James D. Richardson.

A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents Volume 7, part 1: Ulysses S. Grant online

. (page 2 of 50)
Online LibraryJames D. RichardsonA Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents Volume 7, part 1: Ulysses S. Grant → online text (page 2 of 50)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


Secretary of State, I transmit a report from the Department of State,
which is accompanied by a copy of the correspondence referred to.

U.S. GRANT.

[Footnote 3: Regarding the policy to be pursued to avert civil war, then
threatening, which correspondence led to the resignation of Mr. Cass.]



WASHINGTON, _March 31, 1869_.

_To the House of Representatives:_

In compliance with a resolution of the House of Representatives of the
30th of January last, calling for the papers relative to the claim of
Owen Thorn and others against the British Government, I transmit a
report from the Secretary of State, together with copies of the papers
referred to in said resolution.

U.S. GRANT.



WASHINGTON, _April 3, 1869_.

_To the House of Representatives:_

In answer to the resolution of the House of Representatives of the
28th of January last, requesting information concerning the destruction
during the late war by rebel vessels of certain merchant vessels of
the United States, and concerning the damages and claims resulting
therefrom, I transmit a report from the Secretary of State and the
tabular statement which accompanied it.

U.S. GRANT.



WASHINGTON, D.C., _April 5, 1869_.

_To the Senate of the United States:_

I transmit herewith, for the constitutional action of the Senate,
certain articles of agreement made and concluded at the Kaw Indian
Agency, Kans., on the 13th ultimo, between the commissioners on the part
of the United States and certain chiefs or headmen of the Kansas or Kaw
tribe of Indians on behalf of said tribe, together with a letter from
the Secretary of the Interior, to which attention is invited.

U.S. GRANT.



WASHINGTON, _April 7, 1869_.

_To the Senate of the United States:_

In answer to the resolution of the Senate of the 27th of May last, in
relation to the subject of claims against Great Britain, I transmit a
report from the Secretary of State and the papers which accompanied it.

U.S. GRANT.



WASHINGTON, D.C., _April 7, 1869_.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives:_

While I am aware that the time in which Congress proposes now to remain
in session is very brief, and that it is its desire, as far as is
consistent with the public interest, to avoid entering upon the general
business of legislation, there is one subject which concerns so deeply
the welfare of the country that I deem it my duty to bring it before
you.

I have no doubt that you will concur with me in the opinion that
it is desirable to restore the States which were engaged in the
rebellion to their proper relations to the Government and the country
at as early a period as the people of those States shall be found
willing to become peaceful and orderly communities and to adopt and
maintain such constitutions and laws as will effectually secure the
civil and political rights of all persons within their borders.
The authority of the United States, which has been vindicated and
established by its military power, must undoubtedly be asserted for the
absolute protection of all its citizens in the full enjoyment of the
freedom and security which is the object of a republican government; but
whenever the people of a rebellious State are ready to enter in good
faith upon the accomplishment of this object, in entire conformity with
the constitutional authority of Congress, it is certainly desirable that
all causes of irritation should be removed as promptly as possible, that
a more perfect union may be established and the country be restored to
peace and prosperity.

The convention of the people of Virginia which met in Richmond on
Tuesday, December 3, 1867, framed a constitution for that State, which
was adopted by the convention on the 17th of April, 1868, and I desire
respectfully to call the attention of Congress to the propriety of
providing by law for the holding of an election in that State at some
time during the months of May and June next, under the direction of
the military commander of that district, at which the question of the
adoption of that constitution shall be submitted to the citizens of
the State; and if this should seem desirable, I would recommend that a
separate vote be taken upon such parts as may be thought expedient, and
that at the same time and under the same authority there shall be an
election for the officers provided under such constitution, and that
the constitution, or such parts thereof as shall have been adopted by
the people, be submitted to Congress on the first Monday of December
next for its consideration, so that if the same is then approved the
necessary steps will have been taken for the restoration of the State
of Virginia to its proper relations to the Union. I am led to make this
recommendation from the confident hope and belief that the people of
that State are now ready to cooperate with the National Government in
bringing it again into such relations to the Union as it ought as soon
as possible to establish and maintain, and to give to all its people
those equal rights under the law which were asserted in the Declaration
of Independence in the words of one of the most illustrious of its sons.

I desire also to ask the consideration of Congress to the question
whether there is not just ground for believing that the constitution
framed by a convention of the people of Mississippi for that State, and
once rejected, might not be again submitted to the people of that State
in like manner, and with the probability of the same result.

U.S. GRANT.




PROCLAMATION.


BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas objects of interest to the United States require that the Senate
should be convened at 12 o'clock on the 12th day of April, 1869, to
receive and act upon such communications as may be made to it on the
part of the Executive:

Now, therefore, I, U.S. Grant, President of the United States, have
considered it to be my duty to issue this my proclamation, declaring
that an extraordinary occasion requires the Senate of the United States
to convene for the transaction of business at the Capitol, in the city
of Washington, on the 12th day of April, 1869, at 12 o'clock noon on
that day, of which all who shall at that time be entitled to act as
members of that body are hereby required to take notice.

Given under my hand and the seal of the United States, at Washington,
the 8th day of April, A.D. 1869, and of the Independence of the United
States of America the ninety-third.

[SEAL.]

U.S. GRANT.

By the President:
HAMILTON FISH,
_Secretary of State_.




SPECIAL MESSAGES.


WASHINGTON, _April 16, 1869_.

_To the Senate of the United States_:

I transmit to the Senate, for consideration with a view to ratification,
a convention between the United States and the Emperor of the French,
signed this day by the plenipotentiaries of the parties, for the mutual
protection of trade-marks of their respective citizens and subjects.

U.S. GRANT.



WASHINGTON, _April 21, 1869_.

_To the Senate of the United States_:

I transmit to the Senate, in answer to their resolution adopted in
executive session on the 16th of February last, requesting copy of the
official correspondence of Mr. Buchanan during his residence at St.
Petersburg as minister of the United States, a report from the Secretary
of State, with the accompanying papers.

U.S. GRANT.




PROCLAMATIONS.


BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

In pursuance of the provisions of the act of Congress approved April
10, 1869, I hereby designate the 6th day of July, 1869, as the time
for submitting the constitution passed by the convention which met in
Richmond, Va., on Tuesday, the 3d day of December, 1867, to the voters
of said State registered at the date of such submission, viz, July 6,
1869, for ratification or rejection.

And I submit to a separate vote the fourth clause of section I of
article 3 of said constitution, which is in the following words:

Every person who has been a Senator or Representative in Congress, or
elector of President or Vice-President, or who held any office, civil
or military, under the United States, or under any State, who, having
previously taken an oath as a member of Congress, or as an officer of
the United States, or as a member of any State legislature, or as an
executive or judicial officer of any State, shall have engaged in
insurrection or rebellion against the same or given aid or comfort to
the enemies thereof. This clause shall include the following officers:
Governor, lieutenant-governor, secretary of state, auditor of public
accounts, second auditor, register of the land office, State treasurer,
attorney-general, sheriffs, sergeant of a city or town, commissioner
of the revenue, county surveyors, constables, overseers of the poor,
commissioner of the board of public works, judges of the supreme court,
judges of the circuit court, judges of the court of hustings, justices
of the county courts, mayor, recorder, alderman, councilmen of a city
or town, coroners, escheators, inspectors of tobacco, flour, etc.,
clerks of the supreme, district, circuit, and county courts and of the
court of hustings, and attorneys for the Commonwealth: _Provided_,
That the legislature may, by a vote of three-fifths of both houses,
remove the disabilities incurred by this clause from any person
included therein, by a separate vote in each case.


And I also submit to a separate vote the seventh section of article 3 of
the said constitution, which is in the words following:

In addition to the foregoing oath of office, the governor,
lieutenant-governor, members of the general assembly, secretary of
state, auditor of public accounts, State treasurer, attorney-general,
and all persons elected to any convention to frame a constitution for
this State or to amend or revise this constitution in any manner, and
mayor and council of any city or town, shall, before they enter on the
duties of their respective offices, take and subscribe the following
oath or affirmation: _Provided_, The disabilities therein contained may
be individually removed by a three-fifths vote of the general assembly:

"I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I have never voluntarily borne
arms against the United States since I have been a citizen thereof;
that I have voluntarily given no aid, countenance, counsel, or
encouragement to persons engaged in armed hostility thereto; that I
have never sought nor accepted nor attempted to exercise the functions
of any office whatever under any authority or pretended authority in
hostility to the United States; that I have not yielded a voluntary
support to any pretended government, authority, power, or constitution
within the United States hostile or inimical thereto. And I do further
swear (or affirm) that, to the best of my knowledge and ability, I
will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against
all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and
allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without
any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, and that I will well and
faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to
enter. So help me God."


The above oath shall also be taken by all the city and county officers
before entering upon their duties, and by all other State officers not
included in the above provision. I direct the vote to be taken upon each
of the above-cited provisions alone, and upon the other portions of the
said constitution in the following manner, viz:

Each voter favoring the ratification of the constitution (excluding the
provisions above quoted) as framed by the convention of December 3,
1867, shall express his judgment by voting for the constitution.

