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SHIPPING INFORMATION.

Tide Predictions.

Panama (BalDoa) tide predictions for the next
veeks are given in this table:

JANUARY.



Date.



Wed.. Jan. 26

Thurs., Jan. 27

Fri.. Jan. 28

Sat., Jan. 29

Sun.. Jan. 30

Mon.. Jan. 31




13 :45
J

14 :31
2.5

15:27

3
16:31

3.3
17:42

3 4
18 :55

3



19:51
14.4

20:34
14 1

21 :29
13.8

22 :36
13.5

23 :S2
13.6



FEBRUARY.



Date.



Tues., Feb. 1 . . .
Wed., Feb. 2...
Thurs., Feb. 3..

Fri., Feb. 4

Sat.. Feb. 5....
Sun., Feb. 6. . . .
Mon.. Feb. 7...
Tues., Feb. 8...
Wed.. Feb. 9...
Thurs., Feb. 10
Fri., Feb. 11...
Sat.. Feb. 12...
Sun.. Feb. 13..
Mon., Feb. 14. .
Tues.. Feb. 15.
Wed.. Feb. 16..
Thurs.. Feb. 17
Fri., Feb. 18...
Sat., Feb. 19...
Sun.. Feb. 20...
Mon., Feb. 21..
Tues.. Feb. 22.
Wed., Feb. 23..
Thurs.. Feb. 24
Fri., Frb. 25...
Sat., Feb. 26...
Sun., Feb. 27..
Mon., Feb. 28..
Tues.. Feb. 29.



1 :15
14.1

2 :06
14.8

3:05

15.5
3:58
16.0
4:50
16.3
5:39
16.2
0:11
-0.5

:55
0.1

1 :41



3.9
5:2:

4.3
0:03



1 :59

2:42
12.9
3:23
13.5
4 :02
14.1



5:15
14.7
5:52
14:8
0:27

0.7
1 :07

1.0
1 :53



5 :02
2.8

6:15
2.5



7:39
1.4
8:38
0.4
9:31
-0.5

10:19

2-1.

11 :03
-1 .4

11 :47
-1 .1
6:25
15.8
7 :08
15.0
7 iS3
14 1

13.0
9:23
12.0

10:24
11 .2

11 :40
10.9
6:27
4.5
7:29
3.9
8:21

9:05

2.3

9:44

1.6

10:19

1 .0

10:53

0.6

11 :27

0.5

12:0!

0.7

6:30

14.6

7:09

14.3

7:52

13.8

8:44

13.1

9:50

12.6

11 :11



13:46

13.9
14:45

14.9
15 :40

15.9
16:31
16.5
17:19

16.8
18:05

16.8
12 :29

-0.4

13:14

6

14 :00
1.7

14:48
3.0

15 :42
4.0

16:42
4.8

17 :49
5.1

12 :53



15 :16

13.1

15 :53

13.8

16:27

14.4

17:02

14.9

17 :36

15.2

18:10

15.4

12:38

1.0

13:19

- 1.5

14:07

2.2

15 :05

3.0

16:13

3.5

17:28

3.6

1S:44

3.1



21 :02
1.0

21 :54
0.1

22 :41
-0.5

23 :27
-0.7



1S:47
16.3

19:29
15.5

20:10
14.5

20 :S4
13.4

21 :44
12.4

22:'9
11 .7



18:55
5.0

19 :54
4.4

20:44
' 6

21 :27
2.7

22 :04
1.9

22 :40
1.2

23:15
0.8

23 :50
0.6



18 :45

15.3
19:24

15.0
20:10

14.4
21 :05

13.7
22:17

13.2
23 :40

13.2



Date.



Wed., March 1. .
Thurs., March 2
Fri., March 3. .
Sat., March 4. . .
Sun., March 5. .
Mon., March 6.
Tues., March 7.
Wed., March 8.



Time and height of high and
low water.



