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been increased by approximately $950,000 per year.

The following tabulation shows the number of United States Government vessels
transiting the Canal from 1928 to 1937 inclusive, and the probable amount of addi-
tional revenue which would have been received from these vessels had tolls been
paid on the basis of prevailing rates:



Fiscal year


No. of
transits


Tolls


Fiscal year


No. of

transits


Tolls


1928

1929 .


450
553
545
544
458
434


$889,351
1,031,272
1,134,545
1,157,853
899,851
747,930


1934

1935


484
527
426
475


$1,065,723
1,118,340


1930


1936


7S2.941


1931


1937

Total


704,412


1932

1933




4,896


9,532,218









Census of Civil Population of Canal Zone

The annual census of the civil population of the Canal Zone taken by the Police
and Fire Division during the month of June 1937, resulted in a count of 28,707
as the total number of civilian inhabitants. This was a decrease of 491 from the
population in June 1936.

The population as of June 1937, was distributed as follows:





Americans


All Others






Men


Women


Chil-
dren


Men


Women


Chil-
dren


Total




Total


Em-
ployees


Total


Em-
ployees


Total


Em-
ployees


Total


Em-
ployees








1,803
335


2,369

769


359
19






2,268
2,475


2,547

2,167

1


61
20


3,478

4,668
9


14,491


District


2,157


1,972


3,614


216,137
33,049


District


585
9


824


3,413
125


M2.426
5H4














Total employees. ..




2,338




37S






4,743




81




6 7,540








Total inhabitants. .


2,751




3,13S




2,796


7,152




4,715




8,155


'28,707



1 Employees; decrease of 194 since 1936. ; Inhabitants; decrease of 1,446 since 1936. 3 Employees; increase
of 419 since i936. i Inhabitants; increase of 917 since 1936. 5 Increase of 46 since 1936. 5 Employees; increase
of 225 since 1936 7 Inhabitants; decrease of 491 since 1936.



18 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD August 15, 1937

Official Publications of Interest to Shipping

Masters may obtain from the office of the Captain of the Port, at either Cristobal
or Balboa, without charge, the "Rules and Regulations Governing Navigation of the
Panama Canal and Adjacent Waters," and the current tariff of charges at the Canal
for supplies and services.

Requests for Canal publications sent by mail should be addressed to: The Panama
Canal, Balboa Heights, C.Z.; or, when more convenient, to The Panama Canal,
Washington, D.C.

The Hydrographic Office at Cristobal maintains at all times a complete stock of
navigational charts and books, including charts of all parts of the world, sailing
directions of the world, nautical tables, light lists, tide tables, nautical almanacs, etc.

At the office of the Port Captain in Balboa, a limited stock of navigational charts,
books, etc., is also carried, and this office is in a position to fill practically any order
in this connection that a ship might place.

Copies of current issues of Pilot Charts, Notices to Mariners, and Hydrographic
Bulletins may be obtained in return for marine information.

Observations of weather, ocean currents, and other marine data collected, and
blanks, instructions, barometer comparisons, etc., furnished.

Correct time is maintained and chronometers rated.



Coal

Coal, bunker, U. S. Navy Standard Pool No. 1, run-of-mine, Pocahontas, or New
River, is supplied to steamships, including warships of all nations, trimmed in bunkers
at the following prices, per ton of 2,240 pounds: Cristobal, first 250 tons, $7.75 per
ton; second 250 tons, $7 per ton; balance over 500 tons, $6.50 per ton. Balboa, first
250 tons, $10.75 per ton; second 250 tons, $10 per ton; balance over 500 tons, $9.50
per ton.

Extra charges are made in accordance with a published tariff for special trimming
at the request of the officers of the ship, for galley, lump, or run-of-mine coal in sacks,
and for delivery, when coal is furnished from lighters or launches away from the
coaling piers.

Coal can be bunkered by bunkering machines at any rate up to 1,500 tons per hour,
regulated by the amount of necessary trimming.

Coal for cargo is sold under the same conditions and at prices quoted for sale of
coal for bunkers.



