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James Kendall Hosmer.

The life of Thomas Hutchinson, royal governor of the province of Massachusetts Bay [electronic resource] online

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Online LibraryJames Kendall HosmerThe life of Thomas Hutchinson, royal governor of the province of Massachusetts Bay [electronic resource] → online text (page 36 of 36)
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of the Province in 1772, 224 ; obliged
to yield the point as to royal in-
structions, 227 ; on the growth of
the sjiirit of independence, 229 ; ap-
pointed to settle the boundary on
the side of New York, 230 ; again
on the Town-Meeting, 231 ; on de-
struction of the Gaspee, 232 ; his
spirit of tolerance, 233 ; on the ap-
pointment of Lord Dartmouth as
colonial secretary, 234; his blind-
ness as to the Committee of Cor-
respondence, 235 ; on the absurdity
of two supreme powers in one state,
242 ; gradually awakened to the
Committee of Correspondence, 243 ;
his views as to the Town-Meeting
compared with those of Samuel
Adams, 246, etc. ; resolves to head
off the Committee of Correspondence,
249 ; describes his speech to the
legislature on Parliamentary author-
ity, 250 ; despondency over criticisms



450



INDEX.



on his course, 251 ; approved by
Thurlow and Mansfield, 252 ; the
two Houses reply to him, 253 ; the
logical fencing between the Gov-
ernor and the Houses, 257 ; points in
which Hutchinson was right, 258,
etc. ; solution he wished was the
present relation between mother
land and dependency, 260, etc. ;
limitations of his position, 2(:!o ; set-
tles the boundary on the side of New
York, 2G5 ; describes to Bernard
the affaii- of the Letters, 268, etc. ;
various judgments on the affair, 270 ;
tenor of his English correspondence,
271 ; why he dreaded to have his
Letters made known, 272 ; how the
Whigs obtained the Letters. 27o ;
how he met the trouble, 277 ; mild-
ness of the Letters, 280 ; unfair
construction put upon them, 281 ;
his opposition to schemes of taxa-
tion declared, 282 ; he denounces
the interpretation put upon them,
283 ; is confident justice will be
done him, i;85 ; a tailor's order, 287 ;
on the grounds for charging him
with putting his friends in office,
288 ; on Samuel Adams, 290, etc. ;
hopes for a good resvilt in the affair
of the Letters, 292; writes to An-
drew Oliver before the Tea-Party,
294, etc. ; on the unlawfulness of
the assemblies at the time, 299, etc. ;
wishes Boston might be separated
from the Province and disfranchised,
291 ; describes to Dartmouth the
Tea-Party, 302, etc. ; excuses him-
self for refusing to grant a pass to
the tea-ships, 305 ; his limitations
as exhibited in this crisis, 307 ; his
public spirit, 308 ; his effort to keep
the English empire undivided, 309 ;
Samuel Adams and Bowdoin try
to lay the Governor aside, 311 ;
prepares to go to England, 312 ;
detained by the death of Andrew
Oliver, 313 ; superseded by General
Gage, 314 ; farewell to Milton Hill,
315, etc.; at Castle William, 317,
etc. ; his departure from America,
319 ; the penalties inflicted upon
him, 324 ; his interview with George
IIL, 325, etc. ; disapproves the Bos-
ton Port Bill and accompanying acts,
329 ; defends his views and course,
330, etc. ; the '' Vindication.'' 331,
etc. ; treated in England with kind-
ness apd honor, 334 ; at court, 335 ;



his titled friends, 336 ; meets Robert-
son and Gibbon, 337 ; receives the
degree of D. C. L. at Oxford, 338 ;
criticises the Declaration of Inde-
pendence, 339 ; dislike of social and
ecclesiastical frivolity, 341 ; pathetic
charr ter of his diary in England,
342 ; his love for America, 343 ; ca-
lamities, private and public, 345 ;
sinking toward the end, 34(i ; his
death, 347, etc. ; gloom of the cir-
cumstances, 349 ; inventory of prop-
erty destroyed in his house, 1705,
Appendix A ; his Messages to the
Council and Assembly and their Re-
plies, 1773, Appendix B ; his Letters
and the Resolves thereupon of the
legislature, 1773, Appendix C; mem-
orandum of property confiscated in
1774, Appendix D.