0:56


7:24


13:36


19:51


13.7


1.8


14.0


2.1


1 :59


8:22


14:32


20:48


14.4


0.8


15.0


1.0


2:53


9:13


15 :'2


21:37


15.2


-0.1


15.9


0.0


3:43


9:58


16:09


22:22


15.7


-0.7


16.5


-0.6


4:31


10:41


16:53


23 :04


16.0


-0.9


16.7


-0.9


5:16


11 :21


17:34


23:43


15.9


-0.7


16.5


-0.6


5:5 7


12 :00


18:14




15.6


0.0


16.0





0:23
0.1



1S:54



The tides are placed in theordercfoccurren.ee, with
their times on the first line and heights on the second
line of each day; a comparison of consecutive heights
will indicate whether it is high or Io*v water. The
heights, in feet and tenths, are reckoned from mean low
water springs, which is the datum of the soundings on the
Coast and Geodetic Survey charts for this region, and



200



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IX, No. 23.



MOVEMENTS OF OCEAN VESSELS.

(Week ending at 6 p. m., January 23, 1916.)



THROUGH THE CANAL — ATLANTIC *° PACIFIC.



Dale
Entered


Vessel






From


For


CARGO


CANAL
TONNAGE


Nationality Line


Nature 1 Tons


Gross | Net




Potomac (tug) . . . American

Gen. J. M. Schofidd American


United States Government.. . .
United States Government.. . .
United States Government.. . .






























(submarines)


«—»»«—






1





PORT OF CRISTOBAL.







♦Arrivals.








♦Departures.




Date


Vessel


Line


From


Date


Vessel


Line


For


Jan. 20

Jan. 23




Dampskacties Belita

Royal MailS. P. Co


Philadelphia.
Baranquilla.


Jan. 19....
Jan. 21....
Jan. 24....


Jacoh Luckenbach.. .




New York.




Royal Mail S. P. Co


New York & way pts.






Po t Limon.



PORT OF BALBOA.







Arrtvals.






Departures.




Dale


Vessel Line From


Dave


Vessel Line


For


Jan. 15

Jan. 17....

Jan. 17

Jan. 17....

Jan. 17

Jan 18

Jan. 10

Jan. 19

Jan. 21

Jan. 21

Jan. 22 ... .
Jan. 23 ... .
Jan. 23. . . .
Jan. 23. . . .

Jan. 23

Jan. 23. . . .
Jan. 23....
Jan. 23






Jan. 16

Jan. 17

Jan. 18

Jan. 19

Jan. 19

Jan. 20. . . .
Jan. 20. . . .

Jan. 21

Jan. 21....
Jan. 22




Bordeaux.


0. M.Clark

Quilpue


C. H. Higgins Lumber Co. .

Pacific Mail S. S. Co

Pacific Steam Nav. Co


San Francisco.

San Francisco.

Valparaiso.

San Francisco.

Iquique.

San Francisco.

Mejillones.

San Francisco.

Guayaquil.

Buenaventura.

San Francisco.

Cristobal.

Cri tobal.

Cristobal.




Pacific Steam Nav. Co

South American S. S. Co . . .
Pacific Steam Nav. Co


Y aliaraiso.
Valparaiso.


Alfred Nobel


San Francisco.


Alfred Nobel


Concordia Steamship Co. . .


City of Para

O. w. Clark


Pacific Mail S. S. Co

C. H. Higgins Lumber Co. .


San Francisco.
San Francisco.


Howick Hall


U. S. Steel Products Co ... .
N. Y. & Pacific S. S. <_o.. . .

Pacific Steam Nav. Co

Royal Mail S. P. Co


Callao.


Harry Luckenbach .




San Francisco.


Cauca '


Pacific Steam Nav. Co


Taboga.








Coaster






















Gen. J . .1/ .Schofield.




































Cristobal.
Mollendo.






















Expected Arrivals.






Expected Departures. .





