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over forty-five a year, or nearly four a month.

Notices to Mariners.

The Panama Canal, Executive Department,

Balboa Heights, C. Z., May 12, 1932.
No. 1073.

Caribbean Sea, Serra?ia Bank, Southwest Cay light, normal characterise restored.
The following is quoted from "The Daily Memorandum" of the U. S. Hydrographic
office, dated Washington, D. C, May 3, 1932:

The Lighthouse Service announces that Southwest Cay light, Serrana Bank, was restored to its
normal characteristic on April 25, 1932.

The normal characteristic of Serrana Bank light is: Flashing white, period 5 seconds; flash 0.5 second;
eclipse 4.5 seconds.

Position: 14" 16' 26" N., 80° 23' 50" W.

Notice to Mariners No. 1058, Balboa Heights, dated April 28, 1932, is hereby canceled.

H. Burgess,

Governor.



The Panama Canal, Executive Department,

Balboa Heights, C. Z., May 12, 1932.
No. 1074.

Central America, Costa Rica, Nicoya Gulf, Puntarenas approach, lights established.
The second officer of the S. S. Santa Ana reports the establishment of lights in the
Gulf of Nicoya as of May 9, 1932, to be as follows:

Negritas Island: Flashing white, 1 flash every 6 seconds. Approximate position: 9° 49' 15" N.,
84° 50' 30" W.

Caiio Islet: Flashing white, 1 flash every 10 seconds. Approximate position: 9° 37' 20" N., 84°
40' 00" W.

Blanca Islet: Framework constructed but light not yet in place. Approximate position: 9° 32' 00"
N.. 85° 06' 30" W.

(See Notice to Mariners, Balboa Heights, No. 1038, dated March 14, 1932.)

Central America, Salvador, La Libertad, light reported extinguished. The second officer of the S. S.
Santa Ana reports that the fixed white light on the pier at La Libertad was not burning on the night of
May 7, 1932. The flashing white light on the same pier was burning, however. Approximate position:
13° 28' 40" N.. 89° 19' 20" W. ^

(See Notice to Mariners No. 1023, Balboa Heights, dated February 2, 1932.)

H. Burgess,

Governor.



594



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



May 18, 19SM



No. 1075.



Notice to Mariners.

The Panama Canal, Executive Department,

Balboa Heights, C. Z., May 16, 1932.

Aids to Navigation.



Panama Canal, Pacific entrance and Gaillard Cut:

1. The inner and outer yacht channel spar buoys, Pacific entrance, permanently
discontinued, effective May 12, 1932.

2. Balboa yacht club channel Nun buoy, Pacific entrance, established, effective
May 12, 1932.

3. Wreck spar buoy replaced Nun buoy on wreck of sand barge between buoys
No. 9 and 11 on west side of Pacific channel, effective May 10, 1932.

4. Bank light at Station 1881-W, Gaillard Cut, permanently discontinued, and
bank light at Station 1879-W, Gaillard Cut, temporarily discontinued, due to
dredging operations, effective this date.

H. Burgess,

Governor.



Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing
from Port of Cristobal, C. Z., for Week Ending May 14, 1932.



Name of vessel.


Line or charterer.


Arrived.


Departed.


Cargo-


Discharged


Laded.




Panama R. R. S. S. Line




May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May


8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

9

9

9

9

9

10

11

12

12

12

12

13

13

13

13


Tons.


Tons.
384










105




Royal Netherlands S. S. Co






414




United Fruit Co






73




United Fruit Co






538




Colombian S. S. Line


May
May

May


8
8
8


32
129
16


3531






(■)






(')






32




States S.S. Co


May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May




9
9
9
9
10
11
11
11
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
13
14
14
14
14
14
14
14


36

613

396

82

113

23

1,072

2

70

284

50

400

88

216

981

5,453

188

383

269

34

394

5

103

7

216

3


(')




United Fruit Co


13




Grace Line


20






(■)






10


Dinteldijk


Holland-America Line


119




Panama Mail S. S. Co


15




French Line


441






54


Haarlem


Royal Netherlands S. S. Co

French Line


53




13


San Francisco

Alda


Hamburg-American Line


243
309


Santa Barbara


Grace Line

Panama R. R. S. S. Lme


331




United Fruit Co


May
May
May
May


13
13
13
14


(•)




United Fruit Co


121






2




Standard Fruit & Steamship Co. . .


