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J. H. (Joseph Henry) Dubbs.

History of Franklin and Marshall College; Franklin College, 1787-1853; Marshall College, 1836-1853; Franklin and Marshall College, 1853-1903 online

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Online LibraryJ. H. (Joseph Henry) DubbsHistory of Franklin and Marshall College; Franklin College, 1787-1853; Marshall College, 1836-1853; Franklin and Marshall College, 1853-1903 → online text (page 10 of 28)
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He was a professor in Franklin College, 1840-1850; profc«(ior of
Greek in Pennsylvania College, 1850-1867; first president of Muhlen-
berg College, 1867-1876; became professor of the Greek langu«>r«
and literature in the University of Pennsylvania in 1S7«, and nub-
sequently held a similar position in Thicl ('(dlcgc, Gri-envillc, Pa.
As a Greek scholar lie hehl hij.di rank and lie was albo an influential
minister.



130 FRANKLIN COLLEGE.

family to suj)port and children to be educated. But not to
insist on these points, Mr. R. is, we believe, a scholar of such
attainments as we shall hardly meet with again — indefatiga-
ble and enthusiastic in his profession — and possessing skill
and experience which admirably qualify him for his present
post. Thorough master of four languages besides his own,
the committee are quite confident that should we lose the
services of Mr. R., it will not be possible to find one equal
to him, for anything like the salary which he receives, if
at all.

"For these reasons the committee recommend the follow-
ing resolutions :

"Resolved, That an addition of $100 per annum — a sum
about equivalent to his house rent — be made to the salary of
Mr. Regan, beginning with Jan. 1, 1843.

''Resolved, That by tliis increase of Mr. R.'s salary no
precedence in point of rank is intended to be given him, the
addition being grounded entirely upon the facts and reasons
above stated, and his standing and authority to remain in
all respects what they were before."

Wlien Mr. Regan resigned his position, in 1846, very-
complimentary resolutions were adopted, assuring him
of "the affectionate wishes of the Board, for his future
happiness and prosperity."

In 1841 an English Department was added to Franklin
College. Gad Day was principal, and for a time was
very popular. Mr. Day was the oldest of the four sons
of a ISTew Englander, their names being Gad, Asa, Ira
and Dan. Gad Day was in 1838 teacher of the principal
public school in Lancaster, receiving a salary of $800,
which was in those days an unusually liberal compensa-
tion. In 1839 he was chosen Superintendent of all the



GAD DAY. 131

public schools in Lancaster, and was so jm.j '.ilar with the
board that "seldom were any new departures made with-
out first consulting Mr. Day and getting his views.*
AVhen he became connected with the college he had no
difficulty in gathering a large school; so that. for a time
it seemed as if the English Department would swallow
up the rest of the institution. It was, however, said that
Mr. Day was too fond of novelties, and that the result


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Online LibraryJ. H. (Joseph Henry) DubbsHistory of Franklin and Marshall College; Franklin College, 1787-1853; Marshall College, 1836-1853; Franklin and Marshall College, 1853-1903 → online text (page 10 of 28)