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James Cleland.

Statistical tables relative to the city of Glasgow, with other matters therewith connected online

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HA

liss

G46C58
1823



Robert E. Gross



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G^6C58
1823



HA
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G46C58
1823



Robert E. Gross
Collection

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of the



Business Administration Library

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Los Angeles














g^A^a^^lKB^ai ^iiI32iI2^



RELATIVE TO THE



(i^xXxi of (Jllasjjoixi*












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'» ^ '^ 1 V \ % *^



-J. . \\



STATISTICAL TABLES



RELATIVE TO THE



m^^ (Dl^ (BILivg©(|>Ws)



WITH OTHER MATTERS THEREWITH CONNECTED.



-COMPILED BY

JAMES CLELAND,

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC WORKS FOR THE CITY,

MEMBER OF THE CHAMBER, OF COMMERCE AND MANUFACTURES,
HONORARY MEMBER OF THE GLASGOW PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETST, &C.



' It is certainly not necessary that a man should possess great power or extensive talents, to
" be useful in his day and generation." Retrospect.



Cjbirtf (ftJttion, Snitlj ^trirtttong.



GLASGOW:

PUBLISHED BY JAMES LUMSDEN & SON,

WAUGH & INNES, EDINBURGH,

AND G. & W. B. WHITAKER, LONDON.

1823.



TO THE

HON. WILLIAM SMITH,

LORD PROVOST OF GLASGOW,
4-c. ^c. SfC.

WHO

HAS SO ABLY DISCHARGED THE DUTIES

OF THE

HIGH AND HONOURABLE OFFICES

TO WHICH HE HAS BEEN CALLED

IN THIS GREAT AND FLOURISHING CITY,

THIS

STATISTECAL ACCOUS^T

OF HIS NATIVE PLACE,

B,

IN TESTIMONY OF RESPECT AND ESTEEM,

INSCRIBED BY

HIS lordship's

MOST FAITHFUL AND OBEDIENT SERVANT,

JAMES CLELAND.



ADVERTISEMENT.



The kind reception which the two former
Editions of the Glasgow Statistical Tables
received from the Pubhc, has greatly exceeded
the utmost expectation of the Compiler, and a call
for a Third Edition, from persons distinguished
for Political research, is very gratifying to his
feelings.

As the compulsatory part of the Bill, now
before Parliament, for the equalization of the
Weights and Measures of the Country, is not to
take effect for a number of Years after the Eill
shall have passed into a Law; — the Tables of
Weights and Measures in this Work, may be
useful in exemplifying the Weights and Mea-
sures used in this City, and in the Under Ward
of Lanarkshire.

The present Edition contains a number of
New Tables and additional matter connected with
Political Arithmetic, which the Compiler hopes
will prove useful to Economists in drawing re-
sults. On the whole, he is hopeful that this effort
will also meet with the approbation of the Public.



It would be unjust not to mention, in this place, that Mr. Cleland
has transmitted printed documents, containing very numerous and very
useful Statistical Details concerning the City and Suburbs of Glasgow,
and that the example has produced imitation in some other of the
principal Towns in Scotland, though not to the same extent of minute
investigation by which Mr. Cleland's labours are distinguished.

COTBByME.Vr E>n.'MEaATION VOLIME, 1821.



POjpilIUllliW^



PROGRESSIVE
POPULATION OF GLASGOW.

There was no enumeration of the inhabitants of Glas-
gow that can be relied on, before the year iGlU, but there
are grounds for supposing that about the time of the Re-
formation in 1560, the Population miglit amount to 4j()0;
this estimate of the number is rendered probable from the
circumstance, that in 1581, during the ministry of the
first Presbyterian Clergyman who officiated in Glasgow,
the Confession of Faith was subscribed by ^250 individuals,
although at that time there were certainly not so many
persons in the City who could write, yet they might
assent, and even include their children in the number: and
the struggle between the professors of the Roman (^atholic
and Retbrmed Religion was then so warmly contested,
that it is probable their numbers were nearly equal.

In 1610, the Episcopal mode of Government having
been resumed in the Church, Archbishop Spottiswood
directed the Population of the City to be ascertained,
when it was found to amount to 7644; although diu'i ng
the plague which raged in Glasgow in l6oy, the number
of its inhabitants must have been greatly reduced.

In 165^, the dreadful fire which began on 17th July
in that year, and destroyed about one-third of the Town,
caused a number of its inhabitants to leave the place

M



2

for want of accommodation, and reduced their circum-
stances so much, that they were under the necessity
of applying to other Towns for rehef. This, however,
does not seem to have greatly checked the progress of the
Population; for

In 1660, at the restoration of Charles 11. the number
of inhabitants amounted to 14,678.