Jan. 24. . .
Jan. 23. . .
Jan. 24...
Jan. 24. . .
Jan. 25. . .
Jan. 25. . .
Jan. 30. . .



Musician

Mars (oilier) . .
Thode Fagdund.
Santa Cecilia. . .



Charente Steamship Co ... . San Francisco. | Jan. 24 Erroll

U. S. Navy San Francisco. Jan. 25 Logan. . . .

YV. YVilhelmsen Tuc i ilia. Jan. 25 Quilpue...

Atlantic and Pacific S.S. Co. San Francisco. Jan. 25 San Jose.

South American S. S. Co. . . Valparaiso. Jan. 29 Colusa.

Coast Oil Transport Co. . . .1 San Francisco. ! Jan. 31..

Pacific Mail S. S. Co San Francisco. " Feb. 1 ( Jama



J. YVarrack & Co Coronel.

U. S. Army Manila.

Pacific Steam Nav. Co Valparaiso.

Pacific Mail Steam. Co j San Francisco.

& Pacific S. S. Co.



Limari South American S. S. Co.. . . Valparaiso.



Foval Ma'l S P. Co



♦Other than Uni'.ed Fruit Company's



sis ani venels in regular service to the United States.



which is 8.2 fee: below mean sealevel. To find thedepth
ofwater.add the tubal ir height to the soundings given
on the chart, unless a minus (-) sign is before theheight.
in which case subtract it.

The time used is Cosmopolitan Standard, for the
meridian 75° W. The hours of the day are numbe:eJ
consecutively from 0/l (midnight) to 2ih (11:00 p. m )•
All hours greater than 12 are in the afternoon (p. m.)
and when diminished by 12 give the usual reckoning;
for instance. 15:47 is 3:47 p. m.

Stages of the Chagres River, Gatun Lake, and
Miranores Lake.
Maximum heights of the Chagres Rivar, G.t n and
Mir.irljres Lakes for the week ending midnight, Satur-
day, January 22. 1910:





Stations.


Day and Date.




3
Si


i


= « Id




Vigia


E






<


o


OJ 1 SJ


Sun.. Jan. 16


125.80


92 31186.76


S6.67 51.79


Mon.. Tan. 17


125. 8C


92.15 86.75


J6 67 51 80


Tues..Jan. 18


126.01


92.9186 V7


i6.75 51.78


Wed., J ii.. 19


126.05


92. 6086. 77 86. 75 SI ''2




125 S(


92.28 I S6.70JS6 65 52.05


Fri., Jan. 21


125 M


92.26'S6.69S6.60 52.04


Sat., Jan. 22


125.80


92. 25 8f .65 86.6U 5 2.1 S3


Heights of low water






to nearest foot. . .


125 C


91 1



Railroad Steamship Line, and are made every week,
and will be on Thursdays throughout the time that
the Canal is closed to commeice. The mail is delivered
at Neiv York six days after the day of sailing, except
that on the Advmce the voyage requires seven days.t

Train No. 6. leaving Panama at 11 a. m., connects
with the above despatches.*

♦Note— The sailings on Monday. February 7 and
March 6. will not land mail in New York until
Tuesday of the following week. Train No. 4. leaving
Panama at 7.10 a. m. connects with the despatches
for the two sailings mentioned above.

tN'oTE — When the vessel sailing Thursday is the
Advinte. mail for I.ousiana, Mississippi. Arkansas,
and Texas is held for the direct despatch to New
Orleans on the following Sunday.



Tenadores U. F. C . . Jan.

Advance P. R. R..Feb.

Santa Marta U F. C.Feb.

Mctapan U. F C.Feb.



Panama . . .
Almirante.
Pastores. . .
Allianca...
Zacapa. . . .
Calamares.

Colon

Carrillo

Tenadores .
Advance. ..



R. Feb.
. .U. F. C.Feb.

.U. F. C.Feb.
..P. R R.Feb.
. .U. F. C.Feb.
..U.F. C.Feb.
P. R. R..Feb.

