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portrays a Divine rebuke to the angelic hosts about
to sing a psean of triumph over the overthrow of
the Egyptians at the Red Sea : " The works of my
hands are sinking in the sea, and will ye sing a
song before me ? " This Rabbinic delineation of
the arch-enemy of the Jew as the work of God's hands,
and therefore an object of His pitying concern, is a
model instance of the freest, widest, and most tolerant
standpoint in religious philosophy. The Yalkut on nS
T^, quoting from one of the latest Midrashim, to which
allusion has been made in a previous page — the Tanna
Debe Elijahu — remarks : " God said unto Moses, ' Is
there any respecting of persons with me ? ' Verily, be
he Israelite, or be he Gentile, if he perform a precept
there is a recompense [for him] beside it." A developed
form of this doctrine is summarised by Maimonides as
follows : "Every man whatsoever of all who enter the
world, whose spirit hath prompted him, and endowed him
with the knowledge, how to separate himself to stand



XXVI CHRONOLOGY & DEVELOPMENT Z7Z

before God to minister unto Him, and to work in order
to know God and to walk in that uprightness in which
God made him, truly such a man is sacrosanct (tmpriD),
he is a Holy of Holies ; and God shall be his portion
and his inheritance for ever and unto all eternity"
(Maimonides, Yad Ha-IIazaka, Rules of ^ivi nio^om, xiii.
3). Maimonides' pronouncement is no exotic, neither is
it the mere personal expression of his own independent
point of view bearing no relation to his predecessors in
thought. It is the natural outcome of the Rabbinic
inheritance which had come down to him, and which he,
by the help of his genius, retailed to his own time in
the spirit and with the interpretation that suited it.
Maimonides has added nothing which was not already
there, at least in germ.

That these ideas about religion as being a universal,
and not a national or local, thing should find strong
root in the literature under consideration, is not really
strange, for the Pharisees, the Halachists, and the Hag-
gadists were the lineal successors of the great prophets
of Israel who flourished in the eighth and seventh cen-
turies B.C. The Rabbins certainly imported a large
amount of legalism into the inherited prophetic religion.
But this did not imply that in inculcating legalism they
forgot spirituality. It is wrong to think, as is often
thought, that there is a necessary antagonism between
the two. The prophet whose ideas the Rabbins
seem to have most faithfully reflected is Jeremiah.
Jeremiah's message strikes the note of downheartedness
and depression. But there is an intermingling of the
most cheery optimism. He does not think that punish-
ment is God's last word to Israel. He is a man of
hope. He foresees a happy time for the exiles. And
this happy time he depicts in a passage which contains
the sublimated essence of his religious teaching. This



374 THE IMMANENCE OF GOD chap.

passage occurs in chap. xxxi. 31-34, where lie speaks of the
New Covenant. In the days to come, God will replace
the Old Covenant, made at the exodus from Egypt, by
a new one, which will be this : that He will put His
law in the inward parts of the Israelites, and write it in
their hearts ; He will be their God, and they will be
His people. There will be no longer any need for them
to teach one another to know God. The covenant
being engraven indelibly on their souls, they will all
know God of themselves, without any outward in-
struction, from the least of them to the greatest of
them. And, as a necessary consequence, sin and
iniquity will be forgiven and forgotten. The leading
ideas in this familiar passage are : — (a) Religion is a thing
of the heart, obedience to an inward rather than an
outward prompting. (b) Religion is an individual
matter, a relation between an individual soul and its
maker. (c) If religion is individualist through the
truth of God being immanent in every heart, then it is
easy to see how it can transcend any one community
or nation, and become the property of many nations
and communities. In fine, there can be a religion of
humanity.