In 1677» another fire destroyed 136 houses and shops,
which greatly affected the prosperity of the City; and

In 1688, at the Revolution, the Population was reduced
to 11.948; the religious troubles, or wliat was called the
persecution, which took place at that period, has been
assigned as the cause of this decrease.

In I7O8, immediately after the union between England
and Scol^land, the Population amounted to l;s?,766. The
Union having been vehemently opposed in Glasgow;* the
Magistrates directed that an enumeration of the people
should take place, to mark the decrease which they ex-
pected would follow.

In 1712, the Population amounted to 13,832, This
enumeration of the inhabitant-^ was by order of the Con-
vention of lloyal Burghs, who iiad directed the respective
Burghs to make a return of their Population on oath. On
this occasion the Town was divided into five districts, and



* Tlie union with En 'land, %vhicli lins l)fen of so much benefit to Scotland, and particu-
larly to Glasgow, was violently op;>osed here. The C'oinnjission of the General Assembly
having ajipointed Hiursday 7th November, ITOfi, to be observed as a day of fasting and
humili ition. and for imploring the Divine assistance from the impending calajnity, Mr.
James Clark, the Minister of the Tron Church preached from Ezraviii. 21. "Then I
" proclaimed a fast there, at the river Ahava, that we might afflict ourselves before our
" God, to seek of him a right way for us, and for our little ones, and for all our substance."
After the discourse was finished, the preacher said, " Wherefore, up and be valiant for the
'•' City of our God," the peo'ilc instantly arose, and having gone to the Cross, headed by
tlieir Clergymaii, burned the proposed Articles of Union.



the enumeration of each, conducted by two respectable
householders appointed by the Magistrates.

In 1740, the Population was ascertained by the Magis-
trates, to be 17,034.

In 1755, the numbers had increased to 23,546, but in
this enumeration, the Suburbs were partially include 1; at
that period the Magistrates directed returns to be made to
the Rev. Doctor Webster, then preparing his calculations
for the scheme of the Ministers' Widows' Fund.

In 1763, the Population amounted to 28,300. This
enumeration was drawn up by Mr. John Woodburn the
City Surveyor.

In I78O, the numbers had increased to 42,832; but in
this enumeration the whole of the Suburbs were for the
first time included.

In 1785, soon after the American war had ended, the
Magistrates directed the Population to be ascertained; it
then amounted to 45,889.

In 1791, the Population was ascertained for Sir John
Sinclair's Statistical work. At that time it amounted to
66,578, including 4,63-3, being part of the Suburbs which
had been omitted in the return.

Prior to 1801, the general results only, of the different
enumerations, have been preserved; but in that year, a
census of the inhabitants of Great Br:tain was taken for
the first time, by order of Government. The following
account of the Population of Glasgow is taken from that
document.
Males, 35,007. Females, 42,378. Total, 77,385.

But in this enumeration, a part of the connected
Suburbs, the Population ot which amounted to 6,384, had



4

been omitted, and which added to the numbers in the
Government Table, makes the actual Population of Glas-
gow at that time, 83,769.

In 1811, there was another Government enumeration
of the inhabitants of Great Britain, according to which,
the Population of Glasgow at that time, was as follows: —
Males, 45,275. Females, 55,474. Total, 100,749.

But in like manner, a part of the connected Suburbs
had not been included in this enumeration, the Population
of which amounted to 9,711; this number, therefore,
added to the Government Table, made the Population
of the City at that period, 110,460.



DETAIL

Of the Classiffied Enumeration
of 1819-20.

As the enumeration and classification of the inhabitants
of a great manufacturing and commercial City, are caU
culated to fiu'nish important information to the political
inquirer. Mr. Cleland submitted a prospectus to the
Magistrates and Council, the Directors of the Town's
Hospital, and the Commissioners of Police, in August,
1819, and the measure having met the approbation of
these Bodies, they appointed committees of their number,
to give their advice and countenance, viz.

The Hon. Henry Monteith, of Carstairs, M. P. Lord Provost.

From the Town Council. From the Town's llospilal. Fiomthe CommistionersofPolict.

Robert Findlay, Esq. David Crawford, Esq. Matthew Fleming, Esq.

James Ewing, Esq. John Machen, Esq. John Ure, Esq.

"VVilham Smith, Esq. Wm, Leckie, Esq. James Hamihon, Esq.

•John T. Alston, Esq. Thos. Stevenson, Esq. Wm. JM'Gavin, Esq.

