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RADNOR REMINISCENCES



RADNOR REMINISCENCES

A FOXHUNTING JOURNAL

BY

J. STANLEY REEVE

AUTHOR OF " RHUBARB, THE DIARY OF A GENTLEMAN'S HUNTER"

WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY

BENJAMIN CHEW

M.F.H. RADNOR, 1915-19X7

ILLUSTRATED WITH PHOTOGRAPHS
AND SILHOUETTES BY THE AUTHOR




BOSTON AND NEW YORK

HOUGHTON MIFFLIN COMPANY



1921



COPYRIGHT, 1921, BY J. STANLEY RBEVE
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA



PREFACE

AN Arab proverb says, "True happiness is only to be
found in two places on the back of a horse and in the
arms of the woman you love."

Whether this happiness is divided fifty-fifty between
the horse and the woman is rather a delicate matter; so to
save the feelings of the ladies, maybe we had better not
discuss it; but on one thing we will all agree, including the
ladies, and that is, that a great deal of happiness has been
derived from the back of a horse.

Foxhunting and hunting-journalism are two quite dif-
ferent sports. The uninitiated are too prone to picture
hunting as largely composed of elbows and legs, broken
bones, scratched noses, and love affairs. That all of these
do exist in the hunting-field, I will admit; but think for a
moment of the other benefits to be derived. They are so
numerous, it would be folly for me to undertake to write
them down.

Just as long as men and fair women have red blood in
their veins and sporting spirits, hunting will continue; but
hunting-journalism may disappear any minute, princi-
pally owing to the assassination of the poor journalists.

They say it is always a mistake to apologize for one's
efforts, but I must; and I offer them to the editors of The
Tatler and The Sporting and Dramatic News of London, for
the many sayings of their gifted correspondents that I
have appropriated. To my other friends well, maybe
they won't be friends after they read these humble efforts;
but I do offer my most sincere thanks to Miss Dorothy
Mather and Mr. Benjamin Chew for their kind assistance.

J. S. R.



2021395



CONTENTS



SEASON OF 1912-1913

CUBBING
OPENING MEET
2IST NOVEMBER, 1912
ANNUAL MEETING
STH DECEMBER, 1912
I7TH DECEMBER, 1912



3RD FEBRUARY, 1913
4TH FEBRUARY, 1913
I2TH FEBRUARY, 1913
2OTH FEBRUARY, 1913
2STH FEBRUARY, 1913
IST MARCH, 1913



Joint Meet with Mr. Kirk's

Hounds
C. R. Snowden, Esq.

A cold Lincoln's Birthday
Newtown Square



An hour and fifty minutes from

Waynesboro
THE LAST OF THE SEASON



SEASON OF 1913-1914



CUBBING

HAPPY CREEK FARMS
2OTH DECEMBER, 1913
23RD DECEMBER, 1913

3OTH DECEMBER, 1913
I7TH JANUARY, 1914
23RD JANUARY, 1914

27TH JANUARY, 1914
3RD FEBRUARY, 1914

3 IST MARCH, 1914



Mr. Kirk's Breakfast

Sixty-five minutes from Hershey's

Mill

At Newtown Square
A day with the Brandywine
With Sen-ill's Hounds in the Rose

Tree Country

From Crum Creek Farm to West

Chester
A good vixen saved for another

day



19

20
22

24
26
27

29
30

31
32



Vlll



CONTENTS



SEASON OF 1914-1915
CUBBING

THE FIRST BRYN MAWR HOUND SHOW
i8TH NOVEMBER, 1914 A run with the Rose Tree
Out of quarantine
A trapped fox at Crum Creek

Farm

Fatal accident to Mr. Grange
The Bobbery Pack
One of the best



JANUARY, 1915
I4TH JANUARY, 1915



i6rH JANUARY, 1915
22ND FEBRUARY, 1915
23 RD MARCH, 1915



SEASON OF 1915-1916



CUBBING

4TH DECEMBER, 1915
I2TH DECEMBER, 1915
STH JANUARY, 1916
STH FEBRUARY, 1916
I2TH FEBRUARY, 1916

i STH MARCH, 1916
23 RD MARCH, 1916
26TH MARCH, 1916

22ND APRIL, 1916



Mr. Kirk's Annual Breakfast
Mr. Buckley of Erdenheim
An hour and twenty minutes
All the world loves a lover
Brandywine and Pickering at

