Copyright
James A Sharp.

A new gazetteer, or, Topographical dictionary of the British Islands and narrow seas : comprising concise descriptions of about sixty thousand places, seats, natural features, and objects of note ... and an appendix ... (Volume 1) online

. (page 93 of 293)
Online LibraryJames A SharpA new gazetteer, or, Topographical dictionary of the British Islands and narrow seas : comprising concise descriptions of about sixty thousand places, seats, natural features, and objects of note ... and an appendix ... (Volume 1) → online text (page 93 of 293)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


1701., Bishop, ch. lately restored, but part as old
as 1100, has mon. of Carre, greek professor, St.
Peter's (disused) has norman door, and roman
bricks in it; St. Mary the Great Cur. 104Z.,
Trinity Coll. ch. 120 ft. by 68, called the Univer-
sity church, where Univ. sermons are preached,
is later or perpendicular eng. (1478-1519, tower
1593-1608), had the grave of Martin Bucer, the
reformer, whose bones were burnt in Mary's
time (and is the spot whence the miles are
measured) ; St. Mary the Less Cur. 95/., St. Peter's
Coll. ch. perpend, stvle, with norman font ;
St. Michael Cur. 95Z., Trinity Coll. ch. partly
burnt 1849, has a portrait of Ch. I. and mon. of
Conyers Middleton, and was the burial place of
Phagius whose bones were burnt with Bucer's ;
St. Sepulchre Vic. 1231., the Parishioners, the
round church, partly norman and lately restored
by the Camden Society, is one of four remaining
in Engld, built by the Templars in Hen. I.'s time,
on the model of the Sepulchre at Jerusalem ; Holy
Trinity Cur. 96Z., Bishop, in the ch. of 15th cent,
and lately repaired, Tabor the physician, who
first gave bark in fevers, was buried, Simeon was
incumbent, and it has a good spire. Among the
religious houses found, here, were Barnwell priory
begun 1092 by Picot, and finished 1112 by Paga-
nus Peverel, of which the chapel, now a barn,
and walls, remain ; St.Rhadegund's nunnery 1130,
part of it is Jesus Coll. chapel j Bethlemite friary
1257, in Trumpington St., the only one in England,
near the Friary de Sacco 1258 ; austin friary by
Pitchford 1259 ; white friary 1316, at King's Coll.
garden ; black friary, site of Emm. Coll., 1275 ;
gray friary, site of Sidney Sussex Coll. 1225;
St. Mary's friary about 1273 ; gilbertine priory
by Bp. Fitzwalter 1291. Merton Hall or Pytha-
goras school, near St. John's, built 13th cent, in
norman style, is now a barn. On Plough Monday
the country people, hi their best clothes and ribbons
(some men being dressed in women's clothes), go
about, according to old custom, and beg money
for merry making. Hen. VII. visited it 1520,
Hen. VIII. 1522, Eliz. 1564, Jas. I. 1623-4, Ch. I.
1632, Ch. II. 1671 and '81, Will. III. 1689, Geo. I.



