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J. Morrison (John Morrison) Davidson.

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ONE SHILLING.



NET.






CON

Communion of Saints

ChriS'ian Profession and Practice

Religion of Collectivism

Nonconformist Conscience

Our Labour Churciies

The Cost tf Cant

Labourism v Liberalism

National Labour Parliament

Politics without Politicians

Initiative and Referendum

What 13 Anarchy?

Anarchy and Outrage

Give the Woman a Latch- Key 1



TE NTS




n.


Rights of Natural Children


1


IS.


Communism and the Family




16.


The " New Woman "


/


17.


'Unto him that hath"


)


18.


"Triumphant Democracy"


19.


The Poor Man's Bank




20.


Beef and Bureaucracy


i


21.


The Inferno of War


)


22.


Pauper Suffrage


(


23.


" Tender Mercies of the Wicked


]


2f.


Royal Christening


2S.


First Duke of MarP orough


1


28.


Apostle of the Irish




)NDON WILLIAM REEVES, 185, FLEET STREET. EC.



' — ■ ■ ■ mr.



NEW POLITICS FOR THE PEOPLE.



LET THERE BE LIGHT!



I.— RELIGION. 3.— THE FAMILY

2.— POLITICS. 4.— ECONOMICS.

5. — MISCELLANEA.



Learning without Thouoht is Labour lost :
Tliought witliout Learning is perilous indeed.

— Confucius.

New occasions teach |new duties : Time makes ancient good uncouth :
They must upward still and onward who would keep abreast of Truth.

— Lowell.



BY

J. MORRISON DAVIDSON.

(Of the Middle Temple)
Barrister-at-La\v.

Author of " Politics for the People," " The Old Order and the New,

" The New Book of Kings," " The Book of Lords," "The Book of

Erin," " Home Rule for Scotland," " Villager-s Magna

Charta," " Gospel of the Poor," &c., &c.



London :
WILLIAM REEVES, 185, FLEET ST., E.G.



cc



1

^



:5 AM



TO

My Little Grandsons,

CO

o FRANK MORRISON DUPLCCK.

(aged eight)

AND

JOHN MORRISON MARLOWE.

(aged two)



In the Hope that they may Live
To BE Worthy Citizens of



^ THE CO-OPERATIVE COMMONWEALTH

\^ THE

KINGDOM OF GOD ON EARTH.



185, Fleet Street,

London, E.G.
March, 10, 1896.



24r^«^



FOREWORD.

Voice in the Night: What am I ? One who cries
continually, with sweat and
tears, to the Lord God, that it would please Him, out
of His infinite love, to break down all Kingship and
Queenship, all Priesthood and Prelacy ; to cancel and
abolish all Bonds of Human Allegiance, all the Magis-
tracy, all the Nobles, and all the Wealthy ; and to send
us again, according to His promise, the One King, the
Christ, and all things in common, as in the days of the
First Church, when Christ Jesus was King.

— Alfred Lord Tennyson : Queen Mary.



CONTENTS.



PART I— RELIGION.

Pace

No I.
" The Communion of the Saints " . . . • • 3

No. II.
Christian Profession and Pagan Practice ... 9

No. III.
The Religion of Collectivism i5

No. IV.
The " Nonconformist Conscience " and Civic Duty . 20

No. V.
Our Labour Churches : a Personal Experience . . 26

No. VI.
The Cost of Cant: "Without Money and V^ithout

Price" (?) 33

PART II. POLITICS.

No. VII.
Labourism v. Liberalism; The Parting of the Ways . 41

No. VIII.
A National Labour Parliament . ... 48

No. IX.
Politics without Politicians 54

No. X.
The Abolition of the House of Commons : The Initiative

and Referendum ....... 60

No. XL
What is Anarchy ? 67

No. XII.
Anarchy and Outrage ...... 74

PART III.— THE FAMILY.