Marshallton

A cold day from Sugartown
To earth in Mr. Brown's drain
The last of the Season from White

Horse
The Happy Creek Race



39
40
42
43

44

45
46

48



53
54
55
59
61

62
64
65

66

68



CUBBING
2 IST OCTOBER, 1916
3OTH SEPTEMBER, 1916
24TH OCTOBER, 1916
IITH NOVEMBER, 1916
2OTH NOVEMBER, 1916
22ND NOVEMBER, 1916
23RD NOVEMBER, 1916
24TH NOVEMBER, 1916
26TH DECEMBER, 1916
4TH JANUARY, 1917



SEASON OF 1916-1917



71

A kill in the open 73

Cafe au Concourse Hippique 75

Alexander Brown, Esq. 76

Louis S. Fiske, Esq. 76

The Middlesex at White Horse 76

The Middlesex at Bromall 78

Don't jump that gate! 79

A luncheon to Mr. Higginson 80

Two hours in the hills 82
Four and a quarter miles in

twenty-seven minutes 84



9TH JANUARY, 1917
IOTH JANUARY, 1917
IITH JANUARY, 1917
2OTH JANUARY, 1917
IST FEBRUARY, 1917
22ND FEBRUARY, 1917
24TH FEBRUARY, 1917
3 IST MARCH, 1917
7TH APRIL, 1917
I4TH APRIL, 1917
2IST APRIL, 1917
I2TH MAY, 1917



CONTENTS

Good scent everywhere

Radnor Hunt Ball

The day after

The love feast

The Saportas' fire

The Master's Breakfast

The M.F.H. Association Dinner

The Border Plate

The Horston Cup

The Second Race at Happy Creek

White Marsh Puppy Show

Cheshire Puppy Show



SEASON OF 1917-1918
THE ECONOMIES OF WAR TIME
JULIAN C. BIDDLE, ESQ.
3RD SEPTEMBER, 1917 Cubbing
IST NOVEMBER, 1917
IOTH NOVEMBER, 1917
24TH NOVEMBER, 1917
2TH NOVEMBER, 1917
29TH NOVEMBER, 1917
6TH FEBRUARY, 1918
I4TH FEBRUARY, 1918
2ND MARCH, 1918



9TH MARCH, 1918
i8TH MARCH, 1918
3RD APRIL, 1918
27TH APRIL, 1918



IX

84

87
90

91

94
94
96

97

97
98
98

ICO



A War Season Opening Meet

No scent

Fifty minutes with the Cheshire

Mr. Clothier's loss

Thanksgiving Day

Frozen up

Mr. Pig

Two hours and thirty-five minutes 120

A run with the Chester Valley 121

The Boot Hunt and a lemon pie 122

Huntingdon Valley Race Meeting 125

The Maryland Hunt Cup 125



105
107
108
in

112
112
114
114
117
118



SEASON OF 1918-1919
THE REMOUNT TRAIN

SEASON OF 1919-1920
IST SEPTEMBER, 1919 Home again
i8TH OCTOBER, 1919 Old Square
2OTH OCTOBER, 1919 A disappearing fox



129



133
135
136



CONTENTS



25TH OCTOBER, 1919
STH NOVEMBER, 1919
I5TH NOVEMBER, 1919
22ND NOVEMBER, 1919



27TH NOVEMBER, 1919



29TH NOVEMBER, 1919



I3TH DECEMBER, 1919



~ / / X X

27TH DECEMBER, 1919




I4TH FEBRUARY, 1920
l8ra MARCH, 1920
2OTH MARCH, 1920
23 RD MARCH, 1920

27TH MARCH, 1920
22ND APRIL, 1920
24TH APRIL, 1920



Rose Tree Race Meet 137

A bye-day 139

A meet at Goshen School 139
An hour and thirty-five minutes

from Hershey's Mill 141

The Fox and Hound Club 143
Radnor Valley Farm Challenge

Cup 144

After the ball 146

A Waynesboro fox 148

Mr. Kirk's 149

Comedy and tragedy 152

The field gets left 153
A southerly wind and a cloudy

sky 155

An hour and a quarter in the mud 156

A seven mile point 158

Brookthorpe to Mr. Brown's 158
A gallop from Bartholomew's

Wood 1 60

An eight and a half mile point 161

Sunnybrook Farm 163

Maryland Hunt Cup 164



SEASON OF 1920-1921



CUBBING

9TH OCTOBER, 1920
2 IST OCTOBER, 1920
23RD OCTOBER, 1920
3OTH OCTOBER, 1920
6TH NOVEMBER, 1920
IITH NOVEMBER, 1920
I5TH, i8TH, I9TH NO-
VEMBER, 1920
24TH NOVEMBER, 1920
25TH NOVEMBER, 1920
27TH NOVEMBER, 1920
i8TH DECEMBER, 1920



