James D. Richardson.

A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents Volume 8, part 2: Chester A. Arthur online

. (page 26 of 29)
Online LibraryJames D. RichardsonA Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents Volume 8, part 2: Chester A. Arthur → online text (page 26 of 29)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


available, for the purposes indicated.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 13, 1885_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives:_

I transmit herewith a communication from the Secretary of War, dated
January 9, 1885, inclosing a copy of one dated January 5, 1885, from
Lieutenant-Colonel William P. Craighill, Corps of Engineers, who was
charged with the building of the monument at Yorktown, reporting the
completion of the monument and recommending that the balance of the
appropriation for building the same be used in paying the wages of
a watchman and erecting a suitable keeper's dwelling on the site.

The matter is commended to the consideration of Congress.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 16, 1885_.

_To the United States Senate:_

I transmit herewith a copy of a letter addressed to the Secretary of War
by General W.T. Sherman, under date of January 6, 1885, as called for by
resolution of the Senate of January 13, 1885, as follows:


That the President of the United States be, and he is hereby,
requested, if in his opinion it be not incompatible with the public
interest, to communicate to the Senate a historical statement
concerning the public policy of the executive department of the
Confederate States during the late War of the Rebellion, reported
to have been lately filed in the War Department by General William
T. Sherman.


CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 20, 1885_.

_To the Senate:_

In response to the resolution of the Senate passed December 16, 1884,
I transmit herewith a letter of the Secretary of State of the 19th
instant, submitting a report containing certain information in the
Department of State in relation to the foreign trade of Mexico, Central
and South America, the Spanish West Indies, Hayti, and Santo Domingo,
and also in relation to the share of the United States to the trade
in question.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 23, 1885_.

_To the Senate of the United States:_

I transmit herewith, in answer to a resolution of the Senate dated
January 5, 1885, a report of the Secretary of State and accompanying
copies of such treaties and conventions between the United States and
foreign powers as are requested by the resolution.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 23, 1885_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives:_

I transmit herewith a communication of the 20th instant from the
Secretary of the Interior, presenting, with accompanying papers, a draft
of proposed legislation providing for the settlement of certain claims
of Omaha Indians in Nebraska against the Winnebago Indians on account of
horses stolen by members of the latter tribe from the Omahas.

The subject is commended to the favorable consideration and action of
the Congress.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 23, 1885_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives:_

I transmit herewith a report of the Secretary of State of the 22d
instant, respecting an estimate of an appropriation to enable the
Department of State to cause a preliminary search to be made of the
records of the French prize courts from 1792 to 1801, inclusive, to
ascertain whether any evidence or documents relating to the claims in
question still exist, and, if so, the nature and character thereof;
said preliminary search being intended to aid the Department of State
to carry out the requirements of section 5 of the act approved January
20, 1885, to provide for the ascertainment of the claims of American
citizens for spoliations committed by the French prior to the 31st
of July, 1801.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 27, 1885_.

_To the House of Representatives:_

I transmit herewith, as desired by the House resolution of the 9th
instant, a report, with accompanying papers, from the Secretary of
State, in relation to the arrest and the imprisonment of Thomas R.
Monahan by the authorities of Mexico.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 27, 1885_.

_To the House of Representatives:_

I transmit herewith a preliminary report of the Secretary of State
of the 26th instant, in response to a resolution of the House of
Representatives passed on the 9th day of January, 1885, calling for
copies of accounts and vouchers of the disbursing officers of the French
and American Claims Commission and certain other information in relation
to the transactions of said commission.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 27, 1885_.

_To the Senate of the United States:_

I have carefully considered the provisions of Senate bill No. 862,
entitled "An act for the relief of Uriel Crocker."

The general statute provides for relief in case of the destruction of
coupon bonds.

In my opinion this provision of law is sufficiently liberal to meet all
cases of missing coupon bonds worthy of favorable action, and I do not
deem it advisable to encourage this class of legislation.

The bill is not, however, so flagrantly inexpedient as to call for my
formal disapproval, and I have allowed it to become a law under the
constitutional provision, contenting myself with communicating to the
Senate, in which the bill originated, my disapproval of special
legislation of this character.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, January 27, 1885_.

_To the Senate of the United States:_

I transmit to the Senate, for its consideration with a view to
ratification, an additional article, signed on the 23d of June last, to
the treaty of friendship, commerce, and navigation which was concluded
between the United States and the Argentine Confederation July 27, 1853.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 27, 1885_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives:_

I transmit herewith a letter from the Secretary of State, concerning the
awards made against Venezuela by the mixed commission under the
convention of April 25, 1866.

I earnestly invite the attention of Congress to this communication and
the accompanying documents.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 27, 1885_.

