James D. Richardson.

A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents Volume 8, part 2: Chester A. Arthur online

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Secretary of State upon the subject, together with the accompanying
papers.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _March 20, 1884_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives:_

In accordance with the provisions of the act making appropriations for
the diplomatic and consular service for the year ending June 30, 1883,
I transmit herewith a communication from the Secretary of State in
relation to the consular service.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _March 20, 1884_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives:_

I transmit herewith a communication from the Secretary of War of the
18th instant, submitting a letter from Colonel A.F. Rockwell, United
States Army, in charge of public buildings and grounds, embodying an
estimate in the sum of $30,000 for a pedestal for the statue of General
James A. Garfield, to be erected in the city of Washington by the
Society of the Army of the Cumberland, together with a letter upon the
subject from General Anson G. McCook, on behalf of the Society of the
Army of the Cumberland, the object in view being the procurement of an
appropriation by Congress of the amount of the accompanying estimate.

I commend the subject to the favorable consideration of Congress.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _March 26, 1884_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives:_

In my annual message I impressed upon Congress the necessity of
continued progress in the reconstruction of the Navy. The
recommendations in this direction of the Secretary of the Navy and of
the Naval Advisory Board were submitted by me unaccompanied by specific
expressions of approval. I now deem it my duty to advise that
appropriations be made at the present session toward designing and
commencing the construction of at least the three additional steel
cruisers and the four gunboats thus recommended, the cost of which,
including their armament, will not exceed $4,283,000, of which sum
one-half should be appropriated for the next fiscal year.

The _Chicago, Boston, Atlanta,_ and _Dolphin_ have been designed
and are being built with care and skill, and there is every reason to
believe that they will prove creditable and serviceable modern cruisers.
Technical questions concerning the details of these or of additional
vessels can not wisely be settled except by experts, and the Naval
Advisory Board, organized by direction of Congress under the act of
August 5, 1882, and consisting of three line officers, a naval
constructor, and a naval engineer, selected "with reference only to
character, experience, knowledge, and skill," and a naval architect and
a marine engineer from civil life "of established reputation and
standing as experts in naval or marine construction," is an appropriate
authority to decide finally all such questions. I am unwilling to see
the gradual reconstruction of our naval cruisers, now happily begun in
conformity with modern requirements, delayed one full year for any
unsubstantial reason.

Whatever conditions Congress may see fit to impose in order to secure
judicious designs and honest and economical construction will be
acceptable to me, but to relinquish or postpone the policy already
deliberately declared will be, in my judgment, an act of national
imprudence.

Appropriations should also be made without delay for finishing the four
double-turreted monitors, the _Puritan, Amphitrite, Terror,_ and
_Monadnock_, and for procuring their armament and that of the
_Miantonomoh_. Their hulls are built, and their machinery is under
contract and approaching completion, except that of the _Monadnock_,
on the Pacific coast. This should also be built, and the armor and heavy
guns of all should be procured at the earliest practicable moment.

The total amount appropriated up to this time for the four vessels is
$3,546,941.41. A sum not exceeding $3,838,769.62, including $866,725
for four powerful rifled cannon and for the remainder of the ordnance
outfit, will complete and equip them for service. Of the sum required,
only two millions need be appropriated for the next fiscal year. It is
not expected that one of the monitors will be a match for the heaviest
broadside ironclads which certain other Governments have constructed at
a cost of four or five millions each, but they will be armored vessels
of an approved and useful type, presenting limited surfaces for the shot
of an enemy, and possessed of such seagoing capacity and offensive power
as fully to answer our immediate necessities. Their completion having
been determined upon in the recent legislation of Congress, no time
should be lost in accomplishing the necessary object.

The Gun Foundry Board, appointed by direction of Congress, consisting
of three army and three navy officers, has submitted its report, duly
transmitted on the 20th day of February, 1884, recommending that the
Government should promote the production at private steel works of the
required material for heavy cannon, and that two Government factories,
one for the Army and one for the Navy, should be established for the
fabrication of guns from such material. An early consideration of the
report is recommended, together with such action as will enable the
Government to construct its ordnance upon its own territory and so to
provide the armaments demanded by considerations which concern the
national safety and honor.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _April 1, 1884_.

_To the House of Representatives:_

In response to a resolution of the House of Representatives of
January 15, 1884, requesting the President to forward to the House
information, including reports from consuls and others, concerning the
undervaluation, false classification, and other irregular practices
in the importation of foreign merchandise, and to recommend what
legislation, if any, is needed to prevent such frauds on the revenue,
I have the honor to transmit herewith a letter of the Secretary of the
Treasury of the 28th ultimo, inclosing a draft of a bill on the subject,
together with copies of reports taken from the files of the Treasury
Department concerning the information desired.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, April 1, 1884_.