The large variety of mystical teachings which exist
in the Rabbinical literature proves, that Rabbinical
Judaism possesses most intensely human and most
broadly spiritual tendencies. But there is another
factor to be noted. Rabbinical Judaism is an amalgam
of a Jeremiah and an Ezekiel. Ezekiel's ideal was
that of a restored Israel in which the priestly
ordinances, the legalism and ceremonialism of Judaism,
would have full sway. Religion was a communal
affair, to which the individual owes an outward
allegiance. Jeremiah's ideal was that of every soul
having its own intimate intercourse with God. Resting



XXV. CHRONOLOGY & DEVELOPMENT 375

on this twofold anchorage, Rabbinical Judaism was
saved from destruction. Its outwardness and its
inwardness were both necessary to its preservation.
Each corrected and supplemented the other. Modern
Judaism depends for its possibilities of future develop-
ment upon the correctly proportionated blending of
these two necessary tendencies.



APPENDIX I

ON THE INTERCHANGING OF THE TERMS " SHECHINAH " AND
" RUAH HA-KODESn "

My exposition of the different senses in which these two
terms are used throughout the Kabbinical literature will have
shown that although they are far from being synonymous,
they yet bear a strong affinity to one another. Under the
circumstances, it is therefore not surprising to find them
employed interchangeably in many instances. Often what
is said in one place about the Shechinah is said in some
other place about the Holy SjDirit. Similar phraseology clusters
round them both in many passages. The following is a classified
list of some of the more prominent of these interchanges : —

(a) As material ohj'ect. In T. B. Sotah 9b when the
Shechinah rests on Samson his hairs stand up and knock
against one another with the sound of a bell. In Lev. Eabba
viii. 2 the same is said when the Holy Spirit rests upon him.

I have given instances of the materialisation of
Shechinah as light or fire. In Lev. Eabba i. 1 the same
material idea is used in describing the Holy Spirit, when we
are told that " at the time when the Holy Spirit rested on
Phinehas his face burned like a torch." In fact, the same
expression }>'^!^r7 (possibly connected with rT!i*i23 = a spark) is
occasionally used of both.

In T. B. Yoma 21a and 52b the Shechinah is one among
the five things wanting in the second Temple, In Song of
Songs Eabba viii. 3, Numbers Eabba xv. 10 it is the Holy
Spirit that is wanting, not the Shechinah.

(h) Personification. Both Shechinah and Holy Spirit

377



Z7^ THE IMMANENCE OF GOD

are at times (1) mo'iN, "saying"; (2) nn"Ti2, "crying";
(3) nS^-'D, " lamenting " ; (4) HTIDD = answering.

(c) Prophecy. The close connexion between Holy Spirit
and Prophecy has been indicated. In Koheleth Eabba i. 2
Amos is said to have become a prophet, because God placed
His Shechinah upon him (ij-^Jop pTH h^ n^n inD"'DtD Ti^mn n^I).

In Yalkut on Jonah i. there is a sentence distinctly
conveying the idea of the identity of Shechinah and Holy
Spirit as follows : nmtDl . . . Tl-'T] whr^ ''Sli?Q TiDN \1 nil"*

Here prophecy is clearly as much a result of the Shechinah as
of the Holy Spirit, In T. B. Pesahim 117a David's inspira-
tion for the composition of a certain Psalm comes from the
Shechinah. (Cp. also T. B. Yoma 71a.)

{d) Illustrations have been given, of the opposition hetween
Shechinah and Sin. In Tanhuma on TTipnil (and other
parallel places) Phinehas loses his Holy Spirit by reason
of his sin in connexion with Jephthah's daughter (see T, B.
Ta'anith 4a).

(e) As the Ideal. In Deuteronomy Eabba vi. 14 God
takes away His Shechinah from the Israelites by reason of
their sin, but in the time to come, when the heart of flesh shall
have been substituted for the heart of stone, His Shechinah
will again come back. The proof for this is taken from Joel
ii. 28, 29, the great "Spirit" passages.

