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James Christie Whyte.

History of the British turf : from the earliest period to the present day online

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51b. twdce 71b. ; allowances to be deducted from
extra weights, if carried.

The Palatine stakes, a handicap sweepstakes of
25 sovs. each, 10ft. with 200 in specie added,
for all ages two miles. Weights to be declared on
Saturday after Doncaster races.

The St. Leger Stakes of 25 sovs. each, with 50
sovs. added for three yrs. old colts, 8st. 71b. ; and
fillies, 8st. 51b. one mile and three quarters ; the
winners of the Derby or Doncaster St. Leger, to
carry 121b. extra ; second for either, or winner of
the oaks, or of the drawing room stakes, or cup at
Goodwood, or cup or Gascoigne stakes at Doncas-
ter 71b. extra; maidens allcwed 41b. and horses
having started^ and never been placed, allowed 71b.

The selling stakes of 10 sovs. each; h. ft. with



BRITISH TURF. 265

50 sovs. added ; heats one mile and a half. The
winner to be sold for 200 sovs.

To close and name on the Monday before the
races.

Second day. — The Wilton stakes of 30 sovs.
each, 20 ft. with 50 sovs. added ; two yrs. old, 7st.
41b. ; three, 9st. 41b. ; f. allowed 21b. ; maiden
three yrs. old, at starting 41b. ; T. Y. C.

The steward's cup, value 200 sovs. the rest in
specie, by subscriptions of 20 sovs. each, with 100
sovs. added ; two miles and a half; three years old
7st. four, 8st. 71b. five, 8st. 131b. six and aged
9st. 21b. m. and g. allowed 41b. the winner of
the Derby, the Goodwood cup, the Doncaster St.
Leger or cup in 1839, to carry 71b. extra; the
second horse for the Derby or St. Leger, 1839,
the winner of the Ascot cup, 1839, of the Oaks,
1839, or the Derby or St. Leger in any year, 51b.
extra ; of any weight for age, cup in 1839, 31b.
extra ; extra weights to be accumulative, but no
horse to carry more than 121b. extra ; no horse
liable to extra weight to be entitled to claim allow-
ances ; but except as above, maiden four years
old (except such as had been placed in the Derby
or St. Leger, 1838) allowed 71b. maiden five 10
lb. and maiden six and aged, 1 41b. horses having
run in Scotland or Ireland after the 1st of July,
1839, and not receiving other allowance, to be
allowed 71b. If twenty subscribers, the second
horse to receive £50 out of the stakes.



266 HISTORY OF THE

To close and name on the Saturday in the Liver-
pool July meeting.

A handicap stakes of 10 sovs. each for three
years old ; gentlemen riders, one mile.

The Armskirk purse of £50, added to a subscrip-
tion of 15 sovs. each, 5ft. three years old, 7st.
21b. four, 8st. 21b. five, 8st. 71b. six and aged,
8st. 111b. m. and g. allowed 31b. once round.

The selling handicap of 10 sovs. each, h. ft. the
winner to be sold for 100 sovs. heats, T. Y. C.
Gentlemen riders.

Third day, the Knowsley stakes of 30 sov. each,
h. ft., with 50 added, for two yrs. old colts, 8st.
71b. and fillies 8st. 41b. one mile ; the winner of
the Eglinton stakes to carry 51b extra.

The Heaton Park stakes, a sweepstakes of 20
sovs. each, 10 ft. and only 5 if declared on or be-
fore the 1st of Sept. wdth 100 added ; once round
and a distance.

To close and name in the July meeting week.

A free handicap of 25 sovs. each, 10. ft. for all
ages, except three years old ; one mile. The win-
ner of the stewards' cup to carry 71b extra. Gen-
tlemen riders.

A handicap of 20 sovs. each, h. ft. with 20 ad-
ded for the beaten horses of Wednesday and
Thursday ; once round and a distance.

The Option stakes of 10 sovs. each, 5 ft. with 30
added ; heats, one mile and a quarter ; three yrs.
old 7st, 21b. four, 8st. 21b. five, 8st. 91b. six,



BRITISH TURF. 26^

and aged, 8st. 121b. the winner to be sold for
£150 if demanded, with the option of not being
sold for less than £200, £250, or £300, carrying
if for £200 5lb. for 250, 101b. and for £300, 141b.
extra.

