J. A. Stanley Adam.

Parodies and imitations old and new online

. (page 1 of 19)
Online LibraryJ. A. Stanley AdamParodies and imitations old and new → online text (page 1 of 19)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


>



9




i
















&









!









PARODIES

AND

IMITATIONS



PARODIES




ED/'fED BY

J A- STANLEY- ADAM
OWHTTE



WITH A FOREWORD J3V

SIR ARTHUR CPLLER COUCH



LONDON
HUTCHINSON & CO.

PATERNOSTER ROW




First published in



FOREWORD

ON THE GENTLE ART

SAYS Ruskin, in his lecture on The Mystery of
Life and its Arts " The moment a man can
really do his work he becomes speechless about it.
All words become idle to him all theories." With
a rhetorical flourish he goes on to ask, " Does a bird
need to theorise about building its nest, or boast of
it when built ? "

Well, as to the bird, I don't know, and (with all
respect) I very much doubt if Ruskin knew ;
though by the noise the sparrows were making, a
few weeks ago, in the ivies outside this window of
mine, I should judge that as they say in Parliament
" the answer to the second part of the question
is in the affirmative." But if Ruskin be right in
his general proposition, that a man straightway falls
silent about any work he can really do, it would
seem that the editors of this anthology in asking
me to write a Preface have paid a left-handed
compliment, the blow of which is sharpened rather
than softened by their gracefully including two or
three parodies of my own !

Well, well en los nidos de antano no hai pajaros



FOREWORD

hogano I I may theorise a little, perhaps, about
last year's nests.

Now, the first thing to be said about Parody is that
it plays with the gods : its fun is taken with
Poetry, which all good men admit to be a beautiful
and adorable thing, and some would have to be a
holy thing. 1 It follows then that Parody must be
delicate ground, off which the profane and vulgar
should be carefully warned. A deeply religious
man may indulge a smile at this or that in his
religion ; as a truly devout lover may rally his
mistress on her foibles, since for him they make
her the more enchanting. Without being con-
scious of it, he knows unerringly "how far to go,"
as they say; he cannot offend, because his true
reverence does not so much control as permeate

him :

Thou art my life, my love, my heart,

The very eyes of me :

and the tone of the laugh tells of that sweet under-
standing. So, or almost so, it should be with the
parodist. He must be friends with the gods, and
worthy of their company, before taking these
pleasant liberties with them. Nor, if we keep a

1 There are, of course, false gods in Poetry. But
parodies of these directly expose their falsity, while
parodies of true poetry subtly pay homage to its truth.
Moreover, we may say generally that in parody, as else-
where, exposure of the false (though useful and necessary)
ranks below illustration of the true.



FOREWORD

mind at once fearless and modest in approaching
them, shall we fail of that friendship, thanks to
their magnificent condescension. As Emerson has
noted :

" It is remarkable that involuntarily we
always read as superior beings. Universal
history, the poets, the romancers, do not in
their stateliest picture in the sacerdotal, the
imperial palaces, in the triumphs of will or of
genius anywhere lose our ear, anywhere make
us feel that we intrude, that this is for our
betters ; but rather it is true that, in their
grandest strokes, there we feel most at home.
All that Shakespeare says of the King, yonder
slip of a boy that reads in the corner feels to
be true of himself. ..."

If this be true and I think no one will dispute
it then the more shame must we feel when an
outsider comes along and takes advantage of their
noble condescension to call hail-fellow with Milton,
for example, or to slap Wordsworth on the back.
A David may dance before the ark, to which an
Uzzah may not put forth a hand : and even David
must lay his account with Michal's shocked pro-
testantism.

