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James Balfour Paul.

The Scots peerage; founded on Wood's edition of Sir Robert Douglas's peerage of Scotland; containing an historical and genealogical account of the nobility of that kingdom online

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CORNELL

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BOUGHT WITH THE INCOME
OF THE SAGE ENDOWMENT
FUND GIVEN IN 189I BY

HENRY WILLIAMS SAGE





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THE SCOTS PEERAGE



Edinburgh : Printed by T. and A. Constable

FOR

DAVID DOUGLAS

LONDON . . . SIMPKIN, MARSHALL, HAMILTON,
KENT AND CO., LIMITED

CAMBRIDGE . . MACMILLAN AND BOWES

GLASGOW . . JAMKS MACLEHOSE AND SONS







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THE

SCOTS PEERAGE

FOUNDED ON WOOD'S EDITION
OF SIR ROBERT DOUGLAS'S

l^eerage of ^cotlanD

CONTAINING

AN HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL ACCOUNT

OP THE NOBILITY OP THAT KINGDOM

EDITED BY

SIR JAMES BALFOUR PAUL

LORD LYON KING OP ARMS



WITH ARMORIAL ILLUSTRATIONS




VOLUME I

EDINBURGH : DAVID DOUGLAS
1904



All ruthts reserved



/






Co tbc Q^cmorp of
SIR WILLIAM FRASER, K.C.B.

WHOSE

LABOURS AND MUNIFIOBNOE

HAVE MADE IT POSSIBLE

THIS WORK

IS

DeDicateD



CONTENTS

AND LIST OF ILLUSTEATIONS

PAGE

Frontispiece, The Royal Arms of Scotland.

THE KINGS OP SCOTLAND, 1

ABERCORN, HAMILTON, EARL OF, c!7

With full-page Illustration.

ABERCROMBIE, SANDILANDS, LORD, 75

With full-page Ilhtstration,

ABERDEEN, GORDON, EARL OF, 82

With full-page Illustration.

ABOYNE, GORDON, VISCOUNT MELGUM AND LORD, . 100
ABOYNE, GORDON, VISCOUNT OF, 101

ABOYNE, GORDON, EAKL OF, 102

With fuU-page Illustration.

AIRLIE, OGILVY, EARL OF, 100

With full-page Illustration.

AIRTH, GRAHAM, EARL OF, 133

With full-page Illustration.

ALBANY, STEWART, DUKE OF, 140

ALTRIE, KEITH, LORD, 156

ANGUS, CELTIC EARLS OF, 160

ANGUS, UMFRAVILLE, EARL OF, 167

ANGUS, STEWART, EARL OF, i69

ANGUS, DOUGLAS, EARL OF, 172

With full-page Illustration.

ANNANDALE, MURRAY, EARL OP, 214

With full-page Illustration.



VUl



CONTENTS



ANNANDALE, JOHNSTONE, MARQUESS OF,
With full-page Illustration.

ARBUTHNOTT, ARBUTHNOTT, VISCOUNT OF,
With full-page Illustration.

ARGYLL, CAMPBELL, DUKE OF, .

With full-page Illustration.

ARRAN, STEWART, EARL OF,

ASTON OF FORFAR, ASTON, LORD,

With full-page Illustration.

ATHOLL, ANCIENT EARLS OF,

ATHOLL, CAMPBELL, EARL OF, .

ATHOLL, STEWART, EARL OF,

ATHOLL, STEWART, EARL OF,

ATHOLL, STEWART, EARL OF,

ATHOLL, MURRAY, DUKE OF,

With full-page Illustration

BADENOCH, COMYN, LORD OF, .

BALCARRES, LINDSAY, EARL OF,

With full-page Illustration.

BALFOUR OF BURLEIGH, BALFOUR, LORD
With full-page Illustration.

BALMBRINO, ELPHINSTONE, LORD,

With full-page Illustration.



