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J. W. C. (John William Carnegie) Kirk.

The Genesee farmer (Volume v.1 1831) online

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THE



GENESEE FARMER



AND



Gardener's Journal.



A WEEKLY PAPER, DEVOTED TO



n&titultuvt f flfoiHrnltmt # Mmal ^roiioni „



If- GOODSELL, EDITOR



VOLUME I.



ROCHESTER.

PUBLISHED BY LUTHER TUCKER & CO.



1831.



wfdov ot xaa



INDEX TO VOLUME I.



EDITORIAL.

Agricultural Reading 9 Asparagus 101
Apples 69 92 100 321 401 April 140
Age of Trees 28 118 Agri. Papers 116
Agri. Experience 29 Apple Sauce 321
Aphis or Plant Louse 149 Atmosphere 91
Agri. Society Jef. Co. 153
Amer. Wines 266 274 297
Alb. Hort. Soc. 282 Amer. Institute 330
Amer. Productions 385.
Bruff's Elevating Machine 363



JInsects 187 227 233 Indian Cakes 156

.' Insects on Trees 124 156 Irrigation 209

| Incisions in Fruit Trees 265

| Indian Corn 157 273 Impr. Plough 289

S Improvement Hudson River 335

I Improving Fruit Trees 274,

JJeff. Co. Ag. Soc. 153 Jeff.



Ag
Keeping Fruit 289



Co. 179 209.
Kraken 323
£ Keeping Farmers' Accounts 329.

* Life Preserver 410 Locusts 187 209 330

* Lampas of Horses 69 Lucerne 110 330
Bees and Bee Hives 10 178 * Large Fruit 322 337 Long Wool 329

Beer 156-Butter 157 Broom Corn 12 | Lib. Ent. Knowledge 337 Libraries 330

Brocoli 76 Bass Matting 84 Budding 250 \ Laying down Plants 361.
Breeding Animals 117 Bulbous Roots 249 * Melitot 140 Mandrake 322 Manures 86
Barometer 30 Bonnets 157. 5 Manufactures 179 370 377 385 394

Calves 94 361 Cider 2 289 313 ? Melons 201 250 Metheghn 241

Cheese 68 76 84 194 Chesnuts 68 J Meteor. Obs. at Silver Lake 242

Canal Tolls 6 163 330 363 Cranberries 10 § Maple Sugar 60 69 69 185



* Vulgar Errors 10 45 193 273

? Vegetable Physiology 2 22 37 70

l Vegetable Life 369 377.

J Work for March 92 April 116 May 13S

Tomatoes 233 266.

* Temperature of April 14o May 171



| COMMUNICATIONS.

§ Apricots 308 A " Young Farmer" S3
| Amer. Silk and Wine 42
274 275 278 290 302 395 S Rural Cemetery, Boston 205 214

* Flax 225 237 245 253 260 ? Report on Farms. Bristol, Ms 350

' b oddering Cattle 27 Female Industry 294 '* Royal Printing Office, Paris 328

I Flour 47 48 70 87 248 355 Figs 290 334 < Rep. of View. Com. Jeff. Co. Ae. Soc 3^6

> t rench Agri. 307 Farms 59 239 243 \ Rail Road Celebration 312.

} Geology 7 26 38 Grass Grounds 382 f Silk Culture 46 80 83 91 107 114 122 126

5 Gov. Throop's Proc. 343 Grain 95 ? 167 182 198 231 243 275 278 279 294 310

§ Grapes and GrapeVines 67 91 152 155 172$ 318 331 339 347 363 371 374 387 406

% Sedgwick's Address 51 Stock Farm 131
\ Spayed Cows 147 Shallow Sowing 219
I Sheep 122 145 175 181 271 Swine 334
\ Spesutia Farm 218 Swiss Chard 203
| Strawberries 262 268 277 286
| Shakers 254 Spurred Rye 235
| Sweet Potatoes 220 302 334



% 174 180 203 Grafting Grapes 125



% Greville's China Rose 51
| Gooseberries 175 215 245 339
% Green Dressing 115 123
i Grain on Light Soils 407.
Hay and Haymaking 195 221 230



I Hemp 225 237 245 253 260 319 Hops 48 \ Sugar from Beets 160 Stout's Address 13
Horses 64 133 141 146 1S9 176 184 185 I Salt for Milk Cows 15 Saving Seed. 33.
251 258 302 359 383 Hogs 163 \ Sunflower Oil 16 379



S



m 7.i w 1 » „r , , |„ al * ao d0B d3B 383 Hogs 163 \ Sunflower Oil 16 379

„ ,, J~ % , ^ ire Worm s43 Wabash 413 j Hints to Farmers 411 House Keeping 415 X Staves and Heading 352
Wild Black Cherry 237 260 \ Horticulture 328 Ham, 17,1 P b \ Star* AcriSnr A 11 A



Wild Black Cherry 237 260
Webster's Dictionary 405
" X " 42.