No. XIII.
" Lock up the Men : Give the Women a Latch-Key. !" 81



X. CONTENTS.

No. XIV.
The Rights of Natural Children: The " Legitimation

League's " Program 86

No XV.
" Communism and the Family " 92

No. XVI.
The " New Woman "......, 97

PART lY— ECONOMICS.

No. XVII.
" Unto him that hath shall be given " , . . . 105

No. XVIII.
" Triumphant Democracy " ? ...... ii2

No. XIX.
" The Poor Man's Bank .■ " "Uncle" .... 120

No. XX.
Beef and Bureaucracy 127



PART Y— MISCELLANEA.

No. XXI.
The Inferno of War 135

No. XXII.
Baron Orchid de Screwe on Pauper Suffrage . . . 142

No. XXIII.
The Tender Mercies of the Wicked" Draco Day. . 148

No. XXIV.
The Royal Christening " Function "-■ Baby Wettin , 154

No. XXV.
The First Duke of Marlborough . . , . • 160

No. XXVI.
The Apostle of the Irish 166



Part I.— RELIGION.

•'THE COMMUNION OF THE SAINTS."

CHRISTIAN PROFESSION AND PAGAN PRACTICE.

THE RELIGION OF COLLECTIVISM.

THE "NONCONFORMIST CONSCIENCE" AND
CIVIC DUTY.

OUR LABOUR CHURCHES : A Personal Experience.

THE COST OF CANT: "WITHOUT MONEY AND
WITHOUT PRICE " (?)



And darkness was upon the face of the deep.
And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters.
And God said Let there be Light : and there was Light.
And God saw the Light, that it was good.

(Gen. i., 2 3, 4.)



Is)



I.

"^ifiE COMMUNION OF THE SAINTS."

Thou shall communise in all things with thy neighbour and
not call things /nD^iff property: for if ye are communicants in
what is imperishable, how much more should ye be in what is
perishable.- St. Barnabas' Epistle.



For the man who loves his neighbour as himself will waul
for the latter the good things he wants for himself and he will
try both by prayer and effort to get these things for his neigh-
bour, if he loves him. — Justin Martyr.



Whatever is of God is common to our use, nor must any one
so appropriate His benefits and gifts as to prevent the whole
human race from an equal enjoyment of the divine bounty and
generosity. Thus equally for all the day lightens us, the sun
shines, the shower waters, the wind blows, and a common
slumber comes to the sleepers, and the shining of the stars and
of the moon is collective propoty. By this example of equality
thij rran who owns rents and profits which he shares with the
fraternity, being himself by his free gifts both common and
righteous, is an imitation of God the Father. — St. Cyprian.

And Him evermore I behold
Walking in Galilee,
Through the cornfield's waving gold,
In hamlet, and wood, and wold.
By the shores of the Beautiful Sea.

He toucheth the sightless eyes.
Before Him the demons flee,
To the dead He sayeth ; Arise I
To the living : Follow Me !

3



•♦the communion of the saints.

And that voice still soundeth on

From the centuries that are gone,

To the centuries that shall be ! -Longfellow.




NE Sunday evening recently it was my plea-
sure and profit to address an audience in
the Central Hall of tlie Social Democratic
Federation, in the Strand — subject, " The
Communist Christ." At the start I asked my hearers
to divest their minds of all theological or anti-
theological bias, one way or another, and to regard
the Nazarene as they might Plato or Aristotle, Adam
Smith or Karl Marx — simply as an illustrious Teacher
whose Ethical and Economic System is before us.
The audience seemed to be about equally made up of
Social Democrats and Communist Anarchists, but,
in the discussion that followed, all loyally kept to the
purely human Christ.

" What think ye of Christ ? " was practically the
question before the meeting, and the answers given
were most interesting. They showed what I had
doubted, viz., that the speakers could distinguish
clearly between the real Christ of the Commune
and the fictitious Christ of the Churches. They re-
cognised that the Son of Man did not place his
" Kingdom of Heaven " i.e., the Commimistic Commm-
wealth," in the clouds, but on this solid earth, and the
only regret expressed was that princes, plutocrats and
priests among them had contrived to balk man-
kind of the grand reality so long. If any consider-
able divergence of view emerged, it was confined to
the inquiry whether the Founder of Christianity was
a Social Democrat or a Communist Anarchist, both
sections claiming Him with equal confidence and
emulation.