CAM

1707, Geo. II. 1728, Q. Victoria July 1847, at the
installation of Pr. Albert as chancellor ; and the
Roy. Agricult, Soc. was here 1840. Sir J. Cheke
king Edward's tutor (1514-57), Bennet a martvr,
Dean Duport (d. 1679), Cumberland (1732-1811)
the ' english Terence,' Gibbons (1583-1625) the
organist, Bishops Goldsboro' (d. 1G04), Rust,
Townson (d. 1622), and Thirlby (1500-70), Essex
the antiquary (1723-84), Drake a translator of
Heredotus (1667-1787), Lady D. Masham (1658
-1708), and Jeremy Taylor (1605-67), were na-
tives; it publishes the 'Camb. Advertiser,' C.
Chronicle,' ' C. Independent,' newspapers : and
gives title of Duke to George, prince of the
blood royal. Camb. P. L. Union, consists of
the above town; cases relieved (yr. 1846-7)
2864 (out-door 1985), expend. 10,546Z., prop,
rated 119,349Z. Sup. Registry comprises the
same ; pop. 24,453 + 354, births (1845) 848 (419
being females, 72 illegit.) deaths 538 mar-
riages 188, of which 100 persons signed with
marks. The New County Court district includes
the Registry with Caxton and Arlington, and
Chesterton. The Excise District comprises Cam-
bridge, Walden, Linton, Haverhill, Newmarket.
Mildenhall, Soham, Ely, Caxton, Potton, Biggies-
wade, St. Neot's, Kimbolton, Huntingdon, Ram-
sey, St. Ives, Buntingford, Royston ; and in 1835
had 52 oflScers, and collected 206,346Z. (each col-
lector's round being 212 m.), of which 174,585Z.
was on malt, 11,721Z. on licences, 9169Z. on paper,
6443Z. on bricks, etc. and the total no. of traders
(5882), included 2889 dealers in tobacco, 1226 in
tea, 968 in wine and spirits, 334 brewers, 244
maltsters, 104 makers of bricks, 8 of paper.
Markets, daily. Fairs, Midsummer or Pot fair
22 June, horses, cattle, pottery, timber ; Stour-
bridge 18 Sept. and three weeks following, cattle,
wool, cheese, hops, leather, timber; 25th for
horses.

** CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY, as above, first
founded, as some think, by Sigebert of E. Anglia
630, and revived by Edw. the Elder, was of no con-
sequence till 1209 when the Abbot of Croyland sent
monks to lecture here, after the manner of foreign
schools. Under charter of 23 Hen. III. the first
taxors were appointed to regulate the price of lodg-
ings, and the oldest college was found. 1257. It
sends two members to parl. by grant from Jas. I.
1604, the no. of electors, consisting of doctors and
regent masters of arts in convocation, being about
2300. The University is a sort of federal union
of 17 colleges and halls, each bound by its own
statutes, subject to the supreme authority, and
first built as substitutes for the inns or hotels in
the town. Each consists of apartments for the stu-
dents and fellows, the master's lodge, chapel, li-
brary, hall, and combination room (for business) ;
mostly all are surrounded by fine old trees and
walks, which are among the chief ornaments of the
place. They are all ext. par. except Downing
and part of St. John's in St. Peter's par. ; and with
their founders, fellowships, livings, members on
the boards (1850), eminent men, etc. are as fol-
low : 1. Catherine Hall, Trumpington St., found.
1475 by Chancellor Woodlark, has 14 fellowships,
43 scholarships (the highest 35Z.), 4 livings, a
gram, school, and 225 members (112 being memb.
of senate, 79 undergraduates); forms a court
(reb. 1700), 180 ft. by 120, with a hall (42 ft.
by 24) a chapel 75 ft. by 30, in which are mons. of
Lady Dawes, Addenbrooke ; has paintings of the
founder, Sherlock who built the library, which
contains his books, St. Catherine, and portraits by
Kneller (in master's lodge) ; and had for students
Archbps. Sandys and Dawes, Bps. Hoadley and