To close, name, and declare the option by six
o'clock on the Monday evening.

To name for the above stakes to Mr. William
Lynn, Liverpool ; Mr. John Etty, Manchester ; or
Messrs. Weatherby of London.

Mr. Wm. Lynn, Waterloo Hotel, Liverpool,
Secretary.

Mr. John Etty, Manchester, Clerk of the
Course.



Manchester. — A large manufacturing and mar-
ket-town, thirty-six miles (E. by N.) from Liver-
pool (but only thirty-one by the railroad). 54
(S.E.by S.) from Leicester, and 186 (N. W.by N.)
from London, and contains nearly 190,000 inha-
bitants. Its staple trade is the cotton manufac-
ture, which, in all its various branches, is carried
on to an extent almost incredible, and formes a vast
source of wealth to its inhabitants. Some of the
public buildings are extremely elegant, and literary
and other institutions, theatres, libraries, assem-
bly and concert rooms, and in fact every luxury
and convenience usually met with in enlightened
and wealthy communities, abound.



268 HISTORY OF THE

The rail-road which connects this important
town with the port of Liverpool, has been too often
described to require further notice here.

The races, which were established in 1730, take
place towards the end of May, and continue four
days. Another meeting has been lately got up in
August.

The course, which is enclosed with railings, and
carefully secured against accidents, is on Kensal
Moor, and about one mile in circumference,
with a hill and a fine run in ; a grand stand and
numerous buildings have been erected on various
parts of it, for the accommodation of the specta-
tors.

First Day of the spring meeting. The Welton
stakes of 10 sovs. each, with 25 added ; one
mile and a quarter.

A sweepstakes of 15 sovs. each, 10 ft. with 20
added, for three years old filUes, 8st. 31b. one
mile and a quarter.

A free handicap stakes of JO sovs. each, with
30 added, for four yrs. old ; one mile and a quar-
ter.

Second day. Sweepstakes of 20 sovs. each, with
40 added ; about three quarters of a mile.

The St. Leger stakes of 25 sovs. each, with 50
added, for three yrs. old colts, 8st. 61b. and fil-
lies, 8st. 31b. one mile and three quarters ; the
owner of the second horse to receive back his
stake.



BRITISH TURF. 269

Third Day. One hundred sovereigns given by
the owners of the race course, added to a subscrip-
tion of 10 sovs. each, for three yrs. old, 6st. 31b.
four, 8st. 21b. five, 8st. 101b. six and aged, 9st. ;
maiden four yrs. old and upwards, at starting
allowed 61b. ; winners of one cup or stakes of the
value of 100 sovs. previous to starting to carry 31b.
if two or more 61b. extra ; two miles and a dis-
tance ; the owner of the second horse to receive
back his stake. Three to start or the 100 sovs.
will not be given.

Fourth day. The Broughton stakes of 15 sovs.
each, 5 ft. with 25 added ; for three yrs. old,
6st. 61b. and four, 8st. 61b. f. and g. allowed
31b. and maidens at the time of naming, allowed
31b. ; the winner of the St. Leger in that week to
carry 31b. extra ; St. Leger course.

A handicap stakes of 5 sovs. each, with 30 added;
one mile and a quarter, ^ve subscribers or no
race. The horses, &c. to be named to the clerk
of the races by five o'clock the day before^ranning ;
and the weights to be declared by nine o'clock
that night.

Fifth day. A hurdle sweepstakes of 5 sovs.
each, with 40 added ; four yrs. old, lOst. 51b.
five, list, six, list. 61b. and aged list. 81b.
winner of any stakes, to carry 51b. twice or more,
71b. extra ; thorough-bred horses 51b. extra ; the
hurdles to be four feet high, and to have three
leaps in each round ; heats twice round.