I Horticulture 328 Hams 174

^ Hudson and Ohio Rail Road 344.

I Imprisonment for Debt 343

g Improved Lands 205 Improved Stock "3

,.Indian Corn 130 139 152 175 181 231



323

8 298.



SELECTIONS,

Alb. Co. Ag. Report, 1830 43 do. 1831 402 I , ta J ian Agri ; '" Ice Houses 399
Agricultural Education 167 216 1 Influence of Chmate on Plants 316

Agri. Board 98 Apricots 223 I , ro " Ma ™ftclures 399 Insects IS

Agri. Hofwyl 317 Amer. Navy 352 W^»' Le " er l41

Agri. Conven. 411 413 Amer. Rivers 376 J l^:,^!"- Soc ' 3 ° 6 '
Alb. Co. Hort. Soc. 150 163 295 298 203 i„ y . S Address 390 39T

215 242 Amer. Silk 318 Apples 152 I £-? P r, & farmer's Accounts23l
Amer. Wine 403 Alabama Wine 408 \ , ''" Dned Corn 402 -

Asparagus 174 Agave Americana 219. t d" 16 , J 81 Lightning Rods 220

Bees and Beehives 56 126 139 152 155 174? , Ka y de Chaumom's Address 153 164

234 £82 Bloating in Cattle 46 Botts 59 \ T^ 6 P ™ duce 371 39/ Lamhs 230
Buffalo Berry Tree 139 251 Barley 160 ^iberia Colonists 287 Locusts 209
Butter 166 310 350 Budding 269 1 l' Ve l e " c r es 355 382.

Barnard's Letters 96 102 104 112 1»0 1«8 t™ g Wurtzel 106 Milk Cows 158 5

136 144 199 Broom Corn Whiskey 392 J mE-T" 1? lS ?J 39 174 222 22ii 2 «
Blidn in Pear Trees 359 *S1 . oy i, l,st of Trees and Shrubs 26 3£

Market Garden at Paris 269



158 207



State Agri. Soc. 411 413
5 System in Farming 411
$ Sayings for Farmers 411
*, Strange Affection 407
§ Stockfeeding in Ohio 400.
| Tulips 166 Turnips 190 Tomatoes 269
|Topdressing Grass Grounds 198
< Transplanting Trees 206
|T:rnip Butterfly 222
? Taliacotian Operation 400
$ Temperance 375 391.
5 Use of Snow 19 Underdraing 286 338
I Unfermented Manures 19.
5 Village Gardens 58.

i Wheat 27 56 78 141 174 182 192 211 235
t 243 283 338 Wild Rice 130
% Wool 24 70 130 255 Weril 270
J Zinc Ware 190.

I POETRY.

e 1



Birds and Insects 411.
Chloride of Lime 19 167



6~35 42 r 6 104176 25 6 271 328 344 352 376 408 41c.



Cellars 272



>M



r. Coke, Eng. Farmer 251



Census N.York 7 Arkansas 15 Mississippi \ » oral doughboy 254 Melons 152 189

15 Cities and Towns 16 U. States 152 416 \ », ,ms , for Ma "'ed Ladies 243
Currant Wine 220 Cream Cheese 203 \ m". Inducin ? fertility hi Fruit trees 404 :
Cattle 145 147 158 166 196 | ^{ount Auburn Cemetery 318 383

Cucumbers 189 Canal Tolls 312 $ "J ontreal Cattle Show 339 J

Calves 90 Carpet Weaving 78 % v' lk S 'ckness 340.

(Jure for Consumption 118 Castor Oil 290 $ x T ec,arlne . s I . 1 5 * 21 5 Na ""- a ' History 6 7
Criminal Suits against Animals 18 t ^ 0,es °" Mlch| gan 158 "

Chii



MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS.