.U. F. C.Feb.

.U.F. C.Feb.
. . P. R. R. . Mar.



NEW ORLEANS TO CRISTOBAL-COLON.



Sailings of Vessels in Regular Service
United States.

NEW YORK TO CRISTOBAL-COLON.

Vessel. Line. Sails.

Santa Marta U. F. C. Jan. 19. .

Advance P. R. R..Jan. 20.. .

Metapan U. F C.Jan. 22...

Almirante U. F C.Jan. 26..

Panama

Pastores



Mail Despatches.

Following is the schedule of the despatches of mail
made to the United States each week by the Canal Zone
pos'al service:

Every Sunday to New Orleans, for all States.
Due at New Orleans on the following Friday.

Every Monday to New York, for all States Due
at New York the following Monday.*

Every Thursday, temporarily, to New York, for all
States. These dispatches are by vessels of the Panama



Allianca

Calamares. . . .

Carrillo

Colon

Tenadores ...
Santa Marta.

Advance

Metapan

Almirante. . . .
Panama

CRISTOBAL-COLO

Colon P. R. R.Jan. 27..

Carrillo U. F. C .Jan. 27. .



P. R. R.Jan. 27..

U F C. Jan. 29..

U F C .Feb. 2 .

P. R. R. . Feb. 3 . .

U. F. C.Feb. 5..

U. F. C.Feb. 9..

P R. R.Feb. 10 .

.U. F. C.Feb. 12..

.U. F. C.Feb. 16..

P. R. R..Feb. 17..

,U. F. C Feb. 19..

.U. F. C.Feb. 23..

.P. R. R..Feb. 24..

NEW YORK.



Arrives.

.Jan. :

Jan. :

Jan.

.Feb.

.Feb.

.Feb.

Feb.
.Feb.
.Feb.
.Feb.

Feb.
.Feb.
.Feo.
.Feb.
.Feb.
. Mar.
.Mar.

.Feb.
.Feb.



Turrialba

Coppename.. .
Abangarez

Cartago

Atenas

Ilered a

Turrialba

Coppename. . .

Abangarez

Cartago

Atenas

Hered'a

Turrialba

Coppename. . .



.U. F. C.Jan.
.U. F C.Jan.
.U. F. C.Jan.
.U. F. C.Feb.
.U. F. C.Feb.
,U. K C.Feb.
.U. F. C. Feb.
,U. F. C.Feb.
.U F. C.Feb.
.U. F. C.Feb.
.U. F. C.Feb.
.U. F C.Mar.
.U. F. C.Mar.
.U.F. C.Mar.



CKISTOBAL-COLON TO 1



Parismina

Turrialba

Coppename.. .
Abangarez. . . .

Cartago

Atenas

Heredia

Turrialba

Coppename. . .

Abangarez

Cartago

Atenas



. .V F. C.Jan.
. ..U. F. C.Jan.
. ..U. F. C.Feb.
. . .U. F. C.Feb.
. ..U. F. C.Feb.
. . .U. F. C.Feb.
...U. F C.Feb.
. . . U F C Feb
. ..U. F. C.Feb.
. ..U. F. C.Feb.
.. .U. F. C.Mar.
...U.F. C.Mar.



..Feb.
..Feb.

. Feb.
.Feb.
..Feb.
. . Feb.
..Feb.

. Feb.
. . Feb.
. .Feb.
..Mar.
. . Mar.
. . Mar.
..Mar.

Jan.
Jan.
.Feb.
.Feb.
.Feb.
.Feb.
.Feo.
.Feb.
.Feb.
.Feb.
. Mar.
.Mar.
.Mar.
.Mar.



).. .Feb.

) Feb.

i....Feb.

S Feb.

! Feb.

S Feb.

J Feb.

1. .. I"eh

7 Mar.

7 Mar.

5 Mar.

5 Mar.



CANAL




RECORD



Volume IX. BALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1916.



No. 24.