_To the House of Representatives:_

I transmit herewith a report of the Secretary of State and accompanying
papers, furnished in response to a resolution of the House of
Representatives of January 16, 1884, calling for information as to the
payments made by Spain in accordance with the terms of its treaty with
the United States concluded February 17, 1834.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _April 2, 1884_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives:_

I transmit to Congress a communication from the Secretary of War,
embodying the views of the president of the Mississippi River Commission
upon a report from Major Stickney, of the Engineer Corps, in relation to
the protection of existing levees from destruction by the floods in the
lower part of the Mississippi River. It appears that there is an urgent
need of an appropriation of $100,000 to be used for this purpose,
and that an enormous destruction of property may be thereby averted.
I recommend an immediate appropriation of the sum required for the
purpose, to be expended under the direction of the Mississippi River
Commission.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _April 2, 1884_.

_To the House of Representatives:_

In response to the resolution of the House of Representatives of 5th
of February last, respecting the arrest and imprisonment of certain
American citizens by the authorities of Colombia, at Aspinwall,
I transmit a report of the Secretary of State.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _April 11, 1884_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives:_

The condition of our seacoast defenses and their armament has been
brought to the attention of Congress in my annual messages, and I now
submit a special estimate of the Chief of Ordnance, United States
Army, transmitted by the Secretary of War, for a permanent annual
appropriation of $1,500,000 to provide the necessary armament for
our fortifications.

This estimate is founded upon the report of the Gun Foundry Board
recently transmitted, to which I have heretofore invited the early
attention of Congress.

In presenting this estimate I do not think it necessary to enumerate the
considerations which make it of the highest importance that there should
be no unnecessary delay in entering upon the work, which must be
commensurate with the public interests to be guarded, and which will
take much time.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _April 14, 1884_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives:_

I transmit herewith, for the consideration of Congress, a communication
from the Secretary of War of the 5th instant, submitting copies of
certain papers, consisting of a letter, dated February 16 last, from Mr.
Haughwout Howe, of New York City, presenting a proposition for the sale
to the Government for the sum of $5,500 of certain hospital and other
records pertaining to an association founded in New York City in April,
1862, for the purpose of extending relief to soldiers of the late war;
a report of an examination made of these records by a representative
of the War Department, and a report of the Adjutant-General stating
that the records would prove of great value to the Department in the
settlement of claims of deserving soldiers, as well as in detecting
fraudulent claims, as the books, etc., contain information not now
of record in the War Department.

The Secretary of War, it will be observed, recommends that an
appropriation be made by Congress of the necessary sum for the
purchase of the records referred to.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, April 14, 1884_.

_To the Senate of the United States of America:_

I transmit herewith to the Senate, for its consideration with a view
to ratification, a convention concluded between the United States of
America and France and the twenty-four other powers named in said
convention for the protection of submarine cables, concluded at Paris on
the 14th day of March, A.D. 1884. I also inclose, for the information of
the Senate, a copy of Mr. Morton's dispatch No. 518, of the 18th ultimo,
in relation to the subject.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



WASHINGTON, _April 14, 1884_.

_To the Senate of the United States:_

I transmit to the Senate, for its consideration with a view to
ratification, a convention concerning trade-marks and trade-labels
between the United States and Belgium, signed on the 7th instant.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, April 18, 1884_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives:_

I transmit herewith a communication from the Secretary of State of the
16th instant, relative to the approaching visit of a special embassy
from Siam to the United States, and recommend that the appropriation
asked by the Secretary of State to suitably defray the expenses of such
embassy while in this country be made.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, April 18, 1884_.

_To the House of Representatives:_

I transmit herewith a copy of a report of the Secretary of State of the
16th instant, in relation to the final award made by the late French and
American Claims Commission against the United States for the sum of
$625,566.35, for the payment of the claims of French citizens against
this Government. I recommend that an appropriation of the above sum be
made to enable the Government to fulfill its obligations under the
treaty of January 15, 1880, between this country and France.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, April 18, 1884_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives:_

I transmit herewith a communication from the Secretary of State, dated
the 16th instant, respecting the approaching international conference at
Washington, D.C., for the purpose of fixing upon a meridian proper to be
employed as a common zero of longitude and standard of time reckoning
throughout the globe, and recommend that the sum of $10,000 be
appropriated to enable the Secretary of State to meet the expenses of
the same.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, April 18, 1884_.

