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in bunkers, when handled by ship's
gear (per ton), $9.00.

An additional charge of $2 per hour
will be made for the use of each mechani-
cal hoist or crane furnished by the Pana-
ma Railroad Company.

2. These changes apply to the prices given
on pages 41—12- of the Sailing Directions and
General Information, the Panama Canal, and
its supplements.



Increase In the Price of Fuel Oil.

The price of fuel oil sold to steamships at
the Canal ports by The Panama Canal will
be increased to $1.75 per barrel at Balboa and



$2 per barrel at Cristobal, effective October
1, 1916.

This is an increase of 35 cents per barrel
at both terminals, the current prices being
$1.40 at Balboa and $1.65 at Cristobal. This
will be the second advance this year, as prior
to May 1 the price was $1.25 per barrel at
either terminal.

Diesel oil is not sold by The Panama Canal
at this time, but is for sale at both terminals
by the corporations which have erected tanks
on the farms. Their prices on Diesel and crude
oil may be obtained on application to them.



Principal Commodities.

The following is a list of the 50 principal
commodities passing through the Canal
during the fiscal year 1916:



Commodity.



Sugar

Lumber

Manufactured goods
of iron and steel. . .

Crude oil

Railroad material. . . .
9 'Iron ore

10 Canned goods

11 jBarley

12 Copper

13 ,\Vire fencing

14 Chromium ore

15 Machinery

Cotton, raw

Zinc concentrate

Copper ore

Naphtha

Miscellaneous manu-
factured goods. . .



Coffee

Wool

Cacao

I ron

Cement

l-'ruit. dried

Skins and hides. . .
Textiles

Paper

Automobiles

Ivory nuts

Wines and liquors..

Vegetable oils

Explosives

Lubricating oils. . .

i-'lour

Lead

Oats

Chemicals

meat



Wi

Rubber. .
Benzine. .

Rice

Tobacco.

Wax

Gasoline.
Seed



Pacific Atlantic



87.052
50.03a
57,829



16,224

9,205

2,863

695



1.825
3,535
6.986
6.904
1,144
476
50
5.207



2.483
•2.403
2.^9-,



52.250
38.713
38.006
35.851



12.667
22.079
17.940
17,732

640

6.004
11.828
12.549
13.089

4.152



9.712
9,622
1,259
8,995



7.521

5.539

3,587

4

23

5.291

5.713

6.000

664

5.589



4.284
3,896
3,459



894,139
271.041
243.216
128.544
89.685

87.375
69.812
57.829
52.250
41.300
38.006
36.700
31.189
25.920
24.542
23.169
22,079
17.940
17,933

16.864
15.209
14.691
13.244
13,211
12.516
1 1 .697
9.737
9,632
9.149
8.995
8,943
8.310
7,521
7.364
7.122
6.990
6.927
6.4.15
6.189
6.050
5.871
5.589
4.477
4.368
4.189
3.459
2.904
2,503
2.294



The total of the 50 principal commodities
passing thiough the Canal during the fiscal
year was 2,417,146 tons. The total of all
cargo going through was 3,140,046 tons. The
50 commodities were, accordingly, 77 per
cent of all cargo. With the 550,958 tons of
cargo listed as "general cargo" during the
year the 50 commodities aggregated 2,968,104
tons, or 94.5 per cent of all cargo.

The 12 commodities of greatest quantity (in



order, nitrates, refined petroleum, coal, sugar,
lumber, manufactured goods of iron and steel,
crude oil, railroad material, iron ore, canned
goods, barley, and copper) aggregated 2,009,-
897 tons, or 64 per cent of all cargo. Nitrates,
which were three times as great in quantity
as any other commodity, amounted to 894,139
tons, or about 285 per cent of the total cargo
passing through the Canal.