The Canal Record



Offiti I publication of The Panama Canal.

The Canal Record is published every week. The sub-
scription rate is $1 per year in the United Stiles and
its possessions, and in Canada. Cuba. Mexico, and
Panama (domestic postige), and $1.50 in other countries
(foreign postage). The p :per is furnished free to United
States Gov rnmenl departments, representatives of
governments, public libraries, and employes of The
Panima Canal and the Panama Railroad Company
whose names are on the gold roll.

All snbscriptions expire on December 31. Domestic
subscriptions are charged as beginning from the first of
the quarter of the year in which re eiv '■/.

Remittances should be made to pay only to December 31,
on this basis:

Subscription for the rest of the year, to January 1. 19 IT,
is $1.00.

For foreign subscriptions the year is divided in'o thirds;
remittances for the remainder of this year sho.ld be
$1.50.

Remittances for subscriptions may be forwarded to
The Panama Canal, Washington. D. C, or to The
Canal Record at the address given below.

Address all Communications,

THE CANAL RECORD,

B-lboa I..ights, Canal Zone,
Isthmus of Panama.

NOTES OF PROGRESS.



Canal Not to Be Considered in Routing Shipping
at Present.

As in the two weeks preceding, several
vessels arrived at Balboa last week in the hope
of passing through the Canal, and then sailed
for their destinations in the Atlantic by way
of the Strait of Magellan. These included
the steamship Valella, from Tacoma for Ips-
wich with 8,480 tons of barley; and the
Karma, from Victoria for the United King-
dom with 2,677 tons of lumber and explosives.

The Norwegian steamship Thode Fagelnnd,
which arrived from Tocopilla with a cargo
of 6,800 tons of nitrates in the morning of
Thursday, January 27, to take orders at
Balboa, received directions to continue to
San Francisco, since it was impossible to make
the transit of the Canal.

The Danish steamship Chumpon of the
East Asiatic Company arrived at Balboa at
7 p. m., January 29, in the hope of passing
through the Canal on the way to Copenhagen.
She sailed on February 2 for Talara.

As has been previously pointed out, the
Canal authorities can give vessels no en-
couragement to wait at the entrances for
transit. A statement on the subject was issued
by the Governor on January 22, as follows:

"It is not intended to open the Canal until
a safe and practicably permanent channel is
reasonably assured. This can not be assured
at present, although the operations of the
dredges during the past four months have
shown that they are able, when not inter-
rupted in the work by the passage of ships or
cleaning of the channel necessary to provide
ample depth for navigation, to gain on the
slides, and it is desired to have a reasonable



assurance that they can maintain this gain,
even with the delay from the above causes.

"It is hoped that before long better informa-
tion on two main controlling features will be
available. The large mass of rock at the base
of Gold Hill, on the east bank, is being care-
fully observed. If the materials behind it
move northwardly, as is not unlikely, one
danger of interruption to navigation will be
removed. The other feature is the rate of
motion that will result in the west slide when
dredges attack its face, as will shortly be
done. It is believed that the dredges can
keep well ahead of any probable motion of
this mass, provided the east bank is quiescent,
or nearly so.

"As soon as this office feels that sufficient
information on these two points is at hand to
justify it, a prediction will be made. In the
meantime it is recommended that the Canal
be not considered in routing shipping. The
work of restoration of the channel is, however,
proceeding most favorably; the office has in
mind the desire of commerce to resume navi-
gation through the Canal, and as long advance
notice as possible will be given to shipper in
order that preparations for such routing of
vessels may be adequate."



Progress of Excavation at the Culebra Slides.

Excavation from the bases of the Culebra
slides during the week ending at midnight of
Monday, January 31, amounted to 230,830
cubic yards. Other excavation in the Cut
during the same period amounted to 29,361
cubic yards, making a total for the week of
260,191 cubicyards. In addition, 22, 834cubic
yards were rehandled by the pipeline suction
dredge No. 86, the Belgian ladder dredge Mar-
wot, and the seagoing suction dredge Culebra.