In Leviticus Eabba xxxv, 7 the student of the Torah is
said to be " worthy of receiving the Holy Spirit." The word
" receiving " in connexion with the Shechinah is most
common, as has been shown. And the idea that the study
of the Torah is the means of bringing about the mystical
union between man and God implied in the term " Shechinah "
is to be found constantly in Talmud and Midrash. The
immanence of God is the ideal in so far as it represents the
realised consciousness of union with God. This can only be
brought about by a life of devotion to the Torah. The
immanence of God is real in so far as it exists in every man,
but is constantly thwarted by man's perversity. It is there,
but unrealised.

The well-known passages in Mechilta nf^tDl on the



APPENDIX 379

idealism of faith are, in the Mechilta (as in the Tanhuma
parallel passage), associated with the Holy Spirit. Thus,
" Great is the faith with which the Israelites helieved in
Him who spake and the world was, and as a reward for their
faith, the Holy Spirit rested upon them and they sang
a song." But the parallel passage in Exodus Kabba xxi. 13
gives, as their reward, the fact that " the Shechinah rested
upon them."

The Yalkut on Jeremiah x. says, with a worthy universalism,
"causing the Holy Spirit to dwell upon mankind." But this
can be easily paralleled by the many passages where the
Shechinah is spoken of as dwelling among the D"'3innn,
earthly inhabitants in the broad sense. (See e.g. Numbers
Eabba xii. 6 ; Tanhuma on "'I'lpD.)

Hence the following deductions seem to be possible : —

(1) That the two terms, having so much in common, are
ofttimes used indiscriminately.

(2) That the term " Holy Spirit " is used far more sparingly
in Eabbinical literature than " Shechinah." Whether this
is owing to the adoption of Holy Spirit into the theology
of the N.T. and the Church Fathers, is a moot point.

(3) That where Holy Spirit is used as a parallel to Shechinah,
it is mostly to be found in the later rather than in the earlier
Rabbinical literature. This may possibly be accounted for by
the suggestion that the earlier Tannaitic Midrashim, like
Sifra, Sifre, Mechilta, as well as the teachings of the Tanuaim
and Amoraim to be found in the Talmud Babli and Yerushalmi,
were contemporaneous with the opening centuries of Christi-
anity, when the ideas of Holy Spirit in the Christian sense were
making great inroads among many people. The Jews would
accordingly be loath to use an expression, which might further
popularise anything connected with Christianity. The later
Midrashim, however, belong to a period when the breacli
between Judaism and Christianity was a long-accomplished
fact, and all controversy had long been silenced. Hence the
Rabbins and the people had nothing to fear from a free and
open usage of such an expression as Holy Spirit. But the
matter is really one that calls for further investigation.



APPENDIX II

ON THE CONNEXION BETWEEN " KABOD " (GLORY)
AND SHECHINAH

Instances are found where " Kabod " (" Glory ") is the
synonym for Shechinah. But they are comparatively rare.
The N.T. Greek equivalent for both words is Bo^a, which,
though always translated " Glory," covers many of the
meanings implied in Shechinah. Thus, to mention only one
instance, in Acts xxii. 11, St. Paul tells of his experiences
on the road to Damascus, and speaks of his perception of the
risen Christ as " the glory of that light " (utto t^9 86^r]<i
rod (j)coro<i eKeivov). Here glory is undoubtedly materialised.
It is a body of light that Paul is talking about, as if it
were a substance that surrounds and penetrates him through
and through. It has been shown how Shechinah possesses
a series of mystical ideas like these of light. The favourite
figure by which Kabod is materially represented is that
of a cloud. Thus Yalkut on Song of Songs ii., alluding
to the verse in Song of Songs ii. 6, says : " These are the
clouds of [Kabod] Glory which surround Israel from top to
bottom." Instead of being bathed in a body of mystical
light, as the Shechinah idea implies, Israel is bathed in
a mystical body of cloud. In the ideal sense, associated
with the future, there is a passage in Tanhuma on onDD
which is couched in a similar phraseology to that which
often characterises Shechinah and Holy Spirit. It is as
follows : " God will in the future make for every saint a
canopy out of the clouds of glory, as it is said. ..." The
idea of DiSD!i (concentration of Divinity in one small spot)