This point is one of very great importance, but
happily it is of comparatively easy solution. A
Social Democrat puts his trust in the State, like



" THE COMMUNION OF THE SAINTS. 5

any other politician, Monarchical or Republican,
Tory or Liberal. His object is to capture the
" machine " in order to turn it to his own and better
purposes. He desires to establish a national and
international system of governmentally-controlled
co-operation — an Involuntary Collectivism.

Involuntary, because the very foundation-stone of
the State is Force, always Force. In a Social Demo-
cratic State the Justice Hawkins, and the Justice
Day ; the soldier and the marine ; the policeman,
the jailer, and the hangman would still be a neces-
sity. In a word, even with Universal Adult Suffrage,
the rule would still be one of political inferiors by
political superiors, and the result might be — I do
not say, with some prophets of evil, would neces-
sarily be — a very grim form of despotism indeed.

Anyhow, with Communist Anarchy — I do not, of
course, for one moment, mean the pitiable insanity
of the Ravachols, Vaillants, Henrys, and Santos —
but the genuine Anarchy, of which I hold Christ
was the unerring exponent — is introduced into the
problem of human emancipation, a variant of im-
measurable consequence. Where the Social Demo-
crat would apply legal, and the Materialist Anarchist
illegal, Force, the Christian Anarchist substitutes
Love. His Collectivism is purely Voluntary.

That one little word Love dissolves the State, and
establishes the Commune. Patviotistn ceases and
Humanitarianism takes its place. The aim of the
Social Democrat and of the genuine or Christian
Anarchist, is substantially the same, but their re-
spective watchwords — Force, Love — and methods of
procedure are wide as the poles asunder.

The primitive Christians asked nothing, hoped
nothing, from the State except to be let alone. To
avoid giving offence they paid Caesar's taxes, even
as Jesus had done, but in no other way did they
acknowledge his authority. They would neither



6 " THE COMMUNION OF THE SAINTS."

enter his Legions nor his pretended Courts of Justice.
The Love which Christ exempUfied in His own life
and exacted from His followers sternly forbade them
either to " shed blood " or " go to law before the
heathen."

That was the moral bomb which Christ threw into
;he Graeco- Roman world, and it, at one time, bade
fair to shatter the State into irreconstructible frag-
ments. The great God Mammon trembled on his
throne as he never trembled before nor since.
The Communist Christ seemed about to depose him
and bring confusion on all his votaries.

The Acts of the Apostles tells us how the leaven
that was to leaven the whole lump oi private property
godlessness began to work : —

And the multitude of them that believed were of one heart
and one soul ; neither said any of them that aught of the things
which he possessed was his own ; but they had all things in
common. Neither was there any of them that lacked ; for as
many as were possessors of lands or houses sold them and
brought the prices of the things that were sold, and laid them
at the Apostles' feet, and distribution was made unto every
man according as he had need.

Now, as all manner of good Catholics and Pro-
testants alike profess to find in primitive Christian
precept and practice the justification of their own
existence, it cannot be too frequently dinned into
their ears that these were, to the backbone, anti-
property and communistic. The earliest ** Churches"
or Anarchist " Groups " were simply fraternities or
brotherhoods having all things in common, and this is
how the ** Early Fathers " were wont to voice their
tenets : —

St. Basil : " The rich man is a thief."

St. Chrysostom : " The rich are robbers : better all thing^l

were in common."
St. Clement : " Iniquity alone has created private property.''
St. Ambrose : " Nature created community : private preperty it

the off-spring of usurpation."



" THB COMMUNION OF THE SAINTS. ' 7

St. Jerome : "Opulence is always the product of theft com-
mitted, if not by the actual possessor, then by his
ancestors."