A comparison of the quantities of the 12
most important commodities passing through
the Canal this past fiscal year with the quan-
tities in the fiscal year ending June 30, 1915,
is afforded herewith:



Numerical
order. 1916

n
1


Total.

iscal year

1916


Total.

fisca 1 year
1915




1

2
3

4


Refined petroleun


894.139
271.041
243.216
128.544
89,685

87,375
69,812
57.829
52.250
41.300
38.006
36.700


651,948
252.428
286.564
298.864
181,666

202.202
30.594
56.106
86.104
46.998

204.751
49.799


i

4










6

7
8


Manufactured
goods of iron &
steel

Crude oil

Railroad material


7
16
10


10


Canned goods.. . .


14










Total






2,009.897


2,348.024





The commodity fifth in importance in the
fiscal year 1915 was wheat, amounting to
230,222 tons; the eleventh in order that year
was flour, 54,094 tons.



Canal Traffic In June.

A part of the usual monthly summary of
Canal traffic, covering the month of June,
was omitted from The Canal Record of last
week on account of the space required for the
summary for the fiscal year. The omitted
items are published herewith:

The numbers of ships of the several nation-
alities, and their aggregate net tonnages,
passing through the Canal in the month cf
June, 1916, are given in this table:





Atlantic-Pacific


Pa i


r-AtJaiilii-


T


otul.


Nationality


No.
of

slip*


Canal

net
tonnage


No.

of
ships


Canal

net
tonnage


No

of
sMpi


Canal

net
tonnage


British

American .
Chilean....
Norwegian
Peruvian...
Danish ... .
Ja» anese . .
Dutch


33
16

4
4
3
4
3
3


110,008
52.302
12.511
16,'24
7. .'09
10,780
10.022
8..'02


26
15
5
4
3


82.421
39,441
14,231
17,520
7.754


59
31

9

8

6*
4

3


192.429
91.743
26.742
33,6-4
IM>61


1


2.319


12,341








Total


70


236.358


54


163.686


124


400.044



During the mcn:h 91 various commodities
were listed on the cargo declarai ions furnished
by the masters of the ships passing through
the Canal. Of these, 10 were carried through
the Canal in both directions. A summary
of the movements of cargo through the Canal
in the month is given in the tables on the fol-
lowing pages:



430



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IX, No. 51.



Commodities Shipped through the Panama Canal in June, 19 16.



Atlantic

to
Pacific.



Antimony

Antimony ore.

Balsam

Barrilla

Bark

Barley

Books

Borax

Boric acid

Cocoa



Cakes, cotton seed.
Canned goods —

Fruit

Meat

Cement

Chemicals

Coal



Cocoboln ....
Cocoa leaves.
Coffee



Coke

Conduranco.
Copper



Earthenware .
Eucalyptus. . . .
Explosives.. . .
Frozen meat . .
Gas cylinders..
General cargo.



3,569
' 96.919



Hair..
Hair, h
Hats..
Hay...
Hemp.
Iodine.
Iron...



Ivory nuts..

Lead

Leather

Live stock

Lumber

Manganese

Mfd. goods — Iron & steel..



Mfd. goods — Machinery- ■
Mfd. goods — Miscellaneous
Mfd. goods — R. R. material
Mfd. goods — Textiles. .
Metals, miscellaneous.



Naphtha

Naval stores.
Nitrates



1.288
299
463
793



Oils, vegetable

Oil. crude

Oil. lubricating. . . .
Ores, miscellaneous.

Paint

Pearl shells

Peas

Petroleum, refined.



Railroad cars.
Rice

Rosewood

Rosin

Rubber



1,311
8,492



Scrap metal

Seed

Silver

Si Iver ore

Silver sulphide. .
Skins and hides.



6.704
3,059



825

7,600
166

152,198



3,790
' 4.064



2.014

15,143

6

6,704

3,059

90
1.638



300
104

1,252



463
793

825

7,600

1.687

152,198



Fn >u



Antofagasta to Bordeaux. f

Antofagasta to Liverpool.

Central American ports to Cristobal.

Antofagasta to Liverpool, 7 tons; Chilean ports to Cristobal. 55 tons.

From Mollendo to Liverpool, 24 tons; to Barcelona, 2 tons; Manta to Cristobal, 6 tons.

Valparaiso to Liverpool.

Guayaquil to. Cristobal.