27

47
70

87



30

48
71

88



31
54
72
91



32
55
75
95




7 15 19 23 24

35 38 39 40 46

56 59 62 63 64

78 79 80 83 86

99 110 111 119 126 127 134 135 136
139 142 143 144 151 152 158 159 167
175 176 182 183 184 191 195 200 207
208 215 216 224 231 232 240 243 247
248 255 256 263 264 268 271 272 275
279 280 295 296 302 303 304 312 315
320 328 334 335 336 338 344 368 39?
415.






VOLUME I.




KOCHESTER, JANUARY 1, 1831.



NUMBRR I.



THE GENESEE FARMER

AND GARDENER'S JOURNAL.



Devoted to Agriculture, Horticulture, Domestic Econo-
my, &e. Af



The first number of a paper under the above
title, was published at Rochester, on Saturday.
Jan. 1, 1831 — conducted by a gentleman long
experienced in the science of Agriculture, Hor-
ticulture, and other gsetul arts, assisted by man)
of the best practical firmers in this section of
the country, and particularly by some of the
Jlfambers of the Western and Sloaroe County
Horticultural Societies.

No part of the world is more richly blessed
with soil and climate, for a great and flourish
ing Agricultural and Horticultural interest,
than the western part of the state of New York
— that part called Old Genesee. Thi6 section
of country is supposed by competent judges to
be as favorable to the growth of the Vine and
'fulborry as the middle of France ; and as wine
and silk are becoming matters of national in-
terest and legislation, a portion of ihe columns
of the Farmer will be devoted to these sub-
jects.

This section of country has become densely
populated with an industrious and thriving
lass of Citizens, who have made themselves
rich by their own labors and who have now ac
quired ihe time and means of becomiug The-
oretically and Practically learned in the arts for
cultivating Scientifically the soil they have gn
lately reclaimed from the wilderness & prepar-
ed for the highest stale of Agriculture. While
must otherbrar.ches of science have been pro-
gressing, aided by the unwearied eiertionsof
men of learning and invention ; and while
practical improvements have flowed like a
stream from the press, Agriculture and Horti-
culture (twin-sisters) have been comparatively
speak.ng, neglected and forgotten ; and those
who have been pursuing the primitive mode:
of tillage for subsistencehave been left to strug
gle onward, (maided in their progress byjthosc
means which have been given to other bran
cbes of science, and which have proved the
cause of their rapid advancement.

These are among the reasons that have indu
••.edthe subscribers to embark in the cnterprize,
and to direct ii part of their tirr e and attemion
to the diffusion 'of Agricultural and Horticul-
lural information which will occupy a lar«e por-
tion of their paper.

They further expect through the aid of the
Franklin Institute of this place to be able oc-
casionally to present such essays as shall he
Thought useful in meehanical Philosophy.

The undertaking is one which must neces-
sarily require much labor and expense in its
prosecution, and without the aid of a liberal
patronage cannot long be sustained ; yet aware
of all these difficulties to be encountered, the
subscribers flatter themselves that, if they suc-
ceed in rendering their paper worthy of sup
port, itp merits will be duly appreciated by an
enlightened community, and their labors re-
warded in proportion to the profitable informa-
tion distributed to their Patrons.

In addition to the above there will be pub
iVied monthly aMetesrologica! Table, givin->



the temperature and slate of the Atmosphere,
course of the winds, &c It will also contain
> Horticultural and Pomological register; giv-
ing the time of leafing and blossoming o plants,
and the time of ripening of the various kinds
of fruit, lor the benefit of those who reside in
different latitudes, as well as to compare dif-
ferent seasons in the same latitude.

ST A Price Current and Bank Note Table,
carefully corrected each week, will be given.

The paper will be printed every Saturday,
in quarto form, ob fine paper and fair type, ma-
king 416 pages a year, besides a Title Page and
Index, at $"2,50 per annum, payable in six
months, or $2,00, if paid at the time of sub
scribing.

TUCKER & STEA'ENS.

Rochester, Jan. 1, 1631.



Editors who will give the above two or three inser-
tions, will confer a favor which will be reciprocated the
first opportunity.



HTJMBER ONE.