The output of the several dredges during
the week was as follows:

Dredge. Type. Yardage.

Cascades 15-yard dipper 59,835

Camboa 15-yard dipper 63.720

Paraiso 15-yard dipper 59,325

Coronal Ladder 47,950

Culebra Seagoing suction 21,418

No. 86 Pipeline suction 16.232

Cardenas 5-yard dipper 14,545

The Belgian ladder dredge Marmot was
taken out of service at 6 a. m. on January 30.

The average aggregate output from the
Cut during the 14 weeks preceding that end-
ing at midnight of Monday, January 31, was
258,780 cubic yards, not including re-
handled spoil, the total amount of primary
excavation during that period having been
3,622,920 cubic yards.



Arrival of the "Bushneli."

The new submarine tender Bushneli of
the United States Navy arrived at Balboa
from Seattle on Tuesday, February 1. The
Bushneli is on the way to Boston.



The submarines C-l, C-3, and C-5 were
returned from Balboa to Cristobal on Jan-
uary 28 and 29, in tow of the Potomac.



TO EXTEND BREAKWATER.

Length of East Breakwater in Llmon Bay to Be
Increased Approximately 1.300 Feet.

Arrangements are under way to extend the
East Breakwater in Limon Bay 1,300 feet.
The original estimate called for a breakwater
7,200 feet in length, extending from a point
2,000 feet from the outer end of the West
Breakwater to a point 4,125 feet from the
eastern shore of the bay. In July, 1914, it
was decided to reduce the length of the break-
water by 1,800 feet, making its inner end
5,925 feet from shore. This arrangement was
made in the interests of economy, as the cost
of construction was estimated at $475 per
linear foot. The progress of the work has
been such, in spite of a loss of approximately
§360,000 in damages done by northers in
February and April, 1915, that it is expected
that an additional 1,300 feet of breakwater
can be built within the original estimate.
This will be within 500 feet of the length first
proposed. Under the latest plan, the East
Breakwater will be a structure 6,700 feet in
length, extending from a point 2,000 feet from
the outer end of he West Breakwater to a
point 4,625 fee, m shore. A detached
breakwater is feasible on account of the partial
protection afforded by Margarita Point and
the northwesterly point of Manzanillo Island.
This is shown in the accompanying map of the
bay. The landward extension will consider-
ably reduce the gap at the east, and augment
the protection afforded by the points.

This change of plan has enabled the excess
proportion of core rock received from the
Sosa Hill quarry along with the required large
armor rock to be used. In order to pro-
duce the armor rock desired for the 5,400-
foot structure it was necessary to excavate
a great deal of smaller, or core rock; and as
this is in excess of the needs of it on the 5,400-
foot structure it has been decided to use it
for filling for a 1,300-foot extension. It was
at first proposed to dump it along the ap-
proach trestle, as a means of disposing of it
which would be of at least some aid to the
breakwater, and not to armor it; but as it
was found that the positive value of the
structure could be greatly increased by armor-
ing the fill as a part of the original construction
it was decided to make the extension a regular
part of the breakwater, armor and all, as far
as the funds will permit.

The total of armor required has, accordingly,
increased. The production of armor rock
being relatively slow and expensive, resort
will be had to greater use of concrete blocks
for armoring. The original order for 10,000
concrete cubes, seven feet on the side, con-
taining about 12.3 cubic yards each and weigh-
ing approximately 25 tons, to be manufactur-
ed by contractors at Gamboa, has been in-
creased by 20 per cent in accordance with an
optional clause in the original contract, making
the total output from this source 12,000 blocks



202



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IX, No. 24.



or 147,600 cubic yards. In addition, about
75,000 cubic yards of blocks will be manu-
factured by forces of The Panama Canal.