PAOB

230



272

318

394
399

415
434
436
440

447
449

503
511

530

556



PREFACE




HE ^ Peerage of Scotland,
brought out in one
volume folio by Sir
Robert Douglas of
Glenbervie, Baronet,
in 1764, was a work
which at once took
its place as a high
authority on the sub-
ject with which it
dealt. Half a century
later a new and re-
vised edition was com-
pleted by Mr. John
Philip Wood, in two volumes folio. The works
both of Douglas and Wood were for their time
admirable examples of ability and research. The
former author, himself a member of an ancient
Scottish house, was in a position which made it
easy for him to collect information from the mem-
bers of the Scottish nobility, and many of their
charter-chests were opened to him. But he and
his editor, Wood, laborious and painstaking though
they were, lived at a period when the historical
records of the country were very much less acces-
sible than they now are. With the exception
' The shield in the initial bears the oflScial coat of Lyon King of Arms.



X PRBFAOiC

of the Acts of Parliament in an abridged and mutilated
form, absolutely nothing in the way of records had
in Douglas' days been printed, and references and
authorities had to be patiently sought with much
expenditure of time and trouble in the badly arranged,
insafficiently housed, and wholly unindexed public
documents. The natural consequence was that while
their information, so far as it dealt with their own
times or the generation immediately preceding, was
on the whole commendably accurate, the particulars
regarding the earlier centuries were scanty and too
frequently untrustworthy. But though every student
of family history has to acknowledge a deep debt
of gratitude to their labours, after a time a general
desire arose that a more accurate and detailed
account of the Scottish Peerage should be pre-
pared. Especially of late years, owing to the official
publication of several important series of records,
such as the Calendar of Documents relating to
Scotland, the Exchequer Rolls, the Register of the
Great Seal, the Register of the Privy Council, and
the Lord Treasurers Accounts, it was evident that
these in themselves afforded a deep mine from which
information might be drawn. Again, many private
collections have within the last century seen light.
The publications of the Bannatyne, Maitland, and
Spalding Clubs have revealed what a rich store of
ancient documents remained in Scotland, and the
Historical Mss. Commissioners have made accessible
many most valuable collections, which had lain more
or less neglected in the charter-rooms of many a noble
house.



PREFACE xi

A new edition of the Peerage of Scotland has been
for a long time the ardent aspiration of the present
Editor. A good many years ago a meeting of persons
interested was called by him, and the subject was
carefully considered. But the difficulties in 'the way
were apparently unsurmountable. The expense of
such an undertaking was considerable, and the class
of readers to whom it would appeal was necessarily
a limited one : the project therefore was at the time
abandoned. Since then, however, the munificence of
Sir William Fraser, K.C.B., himself a well-known
writer on genealogical subjects, and whose series of
family histories are monuments of patient research,
rendered possible a way out of the difficulty. Sir
William left a certain sum of money to his Trustees
with directions that it should be spent in printing
works which would tend to elucidate the history
and antiquities of Scotland. In carrying out his
intention the Trustees resolved to devote part of this
sum to making possible a new edition of Douglas's
Peerage, though it would far from cover the whole
outlay entailed in such an undertaking.

Modern methods demand a much more thorough
treatment of genealogical questions than was desired
or even possible a century ago. The day of the one-
man dictionary or cyclopsedia is over, and it would
take the devotion of a lifetime for any individual to
write the history of the Scots Peerage as it ought to
be written. It was determined therefore that the
work should be undertaken by a staff of writers
under the supervision of an editor, and in many



xii PREFACE

cases this has resulted in a title being treated by
an author who had made the history of the family
his special study, and had access to sources of
information which could not have been readily got
by any other. There are, no doubt, certain draw-
backs to this method : a writer is apt to extend
the particulars of a family in which he takes a
special interest to a degree far beyond the limits of
a work such as this. The editor's duty is to combat
against this tendency, but occasionally circumstances
are too much for him, and he is unwilling to reject
information which is really valuable and interesting
even though it may seem unduly to increase the
length of the article.

In commencing the preparations for this edition
instructions were given to contributors that, while
free latitude in this respect was given them, they
might, if they pleased, use the actual words of Douglas
or Wood when no correction was necessary as to the
facts. While to a certain extent this has been done,
it has been found better in many cases to re-write the
articles entirely without reference to what the previous
editors had done. So many errors had to be corrected,
so many facts re -stated in the light of modern
research, and so many abbreviations made, that it
was found to be the only satisfactory mode of treat-
ment. It has also, it is hoped, conduced to greater
clearness in diction, as the somewhat verbose com-
ments of Douglas and Wood, though quite in the style
of their own day, hardly commend themselves to the
more practical requirements of our times. The work,



PREFACE xiii

however, has been arranged very much on the lines
on which Wood left it, save that instead of having to
hunt for the Eoyal Hneage through the article Albany
a succinct account of the Kings and Queens of Scot-
land, with their issue, has been included at the
beginning of the first volume.