176








United Fruit Co








United Fruit Co












Troja


Hamburg- American Line








May


14


(')


R L Hustler










May


14


708













No cargo laded.



Density of Water in Balboa and Cristobal Harbors.



Place.



Weight of sea water in ounces per cubicf t.



Average.



Maximum.



Minimum,



Rainy season.
Average tempera- i
ture. Degrees F. '■<



Cristobal (between docks 8 and 9) .
Balboa (dock 18)



1018
1011



1020
1021



1013
1005



84.0
83.0



(Note.— The above is based on two months' observations at Cristobal and Balboa . Average taken at 12-foot depth.
Minimum occurred after heavy rain at 3-foot depth at Cristobal and 12-foot depth at Balboa. The weight of a cubic
foot of fresh water at 85° F . is 995 ounces.



Mayl8,ms THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 595

Lubricating Oils.

The Panama Canal, Supply Department,

Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 7, 1931.

To all concerned. — For the Information of all concerned there is submitted herewith
a list of the different kinds of lubricating oil carried in stock at Panama Canal
storehouses, and a brief description of each of the oils together with a statement of
the purpose for which they are generally used.

Requisitions and orders for oils placed with the storekeepers should state the name
(including number, if any) of the oil desired exactly as given on the following list.

R. R. Watson,
Chief Quartermaster,
STATEMENT OF STANDARD LUBRICATING OILS AND THEIR USES.

OILS, FORCE FEED AND MOTOR CYLINDER.

Medium, M-2135. — A medium oil for the lubrication of main turbines not driving through reduction
gears, dynamos, and small internal combustion engines. Not to be used for steam cylinder lubrication.

Heavy, H-2190. — A heavy oil that will separate quickly from water. For the lubrication of turbines
with reduction gears, medium size internal combustion engines, and forced feed on main engines. A
heavy bodied oil for use on auxiliary equipment.

Extra heavy, E H-2250. — An extra heavy oil for the lubrication of medium size internal combustion
engines, power cylinders, air compressors, and bearings of Diesel engines.

Ultra heavy, U H-2310. — An ultra heavy oil for the lubrication of power cylinders, air compressors,
and bearings of large Diesel engines.

Diesel engine lubricating. — For Diesel engines.

OILS, MISCELLANEOUS.

Ammonia cylinder (gun and ice machine grade No. 125). — A refined petroleum oil without the
admixture of fatty oils, resins, soap, or other compounds not derived from petroleum. For the lubri-
cation of the cylinders of ice machines, pneumatic tools, and hydraulic systems.

Car and locomotive. — A lubricant on journals of all cars, passenger coaches, steam and electric loco-
motives.

Castor. — Grade "A." Used for lubricating purposes of the highest grade.

Cutrite, soluble cutting. — A mixture of soluble alkali soap in mineral and fixed soponifiable oils. For
use in turret lathes and bolt machines.

Fish. — Used as a rust preventive for preserving boiler tubes.

Lard. — For use on pipe cutting and threading machines.

Insulating. — Switch (Electrical Division.)

Insulating. — Transformer (Electrical Division).

Lubricant (gear, chain and wire rope). — For lubrication and protection of chains, wire rope, and gears
of cranes, dredges, steam shovels, etc.

Machine, odorless. — For use on typewriters.

Marine engine, No. 4065, compounded. — A compound of mineral with vegetable oil for the lubrication
of reciprocating engines and auxiliaries where oiling is done by hand or through wick feed or drop oilers,
also for thrust bearings. Must not be used for circulating of forced feed systems.

Mineral steam cylinder. No. 5150. — For use on reciprocating steam engiHes using dry saturated
steam. For noncondensing steam engine cylinder lubrication (valve oil).

Mineral steam cylinder, superheated. — For use on reciprocating steam engines using superheated
steam.

Neatsfoot. — For softening and preserving leather.

Solvent. — Rust -preventing lubricant, for general use.