J«hn Graham, Esq. James Dawson, Esq. Thos. Neilson, Esq.



Among the prominent features of this enumeration, is
the classification of the sexes into ages. The enumera:ion
of 1821 being the first Government Census which contain-
ed the ages of the Population.

The Prospectus alluded to having been submitted to the
. Reverend Clergymen of the City, and others, notice was
given in all the newspapers, and bills posted up over the
Town, explaining the nature of the investigation, and
requesting the co-operation of the Citizens, a set of books
was prepared, nine Clerks, viz. one for each Parish, were
appointed, whose whole attention was to be devoted to
the business, and who, along with the nine Beadles, ap-
peared before a Magistrate, and made oath that they
would faithfully and honestly discharge the duties assigned
to them. These persons then proceeded to call upon
every individual householder, and making the prescribed
inquiries, wrote down the answer to each interrogatory,
and afterwards made up the survey books, in which was
inserted the householders' names, their profession, the
number and description of their families, their servants,
the names and professions of their lodf^ers, the relio-ion
they professed, the country to which they belontred, the
street or lane in which they resided, the number of the
house, the length of residence, and all other circumstan-
ces that appeared to deserve notice. The survey com-
menced on the 14th October, 1819, and was completed
without interval.

When the survey books were returned, the inhabitants
were repeatedly requested through the medium of the
newspapers, to call at the Superintendent's office, and ex-
amine the lists before they were engrossed in the enumer-
ation books: this had the effect of removing any doubt
of the list-takers having done their duty.

When the enumeration was completed, it was printed
in folio, at the expense of the Public Bodies who were
pleased to express their unqualified approbation of it.



Under the Authority before mentioned, the particular Enumeration of the

of 1820, has been made, and the following



Result of the Populatimi



Parishes wil/iiii the
Jiot/a/ly.


%

t5

1796
1315
1674
1772
]86.'j
1230
13((9
1896
1774
1549


Housholders.






Children.






Servants.






1213


HI


•5


Under
12 years.


From 12 to
18 years.


\% years
4- ujrwards.


Lodgers.




Male. Fern


Male.


Fern.


Male.


Fern.


Male.


Fern.


Male. Fc/n.




149' 434! 1213


IC-4 1247
971; 1016
9.031 911

mn 1021

14711 1408
786 788
870> 832
929: 921
1311 1248
1014| 954


493
368
388
395
497
302
289
371
5(,4
360


6(4
381
354
S)9
482
2!H
286
.3.31
427
370


164
148
226
247
275
197
l;38
184
293
218


146
227
325
348
326
243
200
280
386
300


17
33
17
40
67
84
66
36
21
51


387
300
195
432
1023
844
.382
459
226
320


261 192
576 380
459 SM
5911 315
493 387
479 324
3t)9 264
5.33 378
4;)Sl 397
452; od:}


St M..rvV


1102 as! 420| 1102
1017 12;!; 534! 1017






1095 156. .'■)21


1095
1349
718
810
9.38
1321
969

10532


St. G^'orjje's

Ramshorn

St. Andrew's

St. Enoch's


i;:49
718
810
938

1321
969


IGO 354
I57I 355
I21I 378
229 729
92 361
138 442






Total in Royalty...


16478


10532!l418l4528
i 1


1066910346


3967


3868


2090


2781


432


4568


4671, 3394


Barony Parish
Anderston District ...
St. Vinrcnt-St tlo. ...
Port-Dundaji ilo. ...
Calton tlo. ...
Bridget on do. ...


1519

147.")

wm

3458
2592


1048
1CH6
l(/75
2191

2063


92 379
1.50 239

94 215
.364 903
145


Gorbals Parish


182


879


.3478


3675


3538


1.316


130!


800


1051


113


874


762


313


Total in Parisli Lists
: _ —


2-14L


7532


21473


23099


22006


8176


8033


4692


5917


845


6870


8269


6372



In the Royalty Tlie average number of Persons in each family is 4 and j qj o» TJic

married men are, to all the other males, as 10532 to 2.3247. The married
women are, to aU the other females, as 10.')32 to 29485. The children
under 12 years of age, are equal to one-fourth and -rg 575 "f the
whole Population. For every apartment, there is 1 Person and

In the Barony and Gorbals Parishes,. ..The average number of Persons in each family is 4 and -r^g'g'g. Th*

married men, are to all the other males, as 10i>41 to 24274. I'he married
women are to all the other females, .is 10941 to 27245. The children
under 12 years of age, are equal to one-fourth and t ^ S 5 o*" 'he
wh()l(! Population. For every apartment there arc 2 Persons and

yVifo '" °'^'"py ■'•

Royalty, Barony, and Gorbals, Tlie average number of Persons in each family is 4 and r^^^^^. The

married men are to all the other males a* 21473 to 47521. The married
women are, to all the other females, as 21473 to 56730. The children
under 12 years of age, arc equal to one-fourth and y A t^ Jj °^ "'^
wliole Population. For every apartment there are 2 Persons an*
I SCO '° occupy it.