Current Net Prices on Fuel Oil and Diesel Oil

Bunker fuel oil is delivered to vessels at either Cristobal or Balboa, from tanks of
The Panama Canal. Prices will be furnished on application.

Bunker fuel oil and Diesel oil are also sold by private companies with tanks at the
Canal terminals, at prices which will be quoted by them on application. The prices
at present are as follows: Fuel oil, $1.25 per barrel at Cristobal and Balboa; Diesel
oil, $1.80 per barrel at Cristobal and Balboa.



Facilities for Shipping

The Panama Canal is equipped with all the facilities for the fueling, supply, and repairs of ships which
are found in modern ports.

The coaling plants, with an aggregate storage capacity of 700,000 tons, can bunker ships up to 1,500
tons an hour, practically as fast as it can be handled in ships' bunkers. Oil can be delivered as fast as
the ships can take it, from ample stocks at both ends of the Canal. Crude fuel oil, Diesel oil, and
gasoline are sold.

The ships' chandlery storehouses carry a wide variety of marine supplies and spare parts. The Pana-
ma Canal Commissary Division, with facilities at Balboa and Cristobal for delivery of supplies to
steamships, carries a complete line of provisions, such as ice, meats (including native beef), fruits,
vegetables, eggs, butter, canned goods, cigars, cigarettes and tobacco, which are for sale to ships at
reasonable prices. A modern laundry service is also available. Orders may be placed in advance by
radio for prompt delivery on arrival at either terminal, or for delivery at the other terminal after trans-
iting the Canal.

A 1,000-foot drydock, a smaller drydock, floating cranes, foundry, and amply equipped shops, em-
ploying about 1,100 men, provide means of making practically any kind of marine repairs.

Ample space exists at either terminal of the Canal for the berthing of vessels, as well as large, covered
piers for the storage of cargo. These are modern structures: fireproof, rat proof, in splendid condition,
well lighted and maintained in a clean and orderly condition.

In general, the services to shipping at the Canal are such as have been developed and found ample
and effective in the course of handling large traffic through the Canal during the years of operation.



August 15, 1937



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



19



Prices of Miscellaneous Supplies at Panama Canal Storehouses

The following are prices, including the 20 percent surcharge, to individuals and
companies, as of August 17, 1937:



Commodities



Unit



Price



Brass, bar, average

Brass, sheet, average

Bronze, Tobin, average

Gasoline, motor grade

Metal, yellow

Oakum, Navy, spun

Oakum, Navy, unspun

Oil, gun and ice machine

Oil, burning. Colza

Oil, engine, gas, light, in drums, No. 2135

Oil, engine, gas, extra heavy, in cases. No. 2250 .
Oil, engine, gas, extra heavy, in drums. No. 2250

Oil, kerosene, in drums

Oil, marine engine

Paint, lead, white, dry

Paint, lead, white, in oil

Paint, zinc oxide, dry

Paint, zinc oxide, in oil

Grease, gear, chain and wire rope, lubricating. . .

Grease, ydlow, cup, No. 3, medium

Grease, yellow, cup. No. 5, hard

Soda, ash

Waste, cotton, colored

Waste, cotton, white



Lb.


$0.13


Lb.


.28


Lb.


.22


Gal.


.105


Lb.


.26


Lb.


.20


Lb.


.18


Gal.


.28


Gal.


1 14


Gal.


.24


Gal.


.29


Gal.


.24


Gal.


.10


Gal.


.38


Lb.


.11


Lb.


.12


Lb.


.08


Lb.


.11


Lb.


.05


Lb.


.06


Lb.


.07


Lb.


.03


Lb.


.12


Lb.


.13



Lubricating Oils

The following is a list of the different kinds of lubricating oil carried in stock at
Panama Canal storehouses, and a brief description of each of the oils with a statement
of the purpose for which it is generally used.

Requisitions and orders for oils placed with the storekeepers should state the name
(including number, if any) of the oil desired exactly as given on the following list:

STATEMENT OF STANDARD LUBRICATING OILS AND THEIR USES.

OILS, FORCE FEED AND MOTOR CYLINDER.

Medium, No. 2135. — A medium oil for the lubrication of main turbines not driving through reduction
gears, dynamos, and small internal combustion engines. Not to be used for steam cylinder lubrication.