And even in the beginning of the Seventh Century,
long after the atheist Emperor Constantine — " the
first Christian Emperor " forsooth ! — the vile mur-
derer of his wife Fausta, his son Caesar Crispus, and
his nephew Licinius — had " nobbled " Christianity
and harnessed it to the chariot-wheels of the Empire,
the holiest of Popes, St. Gregory the Great, " the
Apostle of the English," in his Pastoral Care, could
write in respect of landlordism, the father of all
other monopolies : —

Let them know that the earth from which they were created is
thi common property oj all mm, a.Qd that, therefore, the fruits of the
earth belong indiscriminately to all. Those that make private

Eroperty of the gift of God pretend in vain to be innocent ; for
y thus withholding the subsistence of the poor they are the
murderers of those who die daily for want of it.

The late Rev. Tait Scott, of Lymington, whose
recent death, at the early age of forty, all good
Collectivists have the best reason to mourn, not
long ago told me a little experience of his own,
which in a striking manner shows how far the
Churches and " clergy of all denominations '' have
forgotten the warning of the Master : " Ye cannot
serve God and Mammon " ; nay, how completely
they have put Mammon in the place of God and His
Christ :

Mr. Tait Scott was,for some eight years, a missionary
in New Guinea among aborigines, who had the
reputation of being cannibals. This, he found, they
were called by the thievish European traders merely
as a pretext for cheating and robbing them. They
were in reality strict Communists and Vegetarians,
and, though naked as Adam and Eve, within the
limits of the matriarchal family, highly moral. They
had no idea oi private property , and consequently none



8 " THE COMMUNION OF THE SAINTS.

of theft. No one lacked while another had. In a
word, Mr. Tait Scott found the " cannibals " kindly,
helpful, happy, intelligent even — naturaliter Christiani.

But, alas, there had been false apostles of Christ
in those parts before Mr. Scott's arrival, and these
had been sowing tares, otiierwise imparting the " ele-
ments of civilisation," to the natives. Mr. Tait Scott
naturally asked to be made acquainted with the
Christian converts, and found that they were dis-
tinguishable from their fellows by one mark, and one
only, VIZ., that each was the happy possessor of " a
box with a lock and key ! " They had in fact gone
gome way towards laying the foundations of gaol
and workhouse and all the other humanising
'• Resources of Civilization."

There is, I am satisfied, no more important study
to be tackled at the present moment, than that of
primitive Christian communal arrangements which
entirely ignored, indeed precluded, the very existence
of a paid or " hireling ministry " (as the Quakers were
wont to phrase it) of any kind, Greek, CathoHc or
Protestant. " Without money and without price "
must ever be the watchword of the Christian Faith
if the Great Founder's mission is to be fulfilled. Said
not St. Paul, " Let him that stole, steal no more;
but rather let him labour, working with his hands.
. . . These hands ministered to my necessities and to
them that were with me ? "

Tennyson's " Third Voice in the Night," in " Queen
Mary," was altogether right : —

Third Voice: "What am I? One who crids continually
with sweat and tears to the Lord God that it would please Him
out of His infinite love to break down all kingship and queenship.
all priesthood and prelacy ; to cancel and abolish all bonds of
human allegiance, all the magistracy, all the nobles, and all the
wealthy, and to send usagain, according to His promise, the One
King, the Christ, and all things in common, as in the days of the
first Church, when Christ Jesus was King."



II.

CHRISTIAN PROFESSION AND
PAGAN PRACTICE.

That Government is the best which governs not at all, and
when men are prepared for it, that is the kind of Government
they will have.— Thoreau.

To educate the wise man the State exists, and with the ap-
pearance of the wise man, the State expires. — Emerson.

Government is in its essence always a force actmg in viola-
tion of justice. Christianity destroys all Government. — Leo
Tolstoy.