_To the Senate of the United States:_

I transmit herewith a report of the Secretary of State and accompanying
papers, furnished in response to a resolution of the Senate of May 2,
1884, calling for information relative to the landing of foreign
telegraphic cables upon the shores of the United States.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 27, 1885_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives:_

I have the honor to transmit communications from the Secretary of the
Navy, recommending certain action by the Government in recognition of
the services, official and personal, extended in Russia to the survivors
of the arctic exploring steamer _Jeannette_ and to the search
parties subsequently sent to Siberia.

The authority of Congress is requested for extending the specific
rewards mentioned in the paper accompanying one of the communications of
the Secretary. The suggestion concerning the thanks of Congress is also
submitted for consideration.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 27, 1885_.

_To the Senate of the United States:_

In response to the resolution of the Senate of the 22d instant, setting
forth that -

Whereas the United States, in 1866, acquired from the Creek and
Seminole Indians by treaty certain lands situate in the Indian
Territory, a portion of which have remained unoccupied until the
present time; and

Whereas a widely extended belief exists that such unoccupied lands are
public lands of the United States, and as such subject to homestead and
preemption settlement, and pursuant to such belief a large number of
citizens of the United States have gone upon them claiming the right
to settle and acquire title thereto under the general land laws of the
United States; and

Whereas it is understood that the President of the United States does
not regard said lands as open to settlement and believes it to be his
duty to remove all persons who go upon the same claiming the right to
settle thereon, and for that purpose has directed the expulsion of the
persons now on said lands by the use of military force, and there seems
to be a probability of a conflict growing out of the attempt to expel
said persons so claiming right and attempting to settle: Therefore,

_Resolved_, That the President be requested to advise the Senate as
to the status of the lands in question as viewed by the Executive, the
action taken, if any, to expel persons seeking to settle thereon, and
the reasons for the same, together with any other information in his
possession bearing upon the existing controversy -


I have the honor to state that the matter was referred to the
Secretaries of War and the Interior and to transmit herewith their
respective reports thereon, dated the 26th instant.

The report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs accompanying that
of the Secretary of the Interior recites fully the provisions of the
treaties made with the Indian tribes ceding the lands in question to
the United States, showing the condition and purposes expressed in
said treaties regarding said lands, as well as the action taken with
reference thereto, from which it will be seen that they are not open
to settlement under any laws of the United States.

The report of the Secretary of War shows the action of the military
authorities at the request of the Interior Department under section 2147
of the Revised Statutes.

The status of these lands was considered by my predecessor, President
Hayes, who on the 26th day of April, 1879, issued a proclamation[25]
warning all persons intending to go upon said lands without proper
permission of the Interior Department that they would be speedily and
immediately removed therefrom according to the laws made and provided,
and that if necessary the aid and assistance of the military forces of
the United States would be invoked to carry into proper execution the
laws of the United States referring thereto. A similar proclamation[26]
was issued by President Hayes on the 12th day of February, 1880. On the
1st day of July, 1884, I considered it to be my duty to issue a
proclamation[27] of like import.

These several proclamations were at the request of the Secretary of the
Interior.

As will be seen by the report of the Secretary of War, the military
forces of the United States have been repeatedly employed to remove
intruders from the lands in question, and that notwithstanding such
removals and in disregard of law and the Executive proclamations a large
body of intruders is now within the territory in question, and that an
adequate force of troops has been ordered to remove the intruders and is
now being concentrated for that purpose.

None of the land or general laws of the United States have been extended
over these lands except as to the punishment for crimes and other
provisions contained in the intercourse act which relate to trade and
the introduction of spirituous liquors and arms among Indians, and do
not sanction settlement. It is clear that no authorized settlement can
be made by any person in the territory in question.

Until the existing status of these lands shall have been changed by
agreement with the Indians interested, or in some other manner as may be
determined by Congress, the treaties heretofore made with the Indians
should be maintained and the power of the Government to the extent
necessary should be exercised to keep off intruders and all unauthorized
persons.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

[Footnote 25: See Vol. VII, pp. 547-548.]

[Footnote 26: See Vol. VII, pp. 598-599.]

[Footnote 27: See pp. 224-225.]



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 29, 1885_.

_To the House of Representatives:_

In response to the resolution of the House of Representatives of the 5th
of January, 1885, calling for information as to the Kongo conference at
Berlin, I transmit herewith a report of the Secretary of State of the
28th instant, in relation to the subject.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 29, 1885_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives:_

I transmit herewith a communication of 27th instant, with inclosures,
from the Secretary of the Interior, in relation to objections on the
part of the Creek Nation of Indians to pending legislation providing for
the opening up to homestead settlement of certain lands in the Indian
Territory.

The matter is presented to the consideration of the Congress.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 29, 1885_.

