing S-6100-63, made by the Section
of Surveys of The Panama Canal, dated June 12, 1929, the total area of said parcel
being 11.7 acres.

HERBERT HOOVER

The White House,

September 6, 1929.

[No. 5185]



Whaling Vessels Transit Canal.

The steamer Kosmos, flag ship, accompanied by her attendant fleet
of 7 whaling vessels, owned and operated by the Kosmos Company of
Sandefjord, Norway, transited the Canal on .September 10, 1929, en
route from Norway to Wellington, New Zealand, which port will serve
as the base of operations for the next year.

The Kosmos, which is known as a "whale factory," is 554 feet in
length, 77.6 feet beam, of 17,801 gross tons and is said to be the largest
single-screw vessel afloat. Recently constructed in Belfast, Ireland,
the vessel carries a complete up-to-date equipment for whaling. Air-
planes are carried to facilitate navigation through icy waters, and for
the purpose of locating the whales. The whole "factory," equipped
with the latest machinery for the extraction of oil from whales, is
situated in the upper 'tween decks, which has a depth of 15 feet.

Three other whaling vessels, the TV. T. Nielsen Alonzo, the Sir
J. C. Ross, and the C. A. Larsen, also transited the Canal in the early
part of this month, bound for the Antarctic, and another fleet, consisting
of the Southern Princess and five whale catchers, passed through from
the Atlantic on September 25.

Record Trip to Manila Reported.

Statement has been made by the Barber Steamship Lines, Inc.,
that the new twin-screw motor ship Tai Ping, which transited the
Canal on August 8, 1929, on her maiden voyage in the trade between
the United States and the Far East, arrived at Manila on September
5th,. having made the passage from New York to that port in the
record time of 35 days, from Newport News in 34 days, and from
San Pedro in 19 days. The motor ship Tai Yang, a sister vessel of
the Tai Ping, which is also entering this trade, sailed from New York
on September 28th, and is due to arrive at the Canal the early part
of this month.

The Tai Ping is 462 feet long, 60.6 feet beam, and of 9,894 gross tons.
She carried 5,331 tons of general cargo on her first voyage in this trade.





THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



135



Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing
from Port of Cristobal, C. Z., from September 10 to September 24, 1929.



Name of vessel.



Buenaventura

Linda S

Calamares

Martha

Uribe

Heluan

Stuyvesant

Metapan

Smaragd

Corinto

Sachsen

Atlantian

Ebro

London Importer ....

Ancon

Suriname

Coppename

William M

Cid

San Mateo

Stuyvesant

Atlantida

Atago Maru

Phrygia

Glamorganshire

Caldas

Loriga

Oropesa

Macabi

Somme

Wanks

Cartago

Durazzo

Calamares

Manizales

Salvador

Essequibo

Santa Cecelia

Alvarado

Bodegraven

Pastorea

Albert Vogler

Havana Maru

Ecuador

Hessen

Linda S

Indiana

Santa Teresa

Narenta

Sixaola

Gymerc

Saramacca

Peru

Perou

Emil Kerdorf

Esparta

Baralt

Cauca

Atlantian

Belgian Maru

Inapaquina

Suriname

Portland

Dintledyk

Amapala

Oklahoma

West Camargo

Sosua

Orazio

Stella

Annetta I

City of San Francisco

Murla

Manaqui

Parismina

Inapaquina

Wanks

Cali

Galicia



Line or charterer.



Panama R. R. S. S. Line . .

Feuiilebois

United Fruit Co

Decruet

Estrada G. Hermanos ...
Hamburg-.American Line . .

Royal Neth. S. S. Co

United Fruit Co

United Fruit Co

Panama Mail S. S. Co . . . .
Hamburg-American Line . .

Leyland^. S. Line

Pacific Steam Nav. Co ... .

Furness, Withy & Co

Panama R. R. S. S. Line .

United Fruit Co

United Fruit Co

Feuiilebois

Pacific Steam Nav. Co ... .

United Fruit Co

Royal Neth. S. S. Co

Standard Fruit Co

Nippon Yusen Kaisha . .
Hamburg- American Line . .

Royal Mails. P. Co

National Navigation Co . . .
Pacific Steam Nav. Co ... .
Pacific Steam Nav. Co . . .

United Fruit Co

United States Army .
Standard Fruit & S. S. Co

United Fruit Co

Hamburg-American Line . .

United Fruit Co

North German Lloyd

Pacific Steam Nav. Co ... .
Pacific Steam Nav. Co ... .

Grace Line

Pacific Steam Nav. Co ... .
Royal Neth. S. S. Line .

United Fruit Co

Hamburg-.American Line . .

Nippon Yusen Kaisha

Panama Mail S. S. Line, . .
Hamburg-American Line . .