ND so another Christmas has come and
gone, and we have crossed the thres-
hold of the year of Grace, 1895, or as very
competent scholars will have it 1897.
Even more disputable still are the day and month
of Christ's Nativity ; but such questions, though they
may exercise the hypnotised sacerdotal mind, affect
the rest of Christendom very little.

And for good reason ; for what matter the time and
manner of birth, or even of the death of the Son of
Man, compared with the saving truths imparted by
Him to his contemporaries, or compared with the
measure of their acceptance or rejection by His pro-
fessed followers to-day ? The "signs " or "miracles "
of healing the sick and feeding the hungry ascribed

9



lO CHRISTIAN PROFESSION AND PAGAN PRACTICE,

to Him in the Gospels may be rejected by supercilious
"scientists " but there is one miracle more astounding
than all the others, which no unprejudiced thinker, no
competent student of history, dreams of controvert-
ing, and in virtue of which He of Nazareth must
ever reign in the innermost consciousness of the
human race.

And that miracle was this : that an unlettered
Galilean artisan should arise in an obscure corner of
the Earth to examine its proud civilizations, and con-
fidently pronounce their foundations hollow, their
justice a mockery, their religions hypocrisy and their
glory an object of shame and contempt. He "con-
victed the world of sin " as it never had been con-
victed, and His indictment remains unanswered and
unanswerable.

Nor did the achievement of this Wonderful Per-
sonage end there. He not merely brought home to
men the full measure of their aberrations, but He
bestowed on them an infallible compass by which in
future to steer their course. The Wise Men of the
East and the unmatched Philosophers of Greece had
sought for some principle to reconcile the warring
elements in the nature of man, but in vain. When
Christ appeared they stood completely baffled, one
and all.

The Prophet of Nazareth solved the problem of
problems without an effort. He simply proclaimed
Love to be the Be-all and End-all of human existence ;
nay, more, He identified it with the Primordial Prin-
ciple of the Universe — with God Himself. And by
exemplifying all-embracing love in His own life, and
demanding it in His followers, Jesus restored the
moral unity of man's nature and placed a New
Heaven and a New Earth within the reach of human
endeavour.

For a couple of centuries or more after Christ's
death love was manifested no less in the practice than



CHRISTIAN PROFESSION AND PAGAN PRACTICE. II

in the profession of His followers, and in spite of the
worst that the State could do by deadliest persecution,
the violence of Pagan Individualism was powerless
againt the love of Christian Communism.

But in the beginning of the Fourth Century there
came a deplorable change. The State, finding that
it could neither s ibdue nor exterminate the Christians
by violence, was seized with a sudden affection for
them, and its craft-begotten love was a thou-
sand times more fatal than its most virulent hate,

For, by the Shades beneath us and by the Gods above,
Add not unto your cruel hate your yet more cruel love.

The vile Imperial homicide, Constantine,
wedded the Church to the State in an incestuous
union, and since then till now Christianity in all its
grand divisions, Greek, Roman and Protestant has
borne on its dishonoured forehead the sign of the
State Beast, The " Communion of the Saints "' i.e.,
Christian /oy^-inspired Communism, has been wholly
superseded by a grasping Individualism, clerical as
well as lay, of unblushing avarice.

I doubt, for example, if Joseph Parker, of the City
Temple, is not as great an expert in " selling the
Holy Ghost " as Simon the Sorcerer would fain have
been. The story of Joseph and the reporter sermon-
thief might almost bring a blush to the cheek of a
City stockbroker. O Joseph, Joseph ! If the vindi-
cation of the cause of Christ depended on thee and
such mercenary gospellers as thee, how hopeless the
outlook !

And in whatever direction we look, a mighty gulf
yawns between Christian profession and practice.
On every hand the love and equality inculcated by
Christ are strangled by State violence and inequality.

Is it a question of Monarchy ? " Then is it wholly
forbidden in a Christian community where " he who
would be the greatest must be the servant of all."



