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No.

of

ships.


TONNAGE.


Tolls.


Tons
of

cargo.


Nationality.


Panama

Canal
net.


United

States

equivalent.


Registered
gross.


Registered
net.




73
1
5
6
1
7
4

19
4
3
6

11
2
2
6

96
1


377,331

4,672

S81

27,221

6,310

38,092

25,279

74,083

14,853

18,015

32,291

58,210

262

5,188

26,809

501,943

4,188


278,645

3,433

856

19,687

5,346

25,330

16,691

51,909

11,271

13,220

25,079

40,555

225

4,477

18,482

384,854

3,310


455,066

7,310

1,285

32,505

8,940

42,342

28,801

82,868

17,978

24,667

40,608

67,006

612

6,910

39,792

630,270

5,150


280,178

3,976

858

19,937

5,050

25,463

17,450

51,314

11,223

13,974

24,320

41,383

229

4,230

23,006

386,408

3,281


8348,236.05

4,291.25

900.20

24,603.75

6,632.50

31,662.50

20,863.75

64.035.S4

14,088.75

16,525.00

31,348.75

50,693.75

188.64

5,596.25

23,102.50

480,749.05

4,137.50


486,971




3,686




499




• 46,753




11,324


Dutch


53,887




25,324




98,171
29,780




13,878


Japanese

Norwegian

Panamanian


32,0S0
87,788

10,500


Swedish

United States


55,943

739,803

7,660






Total, November, 1930...


247


1,222,628


903,370


1,492,110


912,280


1,127,711.03


1,709,102


Total, November, 1929. .


254
252


1,172,321


890,898


1,471,806


892,539


1,111,802.15


1,723,741


Total, November, 1928...


1,128,257


866,882


1,426,332


872,177


1,081,676.24


1,720,878



COMBINED TRAFFIC.





No.

of

ships.


TONNAGE.


Tolls.


Tons

of
cargo.


Nationality.


Panama

Canal

net.


United

States

equivalent.


Registered
gross.


Registered
net.




'133

4

10
10

2
13

7
37

4

4
11
28

4

2

12

196

2


705,804

15,534

1,618

47,518

12,437

71,867

43,217

134,473

. 14,853

24,512

56,158

137,548

7,249

5,188

54,195

1,031,840

7,476


516,219
10,270

1,574
32,526
10,614
49,231
28,703
93,208
11,271
18,125
46,249
96,790

4,203

4,477
38,059
777,369

5,665


844,389

20,329

2,398

53,350

17,879

82,150

49,015

154,058

17,978

32,791

71,492

160,138

7,236

6,910

90,747

1,270,842

8,868


519,131
11,351

1.574
32\ 882
10,057
29,159
29,738
93,334
11,223
19,102
45,607
97,156

4,302

4,230
46,508
778,834

5,554


=1623,429.51

12,837.50

1,769.50

40,657.50

11,093.94

61,638.75

35,878.75

114,079.04

14,088.75

22,656.25

55,632.75

111,653.08

5,156.79

5,506.25

43,676.40

931,631.35

7,081.25


615,211




7,213




1,428




60,296




11,324


Dutch


74,731




35,238




130,358




29,780




20,122




55,107




113,666




4,039




10,500




72,381




1.009,268




12,537






Total, November, 1930...


479


2,371,487


1,744,553


2,890,570


1,759,792


2,098,357.36


2,263,200


Total, November, 1929. . .


525


2,498,906


1,883,652


3,116,040


1,887,001


2,244,895.94


2,534,631


Total, November, 1928...


527


2,468,297


1,877,058


3,078,578


1,882,770


2,225,937.48


2,501,630



1 Includes naval vessel of 5,730 displacement tons.



Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing
from Port of Balboa, C. Z., for Week Ending December 6, 1930.



Name of vessel.


Line or charterer.






Departed.


Cargo — ■




Discharged


Laded.










Tons.


Tons.
31






December 1.
December 2.
December 2.
December 2.
December 2.
December 3.
December 4.




December 1..
December 2..
December 3..
December 3..
December 3..
December 4..
December 5..