The material, then, on which Parody works is
Poetry, and preferably great Poetry. Its method
consists in a nice apposition of the incongruous,
catching as nearly as possible the authentic speech
of the bard and applying it unexpectedly, even



FOREWORD

absurdly, to things beneath his notice ; thereby
reminding him that he is mortal without denying
rather, insisting that he is divine. In its easiest
form Parody will take his actual words, and turn
them to some new and ridiculous connotation. It
is a trick not far removed from punning ; yet, when
well executed, it gives pleasure, I think, to anyone
not born a prig. For an instance, I choose a few
lines of Mr. Hartley Carrick's, one of our younger
parodists. He takes Wordsworth's " She was a
Phantom of delight," and applies the actual words,
or some of them, which in our minds carry their
own associations, to a motor-omnibus.

// was a phantom of delight

Wkenfrst it gleam'd upon my sight,

And seem'd to hint a time of bliss

In store for the metropolis . . .

A perfect motor, nobly planned

To traverse Holborn and the Strand. . . .

But now from early morn till e'en
I hear the pulse of the machine
That clatters past my humble door
In one unending shriek and roar ;
With aching head and deafen'd ear
I note with apprehensive fear
The traveller 'twixt life and death
Endeavour to regain his breath,
As once again it skids away
To haunt, to startle, and waylay.



FOREWORD

At the risk of being numbered among the friends
of Mr. Peter Magnus, I confess that these absurdities
amuse me. But now let us compare the above
with a specimen of parody carried almost, if not
quite, to its fullest powers, and for this purpose
let us choose another " imitation" of Wordsworth,
this time by J. K. Stephen (genius untimely lost) :

POETIC LAMENTATION ON THE INSUFFICIENCY OF STEAM
LOCOMOTION IN THE LAKE DISTRICT

Bright Summer spreads his various hue

O'er nestling vales and mountains steep,
Glad birds are singing in the blue,

In joyous chorus bleat the sheep.
But men are walking to and fro,

Are riding, driving, far and near,
And nobody as yet can go

By train to Buttermere.

Wake, England, wake ! 'tis now the hour

To sweep away this black disgrace
The want of locomotion proves

In so enjoyable a place.
Nature has done her part, and why

Is mightier Man in his to fail ?
I want to hear the porters cry,

" Change here for Ennerdale ! "



Presumptuous Nature ! do not rate
Unduly high thy humble lot,



FOREWORD

Nor vainly strive to emulate

The fame of Stephenson and Watt.

The beauties which thy lavish pride
Has scatter'd through the smiling land

Are little worth till sanctified
By Man's completing hand.

The form is here true Wordsworth, from the
verbose title to the last exquisite quatrain, with
scarcely a lapse. "Enjoyable" in stanza 2 is not
quite Wordsworth, but a little more than Words-
worth, and "the fame of Stephenson and Watt"
occupies Stephen for a moment with his own clever-
ness. On the other hand, what, for example,
could be more exquisitely Wordsworthian in
operation of mind and in actual cadence of speech
than

But men are walking to and fro,

Are riding, driving, far and near . . . ?

There is more than this, with almost diabolical
cunning Stephen has seized on the subject that of
all others would have engaged Wordsworth ; has
turned it upside down ; and has presented the poet
uttering to us in his own authentic words precisely
the last sentiments his admirers would expect him
to utter. And yet again (so clever it is), we are
left with a frolic doubt (remembering Wordsworth's
ineradicable streak of the prosaic and his actual
return upon himself in his later years) that some-
how, had it been possible to fill the great man up



FOREWORD

with laughing gas, in the moments preceding un-
consciousness he might not improbably have
uttered these very sentiments as he would assuredly
have cast them in similar words. I call this the
perfection of Parody.