As a general rule cadets of families have not been
brought down further than the second generation
from the parent stem. But there are cases where
this has been departed from, such as when the
descendants of a younger son ultimately succeeded to
the title, or where it is necessary to show the ex-
tinction of some cadent branch.

Not the least important feature of this work is
the fact that wherever possible, references have been
given to the various authorities for the statements
made. This is especially the case as regards the
older dates. Douglas and Wood are fairly accurate
as to their own times, and they must have got in-
formation from contemporaries who had personal
knowledge of the facts they communicated. As
regards more recent dates it has been thought un-
necessary in many instances to give authorities for
them, as they are contained in the ordinary books of
reference. Burke, Debrett, and Lodge are Peerages
to which the Editor lies under the greatest obligation
for the many more modern dates which have been
taken from them.

In compiling the accounts of the different families
more importance has been given to the genealogical
than to the historical side of their career. And it



xiv PREFACE

has been absolutely necessary, out of consideration
for space, to omit much of the historical matter which
appeared in the former editions, more especially with
regard to the notices of the younger sons. But in the
case of the holders of titles themselves it has been
found impossible to omit certain details in connection
with the history of the country with which they were
so intimately associated. Indeed, not to have done
so would have been to deprive the work of much of
its value.

In conclusion, the Editor has to thank his con-
tributors for the loyal and hearty support which they
have given him. He has often had to regret having
had to omit, from unavoidable reasons, much informa-
tion, the collection of which must have entailed a
large expenditure of time and labour. There are two
persons to whom he owes a deep debt of gratitude : —
Dr. Maitland Thomson, the Curator of the Historical
Department in H.M. Register House, placed the
resources of his exceptionally wide knowledge of
Scottish families freely at his disposal. There is
hardly an article which does not owe something to
his powers of research and willingness to communi-
cate the result. His colleague the Rev. John Ander-
son, assistant Curator of the same Department has
acted as assistant editor, and it is not too much to say
that without his invaluable help the Editor would
have found his task — not an easy one in any case —
immeasurably more difficult. Whatever success the
work may have owes much to Mr. Anderson's learning
and constant care.



PREFACE XV

The illustrations, with the full-page achievements
and the initial letters, are the work of Mr. Graham
Johnston, Heraldic Artist to the Lyon Office, whose
advance to the front rank in his profession the
Editor has for some years watched with interest and
pleasure.

JAMES BALFOUR PAUL.



Edinbukoh, April 1904.



LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS TO VOL. I.



J. A.,

G. D. B., .

D. C. V. C,

J. C,

W. B. C,

F. J. G., .

H. W. F. H.,

W. A. L.,
J. R. N. M.,
K. W. M.,
W. M., .
J. B. P., .
A. F. S., .
J. K. S., .



. Rev. John Anderson.

. G. D. Btjrtchaell.

. Donald C. V. Campbell.

. Rev. James Campbell, D.D.

. W. B. Cook.

. Francis J. Grant, Rothesay Herald.

. H. W. FOESTTH Habwood, Editor of The
Genealogist.

. William A. Lindsay, K.C, Windsor Herald.

. J. R. N. Maophail.

. Keith W. Mdkbay.

. William Murray.

. Sir James Balfour Paul, Lyon King-of-Arms.

. A. Francis Steuart.

. James K. Stewart.



THE KINGS OF SCOTLAND




HE development of the
modern Kingdom of Scot-
land from a disorganised
state in wliicli, after the
days of the Roman occu-
pation, diflerent races
warred for supremacy, toe-
longs to general history,
and need not be treated
of in the pages of a Peer-
age. But it is necessary
for a complete under-
standing of the pedigrees
of the Scottish nobility
to notice briefly the in-
dividual sovereigns who
ruled over the kingdom
after its component elements were united into one people,
who occupied, if not the whole, at least the greater part of
the country now called Scotland. These rulers will be con-
sidered not so much in relation to their public acts, which
again belong to the province of the historian, as to their
alliances, offspring, and relationships, which permeate the
whole genealogical history of the Peerage.