Sperm. — Used principally by U. S. Navy.



Current Net Prices on Fuel Oil, Diesel Oil, Information from American Consuls.

and Coal. The Consular officers of the United States at
Bunker fuel oil is delivered to vessels at either seaports all over the world are ex officio repre-
Cristobal or Balboa, from tanks of The Panama sentatives of The Panama Canal for the purpose
Canal, for $1.00 per barrel of 42 gallons; Diesel of furnishing information to shipping and allied
oil, at Balboa only, $1.50 per barrel of 42 gallons. interests as to conditions, charges, etc., at the
Bunker fuel oil and Diesel oil are also sold by Panama Canal affecting the operation of ships.
private companies with tanks at the Canal The current publications of The Panama Canal
terminals, at prices which will be quoted by them of interest to shipping are furnished to the Con-
on application. The prices at present are as sular officers and filed for reference,
follows: Fuel oil, 90 cents per barrel at Cristobal It is not desired that inquiries of a general
and Balboa; Diesel oil, $1.45 per barrel at Cristo- nature be addressed to the Consular officers, or
bal and Balboa. that they be burdened with requests which should
Coal, bunker. Navy Standard Pool No. 1, be made direct to The Panama Canal; but
Pocahontas or New River, is supplied to steam- ships' operators who may not be sufficiently
ships, including warships of all nations, trimmed advised as to charges, supplies, facilities, etc.,
in bunkers at $6.25 for run-of-mine and $5.25 for at the Canal will always save time by applying to
nut and slack at Cristobal, in any proportion the nearest American Consul,
desired, and $9.25 at Balboa for run-of-mine only, ^^^___^_^___
per ton of 2,240 pounds. __ , . _ . j ^ -.^^

Extra charges are made in accordance with a Provisions Required by Ships.
published tariff for special trimming at the request The Panama Canal Commissary Division, with
of the officers of the ship, for galley, lump, or run- facilities at Balboa and Cristobal for delivery of
of-mine coal in sacks, and for delivery, wlien coal supplies to steamships, carries a complete line of
is furnished from lighters or launches away from provisions, such as meats, fruits, vegetables, eggs,
the coaling piers. butter, canned goods, cigars, cigarettes, tobacco.
Coal for cargo is sold under the same conditions etc., which are sold to ships at reasonable prices,
and at prices quoted for sale of coal for bunkers. Beef especially is available at low prices, hind-
Coal can be bunkered by bunkering machines quarters selling at 141 cents per pound and
at any rate up to 1,500 tons per hour, regulated forequarters at 12 cents per pound,
by the amount of necessary trimming. Oil deliv- Orders may be placed in advance by radio for
eries can be made up to 5,500 barrels per hour, delivery on arrival, or at either terminal for
rate depending on gravity of oil, location of shore prompt delivery or for delivery at the other
tanks, and ship's facilities for handling. terminal after transit.



596



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



May 18, 19S2



Prices of Miscellaneous Supplies at Panama Canal Storehouses.

The following are prices, including the 25 per cent surcharge, to
individuals and companies, effective March 28, 1932.



Commoditiea.

Brass, bar, average

Brass, sheet, average

Bronze, Tobin, average

Gasoline, motor grade

Metal, yellow

Oakum, Navy, spun

Oakum, Navy, unspun

Oil, fuel, at Balboa and Cristobal, in bulk, no surcharge

Oil, ammonia, cylinder

Oil, burning, Colza

Oil, engine, gas, in drums, Gulftriton Med. No. 2135

Oil, engine, gas, extra heavy, in cases, Gulftriton No. 2250. .
Oil, engine, gas, extra heavy, in drums, Gulftriton, No. 2250

Oil, kerosene, in drums

Oil, marine engine

Paint, lead, white, dry

Paint, lead, white, in oil

Paint, zinc oxide, dry

Paint, zinc oxide, in oil

Grease, gear, chain and wire rope, lubricating

Grease, yellow, cup. No. 3

Grease, yellow, cup. No. 5

Soda, ash

Waste, cotton, colored

Waste, cotton, white



Unit.



Price.



Lb.


$0.24


Lb.


.24


Lb.


.24


Gal.