Heavy, No. 2190. — A heavy oil that will separate quickly from water. For the lubrication of turbines
with reduction gears, medium size internal combustion engines, and forced feed on main engines. A
heavy bodied oil for use on auxiliary equipment.

Extra heavy. No. 2250. — An extra heavy oil for the lubrication of medium sire internal combustion
engines, power cvlinders, air compressors, and bearings of Diesel engines.

Ultra heavy. No. 2310. — An ultra heavy oil for the lubrication of power cylinders, air compressors,
and bearings of large Diesel engines.

Tractor, heavy. No. 3100. — A very heavy body oil for aircraft engines, high speed gasoline engines,
motor trucks, motor boats, motorcycles, and Diesel engines S. A. E.-SO.

Diesel engine lubricating. — For Diesel engines.

OILS, MISCELLANEOUS.

Ammonia cylinder (gun and ice machine grade No. 125).— A refined petroleum oil without the
admixture of fatty oils, resins, soap, or other compounds not derived from petroleum. For the lubri-
cation of the cvlinders of ice machines, pneumatic tools, and hydraulic systems.

Car and locomotive. — A lubricant on journals of all cars, passenger coaches, steam and electric loco-
motives.

Castor. — Grade "A." Used for lubricating purposes of the highest grade.

Cutrite, soluble cutting. — A mixture of soluble alkali soap in mineral and fixed sapomfiable oils. For
use in turret lathes and bolt machines.

Fish. — Used as a rust preventive and for tempering.

Lard. — For use on pipe cutting and threading machines.

Insulating. — Switch (Electrical Division) ._

Insulating. — Transformer (Electrical Division).

Lubricant (gear, chain and wire rope). — For lubrication and protection of chains, wire rope, and gears
of cranes, dredges, steam shovels, etc.

Machine, odorless. — For use on typewriters. .

Marine engine. No. 4065, compounded. — A compound of mineral with vegetable oil for the lubrication
of reciprocating engines and auxiliaries where oiling is done by hand or through wick feed or drop oilers,
also for thrust bearings. Must not be used for circulating of forced feed systems.

Mineral steam cylinder. No. 5150. — For use on reciprocating steam engines using dry saturated
steam. For noncondensing steam engine cylinder lubrication (valve oil).

Mineral steam cylinder, superheated. — For use on reciprocating steam engines using superheated
steam.

Neatsfoot. — For softening and preserving leather.

Solvent. — Rust-preventing lubricant, for general use.

Sperm. — Used principally by U. S. Navy.



20



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



August 15, 1937



Provisions Required by Ships

The Panama Canal Commissary Division, with facilities at Balboa and Cristobal
for delivery of supplies to steamships, carries a complete line of provisions, such as
meats, fruits, vegetables, eggs, butter, canned goods, cigars, cigarettes, tobacco,
etc., which are sold to ships at reasonable prices. Beef especially is available at low
prices.

Orders may be placed in advance by radio for delivery on arrival, or at either ter-
minal for prompt delivery or for delivery at the other terminal after transit.



Location of Patients and Visiting Hours at Gorgas Hospital

The following table shows the distribution of patients in the Gorgas Hospital
buildings and the visiting hours for the various wards and sections:



Section and Ward.


Visiting Hours.


Section"A:"

Ward 2


1 Wards: Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays, 2.30 to


Ward 3


1 4.30 p. m.; 6.30 to 7.30 p. m. Sundays and holidays,




| 9.30 to 11.30 a. m.; 2.00 to 4.00 p. m.


Section "B:"

Ward 6, Foreign, male and female, private rooms,


J Private rooms: Same as Section B."
Daily, 9.30 to 11.00 a. m.; 2.00 to 4.30 p. m.; 6.30 to 8.00










Section "C:"
















Ward 13, Colored, male, G. U




Ward 14, White, male, G. U

Section "D:"


Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays, 2.30 to 4.30 p. m.; 6.30
to 7.30 p. m. Sundays and holidays, 9.30 to 11.00
a. m.; 2.30 to 4.30 p. m.; 6.30 to 7.30 p. m.