CAM

Sherlock, Lightfoot the orientalist, Strype, 2.
Christ's Coll. in St. Andrew's St. opposite Petty
Cury, originally found. 1442 near Clare Hall by
W. Bingham as God's House, and removed 1456
by Hen. VI. was completely found, by his half-
sister Margaret, Countess Richmond, 1506 ; has
master and 15 fellowships (mostly divinity), 53
scholarships, 18 livings, and 337 members (191
m. of senate, 82 und. grad.) ; forms two courts
partly b. by I. Jones, one 140 ft. by 120, with
chapel in which are 2 brasses (1516, etc.), paint-
ings of Hen. VII., the foundress (on board),
etc. and mon. of Cudworth, of whom there
is a portrait, a bowling-green, and beautiful
gardens, with Milton's mulberry-tree; and had
for students Abps. Sharp and Cornwallis, Bps.
Latimer and Porteus, More the platonist, Mede,
Seth Ward, Paley, Leland, Saunderson the blind
professor, T. Burnet, L. Echard, Milton (whose
bust and MS. are here), Quarles, Harrington.
3. Clare Hall, near King's Coll. on the site of
University Hall found. 1326 by Richard Badew,
which was burnt, was refound. 1344 by Eliz.
daughter of Earl of Clare ; has a master and 22
fellows (chiefly divinity), 50 scholarships, etc.
(highest 50/.), 16 livings, and 223 members (132
m. of senate, 50 und. grad. ; forms a court on the
river (crossed by an old bridge), reb. 1638,
150 ft. by 111, with a good chapel by Burrough
1703 ; has paintings of the foundress, Tillotson,
Holies Duke of Newcastle, etc. ; and had stu-
dents, besides these, Abp. Heath, Bp. Gunning,
Cudworth, Whiston, Parkhurst, Nic. Ferrar, Dr.
Dodd. 4. Corpus Christi, or Bene't Coll. Trum-
pington St, found. 1351 by the guilds of Corpus
Christi and the Virgin Mary ; has master, 12 fel-
lowships, 59 scholarships, 1 1 livings, and 274 mem-
bers (150 m. of senate, 68 und. grad.) ; forms
two courts (with a front of 222 ft.), the new
one reb. by Wilkins 1823, 158ft. by 129, hall
(62 ft. by 27), library (87 ft. by 22), and chapel
b. 1579 by Ld. Keeper Bacon 75 ft. by 25 (with
good W. door, stained windows) ; has paint-
ings of Erasmus, Wolsey, Sir T. More, Earl of
Leicester, Jno. Fox, and Abp. Parker who be-
queathed his MSS. relating to ecclesiastical affairs,
etc. ; and had for students Abps. Parker and Teni-
son, Browne the founder of the Brownists, Ld. K.
Bacon, Fletcher the dramatist, Gough, Salmon
and Stukeley the antiquaries, Beloe. 5. Down-
ing Coll. Downing Terrace, found. 1807 by will of
Sir G. Downing of Gamlingay, 1717 ; has master,
2 professors, 16 fellows (chiehy lay), 6 scholars, 2
livings, and 63 members (39 m. of senate, 11
und. grad.) ; consists of part of a quadrangle b.
by Wilkins, with Bowtell's collection of books,
etc. and beautiful gardens. 6. Emmanuel Coll.
St. Andrew's St., found. 1584, by Sir W. Mild-
may, on site of dominican, or black friary,
consists of two courts, one 128 ft. by 107, with
good hall, gardens library, and chapel b. 1668
-77 by Wren for Abp. Sancroft, who left his
library, in which is Prince Henry's copy of" Tully's
Offices" printed 1465; has 15 fellowships, about
100 scholarships, etc., 17 livings, 3 gram, schools,
and 315 members (149 m. of senate, 95 und.
grad.) ; paintings of Sancroft, Dixie, the Mild-
mays, Symons the architect, Drs. Farmer and
Parr, Sir W. Temple (said by Lely), Bp. Jack-
son by Gainsborough ; had for students Abps. San-
croft and Manners Sutton, Bps. Hall, Bedell, Hurd,
and Percy, Chalderton a bible translator, Poole
the commentator, Wallis the mathematician, Hor-
rox the astronomer, Josh. Barnes, Blackwall
author of ' Sacred Classics,' Farmer, Parr, Temple,
Akenside, Castell the orientalist, Twysden and