270 HISTORY OF THE

Merton. — A chaplery in the parish of Manches-
ter, two miles from Poulton, and about six from
St. Helens, through which place runs the road
from Liverpool to the race course. The course,
which is triangular and one mile in circumference,
is on a rough and rugged common several miles
from the town. The accommodations afforded by
the stand are excellent, and owing to the vicinity
of these races to the large manufacturing towns
they are generally well and numerously attended.
They take place about the beginning of June, and
continue two days.

On the first day, the trial stakes of 10 sovs.
each, with 25 added ; three yrs. old, 6st. 71b.
four, 8st. 41b. five, 8st. 121b. six, and aged
9st. 21b. one mile and a quarter.

A sweepstakes of 15 sovs. each, 10 ft. with 20
added ; for three yrs. old fillies, 8st. 31b. one
mile, and a quarter.

A Produce sweepstakes (reduced to a match) of
50 sovs, each, h. ft. one mile and a half.

Second Day. The St. Leger stakes of 25 sovs.
each, with 25 added ; for three yrs. old colts, 8st.
61b. and fillies, 8st. 21b. one mile and three quar-
ters ; the owner of the second horse to have his
stake returned.

The Golborn stakes of 20 sovs. each, for two
yrs. old colts ; 8st. 51b. and fillies, 8st. 21b. the
Golborne course.

John Etty, of Manchester, clerk.



BRITISH TURF. 2? I



LEICESTERSHIRE.

Croxton Park. Races are held here in the be-
ginning of April, but the stakes are all ridden for
by gentlemen riders, to whose amusement this
meeting is exclusively devoted.

Leicester. — The capital of the county is plea-
santly situated on the river Soar, 97 miles (N. N.
W.) from London. The theatre, a neat building,
is open during the races ; and assemblies are held,
in a suite of rooms in a building originally designed
for an hotel, and purchased by the county for the
accommodation also of the judges of the assize :
the ball-room, seventy-five feet long, and thirty-
five wide, is elegantly painted by Reinagle, and
lighted on assembly nights by eight splendid lus-
tres, and branches held by statues, after designs
by Bacon. Races take place here in September,
generally about a week after Warwick meeting, and
continue two days, being held south east of the town,
where a grand stand has been erected, and every
means adopted to improve the course and keep it
in proper order. Several valuable stakes are run
for, among which is the gold cup of 100 so vs.
value, the surplus in specie, by subscription of 10
sovs. each ; and on the second day her majesty's
plate of 100 sovs.



272 HISTORY OF THE



LINCOLNSHIRE.



Lincoln. — The chief town of the county, is
situated on the river Witham, 132 miles (N. by
W.) from London, and contains 10,367 inhabitants.
This town contains a theatre (open during the
races) public libraries, assembly rooms, &c. The
races take place at the end of September, and con-
tinue two days. A handsome stand has been
erected on the course. On the first day her ma-
jesty's plate of 100 so vs. is run for and on the
second, a gold cup by subscribers of lOsovs. each,
&c. &c. and a purse of 70 sovs. raised by public
subscription.

Stamford. — On the river Welland, forty-six miles
from Lincoln and eighty-nine from London, and
containing about 5.. 500 inhabitants. It contains a
theatre, assembly rooms, libraries, &c. The races
take place about the middle of June and continue
three days. The course which is a mile in circum-
ference and kept in good order, is on Wittor-
ing heath near the town. On the first day a £50
plate is given by the Marquis of Exeter ; on the
second a gold cup of 100 sovs. value, by subscrip-
tion of 10 sovs. each, forms the prominent feature
of the day, and on the third, a plate of £50
raised by public subscription.



BRITISH TURF 273



MIDDLESEX.

Dove House Meeting, held near Harrow-on-the-
Hill. We find this Meeting mentioned in the
Racing Calendar for 1836, for the first time,
Enfield and Pinner races being discontinued. This
meeting is held in the middle of August, and
judging from last year's sport, bids fair to attain
permanent success.

Hampton, situated on the north bank of the
Thames, 12 miles from London. This place is
celebrated for the royal palace of Hampton Court,
its gardens, and Bushy Park, which adjoins it.
It is also much frequented by pleasure parties to
enjoy fishing in the Thames, in punts let out for
the purpose. The races take place soon after
the middle of June, on Moulsey Hurst, adjoining
the river, and are always both numerously and
fashionably attended. They continue three days,
when the following stakes are run for.