165

3

213

(')

12

175

228




Acajutla


Pacific Steam Navigation Co






Panama Mail S . S . Co

Panama Mail S. S. Co

Westfal, Larsen & Co

United Fruit Co




Ecuador










N. 0.& S. A. S.S.Co


189

















43 tons and 1 automobile.



278



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



December 10, 1930



United States Intercoastal Traffic by Commodities lor November, 1930.

The following table shows the cargo carried through the Canal in
the United States intercoastal trade, segregated by commodities and
by direction, with the total for November, 1930, and the totals for
November. 1929 and 1928. Cargo statistics are compiled from cargo
declarations submitted by masters of vessels, and in these declarations
small items are frequently grouped under the designation "General
cargo." These statistics are accordingly not precise, but they are
indicative of the kind and quantity of the cargo in transit through the
Canal. These figures represent tons of 2,240 pounds and are for the
United States intercoastal trade only:





Atlantic

to
Pacific.


Pacific
to

Atlantic.


Total.




9
1,201


8

75

1,893

1,175


17




1,276


Alfalfa


1,893






1,175




36

732

144

2,973

3,835


36






732




125

81

59

12

120

582

5,554

78

687


269




3,054




3,894




12


Bark




120






582




408


5,962




78






687




604
78
75


604




62

17

7,470

33,333

206

454


140




75




17


Canned:

Fish


232

575

183

45

1.359

771

1,560

51


7,702


Fruit


33,508




389


Milk


499




1,359




8,542
6,460


9,313




8,920




51




452
5


452




129
38

1,198
60

1,500
75


124




38




789
62


1,987




122


Coal


1,500






75




492
127


492


Coffee


333
660

69


460


Coke


660


Cold storage:

Beef




69




35

4


35




200

34

1,112

405


204


Fish


34


Other




1,112






405




7


7


Cork


71
919

51

1,395

226


71




1,482


2,401




51




560
40
34


1,955




266




34




35
22
151

205


35






22


Flour


6,026

10,736
21


6,177


Fruit:


16,941




21




57

673

47,904

946


57




91

11,559

223

40

65

85

2,431


764




59,463




1,169


Glue


40




12
636


1 1




721


Hjv


2,431



December 10, 1930



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



279



Hemp

Honey

Hops

Inf asorial earth

Ink

Lard substitute

Leather

Linoleum

Liquors

Lumber

Malt

Manufactured goods:

Iron and steel

Machinery

Railroad material

Tinplate

Textiles

Miscellaneous

Marble

Matches

Metals:

Copper

Iron

Lead

Scrap

Tin

Zinc

Milk, powdered

Molasses

Musical instruments

Nuts

Oats

Oils:

Crude

Gas oil, fuel oil

Gasoline, benzine, naphtha .

Lubricating and greases

Olive

Vegetable

Whale

Wood

Other

Ores:

Copper

Iron

Magnesite

Manganese

Paint

Paper

Paper pulp

Paper roofing

Peanuts

Peas

Phosphates

Porcelain

Rags

Rice

Rope

Rosin

Rubber:

Manufactured

Scrap

Salt

Sand

Seeds:

Grass

Hemp

Other

Shells

Silk

Skins and hides

Slate

Soap

Soda

Soda ash

Soda, bicarbonate

Soda, caustic

Starch

Sugar

Sulphur

Syrup

Talc

Tallow

Tar

Tea



Atlantic

to
Pacific.



28
1,551



390
117

707
33

64,818

6,550

211

7,356

2,073

4,120

10

207



1,712
25
305



168
30



11

5,291

3

269



55
375

5,468



1,231
263



1,360

53

493

546



133

748



821



703

2,813

567

741

171

154

59

28

4,600

60



107



Pacific

to

Atlantic.



226
286
100
385



114
131,219

7

991
352



141

3,075



3,153



447
177
28
489
597



362
100



46,133

223,291

266



1,400



54



1,033
9,415
8,405



175

247

4

60



197

24

423



1,268
1,874



57



44
293



Total.



294

286

100

385

28

1,551

2

390

231

131,926

40

65,809

6,902

211

7,356

2,214

7,195

10

207

3,153

1,712

472

482

28

489

597

168

30

362

172

52

46,133

223,302

5,557

3

322

12

5

31

1,400

31

54

55

1,408

14,883

8,405

75

38

31

1,231

438

247

1,364

113

493

633
50
133

748



197

24

423

821

1,268

1,874

703

2,870

567

741

171

154

59

4,473

4,600

60

44

293

107

13



280



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



December 10, 1930





Atlantic

to
Pacific.