From Antofagasta to Havre, 153 tons; to Cristobal, 149 tons. New York to Kobe. 100 tons.

New York to Kobe.

From Guayaquil. 1.593 tons; to Liverpool. 321 ; to New York. 382; to Cristobal, 890; from Tumaco to

Cristooal, 20; from various Ecuadorian ports to Cristobal. 1,221 ; Salaverry to Cristobal, 6.
Chilean ports to Liverpool.

New York to Talara; San Francisco to Cristobal,
to London.
York to Huacho.

YorktoKobe; AntofagastatoCristobal.il; Salaverry to Cristobal, 1. New York to Kobe. 2.
Newport News and Norfolk. 56.95 tons; to ports on the west coast of South America. 3.8,871; to ports
on the west coast of North America. 17.2S4; from Cardiff to Esquimau, 5,790; from Liverpool to South
American ports, 168; from New York to Talara, 67 tons.

Puntarenas to Cristobal.

Salaverrv to Cristobal. 10; Callao to Cristobal, 6.

San Francisco to Cristobal. 500; Buenaventura to Cristobal. 450; La Union to Cristobal. 74; Guayaquil
to Cristobal, 29; Ecuadorian ports to Cristobal, 5; various Central American ports to Cristobal, 910.
New York to Vladivostok, 40.

From Baltimore to Callao, 2,412; to Caldera, 5,000; to Guayacan, 3,288; to Valparaiso. 4.443.

Paita to Cristobal.

Valparaiso to Liverpool. 197; Townsville to London, 500; Chilean ports to New York, 1.968; Valparaiso
to Cristobal. 700; Callao to Cristobal. 3,321.

Arica to Liverpool. 787; Chile to New York, 1.258; Chile to Havre, 521; Callao to Cristobal. 270; Sala-
verry to Cristobal, 223.

Central American ports to Cristobal.

New York to Vladivostok 57-1; Chile to Liverpool. 269; Paita to New York. 212; Pisco to Cristobal, 160;
Callao to Cristobal. 419; New Zealand to London, 1; Central American ports to Cristooal, 3.

Liverpool to west coast of South America.

New Zealand to London.

New York to Vladivostok; Manila to Norfolk.

New Zealand to London.

Guayaquil to Cristobal.

New York to Melbourne. 9,000 tons; New York to Shanghai. 2.8.16; New York to New Zealand, 15, 1,6;
New York to Callao, 1.441; Cristobal to Valparaiso, 8.603; Cristobal to Callao. 3,525; Cristobal to
Buenaventura. 1.381; Cristobal to Guayaquil. 4,031; Cristobal to Salina Cruz. 175; Cristobal to San
Francisco, 5,576; Cristobal to Tumaco, 160; New York to Hongkong, 6,900; New York to Vladivostok,
13,400; New York to Yokohama and Vladivostok, 779; New York to Chilean ports, 5.80.5; Baltimore to
Caldera, 1,800; Port Talbot to Iquique, 3.367; London to Guayaquil, 4.501; Wilmington to Vladi-
vostok, 8.500. Wellington to Avonmouth. 7,500; Guayaquil to London. 4.7-10; Valparaiso to Cristobal,
1,108; San Francisco to Cristobal, 1,289; Buenaventura to Cristobal. -i'i'">; Talcahu mo to Cristobal. 4;
Valparaiso to New York. 27; Valparaiso to Liverpool, 16; Callao to Cristobal. 8; Guayaquil to Cris-
tobal, 18; Central American ports to Cristobal, 288; Ecuador to Cristobal. 2; Junin to New York, 7.

Junin to New York.

Central American ports to Cristobal. 1; Ecuador to Cristobal, 1.

New York to Vladivostok, 230 tons.

Queensland to London.

Valparaiso to Cristobal. 10 tons.

Guayaquil to Cristobal, 4 tons; Ecuador to Cristobal, 2 tons; Tumaco to Cristobal, 1.

Valparaiso to Cristobal. 19.

Manila to Norfolk. 300 tons.

Iquique to Cristobal. 72 tons; Iquique to New York. 2; Tocopilla and Taltal to Havre and New York. 30.

