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A Book of favourite modern ballads online

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A BOOK






OF



FAVOURITE MODERN BALLADS



ILLUSTRATED WITH FIFTY ENGRAVINGS,



PROM DRAWINGS BY THE FIKST ARTISTS.





LONDON:
W. KENT & CO. (LATE D. BOGUE), 86, FLEET STREET

1860.




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EDMUND EVANS, ENGRAVER AND PRINTEU.

RAQTJET COURT, FI.EKT STREET,

LONDON.









181

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The chief aim of the Editor of this volume has been to give a
collection of such of the Favourite English Ballads, — written
since the commencement of the last century — as best admit of
picturesque illustration ; and by a combination of the produc-
tions of Modern Poets and Modern Painters, to present to the
literary world an acceptable Gift-book.

The Poets themselves have, in their lyrical pieces, so often
interchanged the words " Songs " and " Ballads," that he has
felt himself at liberty to include a few well-known verses which,
perhaps, more properly belong to the former class. He offers
this explanation, lest he may be charged with departing from
the promise of the Title-page.

To those living Authors who have kindly permitted hi in to
enrich the volume with flowers picked from their gardens, and
to the Artists, who have so ably assisted him in the adornment
of its pages, his thanks are especially due.



.1. c.




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109





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A Gleam of Sunshine .

A Walk in a Churchyard

Allen-a-Dale

Afton Water

An. i) Roein Gray .

A Wet Sheet and a Flowing Si •,

Black-eyed Susan .

Bonnie Jean .

Cumnor Hall

Dear is my Little Native V

Duncan Gray

Edwin and Angelina .

Edwin and Emma .

Excelsior

Hore and Love

I Remember ....

I Wandered by the Brook-si de

Jock o' Hazeldean

John Barleycorn .

King Henrx V. and the Hermit oj Drj i h



LongfcU"'


SI


Trench


90


Sir W. Scott


27


Burns


111


LoAg Barnard


101


A. Cunningham


To


Gay .


7


Burns


77


Mickle


1


Rogers


76


Burns


51


Goldsmith .


40


Mallet


10


Longfellow


51


Praed


11


Hood


31


Milnes


161


Sir W. Scott


150


s


18


y


140




A







CONTENTS.



lochinvak .....

Lokd Ullix's Dauohtek

Lovk ......

Night

Robin Redbreast ....

Rupert's March ....

Summer Woods ....

The Angel's Whisper .

The Arab's Farewell to his Steed

The Ballad of the Bear-Hunters

The Battle of Blenheim

The Breeze in the Church

The Flowers of the Forest

The Friar of Orders Gray

The Hermit ....

The Inchcape Rock

The Irish Emigrant

The Lass of Richmond Hill

The Lovely Lass of Inverness

The May Queen .

The Miller of the Dee

The Mill- Stream .

The Minute Gun .

The Old Green Lane

The Open Window

The Sailor's Journal

The Soldier's Dream

The Spanish Armada

The Stormi Petrel

The Three Fishermen






PAGJ


Sir W. Scott


15


Campbell .


36


Coleridge .


131


Montgomery


127


Allimjham


87


Thorribwry


106


Mary Hoivitt


66


Lover


39


Mrs. Norton


121


Mackay


156


Southey


164


Mrs. Hinxman


154


Mrs. Cockburn


135


Percy


56


Beattie


49


Southey


115


Lady Dufferin


112


Upton


47


f




JOHN BARLEYCORN.

His colour sicken il mure and more,

lie faded into age ;
And then liis enemies began

To show their deadly rage.

They took a weapon long and sharp,

And cut him by the knee ;
Then tied him fas1 upon si cart,

Like a rogue for forgery.

They laid him down upon his back.

And cudgel' d him full sore;
They bung hiin up before the storm,

And turn'd him o'er and o'er.

They til I'd up then a darksome pit

With water to the brim,
And heaved in poor John Barleycorn,

To let him sink or swim.

They laid him out upon the flour,

To work him further woe ;
And still, as signs of life appear' d,

They toss'd him to and fro.

They wasted o'er a scorching flame

The marrow of his bones ;
But the miller used him worst of all,

For he crush'd him between two stones.

And they have taken his very heart's blood,
And drunk it round and round :

And so farewell, John Barleycorn !
Thy fate thou now hast found.



m





THE WOODLAND HALLO.

In our cottage, that peeps from the skirts of the wood.

I am mistress, no mother have I ;
Yet blithe are my days, for my father is good.

And kind is my lover, hard by :
They both work together beneath the green shade.

Both woodmen, my father and Joe ;
Where I've listen'd whole hours to the echo that made

So much of a laugh or — Hallo !