The London and Southampton Railway Stakes of
5 sovs. each, with 50 added by some of the direc-
tors and proprietors of the Railway company.

The Strawberry Hill Stakes of 5 sovs. each,
with 25 sovs. added.

The Ofiicers' Plate of 25 sovs. added to a sweep-
stakes of 5 sovs. each ; to be ridden by officers or
members of a racing or fox-hunting club.

Her Majesty's Plate of lOOgs.

VOL. I. T



274 HISTORY OF THE

The Hurst Stakes of 5 sovs. each, with 50 added.

The Hampton Court Stakes of 5 sovs. each,
with 35 added.

Third day. The Opening Stakes of 5 sovs.
each, with 30 added.

Sweepstakes of 3 sovs. each, with 40 added.

The Hippodrome Race-course, Bayswater, near
Kensington Gardens. — This vast estabUshment,
which may, with justice, be called the Metropo-
litan Race Course, was opened to the public by
its founder, Mr. John Whyte, on the 3rd of June,
1837. Notwithstanding the popularity the races
here immediately acquired, and the patronage they
met with among our first nobility, Mr. Whyte did
not at first meet with that success which his public-
spirited and liberal outlay so fairly entitled him
to. This was owing to a few of the lower trades-
men of Kensington, led on by some fanatical
opponents of all public amusements, laying claim
to a footpath, (till then quite unfrequented) which
intersected the new course.

Finding it impossible to carry on his establish-
ment with order and propriety so long as the
lowest dregs of society from Kensington and its
vicinity could enter by this path, the proprietor
was compelled to entirely re-model it. This is
now effected, and the footpath, which intersected
the old ground, now runs at the outside of the
park. These extensive grounds are entirely sur-
rounded by a high close paling, so that none can



BRITISH TURF. 275

enter without paying at the gates. Besides racing,
training, and leaping, they afford ample space and
every facility for cricket, archery, and other good
old English sports.

The racing is under the immediate direction of
a committee of noblemen and gentlemen, of known
influence and character in the sporting circles ;
and when produce stakes shall have been es-
tablished, and this race-course becomes better
known, we have no doubt but that it will form an
important feature among London amusements,
and a most profitable concern to its proprietor.

The following are the terms on which this
establishment is now open to the public.



TERMS



Foa



SUBSCRIBERS AND VISITORS



ANNUAL SUBSCRIBERS.

A Gentleman on Horseback, and Groom, on all days,
with privilege for Two Ladies of his Family, entrance
for one 4-wheeled Carriage 5 5

A Gentleman on Horseback, on all days, with privilege
for one Lady of his Family, and entrance for one 2-
wheeled Carriage ... 3 3

A person on foot, all days 10 6

T 2



276 HISTORY OF THE



ENTRANCE ON PUBLIC DAYS.



4-wheeled Carriage 5

2-wheeled Carriage 3

Person on horseback 2 6

Ditto on Foot 1



ENTRANCE ON ALL DAYS, BUT PUBLIC DAYS.

4-\vlieeled Carriage 2

2-wheeled Carriage. 1 6

Person on Horseback from 1st May to 1st September. ... 006

Ditto ditto from 1st September to 1st May 1

Person on Foot 3

N.B. The above Subscriptions and Payments admit to all but
the SaddHng Paddock, the Courses, and such Stands and En-
closures thereof as have been or may be erected, and subject to
the Rules and Regulations of the Estabhshraent.



TERMS



FOR



THE USE OF THE RACE COURSE, &c.



Use of Race Course for a Race, on private days 3

Ditto ditto, if a match only 2

Ditto Steeple Chase Course for a Race, on private days 3

Ditto ditto, if a Match only 2

Race Horse in Training for use of exercise ground, per

week, or less, to be paid in advance

Permission to try a Horse for any purpose



3





2





3





2





3





2


6



BRITISH TURF. 277

N.B. No charge is made for the use of the Ground for either a
Race or Match run on a Public Day, provided that 48 hours' no-
tice before it is run be given at the Hippodrome Ground.