Pacific
to

Atlantic.


Total.




1,445
35
15
65


61


1,506


Toys


35




8
95


15




73




95


Wax ...


74


74


Wheat


559

244

1,639


559




6


250


Wool .


1,639




44


44






Total, November, 1930


193,552


552,595


746,147






Total, November, 1929


283,399


679,156


962,555






Total, November, 1928


234,851


638,489


873,340







Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing
from Port of Cristobal, C. Z., for Week Ending November 30, 1930.



Name of vessel.


Line or charterer.


Arrived.


Departed.


Cargo —


Discharged


Laded.








November 23 .
November 23 .


Tons.


Tons.
697


Cali








234




United Fruit Co






52


Ulua


United Fruit Co


November 23.
November 23 .
November 24 .
November 24 .
November 24 .
November 24.
November 24 .


November 23.
November 24 .
November 24 .
November 24.
November 24.
November 25.
November 26.


38

11,698

112

268
(■)
(■)

478


441




CD. Mallory & Co


( a )


Canadian Leader


Canandian National Steamships. . .


(')













185




United Fruit Co


43f






611




Royal Netherlands S. S. Co


November 25.
November 25.
November 25 .
November 25.
November 25 .
November 26.
November 26 .
November 26 .
November 26.
November 26.
November 26.
November 26.
November 26.
November 26.
November 27.
November 27.


November 25.
November 25.
November 25.
November 26 .
November 28.
November 26.
November 26.
November 27.
November 27.
November 26.
November 26.
November 27.
November 27.
November 27.
November 27.
November 28 .
November 28 .
November 29.
November 29.
November 29.
November 29.
November 29.
November 30.
November 30 .
November 30 .
November 30.
November 29.
November 29 .
November 29.
November 29.
November 29.
November 30.
November 30.
November 30.


230

18

1

186

133

150

76

500

458

26

126

844

116

113

158

452


148


Theodore Roosevelt. . .


FredOIsen&Co

Royal Netherlands S. S. Co


32
10


Cuba


233






132


Teno.




C)




N.O. &S.A. S.S.Co


166






374






10






CO




United Fruit Co


4


Tai Yang




49






132




Royal Netherlands S. S. Co


19




(')






150


Lochgoil

Orduna

Simon Bolivar

Amapala


Pacific Steam Navigation Co

Royal Netherlands S. S. Co

Standard Fruit & S. S. Co


November 28.
November 28 .
November 28.
November 28.
November 28.
November 28.
November 28.
November 28.
November 28.
November 29.
November 29.
November 29.
November 29.
November 29.
November 29.
November 29 .
November 30.
November 30.
November 30.
November 30.
November 30.


88
3
3

268

(0

542
27

613|

730

(')

(')

41

35

79

315
(■)
11

106
79

180
43


118

139
366
100






10






486




North German Lloyd

Panama R. R. S. S. Line


59


Buenaventura


18
20




United Fruit Co


261






(')






(')




United Fruit Co


52


Nictheroy




120
377


Calamares

Buenos Aires


United Fruit Co


509


Italian S. S. Line

National Navigation Co

Canadian National Steamships. . . .


November 30.
November 30.
November 30.






257


Canadian Highlander .


(')
734










1 No cargo disci


iarged . 'No cargo laded .


■> One package









Ships' Chandlery Supplies.

Panama Canal storehouses stock a complete
line of ships' chandlery supplies available for sale



to shipping at cost prices plus 25 per cent sur-
charge, which surcharge includes freight, hand-
ling, and other costs.





THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL.

PUBLISHED WEEKLY.

Subscription rates, domestic, $0.50 per year; foreign, $1.00; address

The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or

The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C.

Entered as second-class matter February 6, 1918, at the Post Office

at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879.

Certificate.— By direction of the Governor of The Panama Canal the matter contained herein is published as statistical

information and is required for the proper transaction of the public business.

Volume XXIV. Balboa Heights, C. Z., December 17, 1930. No. 20.

Cargo Through the Canal During November, 1930.