Man O'War

Foxhall Farm Cup

Opening Day

Snakehouse Wood to Castle Rock

Two days with the Cheshire and

one with the Brandywine
A bye-day
Thanksgiving Day
A Meet at Kelso
South of the Pike



169
170
171
172
177
179
180

182
184
1 85
187
189



CONTENTS



28rH DECEMBER, 1920
3<DTH DECEMBER, 1920
4TH JANUARY, 1921
29TH JANUARY, 1921
3RD FEBRUARY, 1921
NLMROD



"Seven-to-One"
A Rose Tree Hunt supper
The death of "Lucy Glitters 1
Delchester to Temple Hill
Radnor and Rose Tree



191
193
195
197
199

202



ILLUSTRATIONS

WILL LEVERTON AND THE RADNOR HOUNDS Frontispiece
WILL LEVERTON AND FRANK. SMITH 4

RADNOR HOUNDS THE WINNING HALF-BRED
PACK AT THE BRYN MAWR HOUND SHOW, 1915 20

MRS. JOHN R. VALENTINE ON "FAILIAN" 32

A. HENRY HIGGINSON, ESQ., WITH HIS WINNING
PACK OF FIVE COUPLES OF ENGLISH HOUNDS 40

HORACE B. HARE, ESQ., M.F.H. 48

BENJAMIN CHEW, ESQ., M.F.H., ON "OVIAT" AND
J. STANLEY REEVE, ESQ., ON "POACHER" 54

MRS. HOWARD H. HENRY AND MRS. A. J. A.

DEVEREUX 58

RADNOR HOUNDS AT THE BRYN MAWR HOUND

SHOW, 1916 76

RADNOR HOUNDS AT WHITE HORSE 82

EDWARD C. DALE, ESQ. 106

THE Six GREYS 114

Mrs. Paul Denckla Mills on "Grey Cloud," Mrs. Charles
A. Munn on "Peter Grey," Mrs. A. J. Antelo Devereux
on "Happy Boots," Harry Ramsey, First Whip, on "Dave
Waller," W. Plunket Stewart, Esq., M.F.H., on " Water
Wagon," and Harry Brown, Huntsman, on "Greymaster"

MRS. EDWARD H. CARLE, ON "GERMOND" 118



xiv ILLUSTRATIONS

MRS. WALTER M. JEFFORDS RECEIVING THE PLATE

OFFERED BY THE MASTERS OF FOXHOUNDS ASSO-
CIATION FOR BEST FIVE COUPLES OF AMERICAN
HOUNDS 138

RADNOR HUNT THANKSGIVING DAY, 1919 144

Patrol Judges: Messrs. J. Stanley Reeve, Walter Stokes,
Charles A. Munn, W. Plunket Stewart, Francis V. Lloyd,
Rowland Comly, Gardner Cassatt, Robert E. Straw-
bridge, Jr.

Miss EUGENIA KELSO CASSATT AND HENRY C.

BARCLAY, ESQ. 1 60

R. CLIFTON LISLE, ESQ.; Miss GERTRUDE S.
HECKSHER; ROBERT E. BROOKS, ESQ. 172

CHESHIRE FOXHOUNDS W. P. STEWART, ESQ.,
M.F.H. 182

Miss GERTRUDE S. HECKSHER ON "SATURNUS" 192

Miss ELLEN MARY CASSATT ON "SEVEN-TO-ONE" 192



INTRODUCTION
BY BENJAMIN CHEW

M.F.H. RADNOR, 1915-1917

IT takes the perspective of time to write history. It takes
still more time and the increasing perspective for us to
read history; especially to read it with a seeing and un-
biased mind and to appreciate the values which only the
perspective of time can bring before our mental vision.

It may seem that to class the following record as history
is to bring it into too great importance. Nevertheless, it is
a part of the history of our country and of our civilization.
It records a phase of life which has much to do with the
racial consciousness of our people. Would that its influ-
ence had been greater and more widespread in this great
land of ours!