Each voter favoring the rejection of the constitution (excluding the
provisions above quoted) shall express his judgment by voting against
the constitution.

Each voter will be allowed to cast a separate ballot for or against
either or both of the provisions above quoted.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

Done at the city of Washington, this 14th day of May, A.D. 1869, and of
the Independence of the United States of America the ninety-third.

U.S. GRANT.

By the President:
HAMILTON FISH,
_Secretary of State_.



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas the act of Congress approved June 25, 1868, constituted, on and
after that date, eight hours a day's work for all laborers, workmen, and
mechanics employed by or on behalf of the Government of the United
States, and repealed all acts and parts of acts inconsistent therewith:

Now, therefore, I, Ulysses S. Grant, President of the United States, do
hereby direct that from and after this date no reduction shall be made
in the wages paid by the Government by the day to such laborers,
workmen, and mechanics on account of such reduction of the hours of
labor.

In testimony whereof I have hereto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

Done at the city of Washington, this 19th day of May, A.D. 1869, and of
the Independence of the United States the ninety-third.

U.S. GRANT.

By the President:
HAMILTON FISH,
_Secretary of State_.



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas satisfactory evidence has been received by me from His
Majesty the Emperor of France, through the Count Faverney, his chargé
d'affaires, that on and after this date the discriminating duties
heretofore levied in French ports upon merchandise imported from the
countries of its origin in vessels of the United States are to be
discontinued and abolished:

Now, therefore, I, U.S. Grant, President of the United States of
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by an act of Congress
of the 7th day of January, 1824, and by an act in addition thereto of
the 24th day of May, 1828, do hereby declare and proclaim that on and
after this date, so long as merchandise imported from the countries of
its origin into French ports in vessels belonging to citizens of the
United States is admitted into French ports on the terms aforesaid, the
discriminating duties heretofore levied upon merchandise imported from
the countries of its origin into ports of the United States in French
vessels shall be, and are hereby, discontinued and abolished.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

Done at the city of Washington, this 12th day of June, A.D. 1869, and of
the Independence of the United States of America the ninety-third.

U.S. GRANT.

By the President:
HAMILTON FISH,
_Secretary of State_.



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

In pursuance of the provisions of the act of Congress approved April
10, 1869, I hereby designate Tuesday, the 30th day of November, 1869,
as the time for submitting the constitution adopted on the 15th day of
May, 1868, by the convention which met in Jackson, Miss., to the voters
of said State registered at the date of such submission, viz, November
30, 1869.

And I submit to a separate vote that part of section 3 of Article VII of
said constitution which is in the following words:

That I am not disfranchised in any of the provisions of the acts known
as the reconstruction acts of the Thirty-ninth and Fortieth Congress,
and that I admit the political and civil equality of all men. So help me
God: _Provided_, If Congress shall at any time remove the disabilities
of any person disfranchised in said reconstruction acts of the said
Thirty-ninth and Fortieth Congress (and the legislature of this State
shall concur therein), then so much of this oath, and so much only, as
refers to the said reconstruction acts shall not be required of such
person so pardoned to entitle him to be registered.


And I further submit to a separate vote section 5 of the same article
of said constitution, which is in the following words:

No person shall be eligible to any office of profit or trust, civil or
military, in this State who, as a member of the legislature, voted for
the call of the convention that passed the ordinance of secession, or
who, as a delegate to any convention, voted for or signed any ordinance
of secession, or who gave voluntary aid, countenance, counsel, or
encouragement to persons engaged in armed hostility to the United
States, or who accepted or attempted to exercise the functions of any
office, civil or military, under any authority or pretended government,
authority, power, or constitution within the United States hostile or
inimical thereto, except all persons who aided reconstruction by voting
for this convention or who have continuously advocated the assembling
of this convention and shall continuously and in good faith advocate
the acts of the same; but the legislature may remove such disability:
_Provided_, That nothing in this section, except voting for or signing
the ordinance of secession, shall be so construed as to exclude from
office the private soldier of the late so-called Confederate States
army.


And I further submit to a separate vote section 5 of Article XII of the
said constitution, which is in the following words:

The credit of the State shall not be pledged or loaned in aid of any
person, association, or corporation; nor shall the State hereafter
become a stockholder in any corporation or association.

And I further submit to a separate vote part of the oath of office
prescribed in section 26 of Article XII of the said constitution, which
is in the following words:

That I have never, as a member of any convention, voted for or signed
any ordinance of secession; that I have never, as a member of any State
legislature, voted for the call of any convention that passed any such
ordinance.