Hutchinson, Thomas, son of the Gov-
ernor, 38 ; leaves college, 115 ; in
the non-importation troubles, 157;
judge of Probate, 289 ; consignee of
tea in 1773, 297.

Hutchinson, William {" Billy ") son of
the Governor, 38 ; goes to England,
115, 200 ; his death, 347.

Instructions, of Samuel Adams, to the
Boston seat, 1764, 82 ; Hutchinson's
ideas on, similar to those of Ed-
mund Burke, 119 ; from the King,
cause a controversy, 172; validity of
royal instructions denied in 1770,
173 ; position of the patriots as to
royal instructions, 217 ; of the town
of Concord to Captain James Barrett,
239.

Knight, Madame, describes colonial
trading, 18.

Lecky, on the American Loyalists, In-
troduction, xiii ; on the Stamp Act,
78, etc. ; on the debate on the repeal
of the Stamp Act, 109, etc.

Leitch, Peter, Hutchinson's tailor, 170.

Lessing, his Eettungen, Introduction,
xiii.

Letter Books. Hutchinson's, preserved
in the Massachusetts Archives, In-
troduction, xxiii, etc. ; their contents
and fate referred to, 330.

Letters, Hutchinson's anxiety not to
have their contents made known,
198, etc. ; affair of, in 1773, 268,
etc. ; the affair of, variously charac-
terized, 270 ; how obtained, 273 ;



INDEX.



451



suggestion from Franklin as to a
crafty nse of, 275 ; their harniless-
ness, liSO ; lluteliins()n"s defence of,
2S;J, etc. ; text of, Appendix ('.

Lincoln, Abraham, the " plain people "
to be trusted, Introduction, xvii.

Louisbnrg, capture of, 2(j ; returned
to the French, ii(i ; the reimburse-
ment for, and its application, '21, etc.

Lumberman's hob-sled as the type for a
political structure, Introduction, xix.

Mackintosh, leader of the mob in the
Stamp Act riots, US ; Ilntehinson
describes, 103; his ruffianly charac-
ter, 247 ; at the Boston Tea-Party,
298.

Mansfield, Lord, in the debate on the
repeal of the Stamp Act, 108, etc. ;
on '' virtnal representation," 100;
Hntchinson's intercourse with, -V-H'} ;
his danger in the Gordon riots, ■040.

Massachusetts Bay, first and second
charters of, 5, etc. ; judicial institu-
tions of, 0, etc. ; its Town-Meeting,
7, etc. ; character of its population,
10, etc. ; business and habits, 14,
etc. ; beginning of trouble from pa-
per money, 18 ; consequent suffer-
ing, 19 ; sinking in moral tone, 20 ;
the "Public Bank," the "Private
Bank," 21; services of Hutchinson
to, in finance, 22 ; help rendered
to, by Pi:rliament, 24 ; rescue of,
through the Louisbiirg indemnity,
2.T, etc. ; prosperity of, after the fall
of Quebec, 44 ; gayety and luxury
in, .51 ; Hutchinson's History of, 85 ;
its limitations, 80 ; its merits, 87 ;
W. F. Poole on the History, 88;
second volume completed in 1707,
122 ; throws aside the charter for
"natural right," 311; its charter
changed, 314 ; how served by Hutch-
inson, 310.

Mauduit, Jasper, agent of Massachu-
setts Bay in 17i)3, 70.

Mayhew, Rev. Jonathan, defends him-
self against charge of complicity in
the Stamj) Act riots, 98.

Mein, John, appeals to Hutchinson
when in distress, ir)4.

Milton Hill, Hutchinson's place at, IIG ;
his farewell to, 315, etc.

Ministers, Hutchinson describes those
of Massachusetts Bay to George III.,
328.

Mob of the Stamp Act days, 91, etc. ;
John Mein's experience with, 153,



etc. ; in the non-ini]inrtati(m days,
157, etc. ; at Ihe iJoston Massacre,
159, etc. ; at the Tea-Party, 307.

Money. . See " Finance."

Montagu, Admiral, talks to the mob
at the Tea-Party, 304.

Montesquieu, influence of his '' Esprit
des Lois " over James Otis, 07, etc.

Natural Right, Massachusetts Whigs

forsake the charter to stand on that

in 1773, 31 1.
Navigation Laws, their enforcement

makes trouble, 50.
New York, settlement of the boundary

on the side of, 129, 230, 2()5, etc.
Non-importation agreements, go into

operation, 83 ; become effective, 127 ;

denounced by Hutchinson, 160 ; fall

through in 1770, 183.
North, Lord, succeeds Townshend in

the government, 129: his cunning

trap as to the tax on tea, 300.