Sport is one of the links of heredity which has come to us
from our British forbears; sport being the lighter visible
sign of our finer inherited qualities: energy, fair play,
manhood in the best sense; justice, honesty, and observa-
tion; love of the land and of the great outdoors; all are ex-
pressed in and developed by sport. More especially by
foxhunting; let us not say the "Sport of Kings," but the
King of Sports.

Foxhunting has flourished in this country of ours for
two hundred years; not fostered by the rich, but main-
tained and loved by the plain men of the land, the men
who, when times of strife stirred the land, were the first to
answer the call of the land and leave their homes and fami-
lies and give themselves, their hopes and joys and goods,
to the service of their country; and can we but feel sure



xvi INTRODUCTION

that they were better fitted, mentally, morally and physi-
cally, by their days with the hounds, their long days in the
open, where clean living, courage, endurance, patience,
and understanding are needed in the making of a good
foxhunter?

If we look back in the pages of our local history, we find
that the members of the Gloucester Foxhunting Club,
most of whom were members of the Old State in Schuyl-
kill, the oldest club in the world with a continuous exist-
ence, formed, in the early days of the Revolution, the now
famous First Troop, Philadelphia City Cavalry, which has
distinguished itself in every war in which this country has
ever engaged.

A great majority of its members have been good fox-
hunters, and the lessons of the hunting-field have been
useful without doubt in camp and field of battle.

Therefore, I feel sure that the following simple record of
a few years of the sport of a representative American
Hunt, cannot be amiss, and that in the long annals of our
glorious country this little side-light into our "manners
and customs," as Caesar would say, will be not only appre-
ciated by those whose names figure in its pages and who
will read with personal pleasure; but will in years to come
bring pleasure to another generation and shed a light for
them upon a not unimportant phase of our lives.

The increase of the motor in all branches of transporta-
tion, and even in the realms of agriculture, seems to indi-
cate the gradual elimination of the horse, and it may well
be indeed is not improbable that in another genera-
tion or so the breeding of horses, especially in this part of
the country, to a great extent, if not entirely, will be
abandoned, and that foxes and foxhunting will be come a
thing of the past. It is in those days that this record will



INTRODUCTION xvii

be read and valued and will give to those generations to
come some idea of the joyous days so much appreciated by
their forbears.

Suffice it to say that a man or woman who has hunted
the fox honestly and courageously has never but benefited
from his or her experience.

The many occasions on which he or she has conquered
self, be it in early rising when laziness is overcome, be it in
overcoming fear when the rasper is faced with pluck de-
spite good excuses for taking the gap, or be it in the ex-
ertion of self-control and expression of courtesy, which
should always be the rule in the hunting-field these
many opportunities of self-mastery, are they to be de-
spised in the building-up of the character of our race?
Surely, no! And, therefore, I feel sure that this hunting
record cannot but be of a certain value in its modest way,
as part of the history of our times.

The honesty and simplicity with which it has been writ-
ten is not the least of its charms and is one of its greatest
values for the future, as no one can fail to recognize the
sincerity of the writer.



RADNOR REMINISCENCES
SEASON OF 1912-1913



RADNOR REMINISCENCES



SEASON OF 1912-1913

CUB-HUNTING in 1912 did not commence until the 2d of
October, when for a fortnight hounds showed very good
sport; foxes being plentiful and scent very good; although
the country was quite blind until the middle of the month,
when we had a protracted dry spell and hounds had great
difficulty in carrying a line for any length of time; but,
fortunately, it rained just before the opening of the regu-
lar season and scenting conditions improved wonderfully.

Charles C. Harrison, Esq., gave his annual breakfast
before the opening meet at Happy Creek Farms, and a
large and representative field turned out, with Horace
Binney Hare, M.F.H., and Will Davis hunting a mixed
pack of seventeen and a half couples.

The first draw was Mr. Harrison's meadows, where a
fox went away at once, giving the field a nice gallop to-
wards Wyola, then swinging back again, hounds marking
their fox to earth in Mr. John Brown's drain, after fifteen
minutes of very pretty work.

After several vain attempts to bolt the fox, Harry Harri-
son sent home for his dachshund, but the excitement was
too much for Mr. Dachshund, for he refused to go to
ground, so the earth was stopped and we moved on. Later
in the day the two Hunt terriers were brought up and
bolted not only the fox, but a very fat groundhog as well.

A second fox was found in Yarnall's Hollow, he proving
to be more straight-necked than our first, and giving us a



4 RADNOR REMINISCENCES

run of eighty-five minutes all through the lower country;
hounds finally losing him back of Bromall, near the Marple
Road.