CAM



331



Morton the antiquaries, and ' Gulliver '(according
to Swift). 7. Gonville and Caius, or ' Keys ' Coff.
Trumpington St., found. 1348, by Edm. Gonvile,
and 1557 by Dr. Caius physician to Mary, consists
of 3 courts, partly b. by Jno. of Padua, with three
gates of Humility, Virtue, and Honour, in different
styles, a chapel, which has brass of a knight
(1500), and mons. of Caius (with his epitaph Fui
Caius. Vivit post funera virtus ') and Burrough
the architect of the senate-house, etc. and a
library with a collection of heraldry, etc. ; has
29 fellowships, 50 scholarships, etc. (56/. the
highest), 22 livings, a gram, school, and 379
members (186 m. of senate, 110 und. grad.);
paintings of Caius (on wood), all the masters ex-
cept one, Bp. Gooch, Burrough, Dr. Smith by
Reynolds, Aid. Trapps (said by Holbein), Rem-
brandt and Raleigh on copper, Harvey, Sanderson ;
and had for students Branthwaite a bible trans-
lator, Gresham, Jeremy Taylor, Jer. Collier, Dr.
S. Clarke, Shadwell the poet laureate, Ld. Thur-
low, the antiquaries Gruter, Chauncey, and Blome-
field, Harvey and many other physicians. 8.
Jesus Coll. Jesus Lane, found. 1496, by Bp. Alcock,
on the site of St. Rhadegund's nunnery, consists
of a front of 180 ft. (with towergate), the old cru-
ciform nunnery chapel (lately restored by Mr.
Sutton, etc.), good old hall, fine gardens, and three
courts (one 140 ft. by 120) ; has a master, 19 fel-
lows, 46 scholarships, etc. (70/. the highest), 16
livings, and 220 members (124m. of senate, 59 und.
grad.) ; paintings of Cranmer (on board, and) by
Reynolds, the founder, Hen. VIII. Q. Mary, San-
croft, Rustat, Laurence Sterne ; and had for stu-
dents Abps. Cranmer and Herring, Bps. Bale (the
biographer) and Pearson, Venn, Flamstead, Roger
North, Jortin, Sterne, the poets Fenton, Fanshaw,
and Coleridge, Hartley the metaphysician, Edw.
Clarke the traveller. 9. King's Coll. Trumpington
St., found. 1441, by Hen. VI. consists of two courts,
part italian by Gibbs, part later english as restored
by Wilkins, with the hall (102 ft by 36), library
(93 ft. by 27), and chapel the glory of Cambridge
and the most perfect specimen of later english
(1441-1515), in which are 4 brasses (from 1496),
and a fine epitaph to T. Crouch ending ' Aperiet
Deus tumulos,' etc. ; has a provost and 70 fellows,
besides other officers, supplied from Eton (also
found, by Henry) and enjoying special privileges,
33 livings, and 125 members (101 m. of senate,
12 und. grad.); paintings of Jane Shore and
Sir R. Walpole ; and had for students, Bps. Aldrich
and Nic. Cloos or Close (one of the chapel archi-
tects), Fryth the martyr, Sir J. Cheke, Sir F.
Walsingham, the Walpoles, Coxe the historian,
A. Collins, Bryant who gave his library, Sir W.
Draper, Ld. Chan. Camden, Oughtred the mathe-
matician, the poets Waller. P.Fletcher, and Anstey.
The chapel, which is the grand mark for Cambridge
from the country round, is, inside, 209 ft. by 45J,
and 78 high, to the exquisitely carved arched roof,
which is in 12 parts, each apparently balanced
by the keystone without the help of a single
pillar ; outside, it is 316 ft. by 84, and 90 high to
the battlements, 101 to the pinnacles which sur-
mount the 11 buttresses on each side, correspond-
ing to the divisions of the roof, and 146^ to tho
domes on the octagon towers at the corners. The
24 windows, each nearly 50 ft. high, are stained
with scripture subjects (the crucifixion, etc.) of
great beauty, especially the E., the W. being
plain. A carved screen (1534) divides the ante-
chapel from the choir ; and 9 chapels or chan-
tries run down each side. 1O. Magdalen ColL
Bridge St. on N. side of Cam, begun 1502 by
Stafford, Duke of Buckingham, on site of St.