The most convenient starting-point for such a purpose
is the reign of

IMalcolm III. ' Oeannmor,' i.e. Great head or Chief. He
was the eldest son of Duncan i. by his wife, a cousin of
Siward, Earl of Northumberland : Duncan being the son of
Orinan the Thane by his wife Bethoc, eldest daughter and
heir of Malcolm ii. King of Scots.' He was born about
1031. Between 1061 and 1093 he led five raids into Eng-
land, devastating the northern counties and bringing about

1 Chron. Picts and Scots, 152 ; Fordun, book iv. 39, 40, 44 : Scottish
Kings^ by Sir Archibald Hamilton Dunbai", Bart., 'H^liich book is the basis
of this article, and where full references are given to the authorities for
the statements made.

VOL. I. A



2 THE KINGS OF SCOTLAND

a great invasion of his own country by William the
Conqueror in 1072, and by his son Robert in 1080. In
his last English raid Malcolm was defeated and slain at
Alnwick, 13 November 1093.' He married, first, about 1059,
Ingibjorg, daughter of Earl Finn Arnason, and widow of
Thorflnn Sigurdson, Earl of Orkney.^ He had by her : —

1. Duncan, afterwards king.

2. Donald, died 1085.'

A sou Malcolm has been assigned to him, but there seems
to be no positive proof of this.

Malcolm Ceannmor married, secondly, at Dunfermline
10G8-9, Margaret (St. Margaret of Scotland), daughter of
Edward ^theling.* By her, who died 16 November 1093, at
Edinburgh Castle, and was buried at Dunfermline, he had : —

1. Edivard, wounded with his father at Alnwick, and died

near Jedburgh 16 November 1093.'^

2. Edmund, Trince of Cumbria and afterwards a monk ;

he died at Montague in Somersetshire.

3. Ethelred, Earl of Fife, aud Abbot of Dunkeld buried

at Kilrimont.'^

4. Ebgar, afterwards king.

5. Alexander, afterwards king, as Alexander i.

6. David, afterwards king.

7. Matilda — the good Queen Maud — was married to

Henry i. of England, 11 November 1100, and died 1
May 1118 leaving a daughter Matilda, who was
married, first, to the Emperor Henry v., and second,
to Geoffrey Plautagenet, by whom she had a son,
Henry ii. of England.
S. Mary, was married in 1102 to Eustace, Count of
Boulogne, and died 31 May 1116, leaving a daughter,
Matilda, who was married to Stephen, King of
England.

Donald ' Bane ' succeeded his brother Malcolm, but after
alx mouths was deposed by his nephew Duncan, the eldest
son of Malcolm iii., in May 1094.

Duncan ii. born circa 1060 ; he also reigned only six

' Chron. Mallros, 60. 2 Orkneyinga Saga, U, 23 ; Saga of Magnus
the Good, 37, 40. '■' Armals of Ulster, 370. * Vita S. Marg. (Surtees
Society), 238. " Chron. Mailros, 60. " Eeg. Prior. St. And., 115.



THE KINGS OF SCOTLAND 3

montlis, being killed 12 November 1094. He marrieil
Etlielreda of Duubar, and had a son : —

1. William ''Fits Duncan,' who niariied Alice, daughter
of Robert de Rnmely, and had issue.'

Donald ' Bane ' after the deatli of his nephew Duncan,
ascended the throne for the second time, but after the
expiry of three years was deposed by his nephew Edgar,
who imprisoned him and deprived him of his eyesight. He
died at Rescobie, though in what year is not known, leaving
an only child : —

Betlioc, who was married to Huctred of Tynedale, by
whom she had a daughter,

Sextilda, married to Richard Comyn ; their great-great-grand-
son Jolm Comyn ^va.s a Competitor for the Scotti.sh cro>vn
in 1291. She married, secondly^ Malcolm, second Earl of
Atholl. (See that title.)

Edgar, fourth son of Malcolm Oeannmor, by his second
wife, succeeded Donald Bane in October 1097, and died un-
married in Edinburgh Castle 8 January 1106-7, aged a))out
thirty-three. Buried at Dunfermline.