But if the parodist can do so much as this, it
follows further that Parody must be a form of
Criticism, and may be enlightening as it is vivacious.
Again I turn for the simplest illustration to the
work of a young practitioner. Some years ago, in
his last Oxford lectures, Mr. Froude lamented that
no poet in this country had arisen to undertake a
national epic of the great Elizabethan seamen ; a
hint which has since been acted on by Mr. Alfred
Noyes in his fine Drake, an epic poem in twelve
books. Now in any long poem of the sea there
inheres the difficulty that while the action of Epic
has to be rapid and the verse correspondingly rapid
(as Matthew Arnold noted in his Lectures On
Translating Homer\ actually the business of sea-
faring is full of patience and longueurs. You
cannot upon the wide Atlantic hustle action and
reaction to and fro as upon the fields of windy
Troy. Homer, when he came to the Odyssey,
dodged a part of this difficulty by casting a whole
mass of his hero's adventures into the form of re-
ported speech a traveller's yarn at the court of
Alcinous ; and another part he could dodge because
he was dealing with the purely fictitious, and



FOREWORD

could introduce a shipwreck or a miracle when-
ever things were getting slow. But in these days
you cannot play tricks like this with Drake, whose
voyages are matters of history. This difficulty,
then, was inherent in Mr. Noyes' subject, and it
seems to me very shrewdly detected and hit off' in
Mr. Wilfrid Blair's parody :

THE NOYES OF BATTLE 1
Meanwhile the wind had changed, and Francis Drake
Put down the helm, and drove against the seas.
Once more the wind changed, and the simple seaman,
Full-fraught with weather-wisdom, once again
Put down the helm, and so drove on, until
The everlasting and omnipotent
Dawn, through the splendid gloom and golden clouds
Broke : and a great, golden, gilded galleon
In raggy piles of gloom and shaggy splendour
Rose up against them, clouded with the dawn.

Flushed, plumed, and purpled on the imperious poop,
Crusty with cramoisie the Spaniards stood.
They quite refused surrender, till Drake cried
" I am El Draque ! " At once they recognised
The name, tho' spoken with a Devon burr.
Down came their flag at once upon the deck,
As when a fragment of the ceiling falls.

Brief and delicious simile !

So with instructions to the wheel
Drake went below, and had a glass of grog.
1 Toets on the his. Oxford : B. H. Blackwell, 1910.



FOREWORD

For a second and more accomplished illustration,
let us take James Smith's famous parody of Crabbe
in Rejected Addresses. Crabbe is a very considerable
poet : for a certain power of poignancy, hard yet
human, and (its best quality) stark clear of senti-
ment, you will hardly find his match. But he
exhibited this power in versified stories, and in the
art of introducing and laying out a story he was
incurably clumsy and could be bald, unpoetical to
the last degree. Those of us who love him best
must have smiled oftenest over such passages as

Peter had heard there were in London then
Still have they being ! workhouse-clearing men,
Who, undisturbed by feelings just or kind,
Would parish-boys to needy tradesmen bind . . .

The difficulty here is somewhat cognate with
that of logging Drake's voyages : and perhaps
among narrative poets Homer stands alone in his
handling of flat intervals, his skill in poetising such
operations as cooking a dinner or hauling up a boat
so that while never aspiring above their due level
in the narrative they never fall below the grand
manner. Crabbe ("a Pope in worsted stockings")
avoided, to be sure, the Charybdis of Pope and
his compeers. He seldom or never clothed triviality
in fine and banal writing such as

The Heavens illumed by Sol's bright ray
Inoculation ! heavenly maid, descend.



FOREWORD

which was the approved way to talk of the
weather or of Dr. Jenner's vaccine. On the other
hand, at the beginning of a tale he would bump for
twenty or thirty lines together upon a Scylla
commonplace so bald and awkward that James
Smith's famous lines contain more of criticism than
of exaggeration :

John Richard William Alexander Dwyer
Was footman to Justinian Stubbs, Esquire ;
But when John Dwyer 'listed in the Blues,
Emanuel Jennings polish'd Stubbs's shoes.
Emanuel Jennings brought his youngest boy
Up as a corn-cutter a safe employ, etc.

This is fun and criticism together ; and as criticism
it indicates at once Crabbe's " worsted stockings "
and his frequent, almost habitual clumsiness in
starting them out for a walk.