On pages 284 and 285 of this issue will be found tables showing the
origin and destination of cargo passing through the Canal in November,
1930. This cargo, segregated according to direction, as compared
with November, 1929, and the differences, are shown in the following
tabulation :





November,
1929.


November,
1930.


Difference.




Long tons.
810,890
1,723,741


Long tons.
554,098
1,709,102


Long tons.
—256,792




— 14,639






Total


2,534,631


2,263,200


—271 431







It will be noted above that the Atlantic to Pacific tonnage de-
creased 256,792 tons (31.7 per cent), as compared with November,
1929, and that from the Pacific to the Atlantic decreased 14,639 tons
(0.85 per cent), making a total decrease of cargo tonnage in both
directions of 271,431 tons (10.7 per cent). As has been pointed out
in several previous reports the general decline in Pacific-bound
tonnage has been due to a general curtailment in shipments in this
direction. These shipments reached a particularly low ebb last
month when the tormage in this direction was the lightest since
August, 1924, when 531,703 long tons were passed through. Tonnage
in the opposite direction showed less than 1 per cent decrease under
November, 1929, accounted for by increases in the shipments of
several important food commodities, which almost completely absorbed
the losses in other important products.

ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC CARGO MOVEMENT.

Origin. — Sixty-three and three-tenths per cent of the cargo tonnage
from the Atlantic to the Pacific originated on the eastern and Gulf
seaboards of the United States, and 28.9 per cent in Europe. Tonnage
from the United States decreased 200,544 tons (36.4 per cent) in
comparison with November, 1929, and that from Europe declined
31,873 tons (16.6 per cent). The proportion of the total tonnage
originating in the United States was also lower in November, 1930,
than in November, 1929, while the proportionate amount coming
from Europe was greater.

Destination. — Forty-six per cent of the Pacific-bound cargo tonnage
was destined to the United States; 19.7 per cent to Asia; 15.9 per cent
to South America; and 10.1 per cent to Australasia. Tonnage to all
these areas declined as compared with November, 1929, as follows:
To the United States, 92,004 tons (26.5 per cent); to Asia, 75,073
tons (40.6 per cent); to South America, 35,194 tons (28.6 per cent);
and to Australasia, 45,092 tons (44.7 per cent). With respect to the



282



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



December 17, 1930



porportion of the cargo tonnage to these various areas to the total
Pacific-bound tonnage, increases were registered in that to United
States and South America, while that to Asia and Australasia de-
creased.

PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC CARGO MOVEMENT.

Origin. — Of the cargo moving in this direction, 50.3 per cent came
from the United States; 28.3 per cent from South America; 13.9 per
cent from Canada; 3.9 per cent from Australasia; and 2.6 per cent
from Asia. The amounts coming from Canada, Australasia, and Asia
showed relative as well as actual increases of 67,811 tons (40.1 per
cent); 30,938 tons (85.4 per cent); and 9,455 tons (27.1 per cent),
respectively, as compared with November, 1929. Tonnage from
the United States and South America decreased relatively as well as
in actual tonnage in the amounts of 102,780 tons (10.7 per cent) and
35,178 tons (6.8 per cent). The large increase in the shipments of
wheat was principally responsible for the large increase of cargo
originating in Canada.

Destination. — Segregated according to destination, 47.4 per cent of
the cargo tonnage moving from the Pacific to the Atlantic went to the
United States, and 48.2 per cent to Europe. Tonnage to Europe
increased 174,374 tons (26.8 per cent) as compared with November,
1929, as did the percentage of the total. That to the United States
decreased 178,089 tons (18 per cent) in comparison with November,
1929. The decreased tonnage to the United States was principally
due to curtailed shipments of mineral oils, lumber, and ores (princi-
pally iron), while the increase to Europe was accounted for principally
by larger shipments of grain and fresh fruits from the Pacific Northwest.

PRINCIPAL COMMODITIES, ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC.

From the cargo declarations submitted it was possible to classify
83 per cent of the total cargo in transit through the Canal from the
Atlantic to the Pacific. The remaining 17 per cent consisted, for the
most part, of manufactured articles in small lots reported as "General
cargo."