1 Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays, 2.30 to 4.30 p. m.; 6.30




\ to 7.30 p. m. Sundays and holidays, 9.30 to 11.00




J a. m. ; 2.30 to 4.30 p. m.; 6.30 to 7.30 p. m.


Ward 18, White children


p. m.
Daily, 9. 30 to 11.00 a. m.; 2.00 to 4.30 p. m.




| Wednesdays, Fridays, Sundays and holidays, 1.00 to 2.30
\ p. m. Visitors from Atlantic Side may remain until
J 3.00 p. m.


Ward 20, Colored, female, surgical, obstetrical




patients, Thursdays, Sundays and holidays, 1.30 to
3.00 p. m.



Permission to visit outside of visiting hours may be granted upon application to the Superintendent's office.
Immediate relatives of seriously ill patients will be admitted at any time by and in the discretion of the attending
physician, section nurse, and in her absence, the nurse in charge.



Density of Water in Balboa and Cristobal Harbors



Place.


Weight of sea water inouncespercubieft.


Rainy season.
Average tempera-
ture. Degrees F.


Average.


Maximum.


Minimum.




1018
1011


' 1020
1021


1013
1005


84.0


Balboa (dock 18)


83







(Note. — The above is based on two months' observations at Cristobal and Balboa. Average taken at 12-foot depth.
Minimum occurred after heavy rain at 3-foot depth at Cristobal and 12-foot depth at Balboa. The weight of a cubic
foot of fresh water at 85° F. is 995 ounces.



Hours of Departure of Passenger Trains

Following are the hours of departure of the
regular passenger trains of the Panama Railroad
running between the Atlantic and the Pacific sides:

From Colon: Daily, 7:25 a, m.; 11 a. m.; 4:55
p. in.; 10 p. m.

From Panama: Daily, 7:10 a. m.; 1:10 p. m.;
5 p. m.; 7:55 p. m.

The time required for passage from one termi-
nal to the other is 1 hour and 25 minutes.



Binders for The Panama Canal Record

Cardboard covers, punched and fitted with
brass fasteners forming binders for The Panama
Canal Record are offered for sale at 25 cents
a set, for the benefit of those who wish to keep
a file of the issues for ready reference. Orders
may be addressed to The Panama Canal, Balboa
Heights, Canal Zone, or The Panama Canal,
Washington. D. C.



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL

PUBLISHED MONTHLY

Subscription rates, domestic, $0.50 per year; foreign, $1.00; address

The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone,

or, for United States and foreign distribution,

The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C.

Entered as second-class matter February 6, 1918, at the Post Office

at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879.

Certificate.— By direction of the Governor of The Panama Canal the matter contained herein is published as statistical

information and is required for the proper transaction of the public business.

Volume XXXI Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 15, 1937 No. 1





Traffic Through the Panama Canal in August 1937

The total vessels of all kinds transiting the Panama Canal during the month of
August 1937, and for the same month in the two preceding years, are shown in the
following tabulation :



Ocean-going commercial traffic .

Local commercial vessels l . ...

Noncommercial vessels:

United States Government
Colombian Government. . .
For repairs

Total



August
1935



377
52



459



August
1936



473
57



August 1937



Atlantic

to
Pacific



273
38



Pacific
to

Atlantic



232
32



277



Total



505
70

34
1

1



611



1 Vessels under 300 net tons, Panama Canal measurement.

OCEAN-GOING COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC 2

The following tabulation shows the number of vessels, Panama Canal net tonnage,
tons of cargo carried, and tolls collected from the ocean traffic transiting the Canal
each month for the 12 months ended August 31, 1937, as compared with the same
period in the previous year:





No


of


Panama Canal net












vessels


tonnage


Tons ot cargo


Tolls




1935-6


1936-7


1935-6


1936-7


1935-6


1936-7


1935-6


1936-7


September .


391


466


2,095,599


2,428,317


1,994,487


2,526,366


$1,780,805.80


$2,045,440.82


October . .


441


482


2,357,640


2,499,67S


2,228,536


2,463,069


1,964,076.81


2,081,758.23


November .