New York to Antofagasta, 200 tons; New York to Shanghai, 400; New York to Vladivostok, Yokohama.
KoDe, 650; Guayaquil to Cristobal, 2.

Ecuador to Cristobal. 700; Tumaco to Cristobal. 13; Bahia to Cristobal. 076; Guayaquil to Cristobal, 30.

New York to Talara. 5 tons; Ne.v York to Yokohama, 103; Sydney to Cristobal. 503; Callao to Cristobal. 9.

La Union to Cristobal, 3 tons; Guayaquil to Cristobal, 4.

Central American ports to Cristobal, 4 tons.

New York to Callao. 33 tons; Corinto to Cristobal. 137.

Central American ports to Cristobal 35 tons; Punta Arenas to Cristobal, 44.

New York to Callao, 1 1 tons; New York to Vladivostok and Shanghai. 2.800; Liverpool to South Ameri
can ports. 233; New York to Yokohama, 1,000; New York to Chilean ports, 7.972; New York to
Vladivostok, Shanghai, and Kobe. 1,350.

New York to Callao, 798 tons; New York to Vladivostok, 350; Liverpoal to South pacific ports, 140.

Liverpool to southern Pacific ports, 289 tons; New York to New Zealand ports. 10.

New York to Callao. 463 tons.

Liverpool to south Pacific ports. 550 tons; New York to Vladivostok. 243.

Coquimbo to New York. 18; Amapala to Cristobal, 2; New Caledonia to Glasgow, 800; Central American
ports to Cristobal, 5. »

Talara to New York. 7,600 tons.

Manila to Virginia, 166 tons; Norfolk to San Francisco, 1.521 tons.

Chile to France, 6,100 tons; Iquique to Norfolk, 8,400; Iquique to Cristobal. 5.610; Mejillones to Norfolk.
7,800; Tocopilla to New York, 8,540; Antofagasta to New York, 2,900; Pisagua to Norfolk, 7.100;
Taltal to France, 5,400; Tocopilla to Newport News, 5,115; Iquique to Cristobal, 6,300; Antofagasta
to Charleston, 5,900; Tocopilla to Delaware River, 7,000; Antofagasta to Marseilles, 5.901; Junin to
Norfolk, 7,271; Junin to New York. 8.236; Mejillones to Norfolk, 6.710; Chile to Charleston, 5,777;
Antofagasta to New Orleans. 3,908; Caleta Buena to Cristobal. 2,269; Tocopilla to Norfolk. 10.160;
Meiillones to Delaware River, 9,000; Taltal to Virginia, 8.200; Antofagasta to New York, 8,601.

New York to Shanghai. 642 tons; Liverpool to south Pacific ports, 36; New York to New Zealand ports.
033.

San Francisco to Cristobal. 3.785 tons; New Zealand, to Cristobal. 5; Tuxpan to Pisagua. 8,492.

New York to Yokohama, 600 tons; New York to Kobe. 210.

Callao to Liverpool, 24 tons; Junin to New York, 5 tons; Callao to New York, 35 tons; New California
to Glasgow, 4,000 tons.

Liverpool to South Pacific ports, 32 tons.

Central American ports to Cristobal. 13 tons.

Chile to Havre, 70 tons.

New York to Shanghai. 11,577 tons; New York to Taku Bar, 8,200; N
New York to Chilean ports. 625; New Y'ork to New Zealand ports. 9,792
New York to Hongkong. 8,000; New York to Chcfu, 9.200; Philadelphi;

New York to Vladivostok, 4.000 tons.

San Francisco to Cristobal.

Central American ports to Cristobal, 2 tons.

New York to Vladivostok. 300 tons.

Central American ports to Cristobal. 14 tons; Guayaquil to Cristobal, 23; Tun
to Cristobal, 22; Chilean ports to Cristobal. 5; Ecuador to Cristobal. 2.

Valparaiso to Liverpool, 1 ton; Valparaiso to Cristobal, 7.

Paita to Liverpool, 1,278 tons; New Caledonia to Glasgow, 289.