Again, could the fatuity of the ordinary Prize
Poem be better rationalised in twenty pages of
prose than it was by the parodist who summarised
all the Oxford Newdigates in one line ?

What though no cenotaph enshrine thy bones !

Or, again, has the banality of poetic diction ever
received a shrewder knock than it did from the
parodies of the Anti-Jacobin ?

The feather'd tribes on pinions cleave the air ;
Not so the mackerel, and, still less, the bear, etc.



FOREWORD

Or yet, again, could the musical flagrancies of
our latest and greatest Strauss, and the affabilities
of all the eighteenth-century Odes to Saint Cecilia,
be more neatly touched than they are by Mr.
Charles L. Graves simply opposing them in an

ODE TO DISCORD

Hence, loathed Melody, whose name recalls
The mellow fluting of the nightingale

In some sequester'd vale,

The Murmur of the stream

Heard in a dream,

Or drowsy plash of distant waterfalls.
But thou, divine Cacophony, assume
The rightful overlordship in her room,
And with Percussion's stimulating aid
Expel the heavenly but no longer youthful maid.

The mischief with Parody is that while no
neater or swifter vehicle of criticism has ever been
invented, the most of men practise it in youth, as a
way of breaking their teeth upon literature, and
abandon it as middle age brings the critical judg-
ment which it would seem designed to convey.
There once was an Aristophanes to whom years
but brought fresh gusto in the gentle art : and our
own times have in England, in Mr. Owen Seaman, a
parodist who has steadily followed up the art to
something as near perfection as our language is
likely to achieve for his first living rival, Mr. A.



FOREWORD

G. Godley, is an Horatian rather than a parodist,
and indeed his line has lain in that direction from
the first. Calverley, Hilton of The Light Green,
J. K. Stephen, all died young. Perhaps the gods
loved them. For, as I said at the start, Parody
plays with the gods ; and, as George Meredith
says in his Essay on Comedy and we may reverently
apply it to the gods " You may estimate your
capacity for Comic perception by being able to de-
tect the ridicule of them you love, without loving
them less : and more by being able to see yourself
somewhat ridiculous in dear eyes, and accepting
the correction their image of you proposes."

ARTHUR QUILLER-COUCH.



CONTENTS

PAGE

FOREWORD, by SIR A. T. QUILLER-COUCH . . . " v

EDITORS' PREFACE . . ... xxxi

EARLY PARODISTS

ISAAC HAWKINS BROWNE (1705-1760) . 3

A Pipe of Tobacco (Imitation V).

( I")-
( IV).

GEORGE GORDON, LORD BYRON (1788-1824) . . . 7

To Mr. Murray.

HENRY CAREY (1693 (?)-i743) . ... 9

Namby-Pamby.

GEORGE CANNING (1770-1827) . . 13

The Elderly Gentleman.

The Friend of Humanity and the Knife-Grinder.
Sonnet on Mrs. Brownrigg.
The Soldier's Wife.

SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE (1772-1834) . . 19

Sonnets attempted in the manner of contemporary

writers (I).

Sonnets attempted in the manner of contemporary
writers (III).

CATHERINE MARIA FANSHAWE (1765-1834) . ... 22

Fragments in Imitation of Wordsworth.
b xvii



CONTENTS

PAGE

JOHN HOOKHAM FRERE (17691846) . 25

The Loves of the Triangles.
The Course of Time.
Isabella.
The Curse of the Laureate.

OLIVER GOLDSMITH (1728-1764) . . 37

The Logicians Refuted.

JAMES HOGG (1770-1835) . . 40

James Rigg.

THOMAS HOOD (the Elder) (1799-1845) . . . 43

Ode to Mr. Graham.
Ode on a Distant Prospect of Clapham Academy.

BEN JONSON (i573( ? )- l6 37) 53

Answer to Master Wither's Song.

JOHN KEATS (1795-1821) . . - 55

A Portrait.
On Oxford.