418


368


2,165,559


1,768,738


2,050,422


1,747,368


1,796,820.57


1,488,054.25


December .


459


341


2,382,602


1,655,501


2,187,731


1,538,503


1,997,206.74


1,366,388.58


Januarv . . .


472


399


2,411,073


1,915,787


2,148,935


1,855,937


2,018,543.52


1,598,323.51


February. .


452


377


2,322,013


1,940,611


2,155,031


1,839,788


1,952,682.73


1,602,306.30


March ....


526


536


2,714,768


2,770,451


2,634,150


3,016, 41S


2,293,874.51


2,355,149.04


April


482


473


2,483,561


2,460,549


2,430,134


2,652,880


2,079,730.70


2,067,026.68


May


488


544


2,504,215


2,839,127


2,419,652


2,950,925


2,081,103.73


2,376,706.36


June


481


472


2,449,127


2,450,018


2,459,752


2,670,466


2,073,359.39


2,070,337.89


July


456


457


2,364,539


2,395,306


2,450,324


2,476,366


1,999,105.18


2,029,642.45


August.. . .


473


505


2,398,306


2,597,119


2,396,331


2,780,603


2, 051, 540. 2S


2,195,308.87


Total.


5,539


5,420


28,649,002


27,721,202


27,555,485


28,51S,6S9


24,0S8,S49.96


23,276,442.98



2 Ocean-going commercial traffic includes only tolls-paying vessels of 300 net tons or over, Panama Canal
measurement.

Traffic by Nationality of Vessels 3 for August 1937



Nationality



No.


Panama


Tons


of


Canal net


of


ships


tonnage


cargo


101


569,093


576,533


22


98,933


107,723


1


2,337


4,695


10


61,662


59,833


30


122,066


144,754


17


75,867


117,356


3


4,845


679


2


7,964


11,176


6


36,001


19,573


27


161,106


188,758



Nationality



No.

of

ships



Panama I Tons
Canal net of

tonnage cargo



British. . . .
Danish . .
Estonian . .
French
German. . .

Greek

Honduran
Hungarian
Italian. . .
Japanese. .



Netherlands.
Norwegian.. .
Panamanian.
Swedish. ....
United States
Venezuelan . .
Yugoslav. . . .

Total . . .



17

59

21

11

174

2

2



51,894

314,279

45,164

47,770

987,579

2,162

S,397



59,785

30S.427

60,929

77,765

1,040,664

1,953



505



2,597,119



2,7S0,603



Tolls-paying vessels of 300 net tons or over, Panama Canal measurement.



22



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



September 15, 19S7



Traffic by Trade Routes, August 1937

The movement of vessels over the various trade routes contributory to the Canal
is summarized in the table below. In connection with this table, the traffic passing
through the Canal has been segregated according to the primary origin and ultimate
destination of the voyage and the cargo listed is the total aboard at the time of
transit. As cargo frequently is laden or discharged at ports en route, the cargo
tonnage figures shown opposite each trade route do not necessarily show the actual
cargo tonnage passing through the Canal between the two terminal areas indicated
by the trade route.





Atlantic to Pacific


Pacific to Atlantic


Trade route


No.
of

ships


Panama
Canal net
tonnage


Tons

of
cargo


No.
of

ships


Panama
Canal net
tonnage


Tons

of
cargo




64

18

10

47

14
3


361,519

23,062
9,984
79,221
14,733
32,000
62,883
233,494

4,019
14,612
18,768

6,793
19,838
12,757

9,901
9,811
5,821

5,761
5,276
7,800

35,796
3,651
6,405

10,977


267,417
2,570


60

1

4
14
8


357,133

4,910

8,279

65,329

41,410


447,730


East coast United States and:


5,926




2,902




27,401

8,913

31,535

62,919

363,163

7,889
2,040
14,222
S.202
22,533
23,477

15,282
12,510
3,648


169,130




61,426






Philippine Islands

Far East


15

6


91,326

37,178


111,971
38,532


East coast Canada and:






2
5


11,680
23,849


25,444




32,145






Far East
















East coast South America and:
















Far East . .