380



APPENDIX 381

which plays a large part in connexiou with Shechinah, also
plays a part in connexion with " Kabod." See Yalkut on
Job xxiii. xxxviii. ; also iSifra (edit. Weiss), p. 4 (where such
expressions are used as " not seeing the Kabod "). An
instance of a Halachic law derived from the mystical nature
of "Kabod" is that of T. B. Kiddushin 31a, where K. Joshua
b. Levi prohibits the walking of four cubits with pride because
God's glory tills the whole world ; and its identity with
Shechinah is proved from the statement which immediately
follows, where E. Huna says that he never walked four cubits
with uncovered head because the Shechinah was above his
head. See Mid rash Tillim on Psalm xc. for another description
of the immanence of the " Kabod " based on the words " He
shall abide in the shadow of the Almighty." The interchange
of Kabod and " Shechinah " is obvious in Tanhuma on "ilTDl,
where the phrase occurs HD'^DtDrr pi;, " the cloud of the
Shechinah " (cloud being the usual metaphor for " Kabod "
and not for Shechinah). In Tanhuma on ipi?, where the
legend is given of how Moses, on the eve of the Israelites'
departure from Egypt, tries to identify the coffin of Joseph,
there occurs tlie phrase : " The Shechinah is keeping back ;
Israel and the clouds of Kabod are keeping back for thee."
Obviously a parallelism is here intended ; further on in
the same passage of Tanhuma, there is a description of the
coming time when " Israel shall see God in His Kabod,'*
which tallies with the many passages where Shechinah and
Holy Spirit are spoken of in an exactly similar sense.

But if the " Kabod " has been largely eclipsed in the Tal-
mudic and Midrashic branch of Eabbinics by the "Shechinah,"
it has maintained itself unimpaired in the Targumic branch.
Here it appears as " Yekara." The Yekara is used in
two ways: (1) as the equivalent Aramaic word for "Kabod,"
as e.g. in Leviticus ix. 23, where the verse " and the
glory of the Lord appeared," is rendered ''m Nip"* "'^JtriNI ;
(2) as a parallel to some (though not all) of the meanings of
" Memra," to denote the Divine immanent activity in the
universe and man. Examples of this are : Genesis xxviii. 13,
where the phrase " and, behold, the Lord stood above it," is
rendered, " and, behold, the Yekara . . . stood above it " ;



J



82 THE IMMANENCE OF GOD



Genesis xvii. 22, "and God went up from Abraham," is
rendered, " and the Yekara . . . went up." Again, Genesis
xviii. 33, "and the Lord went," is rendered, " and the Yekara
. . . departed." In Exodus xxxiii. 23 the words "and I will
take away my hand," are rendered "^"ip'^ mm rr* "'"[I7N1, although
in the preceding sentence the same word "^DD is rendered by
" my Memra." This would seem to prove that Yekara and
Memra are to an extent synonymous. The exact relations
between the two, is a matter for further research. So also are
the relations between " Yekara " and " Shechinta " of the
Targum. " Shechinta " is found occasionally, as e.g. Exodus
xxxiv. 9, which is rendered by Onkelos, " Let the Shechinta
of God go among us." In Deut, xii. 5, Onkelos renders the
Hebrew for " to put His Name there," by " to cause His
Shechinta to dwell there." In the Exodus passage just alluded
to, it is hard to see why " Shechinta " should be used, seeing
that in Genesis xviii. 33 the Tetragrammaton in conjunction
with the very same verb (l'?"'l) is rendered by " Yekara."
Obviously there is a degree of synonymy again between these
two terms. To sum up the matter, both " Yekara " and
" Shechinta " would seem to be terms which at times denote
the same idea and at times denote different ideas. Both terms
seem to denote aspects of the teaching covered by the larger
and more comprehensive term " Memra."