From my basket at noon they expect their supply,

And with joy from my threshold I spring ;
For the woodlands I love, and the oaks waving- high.

And Echo that sings as I sing.
Though deep shades delight me, yet love is my food.

As I call the dear name of my Joe ;
His musical shout is the pride of the wood.

And my heart leaps to hear the — Hallo !




Simple flowers of the grove, little birds live at ease.

1 wish not to wander from you :
I '11 still dwell beneath the deep roar of your trees,

For I know thai my Joe will lie true.





One day, through Fancy's telescope,

Which is my richest treasure,
I saw, dear Susan, Love and Hope

Set out in search of Pleasure :
All mirth and smiles I saw them go;

Each was the other's banker ;
For Hope took up her brother's bow,

And Love, his sister's anchor.



They rambled on o'er vale and hill,

They pass'd by cot and tower ;
Through summer's glow and winter's ehil

Through sunshine and through shower
But what did those fond playmates care

For climate or for weather ?
All scenes to them were bright and fair,

On which they gazed together.













HOPE AND r.OVE.

Sometimes they turn'd aside to bless
Some Muse and her wild numbers,

Or breathe ;i dream of holiness
On Beauty's quiet slumbers.
■• Fly on," said Wisdom, with cold sneers ;

"I teach my friends to doubt you:"'
" Come back," said Age, with bitter tears,
" My heart is cold without you."

When Poverty beset their path,

And threaten'd to divide them,
They coax'd away the beldame's wrath,

Ere she had breath to chicle them,
By vowing all her rags were silk,

And all her bitters honey,
And showing taste for bread and milk.

And utter scorn of money.

They met stern Danger in then- way,

Upon a ruin seated ;
Before him kings had quaked that clay,

And armies had retreated :
But he was robed in such a cloud,

As Love and Hope came near him,
That though he thunder'd long and loud,

They did not see or hear him.

A gray-beard join'd them, Time by name ;

And Love was nearly crazy,
To find that he was very lame,

And also very lazy :
Hope, as he listen'd to her tale,

Tied wings upon his jacket;
And then they far outran the mail,

And far outsail'd the packet.

23



n









HOPE ANM LOVE.

And so. when they bad safely pass'd

O'er many a laud and billow.
Before a grave they stopp'd at last.

Beneath a weeping willow :
The moon upon the humble mound

1 lev softest light was flinging ;
And from the thickets all around

Sad nightingales were singing.

I leave you here," quoth Father Time,

As hoarse as any raven ;
And Love kneel' d down to spell the rhyme

Upon the rude stone graven :
But Hope look'd onward, calmly brave.

And whisper'd, il Dearest brother,
We're parted on this side the grave, —

We'll meet upon the other."







w II IIIX A Mil. I. 01 ED1NBR0 .

Jocky was a wag iliat never would wed,

Though Long he had follow'd the lass:
Contented she eam'd and eai her brown bread.

And merrily turn'd up the grass.

Bonnie Jocky, blythe and free,

Won her heart right merrily:
Vet st ill she blush' d, and frowning- cried, " No, no, it will n< >t d<
1 cannot, cannot, wonnot. woimot, mannot buckle to."




But when he vow'd he would make her his bride,

Though his flocks and herds were not few,
She gave him her hand, and a kiss beside,
And vow'd she 'd for ever be true.
Bonnie Jocky, blythe and free,
Won her heart right merrily :
At church she no more frowning said, " No, no, it will not do ;
I cannot, cannot, wonnot, wonnot, mannot buckle to."









ALLBN-A-DALE.

Allen-a-Dale has no faggot for burning,
Allen-a-Dale lias no furrow for turning 1 ,

Allen-a-Dale has no fleece for the spinning,
Yet Allen-a-Dale has red gold for the winning.
Come, read me my riddle ! come, hearken my tale !
And tell me the craft of bold Allen-a-Dale.



The baron of Ravensworth prances in pride,

And he views his domains upon Arkindale side,
The mere for his net, and the land for his game,
The chase for the wild, and the park for the tame ;
Yet the fish of the lake, and the deer of the vale.
Are less tree to Lord Dacre than Allen-a-Dale!

Allen-a-Dale was ne'er belted a knight,

Though his spur be as sharp, and his blade be as brighl

Allen-a-Dale is no baron or lord,

Yet twenty tall yeomen will draw at his word ;

And the best of our nobles his bonnet will vail,

YHio at Rere-cross on Stanmore meets Allen-a-Dale.





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Online LibraryJ C.A Book of favourite modern ballads → online text (page 1 of 6)