Population in the City of Glasgow and Suburbs, at the commencemeat
Table is constructed to exhibit the Result.



for the year 1819.



Religion.




Country.




Occupying.


Unoccupied


Building.


^


o


1


■?




"^












.^




-i2


•«

S
5

^


1


1


!^


1


►^


to

.S


§
^


I


3




1
1


1
1


5
1
1


1


1

1


til

1


5481


2140


173


7431


39| 324




1791)


3515


23


65


27


95


3571 42J3


7794


413S


ilU6


878


5903


77


1125


12


1615


347(


33


73


5


22


3291 3826


7117


4032


2315


566


6148


To


675


17


1(>74


3251


33


76


2


42


3183 3730


6913


4666


27671 252


7245


10b


315


1<


1772


4fl9S


45


14-1


4


81


3614 4071


7fi85


5783


3640| 218


90t)4


145


348


54


186S


6612


91


343


8


133


4312 5329


9641


a5()8


2701 80


6014


127


113


35


1230


479C


32


147


10


36


2723 3563


6289


3246


2146 423


5129


100


575


11


1309


2995


2


33 2


55


266.3: 3152


5815


5273


1595' 388


6697


94


446


If


1896


3874


35


155 3


105


3220' 4fl36


7256


4407 .3508' 451


70-13


1(12


1217


4


1774


3673


35


103


9


104


4000 4363


8366


3928 2424. 568


5900


89i 921


10


1549


3413


54


169


44


157


3202J 3718


6920


44457


25312' 3997
1


66604


952 6059


181


16478


39686


383


1308


114


830


33779 40017

I


73796


2708


3801


6(M.


6120


74


910


u


1519


2753


28


50


1


11


3363


3750


7113


4074


3458


4


16S0


lOS — and in th
During the tliree


eM^g
montl


Jalene Asylu
s which pre


ra, 3
cede


2








.s




d the comme


nceme


It of the I


iMumei


ation, it is")


known that s


iveral


thousand Pe


sons


belonging to


Irc'lan


d, and oth


jr plac


es, left thot


1123


Town in quest


of em


olovment el


ewh


ere ; and as n


laiiy of


these may


be exp


ccted to re- f


turn, wlien wo


rk can


be procured.


Use


ems reasonab
Granh


e to ad
TOTAI


d for them




3


50000


Suburl


>s

























In the division of the Parishes within the Royalty, the relative number of the resident poor has been cou-
sidered, so as to equaUze the parochial duties as (ar as possible. The disparity between the number of tamilies
and the amount of the Population, in some of the Parishes, is to be accounted for, by the number of |)ocw
Persons living in one apartrai'nt in particular Parishes. There are a few wives who do not reside witli their
husbands, but the number is so small, as to render classification unnecessary.

In the number of unoccupied houses, in all the Parishes, are includetl, all such new houses as are not so
far completed as to have received inhabitants. In the enumeration, under the head of religion in all the Pa-
rishes, the children are considered to be of the same i)ersuasion as their parents or guardians. Tlie children
of English, Irish, and Foreign parents, are considered to be of the same country as their parents. When the
father or the motlier belongs to Scotland, the children are classified with the ScotcJi.



OCCUPATIONS IN WHICH THE POPULATION WAS ENGAGED IN 1819.



Occupations.



Weavers and Warpers,

Shopkeepers,

Labourers,

House Carpenters, Cabinet-makers, and Glaziers

Boot and Shoemakers

Publicans licensed t< retail spirituous liqliors,*

Tailors and Upholsterers

Blacksmiths. Whitesraitlis, and Coppersmiths

Manufacturers of Cotton Cloth,

Porters,

Calenderers,

Masons and Bricklayers,

Bakers and Biscuit-makers,

Carrieiv and Carters,

Writers and Attorneys,

Physicians and Surgeons,

Fleshers, .