Alexander i. ' the Fierce,' also son of Malcolm Oeann-
mor, succeeded his brother ; married Sj^billa, illegitimate
daughter of Henry i. of England by Sybilla Corbet. She
died at Loch Tay 12 July 1122. He died without legitimate
issue 23 April 1124 at Stirling, and was buried at Dunferm-
line. He had an illegitimate son, Malcolm, who attempted
to gain the crown.

DA^^D I. ' the Saint,' youngest son of Malcolm Oeann-
mor ; born about 1080 ; married about 1113-14 Matilda,
daughler and heir of Waltheof, Earl of Huntingdon, grand-
daughter of Siward, Earl of Northumberland, and widow of
Simon de St. Liz. He died at Carlisle 24 May 1153, aged aliout
seventy-three, and was buried at Dunfermline. His wife
Matilda, according to Fordun,^ died 1130-31, and was buried at
Scone ; but she appears in a charter c. 1147.' By her he had

1. Malcolm, said to have been strangled when a child by
Donald Bane.

1 Cal. Doc. Scot, ii. 16, 17, No. 64. - Fordun a Goodall, bis:, v. c. 33. •' Acta,
Pari. Scot., i. 359-60.



4 THE KINGS OF SCOTLAND

2. CJtiricia, died unmarried.

3. Hodierna, died unmarried.

4. Henry, Earl of Northumberland and Huntingdon,

married in 1139 Ada, daughter of William, Earl of
Warenne, second Earl of Surrey. He predeceased his
father David 1. 12 June 1152, and was buried at Kelso.
His wife died 1178. By her he had :—

(!) Malcolm, afterwards Malcolm iv. 'the Maiden.'

(2) William, afterwards William 'the Lion.'

(3) David, Earl of Huntingdon, born about 1144 ; married 26

August 1190 Maud, daughter of Hugh, Earl of Chester. He
died at Jerdelay 17 June 1219, leaving issue :—

1. Eobert, died an infajit, and was buried at Lindores.
ii. Henry, died an infant, also buried there,
iii. John le Scot, Earl of Chester and Earl of Huntingdon ;

d. s. p- June 5, 1237.
iv. Margaret, was married to Alan, Lord of Galloway, in
1209. Her third daughter, Devorgilla, was married to
John Baliol of Barnard Castle, and had with other
issue : —
(i) John Baliol, who was a Competitor in 1291,

and afterwards King of Scotland,
(ii) Alianora, was married to John Comyn of Bade-
noch and Tynedale. {See title Badonoeh.)

V. Isabella was married to Robert de Brus, Lord of Annan-
dale. {See title Annandale.) It was through her that
King Kobert Bruce had a claim to the crown,
vi. ^c?a was married to Henry de Hastj'nges ; her grandson
John was a Competitor in 1291.

Earl David had also three illegitimate children : —
(i) Henry of Stirling.^

(ii) Henry of Brechin.''- These appear frequently in
charters of the period as sons of Earl David.
Heniy of Stirling died apparently unmarried or
s.p. Henry of Brechin held the lordship of that
name, and by a wife named Julian, had issue,
(iii) Ada, was married to Malise, son of Earl Ferteth
and brother of Earl Gilbert of Strathearn.^

(4) Ada was married in 1161 to Florent ill.. Count of Holland;

her great grandson Florence v., Count of Holland, was a
Competitor in 1291.

(5) Margaret, was married first, in 1100, to Conan iv., Duke of

Brittany, Earl of Richmond, and by him had issue ;
second, to Humphrey de Bohun, Earl of Hereford.

(6) Matilda, died young 1152.

' Registrum de Aberbrothec, i. 57. -Ibid. ^ Chartulai-y of Lindores,
Introd. xxvi. et scq. A son David is also mentioned [ibid, xxvii. 3, 8]. It
is difficult to say whether he was legitimate or not. He is not mentioned
by Fordun.



THE KINGS OF SCOTLAND 5

(7) Marjory, possibly a daughter, as Robert dc Pinkeny, one of
the Coiupetitors, claimed to )ie her great-grandson in 1291,
but her position is uncertain.

Malcolm tv. 'the Maiden,' born 20 March 1141-2, suc-
ceeded his grandfather 1153 : died unmarried, at the age of
twenty-tliree, at Jedburgh 9 December 1165. He had a
natural son, name unknown, in whose memorj^ lie granted
the right of sanctuarj' to the church of Innerleithen.'