CHARLES LAMB (1775-1834) . . 58

Nonsense Verses.
Hypochondriacus.

JOHN LEYDEN (1775-1811) . . 61

The Lay of the Ettercap.

WILLIAM MAGINN (1793-1842) . . 64

The Rime of the Auncient Waggonere.
To a Bottle of Old Port.

JOHN PHILIPS (1676-1709) . . 74

The Splendid Shilling.

ALEXANDER POPE (1688-1744) . . . . 80

On a Fan of the Author's Design.
Weeping.

The Happy Life of a Country Parson,
xviii



CONTENTS

PAGE

THOMAS LOVE PEACOCK (1785-1866) . . -85

The Wise Men of Gotham.

WALTER RALEIGH (1552 (?)-i6i8) . . 89

Another Answer to Wither.

THE ROLLIAD (1784.) . . ... 91

Irregular Ode for Music.

JOHN HAMILTON REYNOLDS (1796-1852) . . . 100

Peter Bell : a Lyrical Ballad.

ROBERT SOUTHEY (1774-1843) . ... 104

Love Elegies.

Sonnet IV of the Amatory Poema of Abel Shuffle-
bottom.

HORACE SMITH (1779-1849) . ... 107

Cui Bono.

A Tale of Drury Lane.
The Living Lustres.
Evening, an Elegy.

JAMES SMITH (1775-1839) . . . 124

The Rebuilding.
The Baby's Debut.
The Theatre.

PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (1792-1822) . . . 142

Peter Bell the Third.

HORACE Twiss (1787-1849) . . . 145

The Patriot's Progress.
Fashion.

MODERN PARODISTS

WILLIAM EDMONSTOUNE AYTOUN (1813-1865) . . 155

La Mort d'Arthur.
A Midnight Meditation.



CONTENTS

PAGE

ROBERT BARNABAS BROUGH (1828-1860) . . . 161

The Vulture.
I'm a Shrimp !

FRANCIS BRET HARTE (1839-1902) . ... 168

The Lost Tails of Miletus.
Mrs. Judge Jenkins.
A Geological Madrigal.
The Willows.
North Beach.

SHIRLEY BROOKS (1816-1874) . ... 178

The Song of Hiawatha.
Sonnet CCCI.
More Luck to Honest Poverty.

CUTHBERT BEDE (1827-1889) . ... 184

On a Toasted Muffin.

ROBERT BUCHANAN (1841-1901) . ... 186

The Session of the Poets.

CHARLES STUART CALVERLEY (1813-1884) . . . 189

The Cock and the Bull.
Ode to Tobacco.

LEWIS CARROLL (1833-1898) . ... 196

Father William.

How Doth the Little Crocodile.
Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Bat !
The Voice of the Lobster.
Turtle Soup.
The Lobster Quadrille.
Hiawatha's Photographing.

PHOEBE CARY (1824-1871) . ... 207

Jacob.
The Wife.

Parody of Shakespeare.
There's a Bower of Bean-Vines.



CONTENTS

PAGE

MORTIMER COLLINS (1827-1876) . ... 210

Salad (I).
(HI).

CHARLES DICKENS (1812-1870) . ... 213

New Song.

OLIVER WENDELL HOLMES (1809-1894) . . . 215

Evening.
The September Gale.

THOMAS HOOD (the Younger) (1835-1874) . . . 220

Poets and Linnets.
A Catch.

ANDREW LANG (1844-1912) . ... 224

Ode of Jubilee.
Jubilee before Revolution.

HENRY S. LEIGH (1837-1883) . . . . 228

Only Seven.
'Twas Ever Thui.
Saragossa.
Chateaux d'Espagne.

CHARLES GODFREY LELAND (1824-1903) . . . 235

Top-side Galow.

ARTHUR CLEMENT HILTON (1851-1877) . . . 238

The Light Green.
Octopus.