_To the Senate of the United States:_

In response to the resolution of the Senate of the 5th of December last,
respecting the execution by the United States of the ninth article of
the treaty of 1819 with Spain, I transmit herewith a report of the
Secretary of State and its accompanying papers.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, April 22, 1884_.

_To the Senate of the United States:_

I transmit herewith a report of the Secretary of State, in response to
a resolution of the Senate of February 29, 1884, requesting information
concerning the respective average production, consumption, exportation,
and importation of wheat, rye, corn, and cotton in foreign countries,
together with statistics showing the production and surplus or
deficiency in the crops of the past two years in each of such countries,
an estimate of the probable requirements of such products from the
United States to meet the wants of these countries before the crops
of the coming crop year are ready for market, and other available
information concerning the questions to which the resolution refers.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, April 24, 1884_.

_To the House of Representatives:_

I transmit herewith, in answer to a resolution of the House of
Representatives of the 21st instant, a report of the Secretary of State,
with the accompanying papers, in relation to the threatened confiscation
of the American college at Rome by the Italian Government.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, April 28, 1884_.

_To the House of Representatives:_

I transmit herewith a report of the Secretary of State, in relation to
the bill for the support of the diplomatic and consular services.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, May 3, 1884_.

_To the House of Representatives:_

I transmit herewith, for your consideration, a communication from
the Secretary of State, recommending the appropriation of the sum of
$22,500, or so much thereof as may be necessary, to meet the proper
obligations of the Government on account of the courteous services
of the various umpires of the late American-Spanish Commission.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, May 6, 1884_.

_To the Senate of the United States:_

In answer to the resolution of the Senate of March 12, 1884, requesting
to be furnished with a copy of correspondence between this Government
and that of China respecting the Ward claims and the claim of Charles
E. Hill, I herewith submit a letter of the Secretary of State, together
with its accompanying papers.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, May 6, 1884_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives:_

I transmit herewith, for the information of Congress, a communication
from the Secretary of the Interior, submitting a copy of the report of
the Utah Commission.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, May 6, 1884_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives:_

I transmit herewith, for the information of Congress, a copy of the
preliminary report of the board of management of the World's Industrial
and Cotton Centennial Exposition, showing their operations and
containing observations upon other matters concerning the project deemed
of importance.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _May 6, 1884_.

_To the House of Representatives:_

In answer to that part of the resolution of the House of Representatives
of the 17th of January last respecting the question of boundaries
between the Republics of Mexico and Guatemala, I transmit herewith the
report of the Secretary of State and its accompanying papers.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, May 12, 1884_.

_To the House of Representatives:_

I transmit herewith, in answer to the resolution of the House of
Representatives of the 6th of February last, a communication from the
Secretary of State, respecting the extradition of criminals under the
treaty of 1842 with Great Britain.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, May 12, 1884_.

_To the House of Representatives:_

I transmit herewith a communication from the Secretary of State,
transmitting a draft of a resolution providing for the presentation
of a testimonial to Mr. E.L. Oxenham, British consul at Chin-Kiang,
in acknowledgment of services rendered the United States.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, May 14, 1884_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives:_

I transmit herewith a communication from the Secretary of State of the
14th instant, with accompanying papers, relative to the necessity of
an appropriation by Congress to enable this Government to execute the
provisions of the convention between the United States and Mexico of
July 29, 1882, for the relocation of the monuments marking the boundary
line between the two countries, and recommend that the amount asked,
$224,556.75, immediately provided.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, May 15, 1884_.

_To the Senate:_

I transmit herewith to the Senate, for consideration with a view to
advising and consenting thereto, an agreement, signed May 14, 1884,
between the Secretary of State and the minister plenipotentiary of Siam,
for the regulation of the liquor traffic in Siam when citizens of the
United States engage in the importation or sale of liquors there.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _May 19, 1884_.

_To the House of Representatives:_

I transmit herewith, for such action as is deemed proper, a
communication from the Secretary of State, recommending an additional
appropriation of $6,000 for the construction of a wharf and roadway
as a means of approach to the monument to be erected at Wakefield,
Westmoreland County, Va., to mark the birthplace of George Washington.

I commend the matter to your favorable attention.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _May 19, 1884_.

_To the House of Representatives:_

I transmit herewith a report from the Secretary of State, with
accompanying copies of correspondence, in further response to the
resolution of the House of Representatives of January 16, 1884,
respecting the arrest and imprisonment of John E. Wheelock in Venezuela
in 1879.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _May 29, 1884_.