Central American ports to Cristobal, 1.

Salaverry to Cristobal. 15 tons.

Callao to Cristobal. 5 tons.

Central American ports to Cristobal. 133; Chilean ports to Liverpool. 71; Junin to New York, 241; Callao
to Cristobal, 101 ; Ecuador to Cristobal, 104; Tumaco to Cristobal, 34; Chilean ports to New York. 43;
Guayaquil to Cristobal. 23; Salina Cruz to Cristobal, 28; Paita to New York. 2 ; Chilean ports to Cris-
tobal, 160 ; Brisbane to Cristobal, 500.



ew York to Chinkiang. 5,868;
; New York to Brisbane. 6.000;
i to Sakai. 3,486.



i Cristobal. 8; Callao



August P, 1916.



THE CANAL RECORD



431



































Wax


300






Wood, hard


9,065


Wool





310
7.060



New York to Yokohama, 801 tons.

Chilean ports to Liverpool. 511 tons; Sllnverry to Cristobil. 1.43S tons; Sin Francisco to Colon, 500;

Acajutla to Cristobil. 100; Callao to Cristobal, 1,641; Salaverry to Cristobal, 824; Central American

ports to Crist")'.) ll. S> .
New Zealand to Cristobil, 57 tons.
Liverpool to south Pi:i.ic port-;. 7 tons.
Bluff. N. Z.. to London. 101 tons.
Valparaiso to Liverpool, 6 tons; New York to Talara. 311; New York to Kobe, 1,500; Liverpool to South

America, 75.
Chilean ports to Liverpool, 390 tons.

Corinto to Cristobil, 2 tons; New York to Shanghai, 640; New York to Yokohama, 250.
Mollendo and Ariel to New York. 6 tons.
Callao to Cristobil. Ui t re.

New York to Yokoham t, 300; Valparaiso to New York. 5 tons; Valparaiso to Cristobal. 5 tons,
Sydney to Lon Ion, 464 tons; Portland to Norfolk. 6.596 tons.

New York to Vladivostok, 2.000 tons; Newport News to Vladivostok, 5.465; New York to Shanghai, 1,600.
Caerus to London, 3 tons; Pa.it i Arenas to Cristobil. 55.
Arica to New York. 24 tin;; Cailein ports to Cristobil, 23.
Callao to Liverpool. 256 tons; Junin to New York, 3i tons; Callao to Cristobil. 23 tons; Mollendo to

Cristobal, 96; Arica to Liverpool and New York, 125 ; Queensland to London, 600.



292.771 225.020 I 517,791



WEATHER CONDITIONS.



The rainfall for the month was above the
average at eight stations and deficient at
10 stations. Over the Pacific section and the
Trinidad branch of Gatun Lake, the rainfall
was generally above the normal, while along
the Canal proper, there was a marked de-
ficiency extending from Frijoles to Colon.
The rainfall at Colon was 5.75 inches below
the 46-year average, and the lowest July
rainfall at this station since 1905. The rain-
fall at Bocas del Toro was the lowest on
record for July. Totals for the month
(Bocas del Toro excepted) ranged from 7.23
inches at Frijoles to 18.56 inches at the Indio
station on the upper Chagres. The greatest
amount of precipitation recorded on any one
day was 4.06 inches, at Alhajuela on July 5.
which was the only daily rain in excess of four
inches.

Comparisons are afforded by this tabula-
tion of rainfall in July for the past three
years:



Pacific Section-

Balboa

BalboaUeights

Miratiores.

Pedro Miguel.

Rio Grande. .
Central Secticn-

Culebra |

Ca macho

Gamboa

Juan Mina. . .
Alhajuela ....

Vigia

Frijoles

Trinidad

Monte Lirio. .
Atlantic Section-

Gatun

Brazos Brook.