Pacific-bound commodities which aggregated more than 10,000 tons
for November, 1929, or November, 1930, are listed in the following
tabulation, showing differences:



Commodity.



November,


November


1929.


1930.


Long tons.


Long tons.


17,802


10,165


18,983


4,552


36,536


24,885


28,844


11,182


39,360


25,819


199,394


109,209


15,637


15,236


15,702


7,250


20,246


19,856


10,347


6,013


17,682


8,608


46,057


39,342


18,988


13,202


23,202


21,451


13,225


4,607


10,861


8,625



Difference.



Ammonia

Automobiles

Cement

Coal and coke

Cotton

Manufactured goods:

Iron and steel.. . .

Machinery

Railroad material

Tinplate

Textiles

Miscellaneous. . . .

Mineral oils

Paper

Phosphates

Sulphur

Tobacco



Long tons.
-7,637
-14,431
-11,651
-17,662
-13,541

-90,185
-401
-8,452
-390
-4,334
-9,074
-6,715
-5,786
-1,751
-8,618
-2,236



The above 16 commodity groups for November, 1930, comprise
59.5 per cent of the cargo moving from the Atlantic to the Pacific.
All of the items showed decreases in comparison with November, 1929.



December 17, 1930



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



283



PRINCIPAL COMMODITIES, PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC.

From the cargo declarations submitted it was possible to classify
almost 99 per cent of the cargo moving from the Pacific to the Atlantic
during the month of November, 1930. Commodities which aggre-
gated more than 10,000 tons either during the past month or the
corresponding month in 1929 are listed below:



Commodity.



November,


November,


1929.


1930.


Long tons.


Long tons.


22,210


20,944


10,145


6,941


98,019


93,928


15,938


24,827


10,929


7,991


8,298


10,102


40,793


46,693


14,405


38,367


266,994


195,273


62,422


45,443


211,554


226,197


485,583


408,065


183,667


137,429


6,989


11,216


6,948


11,139


35,639


69,724


121,984


221,309



Difference.



Barley

Beans

Canned goods (fish, fruit, vegetables, etc.)

Cold storage (food products) *

Cotton

Flour

Fruit, dried

Fruit, fresh

Lumber

Metals, various

Nitrates

Oils, mineral

Ores (principally iron)

Paper

Paper pulp

Sugar

Wheat



Long Ions.
-1,266
-3,204
-4,091
+8,889
—2,938
+1,804
+5,900
+23,962
-71,721
-16,979
+14,643
-77,518
-46,238
+4,227
+4,191
+34,085
+99,325



1 Does not include fresh fruit.

The above 17 commodity groups for November, 1930, comprise
02.2 per cent of the cargo moving from the Pacific to the Atlantic.
Nine of the items showed increases and 8 decreases. The heaviest
increases were in shipments of wheat, fresh fruits, and sugar, while
mineral oils, lumber, and ores (principally iron) registered rather
heavy decreases.

(Continued on next page.)



New Libera Liner Due Here on December 26.

The passenger and cargo steamer California, acquired some months
ago by the Navigazione Libera Triestina (Libera Line) from the
Cunard Line, is due to arrive at Cristobal on December 26, 1930, on
her maiden voyage in the former company's service between Medi-
terranean ports and the Pacific coast of North America. The new
vessel, which is 523 feet long, 64 feet beam, and of 12,768 gross tons,
20,000 tons displacement, is to be operated at a speed of 14 knots,
and will afford a 25 -day service between Mediterranean ports and the
Pacific coast. Accommodations are provided for 138 first-class and
24 second-class passengers.

On her homeward journey from the Pacific coast, the new vessel is to
by utilized by the American Express Company in the initial phase of a
comprehensive tour of Southern Europe. The party will sail from
Pacific coast ports in January next, after the vessel has made calls at
Vancouver, Portland, San Francisco, and Los Angeles, sailing from the
latter port January 30th.

The California is the largest vessel yet to be placed in the service
between Europe and the Pacific coast of North America, which ranks
as the second largest trade serving the Panama Canal. The vessel,
which was formerly the Albania, was previously operated in the trans-
Atlantic service.



284



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



December 17, 19S0



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Online LibraryIsthmian Canal Commission (U.S.Panama Canal record (Volume v.24 (1930-31)) → online text (page 41 of 109)