Feuiilebois

French Line

Grace Line

Pacific Steam Nav. Co ... .

United Fruit Co

Asiatic Petroleum Co

United Fruit Co

East Asiatic Co

French Line

Hamburg-American Line . .

United Fruit Co

RoyalNeth. S. S. Co. ...
National Navigation Co. ,

Leyland S. S. Line

Nippon Yusen Kaisha

United Fruit Co

United Fruit Co

Hamburg-American Line . .
Holland-American Line, , . .
Standard Fruit & S. S. Co.

French Line

McCormick S. S. Line

United Fruit Co

Italian Line

Panama Mail S. S. Co

Tagarapulos

Panama Mail S. S. Co

North German Lloyd

United Fruit Co

United Fruit Co

United Fruit Co

Standard Fruit & S. S. Co.

North German Lloyd'

Hamburg- American Line . .
' No cargo discharged.



Arrived.



September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September
September



Departed.



September 7 . .
September 10.
September 11 .
September 12.
September 15.
September 1 1 .
September 1 1 .
September 12 .
September 15,
September 15 ,
September 12,
September 12.
September 13 ,
September 13 .
September 16.
September 13 .
September 13.
September 13 .
September 13 .
September 14 .
September 14 .
September 14 ,
September 1 4 .
September 14 ,
September 15,
September 21 ,
September 14 ,
September 14 ,
September 14 ,
September 15 ,
September 15,
September 1 6 ,
September 22 ,
September 15.
September 16.
September 22 ,
September 16 ,
September 1 C ,
September 17,
September 1 7 ,
September 1 8 ,
September 1 7 ,
September 1 7 ,
September 18.
September 18,
September 18
Sei)tember 18 ,
September 18
September 19
September 19
September 20
September 19,
September 19,
September 20 ,
September 20 ,
September 21 ,
September 21 ,



September 20 ,
September 20 ,
SejJtember 20 ,
September 20
September 21
September 2 1
September 21
September 21
Sejitember 21 ,
September 22
September 22 ,
September 24 ,



September 21 ,
September 21
September 22 ,
September 22 ,
September 23



September 22
No cargo laded.



Cargo



Discharged Laded



Tons.



(■)



140
42
367
800
198



526
18



(■)



(■)



298
894



(')



311
374
142
374
259



(■)



14
103
277
540

18

21
210

20
173-

41
204
589
18(i
550
202

36



(')



(■)



512
343
175
148
618
480
264



(■)



(')



199
28
40
11
21
222
303
150



253
46
52
51

203
13

682
15

123

902
19



136



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



Name of vessel.


Line or charterer.


Arrived.


Departed.


Cargo —


Discharged


Laded.




United Fruit Co


September 22 .
September 22 ,
September 22 .
September 23 .
September 23 .
September 23 .
September 23 .
September 23 .
September 23 .
September 23 .
September 23


September 22 .
September 23 .
September 23 .


Tons.

23

246

32

401

143

5

1

1,529

394

112

(')

74

11

25

(■)

9,364


Tons.
201


Texas




(')






(')


Ulua


United Fruit Co
















September 23 .
September 23 .
September 24 .
September 24 .
September 24 .


(')




United Fruit Co


89


El Salvador

Wido


Panama Mail S. S. Co


448
141


Leme


Nav. Libera-Triestina


(')














Royal Neth. S. S. Co


September 24 .














Chileans. S. Line


September 24








September 24 .

















No cargo discharged.



' No cargo laded.



Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing
from Port of Balboa, C. Z., for Two Weeks Ending September 28, 1929.



Name of vessel.



Line or charterer.



.Arrived.



Departed.



Cargo — •



Discharged Laded



Martha

Ecuador

Havana Maru

Santa Teresa

Peru

WiUfaro

El Salvador

Patrick Henry

Caloric

Max Albrechl

Benjaoiin Franklin

Santa Rita

California

St. Mihiel

Martha

Henderson



L. I. C. Ducruit

Panama Mail S. S. Co.
Nippon Yusen Kaiska.

Grace Line

East .\siatic Line

Williams S. S. Corp

Panama Mail S. S. Co. .
U. S. Shipping Board. . .
WihI. Jebsen Bergen. . . .

Sun Oil Co

FredOlsen&Co

W. R.Grace <fe Co.....
Panama Pacific S. S. Co.

U. S. Army

Chr. Hannevig

U. S. Navy



September 14 ,
September 14
September 16,
September 19.
September 19
September 24
September 24 .
September 25
September 25 ,
September 26 .
September 26 .
September 27 .
September 27 .
September 27 .
September 25 .
September 28 .