_To the House of Representatives:_

In compliance with a resolution of the House of Representatives (which
was concurred in by the Senate) of January 28, 1885, I return herewith
the bill (H.R. 1017) relative to the Inspector-General's Department of
the Army.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 30, 1885_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives:_

When the expedition for the relief of Lieutenant Greely and his party
was being prepared, in the early part of the year 1884, and a search for
suitable vessels was being made, the _Alert_, then the property of
Great Britain, and which had been the advance ship of the expedition
under Sir George Nares, was found to be peculiarly fitted for the
intended service, and this Government immediately offered to purchase
that vessel, upon which Her Majesty's Government generously presented
her to the United States, refusing to accept any pay whatever for the
vessel. The _Alert_ rendered important and timely service in the
expedition for the relief of Lieutenant Greely and party, which in its
results proved so satisfactory to the Government and people of this
country.

I am of the opinion that the _Alert_ should now be returned to Her
Majesty's Government, with suitable acknowledgments for its generous and
graceful acts of courtesy in so promptly putting the vessel at the
service of the United States, and I therefore recommend that authority
be given me by Congress to carry out this purpose.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 30, 1885_.

_To the House of Representatives:_

I transmit herewith, in response to a resolution of the House of
Representatives of the 28th of January, 1885, a report by the Secretary
of State, in relation to the case of Julio R. Santos, an American
citizen imprisoned in Ecuador.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _January 30, 1885_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:_

I herewith transmit a communication from the Secretary of State, in
regard to the desire of the Government of Korea to obtain the services
of one or more officers of the United States as military instructors
in that country, and recommend the adoption of a joint resolution
authorizing such officers as may be conveniently spared, and who may be
selected for that duty, to proceed to Korea for the purpose indicated.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _February 2, 1885_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:_

I transmit herewith to the Senate a communication from the Secretary of
State, submitting, at the request of a delegate from the United States
to the Third International Conference of the Red Cross, held in
September, 1884, a copy of the preliminary report of that conference.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _February 2, 1885_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives:_

I transmit herewith, for the consideration of Congress, the report of
the National Board of Health for the year 1884.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _Washington, February 2, 1885_.

_To the Senate of the United States of America:_

With reference to the resolution of the Senate of the 12th of June,
1884, declining to advise and consent to the ratification of an
accession of the United States to an international convention for the
protection of industrial property, signed at Paris March 20, 1883,
I now return the proposed instrument of accession to the Senate for
reconsideration in connection with the views and recommendations
contained in the accompanying report of the Secretary of State, dated
January 29, 1885.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _February 2, 1885_.

_To the House of Representatives:_

In response to the resolution of the House of Representatives of January
28, 1885, "that the President be respectfully requested to transmit to
this House a copy of the recent appeal of Fitz John Porter, together
with the accompanying papers," I transmit herewith a copy of a
communication from Fitz John Porter, addressed to the President from
Morristown, N.J., under date of October 14, 1884, together with copies
of the accompanying papers.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.



EXECUTIVE MANSION, _February 3, 1885_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives:_

I take especial pleasure in laying before Congress the generous offer
made by Mrs. Grant to give to the Government, in perpetual trust, the
swords and military (and civil) testimonials lately belonging to General
Grant. A copy of the deed of trust and of a letter addressed to me by
Mr. William H. Vanderbilt, which I transmit herewith, will explain the
nature and motives of this offer.

Appreciation of General Grant's achievements and recognition of his just
fame have in part taken the shape of numerous mementoes and gifts which,
while dear to him, possess for the nation an exceptional interest.

These relics, of great historical value, have passed into the hands of
another, whose considerate action has restored the collection to Mrs.
Grant as a life trust, on the condition that at the death of General
Grant, or sooner, at Mrs. Grant's option, it should become the property
of the Government, as set forth in the accompanying papers. In the
exercise of the option thus given her Mrs. Grant elects that the trust
shall forthwith determine, and asks that the Government designate a
suitable place of deposit and a responsible custodian for the
collection.

The nature of this gift and the value of the relics which the generosity
of a private citizen, joined to the high sense of public regard which
animates Mrs. Grant, have thus placed at the disposal of the Government,
demand full and signal recognition on behalf of the nation at the hands
of its representatives. I therefore ask Congress to take suitable action
to accept the trust and to provide for its secure custody, at the same
time recording the appreciative gratitude of the people of the United
States to the donors.

In this connection I may pertinently advert to the pending legislation
of the Senate and House of Representatives looking to a national
recognition of General Grant's eminent services by providing the means
for his restoration to the Army on the retired list. That Congress, by
taking such action, will give expression to the almost universal desire
of the people of this nation is evident, and I earnestly urge the
passage of an act similar to Senate bill No. 2530, which, while not
interfering with the constitutional prerogative of appointment, will
enable the President in his discretion to nominate General Grant as
general upon the retired list.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.


DEED OF TRUST.