William ' the Lion ' succeeded his brother : married 5
September 1186 at Woodstocli, Ermengarde, daughter of
Ricliard, Vicecomes de Bellomonte : died at Stii'ling 4
December 1214, and was buried at Arbroath. By liis wife,
who died 11 February 1233-4 and was buried at Balmerino,
he liad : —

1. Alexander, afterwards iiing.

2. Margaret, was married, at York in 1221, to Hubert de

Burgh, Justiciar of England and Ireland.

3. Isabella, was married to Roger Bigod, Earl of Norfolk,

and died s. p.

4. Marjory, was married, at Berwick 1 August 1235, to

Gilbert, Earl of Pembroke. She died s. p. 17 Novem-
ber 1244, and was buried in London.
King William had several illegitimate children : —

1. Rohej't de London.

2. Henry Galightly, whose sou Patrick Galightly was a

Competitor in 1291.

3. Isabella, whose mother was a daughter of Robert

Avenel ; married, first, in 1183, to Robert de Brus, and
second, in 1191 to Robert de Ros. Her great-grand-
son William de Ros was a Competitor in 1291.

4. Ada, was married in 1184 to Patrick de Dunbar, fifth

Earl of Dunbar ; she died in 1200. Her great-grand-
son Patrick de Dunbar was a Competitor in 1291.

5. Margaret, whose mother was a daughter of Adam de

Hytlius, was married to Eustace de Vesci. Her
grandson William de Vesci was a Competitor in 1291.

6. Aufrica, was mai'ried to William de Say. Her great-

grandson Roger de Mandeville was a Competitor in
1291.

^ Reyistrum de Kelso, i. 23,



6 THE KINGS OF SCOTLAND

Alexander ii. was born at Haddington 24 August 1198 ;
knighted by King Jolm of Bngltind 4 Marcli 1211-12. He
married, first, 19 June 1221, Joan, daughter of Jolm, and
sister of Henry in., Kings of England ; she died at York,
4 March 1237-8, and was buried at Tarrant Keynstan,
Dorsetshire.' He married, secondly, 15 May 1239 Maria,
second daughter of Enguerand ni., Baron de Ooucy. The
King died at Kerrera 8 July 1249, and was buried at Melrose.
His widow was buried at Newbottle, having married as lier
second husband Jean de Brienne ' dit d'Acre,' son of John,
King of Jerusalem.

By his second wife he had : —

Alexander, afterwards king.

Ho had also an illegitimate daughter : —

Marjory, married to Alan Durward ; her gi'andson
Nicholas de Soulis was a Competitor in 1291.

Alexander hi., born at Roxburgh 4 September 1241,
knighted by Henry iii. of England 25 December 1251.
Married at York 26 December 1251, when little more than
ten years old, Margaret, eldest daughter of Henry iii. who
was a year older. She died in February 1274-5, and was
buried at Dunfermline. He mari'ied, secondly, at Jedburgh
14 October 1285, Yolande, Oomtesse de Montfort, daughter of
Robert iv., Oomte de Dreux. He was killed by a fall from
his horse at Kinghoru 19 March 1285-6, and was buried
at Dunfermline. His widow married, secondly, May 1294,
Arthur ii., Duke of Brittany. He had by his first wife : —

1. Alexander, Prince of Scotland, born 21 January 1263-4 :

died vita patris s. p. 17 January 1283-4 at Lindores.
He married at Roxburgh, 15 November 1282, Mar-
guerite, daughter of Guy, Count of Flanders : who
married, secondly, Renaud i. Count of Gucldres.

2. David, born 20 March 1272-3, ri. s. p. June 1281.

3. Margaret, born at Windsor 28 February 1260-1 ;

married, August 1281, to Eric Magnusson, King of
Norway, who married, secondly, in 1293, Isabel Bruce,
sister of King Robert i. Margaret, died at Tons-
berg, 9 April 1283, and was buried at Christ Kirk,
Bergen, Norway, leaving an only child : —



Online LibraryJames Balfour PaulThe Scots peerage; founded on Wood's edition of Sir Robert Douglas's peerage of Scotland; containing an historical and genealogical account of the nobility of that kingdom → online text (page 1 of 52)