.10


Lb.


.23


Lb.


.16


Lb.


.15


Bbl.of42gal3.


1.50


Gal.


.28


Gal.


1.06


Gal.


.33


Gal.


.45


Gal.


.38


Gal.


.07


Gal.


.49


Lb.


.14


Lb.


.11


Lb.


.10


Lb.


.11


Lb.


.05


Lb.


.08


Lb.


.09


Lb.


.03


Lb.


.09


Lb.


.15



Location of Patients and Visiting Hours, at Gorgas Hospital.

The following table shows the distribution of patients in the Gorgas
hospital buildings and the visiting hours for the various wards and
sections :



Section and Ward.


Visiting Hours.


Section"A:"


Daily, 9.30 to 11.00 a. m.; 2.00 to 4.30 p. m.; 6.30 to 8.00


Ward 3, American male, eye, ear, noee and throat


p. m.
Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, 2.30 to 4.30 p. m..




6.30 to 7.30 p. m. Sundays and holidays, 9.30 to 11.00
a. m.; 2.00 to 4.00 p. m.
Daily, same as Ward 2 (above).


Section "B:"

Ward 5, Male, private rooms, American boys

Ward 6, Foreign, male and female, private rooms,


Daily, 9.30 to 11.00 a. m.; 2.00 to 4.30 p. m.; 6.30 to 8.00






Ward 8, Obstetrical department, white females


No visitors permitted in nursery.


Section "C:"

Ward 9, Colored, male




Ward 10, White foreign, male






Wednesdays, Fridays, Sundays and holidays, 1.30 to 3.00


Ward 12, Colored, male (medical)




Ward 13, Colored, male, G. U




Ward 14, White, male, G. U


Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays,


Section "D:"


2.30 to 4.30 p. m.
1 Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays and holidays.




■ 2.30 to 4.30 p. m.; 6.30 to 7.30 p. m. Sundays and


Ward 17, Colored children


J holidays, 9.30 to 11.00 a. m.

Wednesdays, Fridays, Sundays, and holidays, 1.30 to 3.00


Ward 18, White children


p. m.
Daily, 9. 30 to 11.00 a. m.; 2.00 to 4.00 p. m.


Ward 19, Colored, female (medical)


1 Wednesdays, Fridays, Sundays and holidays, 1.30 to 3.00


Ward 20, Colored, female, surgical, obstetrical




Thursdays, Sundays and holidays, 1.30 to 3.00 p. m.



Permission to visit outside of visiting hoxirs may be granted upon application to the Superintendent's Office.
Inmiediate relatives of seriously ill patients will be admitted at any time by and in the discretion of the attending
physician, section nurse, and in her absence, the nurse in charge.



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL.

PUBLISHED WEEKLY.

Subscription rates, domestic, $0.50 per year; foreign, SI. 00; address

The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or

The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C.

Entered as second-class matter February 6, 1918, at the Post OflSce

at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879.

Certificate. — By direction of the Governor of The Panama Canal the matter contained herein is published as statistical

information and is required for the proper transartion of the public business.

Volume XXV.





Balboa Heights, C. Z., May 25, 1932.



No. 43.



Comparison of Canal Traffic in April, 1932, with April Traffic in Previous

Years.

Commercial traffic through the Canal during the month of April,
1932, with 370 commercial vessels, carrying 1,443,731 tons of cargo,
was the lowest April traffic with respect to these two features (number
of transits and tons of cargo carried) since 1922, when 230 commercial
vessels carrying 1,046,047 tons were passed through. The net tonnage
(Panama Canal measurement) of the traffic using the Canal last month
was the lowest for April, since 1925, when the aggregate was 1,840,692
net tons on 382 vessels.

In comparison with April, 1931, commercial traffic for the past
month declined 83 transits (18.3 per cent); 429,113 net tons (18.7 per
cent) ; and 567,386 tons of cargo (28.2 per cent). In comparison with
April, 1930, there was a decrease of 119 transits (24.3 per cent);
615,404 net tons (24.8 per cent); and 1,013,051 cargo tons (41.2 per
cent).