332



CAM



CAM



Giles's priory (afterwards moved to Barn-well)
was completed by Ld. Chan. Andley 1542, and
consists of two courts, one 110 by 78; has
master, 17 fellowships, 43 scholarships (70Z. the
highest), 7 livings, and 219 members (130 m.
of senate, 61 und. grad.) ; paintings of the
founders, Bp. Cumberland by Romney, Pepys (by
Lely) author of the 'Memoirs' who gave his
library to which a large and rare collection of
ballads is joined ; had for students Abp. Grindall,
Bps. Cumberland and Walton, Ld. Keeper Bridg-
rnan, Pepys, Duport, \Vaterland, Waring the ma-
thematician. 11. Pembroke Hall, or " Collegium
Episcopale," Trumpington St., found. 1343 by
Mary de Valence, Countess Pembroke, consists of
two ancient courts 95 ft. by 55, with chapel designed
by Wren 1665, hall (with portraits), library
(good ceiling), -waterworks in the gardens, and Dr.
Long's astronomical tin sphere of 18 ft. diam.
fitted up as a small lecture room ; has master, 16
fellowships, scholarships, 10 livings, 122 mem-
bers (75 m. of senate, 23 und. grad.) ; paintings,
besides the foundress and Gray the poet, of
Abp. Grindall, Spencer, the martyrs Ridley and
Bradford, Dr. Long, all students, as were
Crashaw, Abp. Whitgift, Bps. Wren, Tomline,
Middleton, Rogers the martyr, Edw. Calamy, W.
Pitt, Mason the poet. 12. Queen's Coll. Trum-
pington St., begun 1446, by Marg. of Anjou, wife
of Hen. VI. and completed 1465 by Eliz. wife of
Edw. IV. consists of three ancient- looking courts
on the river, lately reb., with cloisters, joined
to the opposite grounds by a rustic bridge reb.
1 746, a libraryof 30,000 vols. and chapel (4 brasses
from 1490) ; has a president, 29 fellowships, 21
scholarships, 10 livings, 320 members (160 m. of
senate, 93 und. grad.) ; paintings of Eliz. the
foundress, Erasmus whose room and walk are
shown, Sir T. Smith, Gen. Monk, Sir G. Savile,
etc., also an old altar-piece in the president's
lodge ; and had for students Bps. Fisher, Patrick,
Erasmus (who was Greek professor), Fuller, Is.
Milner, Wallis the antiquarian, Weever, Rymer,
Shaw, and Manning, Beaumont and Pomfret the
poets. 13. St. John's Coll., in St. John's St.,
found. 1508 by will of the foundress of Christ's,
on the site of a canons' hospital, consists of three
brick courts (the oldest b. 1510-4, the largest
being 270 by 240 and 228 by 215) on one side
of the river, joined to the fine new buildings, built
1830 by Rickman (a court 480 ft. by 180, and 120
high to the lantern, and cloisters, in the perp.
english and tudor style) on the other, by a covered
bridge, nicknamed the Bridge of Sighs ' or the
' Bridge of Sues,' in allusion to the foundress's
crest (a boar) ; has master, 60 fellowships, about
114 scholarships, exhibitions (70/1 the highest),
46 livings, 6 gram, schools, 1402 members (775 m.
of senate, 345 und. grad.) ; includes an old library
of 150 ft., chapel 150 by 27 (with canopied brass,
1440), hall 60 by 38, fine grounds ; has paintings of
the foundress, Bp. Fisher, Q. Eliz. Mary Q. of Scots,
Burleigh, Ld. Chan. Egerton, Ld. Falkland, Earl of
Strafford, Bp. Stillingfleet, Prior, Baker the anti-
quary, Platt a founder, and others ; had for stu-
dents, the above, with Bps. Watson, Beveridge, and
Morgan (who turned the Bible into welsh), Sir
K. Digby, Ascham, Ld. Keeper Guildford, Fairfax,
Cave the historian, Cartwright, Stackhouse, Whit-
taker, Bowyer, Pegge, S. Jenyns, Briggs, Home
Tooke, Marq. of Rockingham, Wilberforce, and
the poets Sackville, Wyat, Ben Jonson, Her-
rick, Hammond, Otway, A. Phillips, Browne,
Kirk White, Wordsworth. 14. St. Peter's ColL
or Peterhouse (the oldest), Trumpington St,
found. 1257, by Bp. Hugh de Balsham, on the