INDEX OF BIBLICAL AND RABBINICAL
PASSAGES QUOTED



A. OLD TESTAMENT

Genesis i. 2. 49, 175, 188, 217 ; i. 4.
171 ; i. 5. 137 ; i. 26. 75 ; i. 28.
137; i. 31. 314 ; ii. 7. 20, 75, 189,
202 ; ii. 8. 162 ; ii. 9. 189 ; ii. 11-
14. 74 ; ii. 19. 202 ; iii. 8. 154,
218 ; iii. 9. 64 ; iii. 16-17. 137 ; vi.
3. 189 ; vi. 6. 158 ; vi. 17. 188 ;
vii. 15. 176, 188 ; vii. 16. 154 ; viii.
21. 158, 168 ; ix. 9. 21 ; ix. 16-17.
152 ; X. 25. 258 ; xi. 29. 215 ; xii.
5. 90 ; XV. 1. 154 ; xv. 6. 154 ;
xvii. 22. 171, 382 ; xviii. 2. 257 ;
xviii. 33. 382 ; xx. 3. 158 ; xxii.
16. 158; xxiv. 3. 158; xxvi. 10.
171 ; xxvii. 42. 261 ; xxviii. 1. 262;
xxviii. 10. 167 ; xxviii. 13. 171, 381 ;
xxviii. 20-21. 154 ; xxix. 2. 262 ;
XXX. 23. 158 ; xxxi. 49-50. 152 ;
xxxii. 30. 46 ; xxxv. 3. 154 ; xxxvii.
33. 263 ; xli. 8. 176 ; xlii. 29. 216 ;
xlv. 21. 168 ; xlv. 27. 2.50, 270 ;
xlvi. 4. 73, 151, 168, 169 ; xlviii.

16. 129

Exodus i. 12. 58 ; ii. 23-24. 324 ; iii. 2-6.
74 ; iii. 12. 154 ; iii. 14. 46 ; iii. 15. 47,
74, 170 ; iv. 12. 154 ; iv. 22. 54 ;
V. 14. 273 ; vi. 9. 176 ; vii. 1. 238,
239; ix. 16. 47, 74 ; xii. 29. 154 ;
xiii. 21. 134; xiv. 31. 151, 154 ;
XV. 22. 141 ; xvi. 6. 87 ; xvi. 8.
152, 155 ; xvi. 20. 116 ; xvi. 25.
88 ; xvii. 7. 79 ; xix. 3. 296 ; xix.

17. 155 ; xix. 18. 79 ; xix. 20. 296 ;
XX. 1. 155 ; xxi. 22. 337 ; xxiii.
20. 96 ; XXV. 22. 155 ; xxvi. 28.
264 ; xxviii. 3. 177 ; xxxi. 3. 180 ;
xxxi. 17. 152 ; xxxi. 18. 151,
168; xxxii. 229; xxxii. 13. 158;
xxxii, 35. 158 ; xxxiii. 11. 167 ;
xxxiii. 14. 96, 170 ; xxxiii. 20. 95 ;
xxxiii. 22. 57, 171 ; xxxiii. 23. 382 ;



xxxiv. 6. 60 ; xxxiv. 9. 382 ; xxxiv.

29. 84 ; xl. 34-38. 93

Leviticus v. 21. 155 ; vii. 10. 234 ; ix.

23. 381 ; ix. 24. 83 ; xvi. 2, 171 ;

xvi. 16. 139 ; xvii. 11. 21 ; xx. 23.

156; xxiv. 10-12. 215; xxvi. 12.

66 ; xxvi. 30. 158 ; xxvi. 46. 156
Numbers iv. 18. 105 ; v. 3. 79 ; v. 12.

116 ; V. 14. 178; vi. 25. 83 ; vii.

89. 40, 167 ; x. 33-34. 171 ; x. 35.

96, 156 ; X. 36. 93 ; .\i. 12. 236 ;

xi. 16. 194, 203, 273 ; xi. 17. 181 ;

xiv. 9. 11. 156 ; xiv. 24. 177 ; xiv.