September 15
September 15
September 17.
September 19.
September 19,
September 24
September 24 ,
September 26
September 28 .
September 26 .
September 26 .
September 27,
September 28 .

In port

September 25 .
September 29



Tons.



60

202

1

148

6

86

219

9,367

24

867



Tons.



320



197
32



Panama Mail Vessels Now Under the United States Flag.

The Panama Mail Steamship Company's motor ship, City of
San Francisco, operated in the trade between Cristobal and the west
coast of Central America and the United States, transited the Canal
from the Pacific to the Atlantic on September 21, 1929, flying the
American flag. Since induction into this service in 1924, the City of
San Francisco, and her sister ship, the City of Panama, have been
operated under the flag of Panama. The registry of the former was
transferred on her last trip to San Francisco, and that of the City of
Panama is to be changed on her next call at that port. The Corinto, in
this service, is under United States registry.

Some press comments on these changes of registry have stated
that for former Panama vessels would save considerable in Canal
tolls under American registry, as they would come under a lower
classification. Such is not the case, as commercial ships of all nations
pay tolls on an equal basis.

In addition to the above-named vessels, the Panama Mail Steamship
Company operates a fleet of passenger and cargo ships in the United
States intercoastal trade,



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL.

PUBLISHED WEEKLY.

Subscription rates, domestic, S0.50 per year; foreign, $1.00; address

The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or

The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C.

Entered as second-class matter February 6, 1918, at the Post Office

at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879.

Certificate. — By direction of the Governor of The Panama Canal the matter contained herein is published as statistical

information and is req'iired for the proper transaction of the public bjsiuess.





Volume XXIII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 9, 1929. No. 10.

Net Tonnage of Vessels Transiting the Panama Canal During the Fiscal

Year 1929.

During the fiscal year ended June 30, 1929, there were 6,395 transits
of the Panama Canal by commercial vessels, exclusive of foreign
naval vessels paying tolls on the basis of displacement tonnage
(making 18 transits). Fifty-four and two-tenths per cent of the
6,395 commercial transits were by vessels of from 4,000 to 6,000 net
tons, Panama Canal measurement, 6.4 per cent by vessels under 1,000
net tons and 4.7 per cent by vessels over 8,000 net tons, including 86
transits by vessels of over 10,000 net tons. The average net tonnage
of all transits was 4,666. X'essels of Danzig registry had the highest
average amounting to 6,247 net tons, and Colombian vessels the lowest
with an average of 386 net tons. The British ship Belgenland of 18,874
net tons, Panama Canal measurement, was the largest commercial
vessel transiting during the year.

The following tabulation shows the 6,395 commercial transits in
groups according to net tonnage, Panama Canal measurement,
segregated by nationality, together with the average tonnages and the
per cent which the total of each group formed of the total number of
transits.













NUMBER OF TRANSITS.








Panama

Canal Net

tonnage.


S 5

ca -^

c .^

£ c

<


Nationality.


>

0""


ol

o.S




^ >

c



c


3,000 to 3,999
inclusive.

4,000 to 4,999
inclusive.


05 .


u
§.s

to


c




02

a


m

c c
c ■—

or


-a
p




Totals.












11

730


"256


6
181










17

1,774

30

101

1

1

101

30

149

7

112

402

67

83

155

340

47

46

31

144

2,700

57


89,695

8,994,526

130,599

39,032

39

194

416,985

187,403

690,608

16,314

534,505

1,405,385

261,540

492,472

775,005

1,280,184

113,097

109.100

117,528

618,558

13,325,753

239,272


5,276


British


2


^ 75


42


21
• 1


196


117


66


59


29


5,070




3 26


4,353




10

1


84


'














386






















39






1
9




















194






1


15


9


85


29
5
23

1
39



3

24
42










4,129






1

22








6,247


Dutch




, 35


: ■ "5


1
1


13


13








4,635












2,331






1
86


1
33
36

7


71

87
29

90

116

8

.....

65
837
.■?.>;












4,772






64


10
1


52








1


3,496


Greek










3,904










6
61
51

""1


24

'"21
3


2
4
2




16




5,933










5,000




2

i


48
7
3


22
2
9


12

19

32

5

"38S


65

"1
15
15
51
19






1


3,765








2,406












2,372















3,791








20
106


35
699


9
380






1


4,296


United States . . .


14


33


69


49


22 55


4,935
4,198




3:
















1




Totals


373

— . —


287


505


464^2,1911,278


745




217


115


97)' 86


6,395


29,837,794


4,666




O.f


5.8


4. -5


7.9


7 31 %\ 9I on n


11.6


3.4


1.8


15 14


100.0
























138



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



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Online LibraryIsthmian Canal Commission (U.S.Panama Canal record (Volume v.23(1929-30)) → online text (page 18 of 106)