The above oath shall also be taken by all the city and county officers
before entering upon their duties, and by all other State officials not
included in the above provision. I direct the vote to be taken upon each
of the above-cited provisions alone, and upon the other portions of the
said constitution in the following manner, viz:

Each voter favoring the ratification of the constitution (excluding the
provisions above quoted), as adopted by the convention of May 15, 1868,
shall express his judgment by voting for the constitution.

Each voter favoring the rejection of the constitution (excluding the
provisions above quoted) shall express his judgment by voting against
the constitution.

Each voter will be allowed to cast a separate ballot for or against
either or both of the provisions above quoted.

It is understood that sections 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14,
and 15 of Article XIII, under the head of "Ordinance," are considered
as forming no part of the said constitution.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington, this 13th day of July, A.D. 1869, and of
the Independence of the United States of America the ninety-fourth.

U.S. GRANT.

By the President:
HAMILTON FISH,
_Secretary of State_.



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

In pursuance of the provisions of the act of Congress approved April 10,
1869, I hereby designate Tuesday, the 30th day of November, 1869, as the
time for submitting the constitution adopted by the convention which met
in Austin, Tex., on the 15th day of June, 1868, to the voters of said
State registered at the date of such submission, viz:

I direct the vote to be taken upon the said constitution in the
following manner, viz:

Each voter favoring the ratification of the constitution as adopted by
the convention of the 15th of June, 1868, shall express his judgment by
voting for the constitution.

Each voter favoring the rejection of the constitution shall express his
judgment by voting against the constitution.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington, this 15th day of July, A.D. 1869, and of
the Independence of the United States of America the ninety-fourth.

U.S. GRANT.

By the President:
HAMILTON FISH,
_Secretary of State_.



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

The year which is drawing to a close has been free from pestilence;
health has prevailed throughout the land; abundant crops reward the
labors of the husbandman; commerce and manufactures have successfully
prosecuted their peaceful paths; the mines and forests have yielded
liberally; the nation has increased in wealth and in strength; peace has
prevailed, and its blessings have advanced every interest of the people
in every part of the Union; harmony and fraternal intercourse restored
are obliterating the marks of past conflict and estrangement; burdens
have been lightened; means have been increased; civil and religious
liberty are secured to every inhabitant of the land, whose soil is trod
by none but freemen.

It becomes a people thus favored to make acknowledgment to the Supreme
Author from whom such blessings flow of their gratitude and their
dependence, to render praise and thanksgiving for the same, and devoutly
to implore a continuance of God's mercies.

Therefore I, Ulysses S. Grant, President of the United States, do
recommend that Thursday, the 18th day of November next, be observed as
a day of thanksgiving and of praise and of prayer to Almighty God, the
creator and the ruler of the universe; and I do further recommend to
all the people of the United States to assemble on that day in their
accustomed places of public worship and to unite in the homage and
praise due to the bountiful Father of All Mercies and in fervent prayer
for the continuance of the manifold blessings he has vouchsafed to us
as a people.

[SEAL.]

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed, this 5th day of October, A.D. 1869, and
of the Independence of the United States of America the ninety-fourth.

U.S. GRANT.

By the President:
HAMILTON FISH,
_Secretary of State_.



BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas by the proclamation of the President of the United States of the
12th day of June last the levying of discriminating duties on
merchandise imported into the United States in French vessels from the
countries of its origin was discontinued; and

Whereas satisfactory information has since been received by me that the
levying of such duties on all merchandise imported into France in
vessels of the United States, whether from the countries of its origin
or from other countries, has been discontinued:

Now, therefore, I, U.S. Grant, President of the United States of
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by an act of Congress
of the 7th day of January, 1824, and by an act in addition thereto of
the 24th day of May, 1828, do hereby declare and proclaim that on and
after this date, so long as merchandise imported into France in vessels
of the United States, whether from the countries of its origin or from
other countries, shall be admitted into the ports of France on the terms
aforesaid, the discriminating duties heretofore levied upon merchandise
imported into the United States in French vessels, either from the
countries of its origin or from any other country, shall be, and are,
discontinued and abolished.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of
the United States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington, this 20th day of November, A.D. 1869,
and of the Independence of the United States of America the
ninety-fourth.

U.S. GRANT.

By the President:
HAMILTON FISH,
_Secretary of State_.




EXECUTIVE ORDERS.


GENERAL ORDERS, No. 10.


HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,

ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

_Washington, March 5, 1869_.

The President of the United States directs that the following orders be
carried into execution as soon as practicable:

1. The Department of the South will be commanded by Brigadier and Brevet
Major General A.H. Terry.

2. Major-General G.G. Meade is assigned to command the Military Division



Online LibraryJames D. RichardsonA Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents Volume 7, part 1: Ulysses S. Grant → online text (page 2 of 50)