Oliver, Andrew, Secretary, as stamp
distributor, hung in effigy, 89 ; be-
comes Lieutenant-Governor, 203;
his share in the Letters in 1773, 278 ;
advises a change in the constitution,
280 ; his death and character, 313.

Oliver, Peter, Chief Justice, on the
vacillation of James Otis, 02 ; his
firmness at the trial of the soldiers,
19(); stands up against the Assem-
bly, 3 10 ; dares not go to his
brother's funeral, 314 ; describes the
English court, 335 ; receives the de-
gree of D. C. L. at Oxford, 3-38;
describes the House of Lords, 339,
etc.

Oliver, Dr. Peter, Jr., marries " Sallie "
Hutchinson, 115.

Otis, James, Jr., asks an appointment
for his father as judge of the Su-
perior Court, 47 ; opposes govern-
ment, 48 ; his great powers. 49 ; in
the ease of the Writs of Assistance,
55 ; an uncomfortable associate, .57 ;
his eloquence, 58 ; his mastery of the
people, 59 ; on Hutchinson, (52 ; in
the currency dispute of 1702, 04 ;
charges Hutchinson with rapacious
office-seeking, 00 ; a disciple of
Montesquieu, 07 ; relations with the
government, 69 ; opposed to inde-
pendence, 70, etc. ; delegate to the
Stamp Act CongTess, 83 ; on sub-
mission to Parliament, 90 ; his
scheme for colonial representation



452



INDEX.



discredited, 100 ; scorns " virtual
representation," 109 ; negatived as
Speaker in 1766, 117 ; demands a
gallery for the people in the Assem-
bly chamber, 118 ; advocates sub-
mission to the government, 128 ; as-
saulted by Robinson, 150; John
Adams's account of his disease, 151 ;
reactionary in 1771, 210 ; his power
even in his decay, 211 ; his defec-
tion from the patriot cause, 212 ;
carried into confinement, 224.
Oxford University, makes Hutchinson
Doctor Civilis Juris, 338.

Paper money, troubles from, 18, etc.

Parliament, frustrates the Land Bank
scheme, 24 ; passes the Stamp Act,
81 ; debates the repeal of the Stamp
Act, 108, etc. ; punishes Boston for
the Tea-Party, 312, etc.

Parliamentary supremacy, universally
admitted in 1757, 4S ; favored by
Hutchinson and James Otis, 75 ;
still maintained by English writers,
76 ; Hutchinson's view, 188 ; con-
troversy over, in 1773, 249, etc. ;
legality of Hutchinson's position,
250 ; disapproval of his course in
maintaining, 251 ; approval of his
course, 252 ; John Adams's part in
the controversy over, 252, etc. ; C
F. Adams on the importance of the
speeches, 252 ; Webster on the con-
troversy, 253 ; documents in the con-
troversy. Appendix B.

Paxton. Commissioner of Customs, 125 ;
his letter advising the sending of
troops, 280.

Pepperell, Sir William, the Kittery i
merchant, 33. I

Pitt, in the debate on the repeal of the
Stamp Act, 108, etc.

Poole, W. F., sketches Hutchinson,
Introduction, xxv ; his estimate of
the History of Massachusetts Bay,
88, note.

Pownal, Thomas, becomes Governor,
42 ; on colonial representation in
Parliament, 12(3.

Preston, Captain, trial of. for respon-
sibility in the Boston Massacre, 185,
196.

Quebec, the fall of, a crisis for the

Colonies, 49.
Quincy, Josiah, describes Hutchinson

after the Stamp Act riot, 94, etc. ;

advocates armed resistance, 127 ;



counsel for Preston and the soldiers
after the Massacre, 165 ; instructs
the Boston seat in 1770, 175.

Regiments, 14th and 29th at the Bos-
ton Massacre, 163 ; their conduct and
record, 164.

Representation in Parliament, favored
by Franklin, 39 ; thought impracti-
cable by Samuel Adams, 80 ; fa-
vored by Otis, thought impractica-
ble by Hutchinson, 168.

Revolution, American, the word-war
of, takes place in the Massachusetts
legislatiire. Introduction, xxvii ; a
struggle of parties, not countries,
71 ; documents of the controversy
resulting in. Appendix B.