30. 158 ; XV. 31. 170 ; xxiii. 1.
233 ; xxiii. 4. 234 ; xxiii. 8. 21.

156 ; xxiv. 2. 184 ; xxiv. 6. 79 ;
xxvii. 14. 193, 194 ; xxvii. 16. 178

Deutorouomy i. 30. 157 ; i. 31. 236 ; i.
32. 157 ; ii. 16. 167 ; ii. 30. 177 ;
iii. 23. 324 ; iv. 7. 131 ; iv. 33.

157 ; iv. 34. 152 ; iv. 36. 1.57; v.
11. 21. 35. 157 ; ix. 3. 158 ; ix.
18. 324 ; xi. 12. 152 ; xii. 5. 382 ;
XX. 12. 19. 36 ; xxi. 8. 168 ; xxi.
20. 168 ; x.xiii. 14. 49, 60, 115,
297 ; xxix. 20. 242 ; xxx. 3. 127 ;
XXX. 11-14. 50 ; xxxi. 3. 169 ; xxxii.
275 ; xxxii. 11. 236 ; xxxiii. 5.
339 ; xxxiii. 7. 157-159 ; xxxiv. 6.
116 ; xxxiv. 10. 277

Joshua i. 8. 273 ; v. 14. 129; xiii. 22.

184
Judges v. 4. 5. 44 ; v. 31. 227 ; xiii. 18.

46 ; xiii. 22. 99 ; xiii. 25. 93, 180 ;

xiv. 6. 180 ; xv. 14. 180

1 Samuel i. 28. 265 ; ii. 25. 142 ; ii.

27. 127 ; X. 6. 180 ; x. 10. 239 ;
xi. 6. 180 ; XV. 11. 171 ; xvi. 13.
180; xvi. 23. 178; xvii. 10. 178;
xix. 20. 239 ; xix. 24. 240 ; xxv.
29. 102

2 Samuel xv. 263 ; xx. 22. 265

1 Kings vi. 1. 85 ; viii. 28. 325 ; viii.



383



384



THE IMMANENCE OF GOD



50. 170 ; viii. 65. 233 ; viii. 66. 86 ;

ix. 3. 119, ]20, 122; xiv. 9. 339 ;

xvii. 1. 134 ; xix. 11. 219 ; xx. 1.

36
2 Kings ii. 7. 16. 266
Isaiah i. 2. 170 ; i. 4. 158 ; i. 16. 170 ;

ii. 2. 248 ; ii. 22. 43 ; iii. 8. 193 ;

vi. 25, 95 ; vi. 8. 170 ; xi. 2.

177, 185, 205 ; xii. 2. 185 ; xx. 2.

256 ; XXV. 8. 95 ; xxvi. 19. 203 ;

xxvlii. 5. 88 ; xxix. 3. 36 ; sxix.

10. 178 ; XXX. 33. 162 ; xxxv. 1.

96 ; xxxv. 2. 44; xxxix. 16. 191 ;

xl. 22. 13, 47 ; xlii. 1-4. 186 ; xlii.

5. 43 ; xliii. 6. 54 ; xliii. 14. 127 ;

xliv. 3. 181 ; liii. 12. 43 ; Ixiii. 12.

107 ; Iv. 6. 142 ; Iv. 8. 47 ; Ivi. 7.

122 ; Ivii. 15. 50 ; Ivii. 16. 43, 192 ;

Iviii. 13. 350 ; lix. 21. 186 ; Ixiii. 9.

196, 236, 50 ; Ixiii. 10-11. 174, 193,

194, 195, 196, 205 ; Ixiii. 11. 53 ;

Ixiii. 14. 156, 170 ; Ixiv. 7. 53 ;

Ixvi. 1. 25
Jeremiah i. 5. 235 ; v. 13. 149 ; vii. 16.

324 ; xiii. 16. 106 ; xvii. 12. 124 ;

xxiii. 24. 40 ; xxxi. 9. 53 ; xxxi. 19.

54 ; xxxi. 31-34. 371 ; xxxiii. 5.