The Vulture and the Husbandman.
The Heathen Pass-ee.
Ding-Dong.

FREDERICK LOCKER-LAMPSON (1821-1895) . . . 249

A Human Skull.
The Unfortunate Miss Bailey.



CONTENTS

PAGE

ROBERT MURRAY (1863-1894) ... . 254

A Tennysonian Fragment.
The Poet's Hat.
Andrew M'Crie.

DANTE GABRIEL ROSSETTI (1828-1882) . . . 259

MacCracken.

THE SHOTOVER PAPERS (1874-1875) . . . 261

Truthful James Again.
In the Schools at Oxford.
Blue Moonshine.
Horae Tennysonianae.

JAMES KENNETH STEPHEN (1859-1892) . . .' 265

A Sonnet.
Of R. B.
Ode on a Retrospect of Eton College.

ALGERNON CHARLES SWINBURNE (1837-1909) . . . 271

Nephelidia.

BAYARD TAYLOR (1825-1878) . ... 274

The Shrimp-Gatherers.
The Lay of Macaroni.
Ode to a Jar of Pickles.
Sir Eggnogg.
Cimabuella.

Angelo orders his Dinner.
By the Sea.
The Promissory Note.

WILLIAM MAKEPEACE THACKERAY (181 1-1863) . . 288

The Willow-Tree.
Old-Fashioned Fun.

HENRY DUFF TRAILL (1842-1900) . ... 292

After Dilettante Concetti.
Vers de Societe.
The Modern Poet's Song.
xxii



CONTENTS

PAGE

PUNCH . . . . . 300

A Maudle-in Ballad.

ANONYMOUS . . . 3 2

Goosey.

An Unexpected Pleasure.
Ye Clerke of ye Wethere.
Omar for Housewives.

CONTEMPORARY PARODISTS

WILFRID BLAIR . . ... 309

The Noyes of Battle.

SAMUEL D. CHARLES . . . . .. 3'3

The Everlasting Plumber.

EDMUND B. V. CHRISTIAN . . . 3 J 5

Frost -v. Knight.
Of his Old Age.
And yet Afraid to Strike.
Sonnet.

ANTHONY C. DEANE . . ... 320

Jack and Jill.
Humpty-Dumpty.
Three Blind Mice.
An Ode.
Bo-Peep.

O. HENRY . . . . . 329

Options.

MARY KENDALL . . ... 331

Education's Martyr.

RHODE KNIGHT . . 333

A Man's Requirements.
The Ballad of the Matinee Hat.



CONTENTS

PAGE

E. G. V. KNOX . . ... 337

Redford Musagelis.
Upon Julia's Clothes.

CHOLMONDELEY PENNELL . . ... 340

Song of In-the-Water.
The Fight for the Championship.

MOSTYN T. PIGOTT . . ... 347

Punts.

The Boy on One Roller-Skate.
You are Young, Kaiser William.

SIR FREDERICK POLLOCK . . ... 353

Lines on the Death of a College Cat.
Scott <v. Shepherd.

SIR ARTHUR T. QUILLER-COUCH . . . -359

Measure for Measure.
De Tea Fabula.

Behold ! I am not one that goes to Lectures.
The New Ballad of Sir Patrick Spens.
A Letter.

OWEN SEAMAN . . . . . 374

A Nocturne at Danieli'?.
A Birthday Ode.
The Yellow Shin-Pads.

HORATIO SMITH . . . . . 388

They and We.
The Curate to his Slippers.

An Attempt to Remember the "Grandmother's Apology."
At the "Cock" Tavern.



CONTENTS



APPENDIX LIST OF AUTHORS PARODIED



AUTHOR

MATTHEW ARNOLD .
ELIZABETH BARRETT BROWNING



NAME OF PARODY

Redford Musagelis.

A Man's Requirements.
A Nocturne at Danieli's



PACK
393

393



ROBERT BROWNING .




393


BORDER ALLADS


....