Whereas I, William H. Vanderbilt, of the city of New York, by virtue of
a sale made under a judgment in a suit to foreclose a chattel mortgage
in the supreme court of this State, in which I was plaintiff and Ulysses
S. Grant defendant, which judgment was entered on the 6th day of
December, 1884, and under an execution in another suit in said court
between the same parties upon a judgment entered December 9, 1884, have
become the owner of the property and the articles described in the
schedule hereto annexed, formerly the property of Ulysses S. Grant:

Now, therefore, to carry out a purpose formed by me, and in
consideration of $1 to me paid, I do hereby transfer and convey each and
every one of the articles mentioned and itemized in the said schedule to
Julia Dent Grant, to have and hold the same to her, her executors and
administrators, upon the trust and agreement, nevertheless, hereby
accepted and made by her, that on the death of the said Ulysses S.
Grant, or previously thereto, at her or their option, the same shall
become and be the property of the nation and shall be taken to
Washington and transferred and conveyed by her and them to the United
States of America.

In witness whereof the said William H. Vanderbilt and Julia Dent Grant
have executed these presents, this 10th day of January, A.D. 1885.

Sealed and delivered in presence of -

W.H. VANDERBILT.
JULIA DENT GRANT.


_Schedule of swords and medals, paintings, bronzes, portraits,
commissions and addresses, and objects of value and art presented by
various governments in the world to General Ulysses S. Grant_.

Mexican onyx cabinet, presented to General Grant by the people of
Puebla, Mexico.

Aerolite, part of which passed over Mexico in 1871.

Bronze vases, presented to General Grant by the Japanese citizens of
Yokohama, Japan.

Marble bust and pedestal, presented by workingmen of Philadelphia.

General Grant and family, painted by Coggswell.

Large elephant tusks, presented by the King of Siam.

Small elephant tusks, from the Maharajah of Johore.

Picture of General Scott, by Page, presented by gentlemen of New York.

Crackleware bowls (very old), presented by Prince Koon, of China.

Cloisonne jars (old), presented by Li Hung Chang.

Chinese porcelain jars (old), presented by Prince Koon, of China.

Arabian Bible.

Coptic Bible, presented by Lord Napier, who captured it with King
Theodore, of Abyssinia.

Sporting rifle.

Sword of Donelson, presented to General Grant after the fall of Fort
Donelson, by officers of the Army, and used by him until the end of the
war.

New York sword, voted to General Grant by the citizens of New York at
the fair held in New York.

Sword of Chattanooga, presented to General Grant by the citizens of Jo
Daviess County, Ill. (Galena), after the battle of Chattanooga.

Roman mug and pitcher.

Silver menu and card, farewell dinner of San Francisco, Cal.

Silver menu of Paris dinner.

Horn and silver snuff box.

Silver match box, used by General Grant.

Gold table, modeled after the table in Mr. McLean's house on which
General R.E. Lee signed the articles of surrender. This was presented to
General Grant by ex-Confederate soldiers.

Gold cigar case (enameled), presented by the Celestial King of Siam.

Gold cigar case (plain), presented by the Second King of Siam.

Gold-handled knife, presented by miners of Idaho Territory.

Nine pieces of jade stone, presented by Prince Koon, of China.

Silver trowel, used by General Grant in laying the corner stone of the
American Museum of Natural History, New York.

Knife, made at Sheffield for General Grant.

Gold pen, General Grant's.

Embroidered picture (cock and hen), presented to General Grant by
citizens of Japan.

Field glasses, used by General Grant during the war.

Iron-headed cane, made from the rebel ram _Merrimac_.

Silver-headed cane, made from wood used in the defense of Fort Sumter.

Gold-headed cane, made out of wood from old Fort Du Quesne, Pa.

Gold-headed cane, presented to General Grant as a tribute of regard for
his humane treatment of the soldiers and kind consideration of those who
ministered to the sick and wounded during the war.

Gold-headed cane, used by General Lafayette, and presented to General
Grant by the ladies of Baltimore, Md.

Carved wood cane, from the estate of Sir Walter Scott.

Uniform as general of the United States Army.

Fifteen buttons, cut from the coats during the war by Mrs. Grant after
the different battles.

Hat ornament, used at Belmont.

Hat ornament, used at Fort Donelson.

Shoulder straps (brigadier-general), worn by General Grant at Belmont,
Fort Donelson, and Shiloh.

Shoulder straps (lieutenant-general), cut from the coat used by General
Grant in the campaigns against Richmond and Petersburg and Lee's army.

Shoulder straps (lieutenant-general), cut from General Grant's coat.

Pair of shoulder straps (general), cut from a coat General Grant used
after the war.

Medal from the American Congress (gold) for opening the Mississippi.

Gold medal, from Philadelphia.

Twenty-one medals (gold, silver, and bronze), badges of armies and
corps.



Online LibraryJames D. RichardsonA Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents Volume 8, part 2: Chester A. Arthur → online text (page 26 of 29)