79 ; xxxix. 18. 170 ; xlv. 2-5. 247 ;
xlix. 11. 170

Ezekiel i. 1. 202 ; i. 26. 28. 252 ; ii. 2
182 ; iii. 12. 169, 182, 217 ; iii. 14
182 ; iii. 26. 10 ; viii. 3. 182, 256
X. 4. 116 ; xi. 1. 24. 182 ; xvi. 14
86; xviii. 31. 43; xviii. 32. 142
XX. 3. 142 ; XX. 5. 158 ; xxi. 2
239 ; xxiii. 18. 158 ; xxxvi. 17
139 ; xxxvi. 26. 43 ; xxxvii. 203
xxxvii. 1-14. 181 ; xxxvii. 27. 28.

80 ; xliii. 2. 82

Hosea iv. 1-2. 304 ; v. 4. 176 ; v. 7.
170 ; v. 15. 106 ; vi. 7. 170 ; ix.

10. 156 ; xi. 1. 235 ; xi. 3. 235 ; xi,
4. 157 ; xii. 2. 177

Joel ii. 28. 194 ; ii. 28. 29. 378 ; iii. 1.

2. 274
Amos. iii. 2. 28 ; vii. 16. 239 ; ix. 2-4.

124 ; ix. 11. 80
Obadiah i. 21. 338
Jonah i. 3. 124
Micah ii. 6. 239 ; iv. 7. 338
Habakkuk ii. 20. 124 ; iii. 4. 84
Zechariah ii. 3, 108 ; ii. 6. 90 ; iii. 9.

187; iv. 2. 188 ; iv. 6. 187, 188;

iv. 10. 119, 124 ; viii. 23. 130 ;

ix. 1. 317 ; xii. i. 202 ; xii. 2. 10.

178 ; xiv. 9. 338
Malachi ii. 10. 54
Psalms i. 69 ; ii. 47 ; ii. 7. 8. 164 ;

iii. 4. 120 ; v. 4. 137 ; xi. 4.

120, 124 ; xvi. 8. 79, 329 ; xvi. 10-

11. 99 ; xviii. 6. 324 ; xviii. 8. 247 ;



xix. 1. 44 ; xxii. 1, 271 ; xxvii.
29. 136 ; xxix. 4. Ill ; xxix. 7.
147 ; XXX. 1-3. 232 ; xxxi. 5. 202 ;
xxxiii. 6. 76, 147, 191 ; xxxiii. 9.
153, 162 ; xxxiv. 7. 128 ; xxxiv. 18.
201 ; xxxvi. 9. 171 ; xii. 4. 59 ;
xliv. 10. 79 ; 1. 9. 79 ; Ii. 11. 53,
174, 193, 196, 201; Ii. 12. 43, 197;
Ivi. 11. 70 ; Ixiii. 8. 3 ; Ixv. 2. 79,
110, 141, 237 ; Ixv. 13. 193 ; Ixxii.
17. 162 ; Ixxiii. 6. 193 ; Ixxiv. 1.
242 ; Ixxiv. 2. 171 ; Ixxvii. 19. 44 ;
Ixxviii. 25. 87 ; Ixxviii. 39. 176,
190 ; Ixxx. 4. 242 ; Ixxx. 17. 164 ;
Ixxxi. 9. 143 ; Ixxxii. 1. 122 ; Ixxxix.
14. 110 ; Ixxxix. 15. 44 ; xc. 1.
109, 288 ; xc. 2. 3. 162 ; xciii. 2.
162 ; ciii. 10. 192 ; ciii. 13. 53,
192; ciii. 14. 192; ciii. 19. 119;
civ. 4. 89, 175 ; cvi. 30. 324 ; evi.
33. 119 ; ex. 1. 97 ; cxix. 79, 197 ;
cxxxv. 13. 47, 74 ; cxxxix. ."/3 ;
cxxxix. 3. 44 ; cxxxix. 5. 36 ; cxxxix,
7-10. 49 ; cxxxix. 7-12. 44 ; cxli,
2. 265 ; cxliii. 10. 184 ; cxlv. 9.
299, 301 ; cxlv. 13. 338 ; cxlviii.