1

1
5
13

10


5,073

5,761
4,462
7,364

53,718


4,338


Cristobal and:


11,509




4,513
3,217

6,531
22,037


3,209




9,782


West Indies and:


106,972








1

1
1

6
36


4,716
1,081
4,343

37,488
196,788


8,803


Balboa

Far East


7,200


Europe and:


14

17

1

23

7


75,383

108,796

3,070

129,680

60,200


5,117
39,341

3,012
55,976
40,643


60,421




252,892








30

7
1
2

1
1


175,158
47,320
5,792
8,776
2,487
6,037


282,494


Australasia


46,258
6,399










15,925










463


Around the world


2


17,650


8,482


6,142


Total


273


1,389,661


1,062,590


232


1,207,458


1,718,013



Origin and Destination of Cargo by Major Areas, August 1937

The following table summarizes the origin of cargo passing through the Canal in
August 1937, and its destination by major geographical trade areas:

ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC





Tons of cargo destined for—




Origin


United

States


Other
North
America


Asia


South
America


Austral-
asia


Total


North America:


276,304
10,676
34,029
27,273


18,864
29,378
11,628
3,299


436,932

14,372

2

3,410


26,888
11,455
49,073
22,607


21,484
24,286
40,630


780,472


Other North America
Europe


90,167
135,362
56,589








Total


348,282


63,169


454,716


110,023


86,400


1,062,590







September 15, 1937



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



23



PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC





Tons of cargo destined for —




Origin


United

States


Other
North
America


Europe


Miscel-
laneous


Total


North America:

United States


433,150
5,926

65,298
164,401

12,563
144,927


134,756

2,438

4,661

51,225

19,590

10,849


164,799
144,335
353
279,992
46,250
6,399


5,024
674


737,729
153,373

70,312
511,578

78,403
166,618


Canada

Other North America




15,960






4,443




Total


826,265


223,519


642,128


26,101


1,718,013





Principal Commodities

Commodities in transit through the Canal which aggregated 10,000 or more tons
either during August 1937 or August 1936 are listed below:



Commodity



Atlantic to Pacific

Ammonium compounds

Asphalt and tar

Automobiles and parts ....
Canned goods, various ....

Cement

Coal and coke

Corn

Iron and steel

Machinery

Manufactured goods

Metals, various

Oils, mineral

Ores

Paper

Phosphates

Scrap metal

Sulphur

Tinplate

Wood pulp

Pacific to Atlantic

Asphalt and tar

Barley



August



1936



Long

4

7

16

10

7

4

1

156

10

6

18
78
18
38
14
139
19
13
7



tens
,486
,065
,592
,758
,257
,714
,500
,800
667
860
,760
,063
,191
,630
,615
,747
,214
,348
,912



9,706
17,242



1937



Long tons
14,710
11,313
26,877
13,166
10,366
17,618
21,462
249,215
12,974
15,180
76,480
64,656
14,256
36,883
27,843
169,690
35,232
16,761
16,318



11,186
33,252



Commodity



Pacific to Atlantic — Continued

Beans, edible, dry

Borax

Canned goods, various

Coffee

Cold storage (food products) •>..

Copra

Cotton, raw

Flour

Fruit, dried

Fruit, fresh 5

Lumber

Metals, various

Nitrates

Oils, mineral

Oils, vegetable

Ores : . . . .

Paper

Phosphates

Rice

Sugar

Wheat

Wood pulp



August



1936



Long tons

8,699

7,248

100,740

9,888

18,387

21,382

9,798

29,685

25,893

13,476

241,224

51,059

57,594

376,100

IS, 802

189,036

13,364



10,275
123,012
111,113

16,419



1937



Long tons

11,256
11,168
96,004
12,036
11,382
15,705
13,374
14,535
16,566
10,868

306,738
67,245
75,885

409,944
19,556

202,437
15.748
14,258
10,406

164,031

2,943

32,121



4 Does not include fresh fruit. 5 Does not include bananas.



Commodities in Detail



Online LibraryIsthmian Canal Commission (U.S.Panama Canal record (Volume v.31(1937-38)) → online text (page 4 of 48)