Twenty-four hours' notice must be given at the Hippodrome
Ground of either Course being required for a Race or Match, on
a private day, and none such can be run without the Jockeys or
Riders being dressed in Jackets, and Caps, &c., and the Horses
plated.

Neither Subscribers, nor Visitors, nor their Grooms, can on any
account be permitted to use either the Race Course or Steeple
Chase Course for riding exercise, as both courses are kept in
order for Racing and Training only.

Subscribers of Five Guineas have the privilege of sending a Groom
with Two Horses for walking exercise, between the hours of Six
and Nine in the Morning, whenever the Ground is available for
that purpose.

MONMOUTHSHIRE.

Monmouth, the chief town of the county,
is 130 miles W. N. W. from London. It is beau-
tifully situated on the banks of the river Wye,
near its junction with the Mownow. The races
which take place about the middle of October,
and continue two days, are held on Chippenham
meadow, an extensive plot of ground on the bank
of the Wye, and which also forms the prome-
nade of the town.

About £100, raised by subscription, is given
awav in stakes.

Pontipool. — This town is situated on a declivity,
between the river Avon and the canal to Newport,



278 HISTORY OF THE

20 miles from Monmouth, and 146 from London.
The races take place about the commencement
of August and last two days.

NORFOLK.



Yarmouth. — A sea port, borough, and market
town, at the mouth of the river Yare, which here
falls into the ocean ; 23 miles from Norwich, and
123 (N.E.) from London, and containing about
18,680inhabitants. The theatre, an elegant and com-
modious building, was erected in 1778, and is open
during the summer months, in addition to which,
there are many other places of amusement.
Adjoining the bathing-houses on the beach, is a
pubUc room, where balls and concerts occasionally
take place.

The races, which take place towards the middle of
September and last two days, are held on the
Deves, a fine down south of the town, and where
an excellent course has been formed. On the first
day, the Gold Cup Stakes of 10 so vs. each, with 20
added, &c., and a Plate of £50, given by the mem-
bers for the town, are run for; and on the second day,
a Plate of £50 raised by subscription among the
neighbouring gentry, and a Handicap Stake of 3
sovs. each, with £30 added by the tradesmen of the
town.



BRITISH TURF. 279



NOTTINGHAMSHIRE.

Nottingham. — The chief town of the county,
stands on the river Trent, 124 miles (N.N.W.) from
London, and contains 40,415 inhabitants. It con-
tains a theatre, assembly rooms, a public subscrip-
tion library and news rooms, a mechanic's institu-
tion, &c. The races take place about the middle of
October, and last three days ; the race course is situ-
ated to the north-east of the town, and is one of
the finest and most ancient in the kingdom. It is
one mile two furlongs and eleven yards in circumfe-
rence. The grand stand, a handsome brick building,
was erected by subscription in 1777. Besides Her
Majesty's Plate of lOOgs., a Plate of £60, is given
by the county members, and another of £50, by
the members of the town ; a Subscription Cup,
value 100 sovs. &c., is also run for.



NORTHA M PTON SHIRE.

Northampton, the chief town of the county,
on the river Neu, 30 miles (S. E.) from Coventry,
and 66 (N. W.) from London.

It contains a theatre (open during the races,)
assembly rooms, public baths, and libraries.

The course is oval, one mile and a half and



280 HISTORY OF THE

eighty-two yards round, with a strong hill about half-
way from home ; the run in is a straight half
mile.

The races take place about the end of August,
and continue two days.

In addition to Her Majesty's Plate of lOOgs. and
the Town Members' Plate of £50, about £100 raised
by subscription is added to the different stakes.

The Pytchley Hunt Meeting is held on the
Northampton race-course about the end of March.

The Tally-ho Stakes of 25 sovs. each, 10 ft. ;
for horses not thorough-bred ; two miles ; gentle-
men riders ; the winner to pay 2 sovs. to the
clerk of the course, and to subscribe to the stakes
in 1840. One sov. entrance, including scales
and weights.