8. 330

Proverbs iii. 12. 44 ; iii. 34. 313 ; viii,
205 ; viii. 22. 162, 199 ; viii. 22-
26. 200 ; viii. 26. 171 ; viii. .30.
199 ; viii. 34. 123 ; xv. 3, 124 ;
XV, 17. 234 ; xvii. 1. 234 ; xx. 27.

21, 43 ; xxi. 23. 228 ; xxiii. 29. 30.
227 ; XXV. 21. 143 ; xxv. 28. 176

Job xi. 7. 8. 48 ; xii. 10. 176 ; xxiii. 8. 9,
48 ; xxvi. 7. 44 : xxvi. 9. 86 ; xxvi,
11. 44 ; xxvi. 14. 44, 331 ; xxviii.
25. 220 ; xxxii. 8. 21, 43, 50 ; xxxiv,

22. 124 ; xxxv. 5-7. 48 ; xxxvi. 26.
48 ; xxxvlii. 1, 219

Canticles i. 2. 144 ; 1. 13. 94 ; ii. 6.

380 ; ii. 9, 120 ; ii. 12. 220 ; vi. 4.

93 ; viii. 12. 71 ; viii. 13. 229 ; viii.

14. 230
Ruth ii. 8. 9. 220
Lamentations i. 1. 71 ; i. 16. 228 ; iii.

33. 44 ; iii. 37. 237 ; iii. 41. 122 ;

iii. 44. 142
Ecclesiastes i. 14. 177 ; iii. 15. 114, 116 ;

iv. 2. 237 ; v. 2. 48 ; ix. 7. 233 ;

ix. 11. 169; X. 8. 71 ; xii, 7. 21,

43, 179
Daniel iv. 34. 338 ; ix. 14. 141 ; xii. 2.

203 ; xii. 10, 169
Ezra i, 1, 177 ; i. 3. 120 ; i. 5. 43 ; vi.

9. 187 ; viii. 15. 95
Nehemiah viii. 3, 203 ; ix, 20. 202

1 Chronicles xii, 18. 183 ; xxii. 9. 54

2 Chronicles ii. 1. 252 ; vi. 42. 227 ;

vii. 8. 9. 237 ; xv, 1-7. 183 ; xviii.
22. 178 ; xxxvi. 22. 177



INDEX



385



B, NEW TESTAMENT

Matthew iii. 11. 16. 220 ; xviii. 20. 132,

230
Mark i. 10. 220
Luke ii. 9. .57 ; iii. 5. 202 ; iii. 22. 220 ;

xiv. 14. 202 ; xx. 35. 202
John i. 1. 76, 161 ; i, 14. 80, 162 ; iii.

34. 223 ; v. 29. 202 ; vi. 29-46.

165 ; viii. 12. 83 ; viii. 58. 163 ;

xiv. 2. 165 ; xv. 8-10. 165
Acts ii. 2. 206, 132 ; ii. 3. 132, 221,

222 ; ii. 4. 221, 132 ; ii. 42. 131 ;

vii. 51. 53, 193, 194 ; xv. 16. 80 ;

xxii. 11. 222, 380; xxiv. 15. 203 ;

xxviii. 25. 26. 237
Romans vi. 12-14. 142 ; vii. 18. 24. 42 ;

vii. 22. 23. 142 ; viii. 4-13. 142 ;

X. 12. 298 ; xi. 36. 160

1 Corinthians v. 4. 132 ; viii. 6. 76 ; x.

16-17. 132 ; xii. 14-26. 131 ; xv.
45. 160

2 Corinthians iii. 17. 222 ; iv. 4. 76 ;

iv. 6. 57
Ephesians i. 6. 57 ; iv. 10. etc., 76 ; iv.

30. 53, 193



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