Among those hunting were: Harry W. Harrison; W.
Plunket Stewart; Charlie and Mrs. Snowden; Harry Bar-
clay; Miss Kitty Smith; Rowland Comly; John and Mrs.
Converse; Mrs. Valentine; Devy and Mrs. Devereux; R.
Nelson Buckley; Benjamin Chew; Edwin L. Blabon; Mr.
Fiske; Miss Emily Barclay; Ben Holland; and Bayard
Rives, of New York, who had just bought Mr. Wain's
mare "Lady Hannah" for $500, and thought her so satis-
factory that he went to Mr. Wain and wanted him to
accept a few hundred more for her!

Saturday, 2ist November, 1912

As we arrived at Penn Tavern this morning for the meet
at ten o'clock, a farmer in the bar-room said the Rose Tree
hounds were coming up country towards Green Briar, and,
as Green Briar was to be our first draw, we met Rose Tree
just east of the covert, chatted a moment with Sam Pink-
erton, the huntsman, and then the two packs joined
forces.

Hounds were no sooner in covert than a fox was viewed
out the far side, pointing up-country over the same line
that we had on Tuesday, and, with the two packs running
as one, the proverbial blanket would have covered the
thirty-four couples as they flew on towards the Westtown
School, making a complete circle of the school buildings,
leaving it left-handed and going south to Locksley sta-
tion, with our field of seventy-five rapidly thinning out,
and Chris Hagan's new purchase, "War Whoop," already
having given him two tosses.

A freight train was seen coming directly across the line




WILL LEVERTON AND FRANK SMITH

First and Second Whippers-in under Horace B. Hare, Esq., M.F.H.
and Huntsman, 1912-1913



A FOXHUNTING JOURNAL 5

of hounds, and, by a great effort, Will Leverton and Frank
Smith, the whips, succeeded in stopping hounds just at the
edge of the tracks as the train came by. Then a forward
cast by Horace Hare and hounds went off again with a
roar, swinging left-handed beyond the station and taking
us at a burning clip to the House of Refuge, where hounds
made two circles of the wood before heading down-coun-
try. Ben Chew here had a very bad fall, his horse turning
over at a fence and landing on top of him, pushing him
down into the soft mud. When the horse finally rolled off
and Ben was able to move, there was quite a dent in the
ground where they had fallen. Ben was unable to go on,
and, while he was leaning on the only jumpable part of the
fence, trying to get his wind, the rest of us had to jump a
picket fence into some one's farmyard, a rather nasty
place. Mrs. Fred Sturges's horse refused it, and she never
caught up with hounds again.

Chris Hagan had another fall jumping into a lane near
here, landing head-first in a patch of briars, and we left
him sitting on a rock picking thorns out of his face; but he
caught up with hounds again later on, and had the rare
honor to-day of having five falls from his new purchase.

John Converse came to grief a couple of fields beyond,
and then Eddie Dale performed for us very nicely at a
stiff three-rail fence out of a cornfield.

Every one was getting his turn and the pace was begin-
ning to tell, when hounds checked at a fork in the road,
and it was decided to separate the two packs and go home.
Just as we were moving off and had said good-bye to Rose
Tree, a Radnor dog hound spoke; both packs harked to
him and we were off again those that were left of us
at a pretty fast pace towards Green Briar and over a very
nice line of grass.



6 RADNOR REMINISCENCES

Dr. Jim Hutchinson came to grief for the second time
just before we reached Green Briar, as did Frank Smith,
the whipper-in.

Hounds were pressing their fox so hard that he appar-
ently missed connections with his home earth, as he went
straight through the covert, crossing the West Chester
Pike and circling the farm opposite the Street Road, then,
doubling back to covert, he went out the north side again,
hounds setting such a pace that our blown horses had all
they could do to keep on any sort of terms with them; and
the fox continually in view in front of hounds.

After going through the Dutton's Mill Wood, my faith-
ful conveyance " Castlereagh " put me down in a very
muddy field; but, fortunately for me, hounds checked a
moment later, and I caught up. It was faster than ever
from now on to Rocky Hill, where hounds rolled their fox
over in the open, after four hours of really remarkable
work.

There were sixteen in at the death, out of a field of
seventy-five. Mrs. Devereux was given the brush, and
Murray Forbes, of Boston, who was riding one of Dr.
Hutchinson's horses, was given a pad, as was also Harry
Barclay.