The blocks to be made by the Canal forces
will be smaller than those turned out by the
contractor at Gamboa. The East Breakwater
forces will make about 4,500 blocks at Coco
Solo, each block to be six feet three inches
on a side with three-inch corners, and weigh-
ing about 18 tons; the aggregate of concrete
to be used will be about 40,000 cubic yards.
The concrete-mixing organization which has
been engaged at the permanent coaling plant
at Cristobal will make 4,600 blocks, five feet
three inches on a side and containing 5.3 cubic
yards, weighing about 10§ tons each, an
aggregate of about 24,000 cubic yards of
concrete. The organization at Pier 7, Cris-
tobal, will make about 4,000 blocks, four
feet three inches on a side, containing 2.8
cubic yards and weighing 5.6 tons each, a
total of approximately 11,200 cubic yards.
The quantity to be produced by Tiach plant
may be varied according to the developments.
The coaling plant forces will work at the south
end of the plant, and the Pier 7 forces will
lay out a yard in the vicinity of the old Mount
Hope borrow pit of the Panama Railroad.

It is expected that the manufacture of
blocks will begin at the coaling plant on
Friday of this week; by the Pier 7 forces,
about February 7; and at Coco Solo, about
February 10 or 12.



The concrete blocks are not as hard as the
rock obtained from Sosa Hill, and weigh about
20 pounds less per cubic foot. As they will
meet rough treatment in withstanding the
rugged seas that blow in from the north they
are liable to considerable deterioration, and
it is proposed to use them mostly for the inner
and subsurface armoring, and to cover them
with armor rock. Blocks are now being
placed on the inner side of the breakwater at
the land end of the 5,400-foot project, and at
the same time other blocks are being placed
at the outer end on the sea side, to form the
base of the armor. They have been plowed
from cars to bring the fill up to approximately
five feet below the surface of the water; and
armor rock is being placed on them to bring
the fill up to about seven feet above the sur-
face. The structure is not being carried to
full height at any point now because it is de-
sired to have the armor along the sea side
spread over as great a length as practicable.



To Remove the Village of Chagres.

Arrangements are being made for the re-
moval of the town of Chagres, situated on the
east bank of the Chagres River at its mouth,
adjacent to the old Spanish fort of San
Lorenzo. This village contains 96 houses at
present. The territory lying between the
east bank of the Chagres, beyond the Canal
Zone, and the present westernboundary be-



tween the Canal Zone and the Republic of
Panama has been taken over by the United
States for military puposes, in accordance with
the provisions of Articles II and III of the
treaty of November 18, 1903.

A party consisting of the Subsecretary of
Foreign Relations of Panama, the governor
of the province of Colon, the Special Attorney
for The Panama Canal, the Land Agent, and
the assistant engineer in charge of land surveys,
made a trip from Cristobal to Chagres in the
tug Porto Bella on Monday, January 31,
and continued westward beyond the mouth
of the Chagres until a satisfactory situation
for the relocation of the village was found.
This is at the mouth of the Lagarto River,
about eight miles beyond the Chagres. On
the west bank the present village of Lagarto
is situated, containing more than 100 houses,
and a population of about 500. The site
selected for the inhabitants of Chagres is
directly across the river, on a table-land
rising to a height of about 40 feet above the
sea. The Panama Canal will clear an
area of about 20 acres here and lay it off as
a townsite, and furnish transportation for
the effects of the inhabitants of Chagres to
the new town, after settling with them their
claims for improvements at Chagres.

The Lagarto is about 70 feet wide at its
mouth, and as deep as 20 feet inside of the
bar. The new townsite is considered well
situated.




CHART SHOWING 1 OCATION OF PAST BREAKWATER AND 1 ,300-FOOt' EXTENSION.



February 2, 1916.



THE CANAL RECORD



203



PRESIDENT'S PROCLAMATION



Appointing a Day for Making Contributions for
Aid of Jews in Countries at War.

f The President issued, under date of Janu-
ary 11, a proclamation designating January
27 as a day for making contributions to assist
the Jews in the various countries now at war.



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