site of two hotels, consists of two courts, tli6
larger 144 ft. by 84, besides a later one, b.
1826, with a bequest of Rev. T. Gisborne, and a
chapel (1632) with stalls, a stained picture of the
Crucifixion, after Rubens, etc. ; has master, 24
fellowships, 59 scholarships, 2 exhibitions, 11 liv-
ings, a gram, school, 243 members (146 m. of se-
nate, 50 und. grad.) ; had for students, Card. Beau-
fort, Abp. Whitgift, Bps. Cosyns,Law,and Walton,
Parry author of Martin Mar-Prelate,' Jer. Mark-
land, Col. Hutchinson, Duke of Grafton, Ld. Ellen-
borough, Dean Sherlock, the poets Crashaw, Garth,
Gray. 15. Sidney Sussex, or ' Sidnev,' Coll., Sidney
St., found. 1588-98 on the site of grayfriars by
Frances Sydney, countess of Sussex, consists of
two courts (restored by Wyatville) and hall (60 ft.
by 27), good grounds, and chapel reb. 1780,
with an altar-piece by Pittoni ; has master, 12
fellowships (all divinity), 22 scholaships, 6 liv-
ings, 126 members (75 m. of senate, 31 und.
grad.) ; paintings of the foundress, Cromwell by
Cooper (in crayon, and also a bust by Bernini
from a cast taken a few minutes after death),
Wollaston, who wrote the ' Religion of Nature,'
and a view by a pupil of Canaletti ; and had
for students the above, with Abp. Bramhall,
Bps. Reynolds, Seth Ward, and Wilson (of Sodor),
ch. baron Atkyns, May the part, historian, L'Es-
trange, Twining. 16. Trinity Coll. in Trumping-
ton St. found. 1540 by Hen. VII I. on the site of
St., Michael's hall (now the kitchen) by ch. Baron
Aungier 1324, and of King's hall by Edw. III. ;
consists of 3 courts one quadrangular 1202ft.
in circuit (larger than any at this or Oxfd.
Univ.), with a fine old gateway, the later eng.
chapel built by Q. Marv, the ancient hall in
tudor style (102ft. by 40," with timber roof 56ft.
high), the master's lodge (where the sovereign
stays when at the University) and conduit, a
second (1600) called Nevile's, with the library
designed by Wren, and a third called King's
(1823-5) by Wilkins, with the beautiful gardens ;
has master, 60 fellowships, 69 scholarships, 59
livings, 3 gram, schools, 2268 members (1307 m.
of senate, 525 und. grad.) ; paintings of Edw.
III. Hen. VIII. Edw. VI. Mary, Elizabeth, Es-
sex, Raleigh, Cecil, Scaliger, Newton, Dryden,
Cowley, Spelman,Ray, Bentley, Shakespere, Marq.
of Granby, Barrow, Gen. Monk, Montague earl of
Halifax, and others, with statue of Newton by
Roubilliac, bust of Person by Chantry, can-ings
by Gibbons, and altar-piece by West in chapel,
besides the MSS. of some of Milton's poem?,
Newton's own copy of his ' Principia ' and his
telescope, Thorwaldsen's fine statue of Byron
(which was refused admittance into Westminster
ab.), and various busts (by Roubilliac, etc), carv-
ings and relics, in the library, 100ft. by 40 ; and
had students, Bps. Tunstal, Watson, most of the
above, with Bacon, Coke, Fulke Greville, Villiers
duke of Buckingham, Conyers Middleton, R.
Cotes, Maskelyne, Rob. Nelson, Dee the astro-
loger, Le Neve, Dr. Gale (who wrote the inscrip-
tions on the Monument, Lond.), Cotton, Gov.Pow-
nall, Sir R. Filmer, Sp. Perceval, Lord Lansdowne,
the poets Donne, Herbert, G. Fletcher, Marvel,
V. Bourne, Lee, Hayley, Byron, Crabbe. 17. Tri-
nity Hall, near the college, found. 1350 chiefly for
lawyers, on the site of a hotel for the monks of
Ely, by Bp. Bateman, consists of two courts near
Clare hall, with a chapel (3 brasses) ; has master,
12 fellowships, 18 scholarships, 8 livings, 156 mem-
bers (62 m. of senate, 48 und. grad.) ; paintings
of "The Presentation," Corbet, Bp. Gardiner,
Earl of Chesterfield, Dr. Andrews, and a law
library; had for students the above, with Bp.