Colon

Bocas del Toro



5 mi
4 3.?
4 81



8 14
8 59
10 24



8.10



5 28 12 99 S 84

4 94 12.H6 9.'<1

5 (12 12 17 7.86

3 91 8 i 3 9 59
9.72 13 50 10 27
7.21 15 71| 12.05
8 2f 17 74 12 05

4 06 2 1 10 7.23
2.42 13 61 13.26
3.54 15 73 9 64



4 28 18 21

10 30 21 24

10 74 20

18 77 7.59



9.68
II 44
10 44

2 30



/.is.
8.20
7.84
8.00
8.59
9.85



8.71

10.10
9.S2

12.62

12 04
9 56
9.47

12.03



11.78 12
15.70 11
16.19, 46
13.151 8



The estimated rainfall over Gatun Lake
watershed was six per cent above the 6-
year average, and over the Chagres River
basin above Alhajuela it was 10 per cent
below the 15-year average.

The air temperature was approximately
two degrees Fahrenheit below the normal
on the Pacific coast, and one degree Fah-
renheit above the normal on the Atlantic.
The atmospheric pressure, daytime cloudiness,
and temperature of the seas were slightly



above normal on both coasts, and the relative
humidity was approximately normal. There
was a marked deficiency of the wind move-
ment, the average hourly velocities at Balboa
Heights and Colon being the lowest on record
for the month of July. There was an excess
of evaporation on the Atlantic coast, and a
deficiency on the Pacific coast and over
Gatun Lake.

No fogs were observed on either coast, but
a number of fogs were observed at Alhajuela,



37 per cent of which were dissipated by
6.30 a. m. All lifted or were dissipated by
8 a. m.

Elevations of Gatun Lake, in feet above
mean sealevel, were as follows: Maximum,
on the 5th, 86.57; minimum, on the 31st,
86.24; mean for the month, 86.40.

Evaporation from the lake surface during
the month amounted to 3.491 inches.

The following is a summary of theclimato-
logical conditions at the ends of the Canal:







Temperature.


> .


Precipitation.


Wind.














-;


i


&


, -.




•j






Station*.






S
%

A


Q


|


Q




(2


>
e to

in


2 a


Is

£ a
HE


sJ-2


1 .1
> =

is


3


Q


•Ralhoa


29.862


806 90

1


J.ily 3, 73 July 6

|


89


10.44


16.19


20


4,325


S.E.


23


N.E.


July 18


Height9 . . .


29.866


78.5 90
1


July 13 70lju!y 11


91


10.13


7.84


23


3.S96


N.


30


S.W.


July 28



Large Dredges Placed in Dry Dock.

The 15-yard dipper dredge Paraiso was
docked in the new dry dock No. 1 at Balboa
shops on July 21, 1916, for minor repairs to
the plating around the spud-wells and for
cleaning and painting of the hull. Work
was done by forces from the Balboa and
Paraiso shops of the Mechanical Division,
working 12-hour shifts, day and night. The
repairs necessary consisted principally of re-
newing rivets and patching plates in the spud-
wells, and work was completed on July 27.

The Paraiso was returned to service in the
Cut on July 28, and the Gamboa was brought
into the dry dock for repairs of similar nature
at noon on August 2. The Gamboa left the
dock in the morning of August 9.



Civil Service Examinations.

The following civil service examinations
will be held on the dates indicated below, in-
formation concerning the same being posted
at Canal clubhouses and post offices, as per
the numbers of announcements indicated:

Assistant material engineer (male); S5.04
and S6 a day entrance salaries; examination
September 5, 1916; No. 1012.

Explosives chemist (male); §3,000 a year;
examination September 12, 19l6; No. 1031.

Architectural and structural steel drafts-
man (male l; 81,500 a year; examination on
or about September 10-11, 1916; No. 1032.



Levelman and Transicman Examination.

A levelman and transitman examination
will be held in the board room of the Ad-
ministration Building at Balboa Heights on



Sunday morning, September 24, 1916, at
9 o'clock.

Those desiring to take the examination will
submit an application through the leads
of their divisions, giving the following in-
formation:

(a) Examination desired (levelman or
transitman).

(b) Name and address.

(c) State the extent of your education,
with names of preparatory schools and col-
leges, together with dates of graduation.

(d) Give an outline of your experience, with
the approximate length of time served in each
position.