Teachers, •{■

Coopers,

Skinnei-s, Tanners, aud Curriers,

Gardeners,

Barbers and Hair-dressers,

Dyers, ■•

Farmers and Farmers' Male Servants,

Principal and Professors in the University

Clergymen having Cures in the Estiibllshment,

Clergymen connected with the Dissenters

Clergymen of the Episcopal persuasion

Clergymen of the Roman Catholic persuasion,

Professors in the \nder.sonian Institution,

Rector and Masters in the Public Grammar School,

Pawnbrokers. ^ ....

Persons engaged in various employments not before enu-
merated, and at Cotton Mills, Foundries, Distilleries.
Breweries, Sugar- Houses, Soaperies, Coaleries, and other
Public Works,



yumher in

the
Royalty.



5523

]866

1852

1096

956

8S5

746

712

574

560

504

424

348

519

265

176

175

158

145

118

100

90

82

19

18

14

15

2

1

3

6

6

6355



Xutiiber in

Barony
^ Gorbals.



8632

1125

1578

604

578

728

175

334

165

88

58

361

249

346

87

52

76

81

67

15

236

28

281

301



6

10



O

o
o
o

5371



Total in

Royalty,

Rar.^ Gorb.



12155

2991

5430

1700

1334

1613

921

1046

739

648

562

785

597

665

352

228

251

239

212

133

336

118

363

320

18

20



11726



• Within the City, during the year 1819, there were 467 Persons who received licenses
to retail spirits, whose house-rent was under ^15, — 164, whose rent was from ^15 to £'20,
— and 254, whose rciu was upwards of ^20. In tlie Barony and Gorbals Parishes, 703
Persons were licensed, whose rent was under ^£'15. — 15 whose rent was from £\5 to £20,
•^and 12, whose rent was upwards of £20. — So that there luas one change-house, or place
where spirituous liquors were sold, /or every twenty families; and no less than 1347 chani^e-
houses, in the City and Suburb.i where the lower classes resorted tof /

f In 1 816, there were 144 Teachers within the Royalty. The names of these Teachers,
and the particular branches they taught, are given in the .'\nnals of Glasgow, vol. ii. p. 415
— 41 9. The Teachers in the Charity and Free Schools are not included in the above number.

\ In June, 1815, .Mr. John Graham opened a Pawnbroker's office, in Bell-Street,
which was the first office in the West of Scotland for receiving g'wds in pawn. An itinerant
English Pawnbroker commenced business in the High- Street, in August 1806, but eloped
at the end pf six mouths.



»



In 1821, there was another Government enumeration of
the inhabitants of Great Britain, according to which the
Population of Glasgow at that time, was as follows:
Males, 68,119. Females, 78,924. Total, 14-7,043.



ABSTRACT
Progressive Population of Glasgow,

Year. Persons.

At the reformation of Religion, in....; 1560 4,500

At the resumption of Episcopacy in Glasgow, 1610 7,64i

At the restoration of Charles II 1660 14.,678

At the Revolution (after the great fire in 1677) 1G88 11,918

Immediately after the Union of England with Scotland, ... 1708 12,766

Population taken at the desire of the Convention of i

Royal Burghs, J '

Population taken by order of the Magistrates, 1740 17,034

Population taken for the Rev. Doctor Webster, 1755 23,546

Population taken by order of the Magistrates, 1763 28,300

Population taken by order of the Magistrates, (at this i

D ' V I 1780 42 83'^

and subsequent periods the Suburbs are included,) j ^^joo^

Taken soon after the American war had ended, 1785 45,889

Taken for Sir John Sinclair's Statistical Work, (includ- )

ing omissions,) | ^^^l 66,578

First Government enumeration, (including omissions,) 1801 83,769

Second Government enumeration, (including omissions,)... 1811 110,460

First enumeration classified into ages, 1819 147,197

Third Government enumeration, 1821 147,043

In 1821, there were 1,917 unoccupied houses in the City and Suburbs,
calculated to accommodate 8,818 persons.



10



BAPTISMS,

MARRIAGES AND BURIALS.



Concerning the Registry of Baptisms.

In the year 1609, a Register for Baptisms began to be
kept in this City, under the direction of the Session. For
a considerable time the Register was understood to com-
prehend the names of all the Children baptized within the
City.

In 1733, an unfortunate separation from the Establish-
ed Church took place, known by the name of the Secession,
headed by some very respectable Clergymen, who drew
away from the Church, a considerable number of the
inhabitants. This party considered themselves to be the
Church of Scotland, and they not only declined register-
ing the names of their Children in the Parish Register,
but opened separate Registers as well as separate Churches.
The first Secession Church opened in Glasgow, was in


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Online LibraryJames ClelandStatistical tables relative to the city of Glasgow, with other matters therewith connected → online text (page 1 of 23)