The peak month for April traffic was in 1929, when 540 vessels,
aggregating 2,488,176 net tons, and carrying 2,719,668 tons of cargo
were passed through the Canal. In comparison with these high
figures last month's traffic showed a decrease of 33.3 per cent in
transits; 25.1 per cent in net tonnage; and 46.9 per cent in cargo carried.

In the tabulation below are shown the number of transits, net ton-
nage (Panama Canal measurement), and the tons of cargo carried
through the Canal during the month of April each year from 1915 to
1932, inclusive, and for comparison the monthly averages for the
corresponding fiscal year ending June 30 following:





Month of April.


Fiscal year.


Average per month for fiscal year.


Calendar year.


Commer-
cial
transits.


Panama
Canal net
tonnage.


Tons

of
cargo.


Commer-
cial
transits.


Panama
Canal net
tonnage.


Tons

of
cargo.


1915


■121
75
150
173
161
220
227
230
404
403
382
425
464
531
540
489
453
370


404,561

233,990

524,091

542,145

480,867

822,471

955,503

974,833

2,007,690

2,053,171

1,840,692

2,048,247

2,224,500

2,384,491

2,488,176

2,479,096

2,292,805

1,863,692


521,169

366,784

628,169

627,358

506,929

867,521

907,613

1,046,047

2,187,145

2,158,721

1,950,902

2,237,567

2,429,807

2,473,884

2,719,668

2,456,782

2,011,117

1,443,731


1915

1916


'102
63
150
172
169
206
241
228
331
436
389
433
456
538
534
515
461

3 381


361,197

199,687

483,213

547,839

510,416

712,170

951,323

951,455

1,550,482

2,179,073

1,904,506

2,064,549

2,185,651

2,454,886

2,468,483

2,498,385

2,316,012

1,992,531


465,567
257,843
588 213


1916


1917


1917


1918


1918




1919


1919


576,385
781 208


1920


1920


1921


1921


966,601
907,075


1922


1922


1923


1923


1924


1924. .. .


2,249,559
1,996,570
2 169 787


1925


1925


1926


1926


1927


1927


2,312,351
2,469,226
2,555,250
2,502,519
2,090,233
1,672,665


1928


1928


1929


1929


1930


1930. . . .


1931


1931


1932


1932... .







Canal opened August 15, 1914.



' Average for lOi months.



I Average for 10 months of fiscal year.



598



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



May t3, 1932



CANAL WORK IN APRIL, 1932.

The following is the report of the Governor to the Secretary of War,
of Canal work in the month of April, 1932.

B.VLBOA Heights, C. Z., May 17, 1932.
The Honorable, the Secretary of War,

Washington, D. C.
Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report covering operations of The
Panama Canal during the month of April, 1932:

TRANSITS AND TOLLS.

During the month 370 commercial vessels and 7 small nonseagoing launches under
20 tons transited the Canal. In addition to these there were 26 vessels of the United
States Government and one merchant marine training vessel belonging to the State
of California, making a total of 404 transits for the month, or a daily average on all
traffic of 13.47.

Tolls on the 370 commercial vessels amounted to $1,608,634.67, and on the launches
$48.78, a total of $1,608,683.45, or a daily average on all traffic of $53,622.78.

The number of transits in April was 7 higher than in the previous month, while
tolls collected were lower than the amount collected in March, and the lowest col-
lected in the current fiscal year.

In comparison with the first 10 months of the fiscal year 1931, traffic this year has
shown a decrease of 18.9 per cent in transits, 15.4 per cent in net tonnage (Panama
Canal measurement), 21.8 per cent in cargo carried, and 16.5 per cent in tolls collected.
In comparison with the first 10 months of the fiscal year 1930, there was a decrease of
27.1 per cent in transits, 20.9 per cent in net tonnage (Panama Canal measurement),
34.7 per cent in cargo carried, and 23.5 per cent in tolls collected.

The total numbers of craft of all kinds transiting the Canal during the month of
April in the two preceding years and in 1932, are shown in the following tabulation:



April,
1930.



April,
1931.



April,
1932.



Commercial vessels

Launches (under 20 teas)

Noncommercial vessels:

United States Government

Panamanian Government

For repairs

State of California training vessel.