12 CHRISTIAN PROFESSION AND PAGAN PRACTICE.

Even " the Son of Man came not to be ministered
unto, but to minister." No prince or courtier can
liave any possible existence in the Christian Common-
wealth, and yet Queen Victoria is visible Head of the
Church and Defender of the Faith ! Woe unto you,
hypocrites !

Titles are rigorously condemned. Call no man
Master, no man Father. Yet have we a whole
Chamber of the Legislature crammed with Lords,
noble and most noble, and Fathers-in-God, reverend
and right reverend, in sheer defiance of the injunc-
tion of the Christ whom they all profess to serve !

Are then Churches and Clerics of Rome, Canterbury,
or Geneva in the grace of the Great Teacher ?
Assuredly not " The Kingdom of Heaven is within
you " and is not to be found in any Church — "neither
on this mountain nor yet at Jerusalem," Rome or
Canterbury. God is a Spirit, and can only be com-
muned with in spirit and in truth.

And he who would impart to his fellows the glad
tidings of the Kingdom — how is he to equip himself
for his task ? Not with a bishop's imprimatur or the
hall-mark of some School of Divinity. These things,
with their inevitable accessories, the goodly loaves
and fishes, greedily abstracted from the products of
sweated toil, have ever been the heavy impedimenta
of Christian propaganda. The true messenger of
Christ sets out moneyless, with an empty wallet and
without so much as a redundant overcoat. But he
is declared worthy of his meat, and that is his sole
perquisite. Fancy Joseph Parker starting on a mis-
sionary tour on those conditions, not to speak of the
Right Reverend " Successor of St. Augustine " —
him of Canterbury !

And what of our ermined Judges and the whole
tribe of lawyers P " Woe unto you, lawyers ! " said
Christ; "for ye have taken away the key of know-
ledge." And again, "Judge not, that ye be not



CHRISTIAN PROFESSION AND PAGAN PRACTICE. 1 3

judged." This latter injunction Count Tolstoy has
clearly shown is laid primarily on those who actually
sit on the judgment-seat in our pretended Courts of
Justice, and is not, as generally supposed, merely
applicable to criticism of private or personal con-
duct. Under the rule of violence of the pagan State
the function of the Judge is necessary : under that of
Christian love it inevitably disappears. Having due re-
gard to environment, in respect of Judge and Convict,
one would generally be justified in affirming that of
the two, the former is the greater criminal. I wonder,
for example, if it ever occurred to merciless Justice
Day that the words of Him to whom, as a good
Roman Catholic, he professes to look for mercy,
might have some personal application to himself.

And what of Generals, Admirals and other pro-
fessional State Murderers, great and small ? From
the Commander-in-Chief to Tommy Atkins they have
deliberately sworn to kill without mercy whomsoever
the rulers of the State, for the time being, order them
to kill. Yet the express command of Christ stares
them in the face — " Swear not at all." " Resist not
evil." " He that taketh the sword shall perish by
the sword."

If ye take a sword and dror it,

And go stick a feller through,

Guv'mint ain't to answer for it,

God ti'ill send the bill to you.
Here again, as in the case of the Judge, the law of
Christian love completely negatives the law of Pagan
violence and the distinctive element of the Gospel is
unequivocally affirmed. How, for example, a callous
Dugald Dalgetty Uke the late, much-lamented
"Chinese Gordon," of pious memory, should have
been habitually able to refresh his soul with Thomas
a Kempis' incomparable De Imitattone Christi, while at
the same time impiously shedding the blood of the
reforming Taipings, in the interest of a cruel and
effete despotism, is past all understanding.



14 CHRISTIAN PROFESSION AND PAGAN PRACTICE.

Nor is it otherwise with Riches and Rich Men.
" Woe unto you that are rich, for ye have received
your consolation." " It is as easy for a camel to go


1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

Online LibraryJ. Morrison (John Morrison) DavidsonNew politics for the people. Let there be light! 1.-Religion. 2.-Politics. 3.-The family. 4.-Economics. 5.-Miscellanea .. → online text (page 1 of 13)