Robertson, the historian, visits Hutch-
inson, 337.

Robinson, Customs-Commissioner, as-
saults James Otis, 150.

Rockingham ministry, comes in, 107 ;
faUs, 123.

Ruggles, Timothy, delegate to the
Stamp Act Congress, 1764, 83 ; his
character and wit, 106, note.

Sanford, Margaret wife of Governor
Hutchinson, 4 ; her death, 37 ; her
husband's love for, 346.

Shirley, want of significance of, 33 ;
sanctions Writs of Assistance, 52 ;
approves Stamp Act, 107; knows
not the Adamses, 182.

Slave Trade, in New England, 14.

Smuggling, in Massachusetts Bay, 51,
etc.

Stamp Act, cause of the Anglo-Saxon
schism, Lecky on, 78, etc. ; opposed
by Bernard and Hutchinson, 81 ;
riots caused by, 89, etc. ; goes into
operation, 106 ; debate on the repeal
of, 108, etc.

Stamp Act Congress, in 1764, its con-
clusions, 106.

Sugar Act of 1733, its enforcement
makes trouble, 50.

Superior Court, its constitution, 6 ; sits
in state, 56 ; Hutchinson appears in,
after the Stamp Act riot, 94 ; stiff-
ened by Hutchinson at the trial of
the soldiers, 196 ; dispute as to the
salaries of its judges, 264.

Tea, taxed by Townsend, 124; tax
on, retained for the principle, 145 ;
tax on. disapproved by Hutchinson,
187, 197 ; tea of East India Com-



INDEX.



453



pany to be sent to America, 2fl6 ;

eoiisigjiees of, 2117 ; destruction of,

and consequeRces, 802, etc.
Temple, Sir Jolin, in the affair of the

Letters in ITTo, 2To.
Tliacher, Oxeubridge, witli Otis in the

case of the Writs of Assistance, 57 ;

opposes Hutchinson as English agent.

To ; his retirement makes room in

the Assembly for Samuel Adams,

Tories, number driven into exile at the
Revolution, Introduction, xiv ; name
appears in 17(i5, 100; their suffer-
ings and general character, 320, etc. ;
harshness shown them necessary,
S-2Z, etc.

Town-Meeting, obscurity of its origin,
7 ; the plain basis of, in Massachu-
setts, 8 ; its assumption of power, its
constitution in the Revolution, 9 ; its
educational value, its shortcomings,
10 ; Hutchinson would limit its ac-
tion to strictly local matters, 143 ;
his dissatisfaction with it, 167, 189,
206, 221, 231, 263; justified by
Samuel Adams, 244, etc. ; views
upon, of Hutchinson and Samuel
Adams compared, 246, etc. ; great
credit due to its defenders, 262.

Townshend. Charles, his ministry, 123 ;
his taxes, 124; his death, 125; his
taxes repealed, except on tea, 187.

Trowbridge, Judge, on Hutchinson as
Chief Justice, 48, note; complies



with the Assembly's demand in the
salary dispute, 310.

Virginia, Resolves of 1764, 83.
" Virtual representation," ideas of

Mansfield, Burke, Pitt, Lecky, etc.,

109, etc.

Warren, Joseph, denounces Bernard,
132 ; orator at second anniversary of
the Boston Massacre, 225 ; his part
in the controversy of 1773 described
by John Adams, 254.

Washburn, Governor Emory, on Hutch-
inson as a judge. Introduction, xv,
etc.

Webster, Daniel, on the ability of the
legislative papers in the controversy
as to Parliamentary supremacy, 253.

Wedderburn, denounces Franklin for
his course as to the Letters in 1773,
274.

•Whately. recipient of the Letters in
1773, 269, 274.

Whig, name appears in 1765, 100.

Whitmore, W. H., his sketch of Hutch-
inson, Introduction, xxv.

Wilkes, John, seen by Hutchinson at
the Guild Hall in London, 342.

Williams, Col. Israel, his correspond-
ence with Hutchinson, Introduction,
xxv.

Winthrop, Robert C, on the transmis-
sion of the Letters in 1773, 273, etc.

Writs of Assistance, case of, 52, etc.



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Online LibraryJames Kendall HosmerThe life of Thomas Hutchinson, royal governor of the province of Massachusetts Bay [electronic resource] → online text (page 36 of 36)