We are aware that this season of the year is
rather an unfavorable time to commence a work
like this, when every subjeotof whiohwc shall
treat is frozen in " thick ribbed ice," — the
field, the garden, and the forest, shorn of their
glorias, dressed in the habiliments of death,
have gone to their night of repose ; and man,
with his fine bounding animal spirits, which
expand and exhilarate the frame at the return
of spring and the re-appearance of all things
that are fair — he whose " eye in a fine frenzy
rolling, doth glance fiom heaven to earth, from
earth to heaven" — now frigid and torpid, driv
en like the " silvery sap" of vegetables to their
hidden recesses — we say. that this period. when
all things aro a " chaos of hard clay," mav he
rather an unfavorable one to commence our
work ,of which this number is a specimen ; but
as this little plant is the only one of the class.
;>rdor, genus, or species, of the kind, in this
Slate, except a monthly publication in ISew
York city, we intend to nurse it with peculiar
care, and fondly hope that this bud which we
now set will increase and multiply, blossom
and bear fruit to the satisfaction of all concern-
ed. With this number we strike off, and shall
continue at that ratio 1000 copies, trustin"
that when the genial sun of public approbation
and liberality shall kindle it into life, the bene-
fits on the score of mutuality may be in favor of
our patrons. We shall not be disappointed
nor discouragi d if a part of our edition should
lie dormant for a while, until the season of hy
bernation, both of the animal and vegetable
systems, shall pass away.

In the mean, time, maugre as the season is
with subjects, we hope to be able, not only to
assure but to instruct a great portion of our rea-
ders by uch suggestions on general topics, and
such philosophical speculations as our experi
ence and research has endowed ns with, to
gether with the kind favors we anticipate from
a large and able promised correspondence, and
selective facts, regarding the physiology of the
vegetable kingdom, from staple authors and
periodical works as we shall regard worth the
attention of our readers. With this peroration,
I we make our congee to our patrons. *



GENESEE COUNTRY.

We were forcibly struck with the wonder
ful and magic change that the region once cal
led the "Genesee Country," has undergone
in the brief space of thirty years— brief space
because many of our readers can look back te
that length of time as yesterday, and see in the
mirror of memory events shadowed forth with
more palpable boldness and reality than even
the events of yesterday. We say we were
forcibly effected by the wonderful change of
thirty years on looking over a little work pub-
lished by the Messrs. T. A- J. Sword in 1799
ontitled, " A Series of Letters from a Gentle-
man to his Friend, describing the Genese«
Country." He says, " in 1790, all that part oi
the Stale, lying west of the above mentioned
line to lake Ontario, including the Genesee
Country, was ereoted into a county by the name
of Ontario ; it is bounded on the north by lake
Ontario, on the west by Niagara river, and lake
Erie; on the south by Pennsylvania, and on the
east by the counties of Tioga and Onondaga.''
" In 1796, a printing office was established in
the town of Eatb, entitled the Bath Gazette—
another paper is also printed in the Genesee, en-
titled the Ontario Gazette, The same year a
sloop of forty tons was built and launched on
the Genesee lake."

Quere? Where was the •■ Ontario Gazette"
printed, and where is the " Genesee lake?"

That portion ofcountry once called ihe ''Ge-
nesee Country," although its exact boundaries
were rather vague and uncertain, probably now
contains some two hundred towns with more
than 800,000 inhabitants, with cities and villa-
ges at every four corners, and newspapers as
thick as blackberries. The Genesee Country,
at that time a wilderness of forest, now teems
with an active, industrious and wholesome po-
pulation. The forests have fallen uefore the
axe, and the bread stuffs, and all the luxuries of
life arise behind the plough share, and the
young lion of the west, from a purblind whelp,
now shews his gnashing fangs and bristles his
waving mane, in proud confidence to ihe mam-
moth of the east. Possessing one of the most
luxurious soils of the globe, with a climate that
for mildness will compare with New Jersey and
Pennsylvania, and situated on the great inland
seas of America, the production of their soil
can lay under contribution Quebec and Mon-
treal, New York, Boston, and the cities of the
east— New Orleans— even (under the modern
discoveries which defy time and space) Colum-
bia rivar, and Kamschatka. These are not
chateaus d' Espagne, and Time, that old hoary
headed truth-teller,will endorse it a '"true bill."
Feeling, as we do, the importance and wo.th
of the Genesee Countiy, we trust our reader?

will not ihink the title of our paper "The

Genesee Farmer"— too local or trivial to pat-
ronize it even beyond the counties of "Tioaa.
and Onondaga;" and although they may ask
what good can come out ofGallilee, like tbem
of old let them wait, and hear what he hath to
say for himself. »



BtFTwo weeks will elapse before tho pub-
lication of No. 2, after which this paper wilfc



Online LibraryJ. W. C. (John William Carnegie) KirkThe Genesee farmer (Volume v.1 1831) → online text (page 1 of 171)