All applications are to be mailed to the
Office Engineer, Balboa Heights, on or before
September 14, 1916.

On Sunday, the 24th proximo, a written
and oral examination will be given, all papers
to be completed by 12 m., all parts of the
examination to have the following count:

Points.

Education 10

Experience 15

Written examination 50

Oral examination 20

Free hand lettering 5

Total 1 00

Those receiving a standing of 70 or better

will be eligible for prt motion to the p>sitions

of levelman and transitman, respectively, as

vacancies occur.

C. J. Embree, O. E. Malsbury, A. Wilson,

Board of Examiners.



432



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IX, No. 51.



PANAMA CANAL DIRECTORY.



Executive Department.
Headquarters. Balboa Heights.

GEO. W. GOETHALS, U. S. A.. Governor.

M. B. Stevens. Secretary.

C. A. McIlvaine, Executive Secretary.
VV. P. Copeland, Chief Clerk,
Executive Office.
Crede H. Calhoun, Chief, Division
of Civil Affairs, Balboa Heights.
Capt. Harry D. Mitchell, U. S. A.,
Chief, Division of Police and
Fire, Balboa Heights.
A. R. Lang, Superintendent, Divi-
sion of Schools, Balboa Heights.
T. S. Booz, General Secretary, Bu-
reau of Clubs and Playgrounds,
Balboa.
Frank Fei ille, Special Attorney. Ancon.
Walter F. Van Dame, Assistant to
the Special Attorney, Ancon.
R. S. Carlson, Land Agent, Ancon.
Charles R. Williams, District Attor-
ney, Ancon.
Department of Operation and Maintenance.
(Under immediate direction of the Governor as
Head of the Department.)
Headquarters, Balboa Heights.

LIEUT.-COL. CHESTER HARDING, U.
S. A., Engineer of Maintenance.
Lieut. -Col. Jay J. Morrow, U. S. A., As-
sistant to the Engineer of Mainte-
nance.

C. O. Carlson, Secretary.

C. J. Embree, Office Engineer.

Capt. W. H. Rose, U. S. A., Electrical En-
gineer, Electrical Division.

D. E. Wright, Municipal Engineer, Di-

vision of Municipal Engineering.

Capt. T. H. Dillon, U. S. A., Superin-
tendent, Gatun Locks, Gatun.

R. H. Whitehead, Superintendent, Pa-
cific Locks, Pedro Miguel.

F. D. Willson, Chief Hydrographer,
Section of Meteorology and Hydrog-
raphy.

O. E. Malsbury, Assistant Engineer,
Section of Surveys.

F. H. Cooke, Civil Engineer, U. S. N.,
Designing Engineer.

T. B. Monniche, Engineer of Docks,
Cristobal.

A. H. Jones, Assistant Engineer, Balboa.

C. C. Snedeker, Superintendent, Coco
Solo, Cristobal.

J. W. Wright, Superintendent of Steel
Erection, Balboa.
COMMANDER HUTCHINSON I. CONE,
U. S N., Marine Superintendent,
Marine Division, Balboa Heights.

Lieut. P. P. Bassett, U. S. N., Captain
of the Port, Cristobal.

Lieut. A. B. Reed, U. S. N., Captain
of the Port, Balboa.

Board of Local Inspectors — Lieut. P. P.
Bassett, Cluxirman; J. Macfar-
lane, Lieut. A. B. Reed. Head-
quarters, Balboa Heights.

Geo. J. Vanderslice. Recorder.

W. G. COMBER, Resident Engineer,
Dredging Division, Paraiso.

J. M acfarlane, Superintendent, Paraiso.

C. A. Black. Superintendent, Cristobal.

C. L. Vandeburgh, Junior Engineer,
Paraiso.
D. C. NUTTING, Jr.. Constructor. U. S. N.,
Superintendent, Mechanical Divi-
sion, Balboa.

A. L. Bell, Mechanical Engineer,
Balboa.



GEO. M. WELLS, Resident Engineer, Build-
ing Division, Balboa Heights.
Samuel M. Hitt, Architect.
T. C. Morris, Assistant Engineer.



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