Hounds ran their fox quite twenty-five miles before
pulling him down, and, by the map, it is fifteen miles be-
tween the various points.

P.S. Some years later, after dining at the Barclays'
town house, we were talking over the long runs of the past,
and on harking back to this memorable day, Harry showed
me a silver paper-knife with a fox's pad for a handle, and,
on reading the engraved inscription, I found it was this
same fox.



A FOXHUNTING JOURNAL' 7

Saturday, ^oth November, 1912

IF something unusual did n't happen at the Annual Meet-
ing of Radnor Hunt, most people would be disappointed.

After quite a good day's sport, several foxhunters
stayed on at the Club House until time for the Annual
Meeting at six-thirty. Being a cold, raw day, it apparently
was necessary to take liquid refreshment to warm the
inner man, and the famous Radnor Yellow Port, which
never fails, again had the desired effect.

Just as the President had heard the Master's report
and was rising to make some sort of remark, complimen-
tary, of course, there was a tremendous and prolonged
crash, and a very much befuddled foxhunter, accompanied
by a table and suitcase, came rolling down the stairs and
landed in the room at the President's feet. To say the
President was pleased, is putting it mildly! What remarks
he intended to make, no one ever knew, but the Secretary
saved the day by calling for the Treasurer's report, while
helping hands disposed of our pink-coated friend.

Thursday, 5th December, 1912

AFTER the early part of November, the country became
dry again, scent being indifferent until to-day, when a
stout fox went away in front of hounds from the north
side of Cathcart's Rocks, making a big circle around the
Leopard and back to the White Horse Farm, when hounds
swung right-handed, and, keeping Mr. Boyer Davis's
house on their right, marked their fox to ground at the
foot of a dead chestnut tree just across the road from the
Davis gateway.

Curiosity x they say, killed the cat, and it nearly had the
same effect on Alfred Borden, of New York, who was here
as the guest of Fred and Mrs. Sturges. After hounds had



8 RADNOR REMINISCENCES

put their fox under, and, while there was a great tow-row-
ing going on around the earth, Borden decided he wanted
a closer view of the proceedings, and in jumping a barway
from the road into the field, his horse turned upside down,
giving him a nasty-looking fall, but, fortunately, he was
none the worse for it.

Tuesday, ijth December, 1912

A. HENRY HIGGINSON, M.F.H., Middlesex, is stopping
with me, and, being very anxious that he should have a
good day with hounds, I was more than satisfied, as we
had two runs, both of which were top-hole. Mr. William
M. Kerr very kindly mounted Alex., so he was on the
right sort of cattle to go, which was fortunate.

As we were moving off from White Horse at ten o'clock,
Sam Kirk's hounds came up the road, so the two packs
joined and found at the first draw; a fox going out of the
meadow below Fairy Hill, and, turning up-country,
crossed the Bryn Clovis Dairy Farm to Sugartown, where
hounds turned left-handed and came down the vale very
fast to Dutton's Mill, and on through to the West Chester
Pike, where, at a moment's check, the field caught up;
then, at a backward cast, they turned down-country,
finally marking their fox to earth in Charlie Snowden's
wood, after a very nice forty-five minutes.

Our second fox was viewed away from the far side of
Green Briar Thicket, with, unfortunately, only four and a
half couples of hounds on the line, and with the greater
part of the field left behind on the lower side of the covert.
But what we lacked in numbers, we made up in quality;
our fox, pointing his mask towards West Chester, bore
slightly left-handed, and hounds, keeping the Westtown
School on their right, raced up-country, over the school



A FOXHUNTING JOURNAL 9

property, then, bearing north again, ran with a burning
scent to the railroad line, about a mile above Moorestein
Station, where hounds were at fault for about five minutes
while we got off our horses and sat on a fence watching
them working things out, which they soon did; and,
carrying a good scent, ran back to the school again,
around the farm buildings, then straight down-country
over a beautiful line to Green Briar, where our fox evi-
dently went under; but hounds did not mark him.

We had all had quite enough of it by now, so called it a
day. This last run had been three hours all told, and
those of us in it were: Higginson; Will Leverton; Mrs.
Charlie Snowdon; the Misses Beatrice and Gertrude
deCoppet; Ned and Mrs. Blabon; Frank Lloyd; Mr. Kerr;
Alex. Brown on "Pebbles"; and Sam Kirk.


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