394




The New Ballad of Sir






Patrick Spens.




WILLIAM CULLEN BRYANT .




39+




Evening. By a Tailor.




ROBERT BURNS




395




More Luck to Honest






Poverty.




THOMAS CAMPBELL .


.


395




The September Gale.




WILLIAM COWPER .


.


396




To Mr. Murray.




AUSTIN DOBSON


.


39 6




The Ballade of the Matinee






Hat.






Vers de Societe.




JOHN DRYDEN


.


397




The Rolliad.




THOMAS GRAY





397



Ode on the Death of a

College Cat.
Ode on a Distant Prospect

of Clapham Academy.
Retrospect of Eton College.
Evening.



CONTENTS



AUTHOR


NAME OF PARODY


PAGE


FRANCIS BRET HARTE


.


398




Truthful James Again.






The Heathen Pass-ee.




W. E. HENLEY


....


399




Humpty-Dumpty.




ROBERT HERRICK


....


399




Julia's Clothes.




JEAN INGELOW . .


....


399




The Shrimp-Gatherers.




JOHN KEATS . .


....


400




Ode to a Jar of Pickles.




RUDYARD KIPLING .


....


400




Jack and Jill.






Punts.




CHARLES LAMB


....


401




Nonsense Verses.




HENRY WADSWORTH LONGFELLOW


. .


402




Ode to Tobacco.






Hiawatha.






Top-side Galow.




RICHARD LOVELACE . .


....


403




At the " Cock " Tavern.




JOHN MILTON


....


403




Fashion.




THOMAS MOORE .


. .


404




To a Bottle of Old Port.






New Song.






There's a bower of bean-






vines.




ALFRED MOVES . .


....


405




The Noyes of Battle.




AMBROSE PHILIPS .


....


405




Namby-Pamby.





AUTHOR

EDGAR ALLAN POE



CONTENTS

NAME OF PARODY

Andrew M'Crie.
The Vulture.
Chateaux d'Espagne.
The Willows.
The Promissory Note.



JAMES WHITCOMB RILEY
DANTE GABRIEL ROSSETTI

NICHOLAS ROWE .
WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

ROBERT SOUTHEY



PAGE
406



EDMUND SPENSER



ALGERNON CHARLES SWINBURNE



Options.

Cimabuella.

After Dilettante Concetti.

The Elderly Gentleman.

The Curate to his Slippers.
The Patriot's Progress.
Parody Shakespeare.

Sonnet on Mrs. Brownrigg.

The Soldier's Wife.

The Friend of Humanity

and the Knife-Grinder.
You're old, Father William.
You're young, Kaiser

William.

A Portrait.
North Beach.

A Catch.
Octopus.
Nephelidia.



407
407

408
408

409



410



411



CONTENTS



AUTHOR NAME OK PARODY PAGE

ALFRED, LORD TENNYSON . . ... .412

MacCracken.

An Attempt to Remember
the Grandmother's Apology.
In the Schools at Oxford.
Frost -v. Knight.
The Boy on the One Roller-

Skate.

A Tennysonian Fragment.
La Mort d'Arthur.
The Poet's Hat.
Horae Tennysonianae.
The Unfortunate Miss Bailey.



WILLIAM MAKEPEACE THACKERAY

The Willow Tree.



MARTIN FARQUHAR TUPPER .
WILLIAM WATSON .

ISAAC WATTS

WALT WHITMAN

JOHN GREENLEAF WHITTIER
GEORGE WITHER



Sonnet CCCI.



They and We.
Three Blind Mice.



416

417

4'7



How Doth the Little Croco-

dile.
'Tis the Voice of the Lobster.

.418

Behold ! I am not one of
those that goes to Lectures.



Mrs. Judge Jenkins.



. 418



Answer to Mr. Wither's


1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19

Online LibraryJ. A. Stanley AdamParodies and imitations old and new → online text (page 1 of 19)