_To the House of Representatives:_

I transmit herewith, for such action as is deemed proper, a
communication from the Secretary of State, accompanied by several
inclosures, in which he recommends an appropriation for rewarding the
services of the Osette Indians in rescuing and caring for the crew of
the American steamer _Umatilla_, which vessel was wrecked in
February last near the coast of Vancouvers Island.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, May 29, 1884_.

_To the Senate of the United States:_

I transmit herewith, in response to the resolution of the Senate of
March 10 last, a report from the Secretary of State, with accompanying
papers, in regard to the claim of Edward H. Ladd against the Government
of Colombia.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, June 9, 1884_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives:_

I transmit herewith, for the consideration of Congress, a letter and
its accompanying estimate, submitted by the board charged with preparing
a departmental exhibit for the World's Industrial and Cotton Centennial
Exposition to be held at New Orleans, beginning December 1, 1884.
This board was appointed by Executive order of May 13, 1884,[17] and
is composed of representatives of the several Executive Departments,
the Department of Agriculture, and the Smithsonian Institution. It is
charged with the important and responsible duty of making arrangements
for a complete and harmonious collection of the articles and materials
deemed desirable to place on exhibition, in illustration of the
resources of the country, its methods of governmental administration,
and its means of offense and defense.

The board submits an estimate calling for an appropriation of
$588,000 to accomplish the desired end. That amount is distributed
among the Departments as shown in the table. The War, Navy, and Interior
Departments call for the largest share, representing as they do the
national defenses by land and sea, the progress of naval architecture
and ordnance, the geological survey and mineral wealth of the
Territories, the treatment of the Indians, and the education of the
masses, all of which admit of varied and instructive exhibits. The
Smithsonian Institution, having under its general care the National
Museum and the Fish Commission, is prepared to make a display second
in interest to none of modern days. The remaining Departments can
present instructive and interesting exhibits, which will attract popular
attention and convey an idea of their extensively ramified duties and of
the many points where they beneficially affect the life of the people as
a nation and as individuals.

The exhibit of the Government at the Centennial Exhibition held at
Philadelphia in 1876 was admitted to be one of the most attractive
features of that great national undertaking and a valuable addition to
it. From men of intelligence and scientific attainments, at home and
abroad, it received the highest encomiums, showing the interest it
awakened among those whose lives are given to the improvement of the
social and material condition of the people.

The reproduction of such a display now on a more extensive plan is
rendered possible by the advancement of science and invention during
the eight years that have passed since the Philadelphia exhibit was
collected.

The importance, purposes, and benefits of the New Orleans Exhibition
are continental in their scope. Standing at the threshold of the almost
unopened markets of Spanish and Portuguese America, New Orleans is a
natural gateway to their trade, and the exhibition offers to the people
of Mexico and Central and South America an adequate knowledge of our
farming implements, metal manufactures, cotton and woolen goods, and the
like necessities of existence, in respect to which those countries are
either deficient or supplied to a limited extent. The breaking down of
the barriers which still separate us from the Republics of America whose
productions so entirely complement our own will aid greatly in removing
the disparity of commercial intercourse under which less than 10 per
cent of our exports go to American countries.

I trust that Congress will realize the urgency of this recommendation
and make its appropriation immediately available, so that the board may
lose no time in undertaking the extensive preparations necessary to
spread a more intimate knowledge of our Government institutions and
national resources among the people of our country and of neighboring
states in a way to command the respect due it in the family of nations.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

[Footnote 17: See pp. 230-231.]



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, June 9, 1884_.

_To the Senate of the United States:_

I transmit herewith, for consideration by the Senate and appropriate
action thereon, a report of the Secretary of State, communicating the
proposal of the King of Hawaii that the duration of the existing
reciprocity treaty with the United States be extended for a further
definite period of seven years.

The treaty having been heretofore under consideration by your honorable
body, I deem it fitting to consult the Senate in the matter before
directing the negotiations to proceed.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, June 11, 1884_.

_To the House of Representatives:_

In compliance with the resolution of the House of Representatives of
the 10th instant, I return House bill No. 2344, entitled "An act for
the relief of Melissa G. Polar."

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, June 11, 1884_.

_To the House of Representatives:_

I transmit herewith to the House of Representatives, in response to
a resolution of that body of the 21st of April last, a copy of the
material correspondence on file in the Department of State relative to
the claim of W.J. Hale against the Argentine Republic, and a list of



Online LibraryJames D. RichardsonA Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents Volume 8, part 2: Chester A. Arthur → online text (page 20 of 29)