Total



439
7



453
17



32



370
26



In addition to the vessels listed above, Panama Canal equipment consisting of
barges, tugs, dredges, etc., was passed through the locks as follows:





North-
bound.


South-
bound.


Total.




13
21
30


7
21
22


20




42




52






Total


64


50


114



COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC. '

The following tabulation shows the number of vessels, Panama Canal net tonnage,
tons of cargo carried, and tolls collected, from the commercial traffic transiting the
Canal each month from the beginning of the fiscal year 1932, to the end of April,
1932, as compared with the same months in the previous year:





No. of
vessels.


Panama Canal net
tonnage.


Tons of cargo.


ToUs.




1930-1.


1931-2.


1930-31.


1931-32.


1930-31.


1931-32.


1930-31.


1931-32.


July

August. . . .
September.
October . . .
November.
December .
January. . .
February. .
March ....
April


488
465
458
517
479
495
476
431
4:39
453


406
390
396
390
376
387
377
358
363
370


2,438,895
2,345,573
2,314,424
2,584,160
2,371,487
2,473,620
2,330,871
2,134,866
2,211,934
2,292,805


2,110,701
1,998,194
2,070,873
2,031,600
2,031,745
2,033,158
2,022,275
1,878,177
1,864,896
1,863,692


2,402,047
2,148,469
2,059,582
2,394,410
2,263,200
2,166,884
2,106,9:37
1,930,219
1,915,507
2,011.17


1,866,803
1,789,234
1,754,855
1,762,670
1,577,523
1,648,904
1,593,585
1,045,393
1,643,952
1,443,731


?2, 180,511.82
2,080,230.42
2.057,103.58
2,2.88,982.08
2,098,357.36
2,192,583.85
2,108,140.42
1,915,902.78
1,964,434.22
2,014,349.13


$1,848,638.45
1,770,202.71
1,820,735.75
1,823,650.74
1,762,036.19
1,757,869.54
1,770,250.68
1,647,797.06
1,645,366.81
1,608,334.67


Total .


4,701


3,813


23,. 548, 641


19,925,311


21,398,372


16.728,650


20,900,595.66


17,455,182.60



' Commercial traffic includes all ocean-going vessels paying tolls. Vessels in direct service of the United States,
Panamanian, and Colombian Governments, including merchant vessels chartered by these Governments, and vessels
transiting solely for repairs, do not pay tolls. Statistics on vessels not paying tolls are shown under "No.icommercial
traffic."



May 23, 19S2



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



599



The following is a summary of the commercial traffic for April in the j'ears 1930,
1931, and 1932, and comparison with the monthly averages for the calendar year 1931:





April,
1930.


April,
1931.


April,
1932.


Average per

month for

calendar year

1931.




4S9
2,479,096
1,849,804
3,075,488
1,872,024
12,232,763.00
2,456,782


453
2,292,805
1,686,523
2,814,348
1,711,593
J2, 014, 349. 13
2,011,117


370
1,863,692
1,-344,902
2,280,170
1,364,088
SI, 608, 634. 67
1,443,731


414




2,1.30,021




1,560,549




2,602,673




1,576,788


Tolls


$1,877,568.40




1,837,350







The daily average number of transits, tonnage (Panama Canal measurement),
tolls and cargo, are shown in the following table, in comparative form, commercial
vessels onlv:





Average per day.


.^.verage per

day for calendar

year 1931.




April, 1930.


April, 1931.


.■Vpril, 1932.




16.30

82,637

874,425.43

81,893


15.10

76,427

$57,144.97

67,037


12.33

62,123

$53,621.16

48,124


13.62




70,028


Tolls


S61,728.27




60,406







AVERAGE TONNAGE, TOLLS, AND TONS OF CARGO PER VESSEL.

-The average tonnage, tolls, and tons of cargo per vessel transiting the Canal during
the month of April in 1930, 1931, and 1932, are shown in the following tabulation:



Average per vessel.



April, 1930. April, 1931. April, 1932



Average per

vessel for

calendar year

1931.



Online LibraryIsthmian Canal Commission (U.S.Panama Canal record (Volume v.25(1931-32)) → online text (page 84 of 104)