A Trial Stakes of 10 sovs. each, with £50
added (£25 by the town and £25 from the fund) ;
for horses of all ages ; one mile and a quarter. The
winner to pay 3 sovs. to the clerk of the course,
and to subscribe to the stakes in 1840. Each person
naming or entering a horse for this race to pay lOs,
for scales and weights. Three horses to start, or
the public money will be withheld.

An Open Stakes of 10 sovs. each, free for any
horse, with 25 added from the fund ; once round
and a distance. The winner to be sold for 150
sovs. if demanded in the usual way. Three horses
to start, or the 25 sovs. will not be added ;



BRITISH TURF. 2Sl

gentlemen riders. One sov. entrance, including
scales and weights, &c.

A Hunters' Stakes of 10 sovs. each, for horses
of all ages and denominations, lOst. 71b. each,
m. and g. allowed 31b. ; half-bred horses allowed
71b. ; once round ; the whinner to be sold for
40 sovs. Five subscribers, or no race, gentlemen,
farmers, or tradesmen riders ; 106*. entrance, in-
cluding scales and weights, &c.

A Farmers' Cup, value 50 sovs., for horses, &c.,
not thorough -bred, belonging to farmers only,
which have been regularly hunted the previous
season with the Duke of Grafton's or Lord
Chesterfield's hounds, and which have never won
up to the day of running — (matches or farmers'
plates at these, or the yeomanry cup at the
summer races excepted,) — heats, once round and
a distance ; four yrs. old, lOst. 101b.; ^ve, list.
41b. ; six, list. 121b. and aged, 12st. ; m. and g.
allowed 31b. ; a winner of the farmers' plate and
yeomanry cup in any preceding year to carry 71b.;
horses bred in the country to be allowed 51b. No
licensed horse-dealer will be allowed to enter or
start a horse in this race. Each person entering
or naming a horse for this race, to pay lO^.. en-
trance, including scales and weights ; gentlemen
or farmers riders. N.B. — Pedigree and qualifi-
cation for this race to be produced to the clerk of
the races at the time of entrance.

A Hurdle-race Sweepstakes of 10 sovs. each,



282 HISTORY OF THE

with a sum added by the innkeepers, for horses, &c.,
that have been regularly hunted with any esta-
blished pack of hounds in the previous season ;
thorough-bred horses to carry 12st. 31b. ; half-
bred, list. 71b.; the winner of a hurdle-race at
any time to carry 51b. extra ; gentlemen, farmers,
or tradesmen riders ; two miles, six leaps. The
winner to pay 3 sovs. towards the expences of
the hurdles ; IO5. entrance, including scales and
weights.

Rules and regulations as at Newmarket.

Stakes to be paid by ten o'clock on the morn-
ing of the race, to the clerk of the races, or not
entitled, though a winner.

Objections made to any horse, &c., in either of
the races, must be in waiting, to the stewards,
before starting.

Mr. T. H. Waters, Clerk of the Races.

NORTHUMBERLA ND.

Belford. — 49 miles from Newcastle, and 325^
miles from London. The races were formerly held
at Beadnell (a village on the sea- shore, 10|^ miles,
E. S. E. from Belford,) but have been removed here.
Races of an inferior description take place here in
September. The course is about a mile to the
south-west of the town, on the site of what is
supposed to have been a Danish camp.

Morpeth. — On the northern bank of the river



BRITISH TURF. 283

Wansbick, 15 miles from Newcastle, and 289 (N.)
from London. The races, which take place in
the beginning of September, and continue two
days, are held at Cottingwood, immediately north-
ward of the town. A plate of £50 is given by the
borough member.

Newcastle-upon-Tyne, an ancient borough,
port, and market-town, 276 miles (N. N. W.)
from London, and 117 (S. E.) from Edinburgh,
containing, including the environs, about 60,000
inhabitants. This thriving and wealthy town
contains numerous valuable institutions, among
which may be named, the Literary and Philosophi-
cal Society, the Antiquarian Society, the Botanic
and Horticultural Society, &c., &c. The Theatre
Royal is a fine building, and capable of accommo-
dating 1350 persons ; and there is a circus for
equestrian performances.

The races take place towards the end of June,
and occupy four days. The grand stand is a



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