CAM

Horsley, Bilncy the martyr, Tusscr, Drs. Cowell
and Gabriel Harvey, Sir li. Naunton, and other
lawyers. The University buildings are : the se-
nate-house for public occasions by Burrough
(1722-66) 101 ft. by 42, with galleries of oak,
statues of Geo. I. and Duke of Somerset by Rys-
brach, Gco. II. by Wilton, W. Pitt by Nollekins ;
the public schools, first founded 1443 on the same
site, consisting of the philosophy, divinity, law,
and physic schools, for disputations and exercises,
with a lecture-room, model of the Warwick vase,
all in one court; the library, Trumpington St.
(originally b. 1480, and reb. 1775) over the
schools, containing many rare MSS. and upwards
of 100,000 vols. (to which a copy of every pub-
lished work is added), among which are a he-
brew Bible written 856, a koran, and an illumi-
nated persian work on cotton paper, Beza's Gospels
and Acts, on vellum, of the 4th cent, (the famous
Codex Beza; which he gives to the Univ. 1581,
and Dr. Kipling pub. a fac-simile of 1793), Cax-
ton's works, with his " Book of Chess" (1474) the
first book printed in England, first editions of
many classics (Faust's ' Catholicon,' 1460), col-
lections given by Geo. I., Dr. Lewis, Buchanan,
etc., Kembrandt's etchings, portraits of Chas. I.
by Vandyck, Secretary (or ' Turnip ') Townshend,
Mcholson the bookseller (called ' Maps') by Rei-
nagle: part of the new library by Cockerell,
167 ft. by 45, has Dr. Woodward's geolog. speci-
mens on the base. The Pitt press, or University
printing-office, b. 1832 in perpendicular eng. style
by Blore (partly with a surplus of the fund for
Pitt's statue) with a good tower, is called the
' freshman's church,' because a new comer is apt
to mistake it for one. The Fitzwilliam Museum,
Trumpington St., found. 1816 with a bequest of
1 00,0007. from Earl Fitzwilliam, and containing
his books (7000 vols.), music, paintings (among
which are Titian's ' Venus,' landscapes by Wou-
vermans and other dutch masters, some Morelands,
etc.), was begun 1837 by Basevi, and finished by
Cockerell, is 160 ft. square, with a noble corinthian
portico 75 ft. high, an enriched hall 70 ft. by 100,
five picture rooms (the largest 68 ft. by 30), and
has Mesman's collection of Dutch masters,
ivory model of the Taj Mahal at Agra, several
casts, etc. The anatomical school, has Harwood's
wax models, etc. ; observatory on the Madingley
road, b. 1822-4, by J. Mead, 120 ft. long, at a gentle
ascent, in lat. 52 12' 52" N., long. 0' 24^' E.,
is well arranged, and has a transit, mural circle,
equatoreal, and a domed house for a 20 ft. telescope
given by Duke of Northmbrld. ; botanical gardens
of 3 acres, on site of the austin friary. The
Philosophical Soc. was found. 1819, and Antiqn.
Soc. 1849 ; Parker's Piece, or cricket-ground of
acres, is in Regent St. The supreme authority
rests with the legislative body, composed of members
of the senate, who are divided into two houses, the
regents or white hoods (masters of less than 5 yrs.
and doctors of less than 2 yrs. standing), and non-
re-gents or black hoods, assisted by a caput or com-
mittee of council, to prepare the graces or laws,
and an executive body, consisting of a chancellor
(generally a person of rank and non-resident), a
high steward or judge in cases of felony, a vice-
chancellor or acting governor, a commissary or
assessor, a public orator to make speeches, write
official letters, etc., two proctors or peace officers,
and two pro-proctors, besides two taxors who
look to the markets, lodgings, etc., two scrutators
to take the nonregent votes, two moderators to
superintend the examinations, librarian, esquire
and yeoman bedells, marshall. Total no. on the
boards in 1748, was 1500 ; in 1820, 3953 ; in 1849,



CAM



333



6906 ; in 1850, 7047 (3931 being memb. of senate,
1742 under grad.), according to the several orders
of heads of houses (17), fellows (430) and profes-
sors (27), fellow commoners as noblemen, etc.,
who take a degree as a matter of course, masters



Online LibraryJames A SharpA new gazetteer, or, Topographical dictionary of the British Islands and narrow seas : comprising concise descriptions of about sixty thousand places, seats, natural features, and objects of note ... and an appendix ... (Volume 1) → online text (page 93 of 293)